Need to understand how to buy RH subscriptions

Latest response

Hello.

I have recently read RH purchasing guide. I must admit I understood it in different way as it is explained there. That is I thought that e.g. RHEL 2-socket up to 4 guests gives me the right to use RHEL on one physical server with 2 sockets and 4 RHEL guests on it. But after reading the document I think I was wrong. As I am still not 100% sure thus I need complete clarification, so I would be happy to have answers the following.

What subscriptions do I need to buy from Red Hat to legally use:

  1. 3 RHEL guests running on 2-socket physical server working as RHEL 6.4 KVM hypervisor
  2. 6 RHEL guests running on 4-socket physical server working as RHEL 6.4 KVM hypervisor
  3. 10 RHEL guests runing on 3 (three) physical 2-socket servers working as RHEV-H hosts.
  4. Red Hat Satellite Server running on separate physical 2-socket server to manage all of the above.

It would be ideal to have the answers directly from Red Hat.

Thank you

Marek Bednarczyk

Responses

Hi Marek,

The easiest approach might be to give customer service a call - they'll be able to answer any questions you have. Contact details are here: https://access.redhat.com/site/support/contact/customerService/

Hi David.

There is no contact for Poland there. I know I can use English and call UK guys, but it's not the point.

I simply would like to understand the rules.

Marek

Any more comments on my initial post ?

Marek

Please see comment below.

Hello Marek,

You are correct, regarding the architecture of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Subscription. Your example of a RHEL 2-socket up to 4 guests, would provide one physical server with two sockets and 4 virtual guests.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server, Premium (1-2 sockets) (Up to 4 guest)

RHEL is priced out on a physical socket pair basis. Red Hat made a transition away from the Subscription model that made the 1/4/unlimited guests dilineation on October 1, 2013.

You can find documentation on the new model at:

https://www.redhat.com/wapps/store/catalog.htm

However, please use this as only an example, do not purchase here. It would be appropriate to contact your Accounts Manager for review and communicate your needs with a solutions architect for more specific and accurate answers. This is necessary due to the greater questions of "clustering" within the hypervisor hosts which would need to be reviewed by a Solutions Architect.

Regarding the included examples you provided, requesting answers:

1) 3 RHEL guests running on 2-socket physical server working as RHEL 6.4 KVM hypervisor

   - 3 Subscriptions 
         + 2 Subscriptions with 2 virtual nodes each
         + 1 Subscription with 1 Physical System

2) 6 RHEL guests running on 4-socket physical server working as RHEL 6.4 KVM hypervisor

    - 3 Subscriptions
         + 3 Subscriptions with 2 virtual nodes each

3) 10 RHEL guests runing on 3 (three) physical 2-socket servers working as RHEV-H hosts.

     - 8 Subscriptions
         + 5 Subscriptions with 2 virtual nodes each
         + 3 Subscriptions with 1 physical system each

4) Red Hat Satellite Server running on separate physical 2-socket server to manage all of the above.

     - I will have to do further research regarding this specific inquiry.    
       I will submit a follow up with a supplemental answer regarding 
       Satellite. As I had suggested prior, these answers are only  
       appropriately answered by the Account Manager.

If you contact customerservice@redhat.com or 888-REDHAT-1, opt 5, we will be able to provide your dedicated Account Manager who can fully and correctly answer any questions you may have regarding Subscriptions and certain build requirements for guest/system arrangements.

Regards,

Jessica
Red Hat Customer Service

Dear Jessica.

Thank you very much indeed for spending your time to elaborate the subject.

At first I want to understand as clearly as possible:

if on 30 September 2013 I bought this subscription:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server, Premium (1-2 sockets) (Up to 4 guest) (1 year)

I obtained the right to use this:

1 x RHEL instance running on 1 2-socket physical server named A
4 x RHEL instance running as a virtual machine on this server A

for 1 year.

Please just confirm: I am right or I am wrong with the above.

Regarding your answers to my examples:

2) don't we need additional two subscriptions for 4 sockets of the physical server ?

4) what about subscriptions for RHEV-H hosts (Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization)?

Thank you once again for your valuable help.

Marek

Marek,

You are correct on your first question. The Subscription example you provided would allow for one physical system, and four virtual systems (guests), for one year.

Regarding your second question (#2), this is a perfect example of a question your Account Manager could answer.

For question three (#3). If you contact customerservice@redhat.com or 888-REDHAT-1, opt 5, they will be able to provide your dedicated Account Manager who can fully and correctly answer any questions you may have regarding Subscriptions and certain build requirements for guest/system arrangements. Also, if you provide me with your contact information I will also be happy to forward this information to them and have them reach out to you.

I hope this was of assistance. If you have any further questions please feel free to reach out to me directly at 919-754-4580. Customer service would be a great help to you as well and can be reached at 888-REDHAT-1, opt 5.

Regards,

Jessica Dang
Support Relationship Manager
Red Hat, Inc
Office: (919) 754-4580
jdang@redhat.com

In October 2013 we (Red Hat) simplified the way we sell RHEL.

For example, the number of orderable products has been reduced from dozens to a few for simplicity and flexibility:

RH00001 Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Virtual Datacenters, Premium
--> Premium support service level
--> Unlimited RHEL Guests on a Server (2-sockets, stackable)
--> No physical server, RHEL Guests ONLY (Bring your own certified Hypervisor)
--> Includes RHSCL (Red Hat Software Collections) and EUS (Extended Update Support)

RH00002 Red Hat Enterprise Linux for Virtual Datacenters, Standard
--> Standard support service level
--> Unlimited RHEL Guests on a Server (2-sockets, stackable)
--> No physical server, RHEL Guests ONLY (Bring your own certified Hypervisor)
--> Includes RHSCL

RH00003 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server, Premium (Physical or Virtual Nodes)
--> Premium support service level
--> one physical RHEL server (2-sockets, stackable) OR two RHEL virtual guests
--> Includes RHSCL (Red Hat Software Collections) and EUS (Extended Update Support)
--> Maximum of (any) four virtual guests if using RHEL physical server

RH00004 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server, Standard (Physical or Virtual Nodes)
--> Standard support service level
--> one physical RHEL server (2-sockets, stackable) OR two RHEL virtual guests
--> Includes RHSCL, EUS at extra cost
--> Maximum of (any) four virtual guests if using RHEL physical server

RH00005 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Entry Level, Self-support
--> Self-support service level
--> one physical server up to 2-sockets (not stackable)
--> No RHSCL and EUS not eligible - all Add-Ons not eligible except Smart Management

If you are looking for RHEL Server + Unlimited guests:

MCT2937 Red Hat Enterprise Linux with Smart Virtualization Premium (2-sockets)
MCT2930 Red Hat Enterprise Linux with Smart Virtualization Standard (2-sockets)
--> Both include RHEL or RHEV as a hypervisor with unlimited RHEL guests

Came upon this post and definitely some good and detailed answers. We've created a handy quick reference guide that might help in determining the subscriptions that you need. You can download it at - www.quru.com/rhel-qrg . Hope it helps!

As someone new to Redhat at the Enterprise Level, I felt how the subscriptions were described was confusing.

Eventually, I had to go thru a vendor who sent me a breakdown, really helped me understand the layout of these.

Also the doc from quru.com was good.

thanks

RE: RH00005 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server Entry Level, Self-support --> Self-support service level --> one physical server up to 2-sockets (not stackable) If I use only one physical machine with one OS this still seems to limit to per two sockets, right? This brings me to the question: How can I determine remotely if I really have more than 2 sockets? It seems the OS sees 16 CPUs. How can I determine if hyper threading is active? What does stackable mean?

Hi Danie,

Remotely I cannot tell you at the moment, for I do not have access to a Satellite server. On the command prompt: cat /proc/cpuinfo|grep "physical id"|sort -u

Regards,

Jan Gerrit Kootstra

Thanks. I meant on command line. Not opening the box. Sorry. What I got is this: physical id : 0 physical id : 2 physical id : 4 physical id : 6 - How do you interpret this. 4 CPUs or 4 Sockets? With hyper threading? I thought we had two sockets with 4 cores each...

I know this is old...but thought this might help someone in the future:

cat /proc/cpuinfo |grep "physical id" |sort -u |wc -l should do the trick

For anyone who is performing true development work (developers), Red Hat has the free Red Hat Linux in the form of the Red Hat Developer's Suite http://developers.redhat.com/products/rhel/get-started/, but note, there is ==no== support, but you do get patches. Details in link above.

Hi,

I'm confused with entitlement counting of that subscription. Per subscription rules I'm able to run 1 physical system and unlimited amount of virtual systems. Does it mean that if I use 1 RHEL physical system, then alllowed RHEL VMs can running only on that physical system and not on other hosts/hypervisors? Also, I have noticed that this subscription plan has 16 entitlements. Currently I'm using 2 VMs (and 0 physical systems), and 2 entitlements are occupied. Does it mean that I'm able to run no more than 16 VMs rather than unlimited amount? Or 16 VMs limit is valid if I run those VMs outside of 1 RHEL physical system. Otherwise, if I use 1 physical system, only there I could run unlimited amount of virtual systems?

In sum: is my understanding correct that I have two options:

1) I can run up to 16 VMs without using 1 physical system; 2) I can run unlimited amount of VMs on 1 RHEL physical system (covered by this subscription plan), but no one VM outside of that physical system.

Thanks in advance.

Alexander -- --- to your question, I'd recommend calling Red Hat sales directly https://access.redhat.com/support/contact/Sales/, this sounds like something they ought to be able to answer with ease.

R. Hinton. Would it be possible to have general guidelines for this kind of virtual environment rather than having individuals to call redhat sales team to advice their subscription type?

Cos the virtual environment becoming more and more common in use in the company premises. It would be good to have transparencies on this kind of pricing for the benefit of everyone

Suppose a company wants to buy 2 set of 2U servers (high availability active passive) with physical specs: - 2 sockets of Xeon with total 24 logical cores (hyperthreaded) - RAM 512GB

Afterwards, using hypervisor (e.g. ESXi), they estimate the needs to provision virtual servers for about 200 nodes running RHEL where each of the nodes are expected to be configured with 2-cores and 3GB of RAM

So, the questions are: 1) Does the company need to buy 2 redhat subscriptions with 4 entitlements for 2 physical sockets of active passive nodes? 2) Or, is the company required to buy 200 subscriptions for 200 RHEL instances of guest OS?

As an engineer who has been working with many Linux system, we have been getting a lot of benefits on the support level from redhat subscription and would like to advise everyone to use RHEL as many as they can

But if we try to present the $$ numbers to the management or finance team using unit price reference on https://www.redhat.com/en/store/linux-platforms to tell that we need to buy 200 subscriptions, they will surely walk away and have no interest with it.

In addition, the kubernetes and dockers are also coming soon to the games. There will be more pros and cons on how we can convince people to fit their support model, whether to use RHEL or CentOS during their early planning.

We don't want to jump into the kubernetes/docker scenario for now, but as general guidelines, we'd like to know how we should proceed when buying subscription for the virtual environment like ESXi.

I have asked Red Hat sales. 2+ weeks have been elapsed, and no answer yet.

Thank you.

This document has a reasonable explanation of the 8 socket entitlement guidelines.. https://developers.redhat.com/articles/no-cost-rhel-faq/

The issue is covered in point 8.

Hi, we buy the products bellow, but would like to know the difference for other support, and wold like have an alternative, because we want to migrate for another version.

RH00236 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for Service Providers, Diagnostic Support (Physical or Virtual Nodes, Dedicated, Yearly) Bill Only

RH00237 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for Virtual Datacenters for Service Providers, Diagnostic Support (Dedicated, Yearly) Bill Only

MCT2565 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (Small Instance) - Partner Support (Diagnostic), Yearly Bill Only

MCT2566 Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (Large Instance) - Partner Support (Diagnostic), Yearly Bill Only

Danilo --- to your question, I'd recommend calling Red Hat sales directly https://access.redhat.com/support/contact/Sales/, this sounds like something they ought to be able to answer,

All participants in this thread with sales questions, I asked one of the Red Hat administrators to summon a Red-Hatter to respond.

Regards,

RJ

Good idea, RJ - Thanks ! :)

Regards,
Christian

Looks like RHSCL is now included with RHEL Server, standard as well, per https://access.redhat.com/solutions/472793