IBM Dx360 M2 failed to boot RedHat from harddisk

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Hi Ben

my name is Ben, i am from. one of our client recently brought 6 dx360 M4 server. Their requirement is to install Red Hat 5.5 on those server. I tred to install Redhat on that. Installation completed, after that it's not booting from the harddisk. I tried this on other 2 machines, all are same.

after that i installed windows 2008 R2 on one of the machine by using server guide, the installation was successful and it's booting perfectly from the harddisk.

we want to finish this task very urgently. after linux instillation i want to migrate some services to this, current status is production got down.

Why Red Hat is not booting from the harddisk. Please help me to solve this issue urgently 

regards,
Ben

Responses

Hi Ben,

 

For urgent issues, such as production down situations, please open a support case immediately (https://access.redhat.com/support/cases/new). 

Looking at the specs of this system:

 http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/x/hardware/rack/dx360m4/specs.html

 Two 2.7 GHz 8-core Intel Xeon E5-2600 Series processors

 

Let's compare this the CPU support matrix:

 Intel CPUs and Supported Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) Versions

 https://access.redhat.com/knowledge/articles/65442

 

The E5-2600 (aka Intel Sandy Bridge) requires at least RHEL 5.7. The rest of the system might be so new that the old RHEL 5.5 kernel might not recognise some important components, hence no boot.

 

Please be aware that Red Hat have an Application Binary Interface guarantee across all minor versions. This means software which works on RHEL 5.5 will work on all RHEL 5.x after that. We put a significant amount of engineering effort into maintaining ABI compatibility, and will usually fix regressions as a priority.

 

If your application operates completely in userspace, there is no technical justification for remaining on an old RHEL version. Your application will work just the same on RHEL 5.7 or 5.8 as it will on RHEL 5.5. In fact, it'll probably work better as you'll see the benefit of performance improvements and bugfixes included in the later version.

 

If your application has a kernelspace component, the ABI extends to the kernel as well, so the component will likely just need a re-compile.