• CWE Vulnerability Assessment Report

    Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) is a dictionary or formal list of common software weaknesses. It is a common language or taxonomy for describing vulnerabilities and weaknesses; a standard measurement for software assurance tools and services' capabilities; and a base for software vulnerability and weakness identification, mitigation, and prevention. Weaknesses IDs are assigned to vulnerabilities in Red Hat products in chains. A chain is a sequence of two or more weaknesses that are closely...
    Posted 2012-09-05T13:00:20+00:00 - 0
  • Welcome to the Red Hat Security Blog

    We are happy to announce that Red Hat is starting a security blog. Red Hat has a long history of security leadership in the open source community but this is the first time we have shared our knowledge, security expertise, and experience with a wider audience via a blog. Red Hat has plenty of interesting security news and topics that we think would be useful to share. Previously, various team members have published security stories on an ad hoc basis. Now we have decided it is time to...
    Posted 2012-08-22T13:00:52+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.7 to 5.8 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.8 was released today (February 2012), seven months since the release of 5.7 in July 2011. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 is coming up to its fifth year since release, and is supported for another five years, until 2017. Errata count The chart below illustrates the total number of security updates...
    Posted 2012-02-21T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 6.1 to 6.2 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.2 was released this week (Dec 2011), just over six months since the release of 6.1 in May 2011. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Server. Errata count The chart below illustrates the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Server if you had installed 6.1, up to and including the 6.2 release, broken down by...
    Posted 2011-12-08T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Red Hat's Most Serious Flaw Types for 2010

    A few weeks ago the 2011 update to the CWE/SANS Top 25 Most Dangerous Software Errors was published. As part of our contribution to this update we analysed the most severe vulnerabilities that affected Red Hat since the last update and mapped each one to the appropriate Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE) type. The table below lists all vulnerabilities which have a CVSS score of 7 or more ('high'), that we fixed in any product during calendar year 2010. Most common CWE were: Buffer Copy without...
    Posted 2011-08-09T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.6 to 5.7 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 was released last week (July 2011), six months since the release of 5.6 in January 2011. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. Errata count The chart below illustrates the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server if you had installed 5.6, up to and including the 5.7 release, broken down by...
    Posted 2011-07-27T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 6.0 to 6.1 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.1 was released this week (May 2011), just over six months since the release of 6.0 in October 2010. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Server. Errata count The chart below illustrates the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Server if you had installed 6.0, up to and including the 6.1 release, broken down...
    Posted 2011-05-20T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Red Hat Security Advisories in CVRF

    Earlier this year, Red Hat joined the Common Vulnerability Reporting Framework (CVRF) working group run by ICASI. The goal of CVRF is to provide a way to share information about security updates in a machine-readable format. Red Hat already produce a version of our security advisories in machine readable format, as OVAL definitions, but these are really designed for automated test tools to determine the need to apply an update. CVRF looked like it would be more useful for providing customers...
    Posted 2011-05-18T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.5 to 5.6 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.6 was released last week (January 2011), nearly ten months since the release of 5.5 in March 2010. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. Errata count The chart below illustrates the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server if you had installed 5.5, up to and including the 5.6 release, broken down...
    Posted 2011-01-17T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Why Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 has a new package signing key

    Starting with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 we have switched to using SHA-256 signatures on all RPM packages and to a 4096-bit RSA signing key. We've done this because it is current best practice to migrate away from MD5 and SHA-1 hashes due to various flaws found in them. Those flaws don't yet directly pose a threat to package signing however, and therefore our existing shipped products which used these older hashes will continue to use their existing keys until they reach their end of life. A...
    Posted 2010-11-11T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.4 to 5.5 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.5 was released at the end of March 2010, just under 7 months since the release of 5.4 in September 2009. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates we've made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. Errata count The chart below illustrates the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server if you had installed 5.4, up to and including the 5.5 release,...
    Posted 2010-04-27T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Red Hat's Top 11 Most Serious Flaw Types for 2009

    The 2010 CWE/SANS Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors was published today listing the most widespread issues that lead to software vulnerabilities. During the creation and review of the list we spent some time to see how closely last years list matched the types of flaws we deal with at Red Hat. We first looked at all the issues that Red Hat fixed across our entire product portfolio in the 2009 calendar year and filtered out those that had the highest severity. All our 2009...
    Posted 2010-02-16T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.3 to 5.4 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4 was released today, just over 7 months since the release of 5.3 in January 2009. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates we've made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. Errata count The chart below illustrates the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server as if you installed 5.3, up to and including the 5.4 release, broken down by severity...
    Posted 2009-09-02T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.2 to 5.3 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 was released today, around 8 months since the release of 5.2 in May 2008. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates we've made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. The chart below shows the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server as if you installed 5.2, up to and including the 5.3 release, broken down by severity. I've split it into two...
    Posted 2009-01-20T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Security of Third Party Applications

    Secunia collect some very interesting information about the patch state of Windows systems. Their results from 20,000 machines published yesterday were that over 98% of PCs were insecure, having at least one out-of-date application installed. Actually this isn't surprising and is exactly what I'd expect; it's all down to third party applications. Let's say you're browsing the web. It's more than likely that at some point you'll want to view some PDF files, watch some Flash content, or play a...
    Posted 2008-12-04T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.1 to 5.2 risk report

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 was released last week, around 6 months since the release of 5.1 in November 2007. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates we've made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. The graph below shows the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server starting at 5.1 up to and including the 5.2 release, broken down by severity. I've split it into two...
    Posted 2008-05-26T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • XSS vs Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code

    Last Friday, just as I was finishing work for the day, an email appeared in my mailbox from the UK CPNI announcing a public remote code execution flaw in Apache on HP-UX. As Chair of the Apache Software Foundation Security Team I knew there were no outstanding remote code execution flaws in Apache HTTP server (in fact we've not had a remote code execution flaw for many years) so I was expecting to invoke the Red Hat Critical Action Plan which would have meant a rather long weekend for me, my...
    Posted 2008-02-26T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Read more than the Headline

    Secunia released a security summary report for 2007 and surprisingly gave a count for Red Hat for the year at over 600 vulnerabilities. I had no idea how they got to this number, it certainly doesn't match our own publicly available metrics at https://www.redhat.com/security/data/metrics. Using our public tool, for every Red Hat product and service, for 2007 we issued 306 advisories to fix 404 vulnerabilities. Of those 404 vulnerabilities 41 were critical (on the scale used by Microsoft and...
    Posted 2008-01-16T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Enterprise Linux 5.0 to 5.1

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.1 was released today, around 8 months since the release of 5.0 in March 2007. So let's use this opportunity to take a quick look back over the vulnerabilities and security updates we've made in that time, specifically for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server. The graph below shows the total number of security updates issued for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Server up to and including the 5.1 release, broken down by severity. I've split it into two columns, one for the...
    Posted 2007-11-07T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Common Platform Enumeration

    Although Red Hat is well known for Red Hat Enterprise Linux we actually have a large number of other supported products, both layered on top of Enterprise Linux (like Red Hat Application Stack) and stand-alone (like Red Hat Directory Server). The majority of these products are serviced through the Red Hat Network and get our security advisories in a standard way and are included in the Security Response Team metrics. But our analysis scripts were not particularly consistent in dealing with...
    Posted 2007-07-31T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Third-party severity ratings

    The National Vulnerability Database provides a public severity rating for all CVE named vulnerabilities, "Low" "Medium" and "High", which they generate automatically based on the CVSS score their analysts calculate for each issue. I've been interested for some time to see how well those map to the severity ratings that Red Hat give to issues. We use the same ratings and methodology as Microsoft and others use, assigning "Critical" for things that have the ability to be remotely exploited...
    Posted 2007-06-23T00:00:00+00:00 - 3
  • Three months of Enterprise Linux 5

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 was released back in March 2007 so let's take a quick look back over the first three months of security updates to the Server distribution: We released updates to ten packages on the day we shipped the product. These is because we freeze packages some months before releasing the product (more information about this policy). Only one of those updates was rated critical, an update to Firefox. For the three months following release we shipped 31 more advisories to...
    Posted 2007-06-20T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Predictable security severities

    Red Hat has shipped products with randomization, stack protection, and other security mechanisms turned on by default since 2003. Vista recently shipped with similar protections and I read today an article about how the Microsoft Security Response Team were not treating Vista any differently when rating the severity of security issues. The Red Hat Security Response team use a similar guide for classification and I thought it would be worth clarifying how we handle this very situation. We...
    Posted 2007-05-18T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • New Red Hat Signing Keys

    We're changing the package signing key we use for all new Red Hat products. Since 1999, all RPM packages in Red Hat products have been gpg signed by the master key "Red Hat, Inc <security@redhat.com>" (keyid DB42A60E). I'll call this the legacy signing key for the rest of this article. This signature is one of two security mechanisms we use to ensure that customers can trust the installation of packages and their updates. The other is that the update client, up2date, checks the SSL...
    Posted 2007-01-30T00:00:00+00:00 - 0
  • Hip to be... OVAL

    Earlier this month Red Hat started publishing Open Vulnerability and Assessment Language (OVAL) definitions for Red Hat Enterprise Linux security issues and today we obtained official compatibility. But what are these definitions, how do you use them, and why are they important? One of the goals of Red Hat Enterprise Linux is to maintain backward compatibility of the packages we ship where possible. This goal means making sure that when we release security updates to fix vulnerabilities that...
    Posted 2006-06-21T00:00:00+00:00 - 0

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