Red Hat JVM/JDK Summary

Updated -

Overview

Red Hat has a long history of providing Java with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and with our JBoss Middleware portfolio. Starting in 2013, when the new lifecycle policy for Oracle JDK 6 End of Public Updates was introduced, a number of articles and questions have been raised about Java’s ongoing status in the marketplace. This document provides an overview of the Java related options Red Hat offers its customers.

OpenJDK

  • OpenJDK is the open source reference implementation of the Java SE specification and contains similar features to Oracle Java SE.
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux includes OpenJDK as the default Java development and runtime environment.
  • OpenJDK has a long history of support at Red Hat dating back to 2007 (see Red Hat Helps Advance Open Source Java), and Red Hat is a longstanding and senior member of the OpenJDK project.
  • Starting with OpenJDK 8, Red Hat also makes available and supports OpenJDK on Microsoft Windows to enable the development of Windows applications in conjunction with Red Hat JBoss Middleware.
  • Since OpenJDK is licensed under GPLv2, users of OpenJDK receive the rights and obligations under that license. The Oracle Java SE license terms do not apply to OpenJDK.

Other JDKs

  • In the interest of securing customer choice, Red Hat has agreements with Oracle and IBM to include both Oracle Java SE and IBM Java SDK with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
  • IBM Java is available via the Supplementary media, RHN channels, and Red Hat Customer Portal. IBM Java SDK is subject to the licensing obligations set forth in the applicable IBM end user license agreement. Access to Oracle Java SE, including updates, is available via the “Oracle Java” channels in the Red Hat Customer Portal and is subject to the licensing obligations set forth in the applicable end user license agreement. Customers are responsible for complying with these licenses.

Middleware

Additional Information about Red Hat and Java

Red Hat offers various flavors of Java with its subscriptions. This includes the distribution of multiple JVM/JDK offerings to its customers, as well as the support of the JBoss Middleware portfolio on multiple JVM/JDK offerings.

Distribution of multiple JVMs:

OpenJDK
Red Hat introduced support for OpenJDK 6 in 2010 with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. OpenJDK is the open source implementation of the Java SE specification. A Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription includes OpenJDK as the default Java development and runtime environment. For more information, see OpenJDK Life Cycle and Support Policy.

Oracle Java SE
Oracle Java SE is no longer available with the Red Hat Enterprise Linux or Red Hat JBoss Middleware product subscriptions. You can refer to Oracle Java SE End of Support & Distribution FAQ for more details. Note that the Oracle Java life cycle is defined by Oracle and not by Red Hat. Oracle Java SE is subject to the licensing obligations set forth in the applicable Oracle end user license agreement.

IBM Java SDK
The IBM Java software is included with the Red Hat Enterprise Linux and all Red Hat JBoss Middleware product subscriptions. Note that the IBM Java life cycle is defined by IBM and not by Red Hat. Note also that, because Red Hat has no access to the IBM Java source code, Red Hat provides this software in binary format only. IBM Java SDK is subject to the licensing obligations set forth in the applicable IBM end user license agreement.

Azul Zing and Zulu JDKs
Azul Zing and Zulu JDKs are certified and supported for use with Red Hat JBoss Middleware products. The Azul Zing and Zulu JDK software are available, but not included with either Red Hat Enterprise Linux or Red Hat JBoss Middleware subscriptions. You can Download Zulu and/or Download Zing on the Azul website.

Support of Red Hat JBoss Middleware on multiple JVMs
The Red Hat JBoss Middleware portfolio is supported on multiple JVM/JDK offerings regardless of whether Red Hat distributes the JVM/JDK. See JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7 Supported Configurations for an example of the JBoss EAP support matrix.

1 Comments

You mention in several places that a subscription is needed for non-development work with OpenJDK for Windows but I'm unable to find any information on this.