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Configuring and managing Identity Management

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Configuring, managing, and maintaining Identity Management in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Red Hat Customer Content Services

Abstract

This documentation collection provides instructions on how to effectively configure, manage and maintain Identity Management on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

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Chapter 1. Logging in to Identity Management from the command line

Identity Management (IdM) uses the Kerberos protocol to support single sign-on. Single sign-on means that the user enters the correct user name and password only once, and then accesses IdM services without the system prompting for the credentials again.

Important

In IdM, the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) automatically obtains a ticket-granting ticket (TGT) for a user after the user successfully logs in to the desktop environment on an IdM client machine with the corresponding Kerberos principal name. This means that after logging in, the user is not required to use the kinit utility to access IdM resources.

If you have cleared your Kerberos credential cache or your Kerberos TGT has expired, you need to request a Kerberos ticket manually to access IdM resources. The following sections present basic user operations when using Kerberos in IdM.

1.1. Using kinit to log in to IdM manually

This procedure describes using the kinit utility to authenticate to an Identity Management (IdM) environment manually. The kinit utility obtains and caches a Kerberos ticket-granting ticket (TGT) on behalf of an IdM user.

Note

Only use this procedure if you have destroyed your initial Kerberos TGT or if it has expired. As an IdM user, when logging onto your local machine you are also automatically logging in to IdM. This means that after logging in, you are not required to use the kinit utility to access IdM resources.

Procedure

  1. To log in to IdM

    • under the user name of the user who is currently logged in on the local system, use kinit without specifying a user name. For example, if you are logged in as example_user on the local system:

      [example_user@server ~]$ kinit
      Password for example_user@EXAMPLE.COM:
      [example_user@server ~]$

      If the user name of the local user does not match any user entry in IdM, the authentication attempt fails:

      [example_user@server ~]$ kinit
      kinit: Client 'example_user@EXAMPLE.COM' not found in Kerberos database while getting initial credentials
    • using a Kerberos principal that does not correspond to your local user name, pass the required user name to the kinit utility. For example, to log in as the admin user:

      [example_user@server ~]$ kinit admin
      Password for admin@EXAMPLE.COM:
      [example_user@server ~]$
  2. Optionally, to verify that the login was successful, use the klist utility to display the cached TGT. In the following example, the cache contains a ticket for the example_user principal, which means that on this particular host, only example_user is currently allowed to access IdM services:

    $ klist
    Ticket cache: KEYRING:persistent:0:0
    Default principal: example_user@EXAMPLE.COM
    
    Valid starting     	Expires            	Service principal
    11/10/2019 08:35:45  	11/10/2019 18:35:45  	krbtgt/EXAMPLE.COM@EXAMPLE.COM

1.2. Destroying a user’s active Kerberos ticket

This section describes how to clear the credentials cache that contains the user’s active Kerberos ticket.

Procedure

  1. To destroy your Kerberos ticket:

    [example_user@server ~]$ kdestroy
  2. Optionally, to check that the Kerberos ticket has been destroyed:

    [example_user@server ~]$ klist
    klist: Credentials cache keyring 'persistent:0:0' not found

1.3. Configuring an external system for Kerberos authentication

This section describes how to configure an external system so that Identity Management (IdM) users can log in to IdM from the external system using their Kerberos credentials.

Enabling Kerberos authentication on external systems is especially useful when your infrastructure includes multiple realms or overlapping domains. It is also useful if the system has not been enrolled into any IdM domain through ipa-client-install.

To enable Kerberos authentication to IdM from a system that is not a member of the IdM domain, define an IdM-specific Kerberos configuration file on the external system.

Prerequisites

  • The krb5-workstation package is installed on the external system.

    To find out whether the package is installed, use the following CLI command:

    # yum list installed krb5-workstation
    Installed Packages
    krb5-workstation.x86_64    1.16.1-19.el8     @BaseOS

Procedure

  1. Copy the /etc/krb5.conf file from the IdM server to the external system. For example:

    # scp /etc/krb5.conf root@externalsystem.example.com:/etc/krb5_ipa.conf
    Warning

    Do not overwrite the existing krb5.conf file on the external system.

  2. On the external system, set the terminal session to use the copied IdM Kerberos configuration file:

    $ export KRB5_CONFIG=/etc/krb5_ipa.conf

    The KRB5_CONFIG variable exists only temporarily until you log out. To prevent this loss, export the variable with a different file name.

  3. Copy the Kerberos configuration snippets from the /etc/krb5.conf.d/ directory to the external system.

Users on the external system can now use the kinit utility to authenticate against the IdM server.

Additional resources

  • For details on Kerberos, see the krb5.conf(5), kinit(1), klist(1), and kdestroy(1) man pages.

Chapter 2. Viewing, starting and stopping the Identity Management services

Identity Management (IdM) servers are Red Hat Enterprise Linux systems that work as domain controllers (DCs). A number of different services are running on IdM servers, most notably the Directory Server, Certificate Authority (CA), DNS, and Kerberos.

2.1. The IdM services

2.1.1. List of services hosted by IdM servers

Most of the following services are not strictly required to be installed on the IdM server. For example, you can install services such as a certificate authority (CA) or DNS server on an external server outside the IdM domain.

Kerberos
the krb5kdc and kadmin services

IdM uses the Kerberos protocol to support single sign-on. With Kerberos, users only need to present the correct username and password once and can access IdM services without the system prompting for credentials again.

Kerberos is divided into two parts:

  • The krb5kdc service is the Kerberos Authentication service and Key Distribution Center (KDC) daemon.
  • The kadmin service is the Kerberos database administration program.

For information on how to authenticate using Kerberos in IdM, see Logging in to Identity Management from the command line and Logging in to IdM in the Web UI: Using a Kerberos ticket .

LDAP directory server
the dirsrv service

The IdM LDAP directory server instance stores all IdM information, such as information related to Kerberos, user accounts, host entries, services, policies, DNS, and others. The LDAP directory server instance is based on the same technology as Red Hat Directory Server. However, it is tuned to IdM-specific tasks.

Certificate Authority
the pki-tomcatd service

The integrated certificate authority (CA) is based on the same technology as Red Hat Certificate System. pki is the Command-Line Interface for accessing Certificate System services.

You can also install the server without the integrated CA if you create and provide all required certificates independently.

For more information, see Planning your CA services.

Domain Name System (DNS)
the named service

IdM uses DNS for dynamic service discovery. The IdM client installation utility can use information from DNS to automatically configure the client machine. After the client is enrolled in the IdM domain, it uses DNS to locate IdM servers and services within the domain. The BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) implementation of the DNS (Domain Name System) protocols in Red Hat Enterprise Linux includes the named DNS server. named-pkcs11 is a version of the BIND DNS server built with native support for the PKCS#11 cryptographic standard.

For information, see Planning your DNS services and host names.

Apache HTTP Server
the httpd service

The Apache HTTP web server provides the IdM Web UI, and also manages communication between the Certificate Authority and other IdM services.

Samba / Winbind
smb and winbind services

Samba implements the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, also known as the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol, in Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Via the smb service, the SMB protocol enables you to access resources on a server, such as file shares and shared printers. If you have configured a Trust with an Active Directory (AD) environment, the`Winbind` service manages communication between IdM servers and AD servers.

One-time password (OTP) authentication
the ipa-otpd services

One-time passwords (OTP) are passwords that are generated by an authentication token for only one session, as part of two-factor authentication. OTP authentication is implemented in Red Hat Enterprise Linux via the ipa-otpd service.

For more information, see Logging in to the Identity Management Web UI using one time passwords.

OpenDNSSEC
the ipa-dnskeysyncd service

OpenDNSSEC is a DNS manager that automates the process of keeping track of DNS security extensions (DNSSEC) keys and the signing of zones. The ipa-dnskeysyncd service manages synchronization between the IdM Directory Server and OpenDNSSEC.

The Identity Management Server: Unifying Services

2.1.2. List of services hosted by IdM clients

  • System Security Services Daemon: the sssd service

The System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) is the client-side application that manages user authentication and caching credentials. Caching enables the local system to continue normal authentication operations if the IdM server becomes unavailable or if the client goes offline.

For more information, see Understanding SSSD and its benefits.

  • Certmonger: the certmonger service

The certmonger service monitors and renews the certificates on the client. It can request new certificates for the services on the system.

For more information, see Obtaining an IdM certificate for a service using certmonger.

Interactions Between IdM Services

2.2. Viewing the status of IdM services

To view the status of the IdM services that are configured on your IdM server, run the ipactl status command:

[root@server ~]# ipactl status
Directory Service: RUNNING
krb5kdc Service: RUNNING
kadmin Service: RUNNING
named Service: RUNNING
httpd Service: RUNNING
pki-tomcatd Service: RUNNING
smb Service: RUNNING
winbind Service: RUNNING
ipa-otpd Service: RUNNING
ipa-dnskeysyncd Service: RUNNING
ipa: INFO: The ipactl command was successful

The output of the ipactl status command on your server depends on your IdM configuration. For example, if an IdM deployment does not include a DNS server, the named service is not present in the list.

Note

You cannot use the IdM web UI to view the status of all the IdM services running on a particular IdM server. Kerberized services running on different servers can be viewed in the IdentityServices tab of the IdM web UI.

You can start or stop the entire server, or an individual service only.

To start, stop, or restart the entire IdM server, see:

To start, stop, or restart an individual IdM service, see:

To display the version of IdM software, see:

2.3. Starting and stopping the entire Identity Management server: the ipactl utility

Use the ipactl utility to stop, start, or restart the entire IdM server along with all the installed services. Using the ipactl utility ensures all services are stopped, started, or restarted in the appropriate order. You do not need to have a valid Kerberos ticket to run the ipactl commands.

ipactl commands

To start the entire IdM server:

# ipactl start

To stop the entire IdM server:

# ipactl stop

To restart the entire IdM server:

# ipactl restart

To show the status of all the services that make up IdM:

# ipactl status
Important

You cannot use the IdM web UI to perform the ipactl commands.

2.4. Starting and stopping an individual Identity Management service: the systemctl utility

Changing IdM configuration files manually is generally not recommended. However, certain situations require that an administrator performs a manual configuration of specific services. In such situations, use the systemctl utility to stop, start, or restart an individual IdM service.

For example, use systemctl after customizing the Directory Server behavior, without modifying the other IdM services:

# systemctl restart dirsrv@REALM-NAME.service

Also, when initially deploying an IdM trust with Active Directory, modify the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file, adding:

  • specific parameters to tune the timeout configuration options in an environment where remote servers have a high latency
  • specific parameters to tune the Active Directory site affinity
  • overrides for certain configuration options that are not provided by the global IdM settings

To apply the changes you have made in the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file:

# systemctl restart sssd.service

Running systemctl restart sssd.service is required because the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) does not automatically re-read or re-apply its configuration.

Note that for changes that affect IdM identity ranges, a complete server reboot is recommended.

Important

To restart multiple IdM domain services, always use ipactl. Because of dependencies between the services installed with the IdM server, the order in which they are started and stopped is critical. The ipactl utility ensures that the services are started and stopped in the appropriate order.

Useful systemctl commands

To start a particular IdM service:

# systemctl start name.service

To stop a particular IdM service:

# systemctl stop name.service

To restart a particular IdM service:

# systemctl restart name.service

To view the status of a particular IdM service:

# systemctl status name.service
Important

You cannot use the IdM web UI to start or stop the individual services running on IdM servers. You can only use the web UI to modify the settings of a Kerberized service by navigating to IdentityServices and selecting the service.

2.5. Methods for displaying IdM software version

You can display the IdM version number with:

  • the IdM WebUI
  • ipa commands
  • rpm commands

 

Displaying version through the WebUI

In the IdM WebUI, the software version can be displayed by choosing About from the username menu at the top-right.

Checking IdM Software Version
Displaying version with ipa commands

From the command line, use the ipa --version command.

[root@server ~]# ipa --version
VERSION: 4.8.0, API_VERSION: 2.233
Displaying version with rpm commands

If IdM services are not operating properly, you can use the rpm utility to determine the version number of the ipa-server package that is currently installed.

[root@server ~]# rpm -q ipa-server
ipa-server-4.8.0-11.module+el8.1.0+4247+9f3fd721.x86_64

Chapter 3. Introduction to the IdM command-line utilities

The following sections describe the basics of using the Identity Management (IdM) command-line utilities.

Prerequisites

3.1. What is the IPA command line interface

The IPA command line interface (CLI) is the basic command-line interface for Identity Management (IdM) administration.

It supports a lot of subcommands that are used to manage IdM, such as the ipa user-add command to add a new user.

IPA CLI allows you to:

  • Add, manage, or remove users, groups, hosts and other objects in the network.
  • Manage certificates.
  • Search entries.
  • Display and list objects.
  • Set access rights.
  • Get help with the correct command syntax.

3.2. What is the IPA help

The IPA help is a built-in documentation system for the IdM server.

IPA command line interface (CLI) generates available help topics from loaded IdM plugin modules. If you want to run the IPA help successfully, you need to:

  • Have an IdM server installed and running.
  • Be authenticated with a valid Kerberos ticket.

Executing the ipa help command without options displays information about basic help usage and the most common command examples.

Executing help with options has the following syntax:

$ ipa help [TOPIC | COMMAND | topics | commands]
  • [] — Brackets mean that all parameters are optional and you can write just ipa help and the command will be executed.
  • | — The pipe character means or. Therefore, you can use TOPIC or COMMAND or topics or commands with the basic ipa help command.
  • topics — You can run the command ipa help topics and it will execute correctly. The command displays a list of topics that are covered by IPA help, for example, user, cert, server and many others.
  • TOPIC — The TOPIC with capital letters means variable, therefore, you can use the particular topic, for example, ipa help user
  • commands — You can run the command ipa help commands and it will execute correctly. The command displays a list of commands which are covered by the IPA help, for example, user-add, ca-enable, server-show and many others.
  • COMMAND — The COMMAND with capital letters means variable, therefore, you can use the particular command, for example, ipa help user-add

3.3. Using IPA help topics

The following procedure helps you to understand using the IPA help in the command line interface.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter ipa help topics to display a list of topics covered by help.

    $ ipa help topics
  3. Select one of the topics and create a command according to the following pattern: ipa help [topic_name], instead of the topic_name string, add one of the topics you listed in the previous step.

    In the example, we use the following topic: user

    $ ipa help user
  4. If the IPA help command is too long and you cannot see the whole text, use the following syntax:

    $ ipa help user | less

    You can then scroll down and read the whole help.

The IPA CLI displays a help page for the user topic. After reading the overview, you can see many examples with patterns for working with topic commands.

3.4. Using IPA help commands

The following procedure helps you to understand creating the IPA help commands in the command line interface.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter ipa help commands to display a list of commands covered by help.

    $ ipa help commands
  3. Select one of the commands and create a help command according to the following pattern: ipa help <COMMAND>, instead of the <COMMAND> string, add one of the commands you listed in the previous step.

    $ ipa help user-add

Additional resources

  • For details, see man ipa page.

3.5. Structure of IPA commands

The IPA CLI distinguishes the following types of commands:

  • Built-in commands — Built-in commands are all available in the IdM server.
  • Plug-in provided commands

Structure of IPA commands allows you to manage various types of objects. For example:

  • Users,
  • Hosts,
  • DNS records,
  • Certificates,

and many others.

For most of these objects, the IPA CLI includes commands to:

  • Add (add)
  • Modify (mod)
  • Delete (del)
  • Search (find)
  • Display (show)

Commands have the following structure:

ipa user-add, ipa user-mod, ipa user-del, ipa user-find, ipa user-show

ipa host-add, ipa host-mod, ipa host-del, ipa host-find, ipa host-show

ipa dnsrecord-add, ipa dnsrecord-mod, ipa dnsrecord-del, ipa dnsrecord-find, ipa dnrecord-show

You can create a user with the ipa user-add [options], where [options] are optional. If you use just the ipa user-add command, the script asks you for details one by one.

To change an existing object, you need to define the object, therefore the command includes also object: ipa user-mod USER_NAME [options].

3.6. Using an IPA command to add a user account to IdM

The following describes adding a new user to the Identity Management (IdM) database using command line.

Prerequisites

  • You need to have administrator privileges to add user accounts to the IdM server.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter the command for adding a new user:

    $ ipa user-add

    The command runs a script where you can add basic data necessary for creating a user account.

  3. In the First name: field, enter the first name of the new user and press the Enter key.
  4. In the Last name: field, enter the last name of the new user and press the Enter key.
  5. In the User login [suggested user name]: enter the user name or just press the Enter key if the suggested user name works for you.

    User name must be unique for the whole IdM database. If an error occurs, that the user already exists, you need to start from the beginning with the ipa user-add command and try a different user name.

After you successfully added the user name, the user account has been added to the IdM database and the IPA command line interface (CLI) prints on the output the following log:

----------------------
Added user "euser"
----------------------
User login: euser
First name: Example
Last name: User
Full name: Example User
Display name: Example User
Initials: EU
Home directory: /home/euser
GECOS: Example User
Login shell: /bin/sh
Principal name: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Principal alias: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Email address: euser@idm.example.com
UID: 427200006
GID: 427200006
Password: False
Member of groups: ipausers
Kerberos keys available: False

As you can see, a user password is not set to the user account. If you want to add also password, use the ipa user-add command in the following syntax:

$ ipa user-add --first=Example --last=User --password

The IPA CLI then asks you for adding or confirming a user name and password.

If the user has been already created, you can add only the password with the `ipa user-mod`command.

Additional resources

For more information about parameters, enter the following help command to the command line:

$ ipa help user-add

3.7. Using an IPA command to modify a user account in IdM

You can change many parameters for each user account. For example, you can add a new password to the user.

Basic command syntax is different from the user-add syntax because you need to define the existing user account for which you want to perform changes, for example, add a password.

Prerequisites

  • You need to have administrator privileges to modify user accounts in the IdM server.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter the command for adding a password:

    $ ipa user-mod euser --password

    The command runs a script where you can add the new password.

  3. Enter the new password and press the Enter key.

After you successfully added the user name, the user account has been added to the IdM database and the IPA CLI prints on the output the following log:

----------------------
Modified user "euser"
----------------------
User login: euser
First name: Example
Last name: User
Home directory: /home/euser
Principal name: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Principal alias: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Email address: euser@idm.example.com
UID: 427200006
GID: 427200006
Password: True
Member of groups: ipausers
Kerberos keys available: True

The user password is now set for the account and the user can log into IdM.

Additional resources

For more information about parameters, enter the following help command to the command line:

$ ipa help user-mod

3.8. How to supply a list of values to the IdM utilities

Identity Management (IdM) stores values for multi-valued attributes in lists.

IdM supports the following methods of supplying multi-valued lists:

  • Using the same command-line argument multiple times within the same command invocation:

    $ ipa permission-add --right=read --permissions=write --permissions=delete ...
  • Alternatively, you can enclose the list in curly braces, in which case the shell performs the expansion:

    $ ipa permission-add --right={read,write,delete} ...

Examples above show a command permission-add which adds permissions to an object. The object is not mentioned in the example. Instead of …​ you need to add the object for which you want to add permissions.

When you update such multi-valued attributes from the command line, IdM completely overwrites the previous list of values with a new list. Therefore, when updating a multi-valued attribute, you must specify the whole new list, not just a single value you want to add.

In the command above, the list of permissions includes reading, writing and deleting. When you decide to update the list with the permission-mod command, you must add all values, otherwise those not mentioned will be deleted.

Example 1: — The ipa permission-mod command updates all previously added permissions.

$ ipa permission-mod --right=read --right=write --right=delete ...

or

$ ipa permission-mod --right={read,write,delete} ...

Example 2 — The ipa permission-mod command deletes the --right=delete argument because it is not included in the command:

$ ipa permission-mod --right=read --right=write ...

or

$ ipa permission-mod --right={read,write} ...

3.9. How to use special characters with the IdM utilities

When passing command-line arguments that include special characters to the ipa commands, escape these characters with a backslash (\). For example, common special characters include angle brackets (< and >), ampersand (&), asterisk (*), or vertical bar (|).

For example, to escape an asterisk (*):

$ ipa certprofile-show certificate_profile --out=exported\*profile.cfg

Commands containing unescaped special characters do not work as expected because the shell cannot properly parse such characters.

Chapter 4. Searching Identity Management entries from the command line

The following sections describe how to use IPA commands, which helps you to find or show objects.

4.1. Overview of listing IdM entries

This section describes the ipa *-find commands, which can help you to search for a particular type of IdM entries.

To list all the find commands, use the following ipa help command:

$ ipa help commands | grep find

You may need to check if a particular user is included in the IdM database. You can then list all users with the following command:

$ ipa user-find

To list user groups whose specified attributes contain a keyword:

$ ipa group-find keyword

For example the ipa group-find admin command lists all groups whose names or descriptions include string admin:

----------------
3 groups matched
----------------
   Group name: admins
   Description: Account administrators group
   GID: 427200002

   Group name: editors
   Description: Limited admins who can edit other users
   GID: 427200002

   Group name: trust admins
   Description: Trusts administrators group

When searching user groups, you can also limit the search results to groups that contain a particular user:

$ ipa group-find --user=user_name

To search for groups that do not contain a particular user:

$ ipa group-find --no-user=user_name

4.2. Showing details for a particular entry

Use the ipa *-show command to display details about a particular IdM entry.

Procedure

  • To display details about a host named server.example.com:

    $ ipa host-show server.example.com
    
    Host name: server.example.com
    Principal name: host/server.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
    ...

4.3. Adjusting the search size and time limit

Some queries, such as requesting a list of IdM users, can return a very large number of entries. By tuning these search operations, you can improve the overall server performance when running the ipa *-find commands, such as ipa user-find, and when displaying corresponding lists in the Web UI.

Search size limit

Defines the maximum number of entries returned for a request sent to the server from a client’s CLI or from a browser accessing the IdM Web UI.

Default: 100 entries.

Search time limit

Defines the maximum time (in seconds) that the server waits for searches to run. Once the search reaches this limit, the server stops the search and returns the entries discovered in that time.

Default: 2 seconds.

If you set the values to -1, IdM will not apply any limits when searching.

Important

Setting search size or time limits too high can negatively affect server performance.

4.3.1. Adjusting the search size and time limit in the command line

The following text describes adjusting search size and time limits in the command line:

  • Globally
  • For a specific entry

Procedure

  1. To display current search time and size limits in CLI, use the ipa config-show command:

    $ ipa config-show
    
    Search time limit: 2
    Search size limit: 100
  2. To adjust the limits globally for all queries, use the ipa config-mod command and add the --searchrecordslimit and --searchtimelimit options. For example:

    $ ipa config-mod --searchrecordslimit=500 --searchtimelimit=5
  3. To adjust the limits only for a specific query, add the --sizelimit or --timelimit options to the command. For example:
$ ipa user-find --sizelimit=200 --timelimit=120

4.3.2. Adjusting the search size and time limit in the Web UI

The following text describes adjusting search size and time limits in the IdM Web UI:

  • Globally
  • For a specific entry

Procedure

To adjust the limits globally for all queries:

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.
  2. Click IPA Server.

    web ui ipaserver

  3. On the IPA Server tab, click Configuration.
  4. Set the required values in the Search Options area.

    Default values are:

    • Search size limit: 100 entries
    • Search time limit: 2 seconds
  5. Click Save at the top of the page.

    web ui search limits

After saving the values, search an entry and verify the result.

Chapter 5. Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser

The following sections provide an overview of the IdM (Identity Management) Web UI and describe how to access it.

5.1. What is the IdM Web UI

The IdM (Identity Management) Web UI is a web application for IdM administration, a graphical alternative to the IdM command line tools.

You can access the IdM Web UI as:

  • IdM users: A limited set of operations depending on permissions granted to the user in the IdM server. Basically, active IdM users can log in to the IdM server and configure their own account. They cannot change settings of other users or the IdM server settings.
  • Administrators: Full access rights to the IdM server.
  • Active Directory users: A set of operations depending on permissions granted to the user. Active Directory users can now be administrators for Identity Management. For details, see Enabling AD users to administer IdM.

5.2. Web browsers supported for accessing the Web UI

IdM (Identity Management) supports the following browsers for connecting to the Web UI:

  • Mozilla Firefox 38 and later
  • Google Chrome 46 and later

5.3. Accessing the Web UI

The following procedure describes the first logging in to the IdM (Identity Management) Web UI with a password.

After the first login you can configure your IdM server to authenticate with:

Procedure

  1. Type an IdM server URL into the browser address bar. The name will look similarly to the following example:

    https://server.example.com

    You just need to change server.example.com with a DNS name of your IdM server.

    This opens the IdM Web UI login screen in your browser.

    web ui login screen

    • If the server does not respond or the login screen does not open, check the DNS settings on the IdM server to which you are connecting.
    • If you use a self-signed certificate, the browser issues a warning. Check the certificate and accept the security exception to proceed with the login.

      To avoid security exceptions, install a certificate signed by a certificate authority.

  2. On the Web UI login screen, enter the administrator account credentials you added during the IdM server installation.

    For details, see Installing an Identity Management server: With integrated DNS, with an integrated CA.

    You can enter your personal account credentials as well if they are already entered in the IdM server.

    web ui login passwd

  3. Click Log in.

After the successful login, you can start configuring the IdM server.

web ui users

Chapter 6. Logging in to IdM in the Web UI: Using a Kerberos ticket

The following sections describe the initial configuration of your environment to enable Kerberos login to the IdM Web UI and accessing IdM using Kerberos authentication.

Prerequisites

6.1. Kerberos authentication in Identity Management

Identity Management (IdM) uses the Kerberos protocol to support single sign-on. Single sign-on authentication allows you to provide the correct user name and password only once, and you can then access Identity Management services without the system prompting for credentials again.

The IdM server provides Kerberos authentication immediately after the installation if the DNS and certificate settings have been configured properly. For details, see Installing Identity Management.

To use Kerberos authentication on hosts, install:

6.2. Using kinit to log in to IdM manually

This procedure describes using the kinit utility to authenticate to an Identity Management (IdM) environment manually. The kinit utility obtains and caches a Kerberos ticket-granting ticket (TGT) on behalf of an IdM user.

Note

Only use this procedure if you have destroyed your initial Kerberos TGT or if it has expired. As an IdM user, when logging onto your local machine you are also automatically logging in to IdM. This means that after logging in, you are not required to use the kinit utility to access IdM resources.

Procedure

  1. To log in to IdM

    • under the user name of the user who is currently logged in on the local system, use kinit without specifying a user name. For example, if you are logged in as example_user on the local system:

      [example_user@server ~]$ kinit
      Password for example_user@EXAMPLE.COM:
      [example_user@server ~]$

      If the user name of the local user does not match any user entry in IdM, the authentication attempt fails:

      [example_user@server ~]$ kinit
      kinit: Client 'example_user@EXAMPLE.COM' not found in Kerberos database while getting initial credentials
    • using a Kerberos principal that does not correspond to your local user name, pass the required user name to the kinit utility. For example, to log in as the admin user:

      [example_user@server ~]$ kinit admin
      Password for admin@EXAMPLE.COM:
      [example_user@server ~]$
  2. Optionally, to verify that the login was successful, use the klist utility to display the cached TGT. In the following example, the cache contains a ticket for the example_user principal, which means that on this particular host, only example_user is currently allowed to access IdM services:

    $ klist
    Ticket cache: KEYRING:persistent:0:0
    Default principal: example_user@EXAMPLE.COM
    
    Valid starting     	Expires            	Service principal
    11/10/2019 08:35:45  	11/10/2019 18:35:45  	krbtgt/EXAMPLE.COM@EXAMPLE.COM

6.3. Configuring the browser for Kerberos authentication

To enable authentication with a Kerberos ticket, you may need a browser configuration.

The following steps help you to support Kerberos negotiation for accessing the IdM domain.

Each browser supports Kerberos in a different way and needs different set up. The IdM Web UI includes guidelines for the following browsers:

  • Firefox
  • Chrome

Procedure

  1. Open the IdM Web UI login dialog in your web browser.
  2. Click the link for browser configuration on the Web UI login screen.

    ipa browser config link

  3. Follow the steps on the configuration page.

    ipa browser config page

After the setup, turn back to the IdM Web UI and click Log in.

6.4. Logging in to the web UI using a Kerberos ticket

This procedure describes logging in to the IdM Web UI using a Kerberos ticket-granting ticket (TGT).

The TGT expires at a predefined time. The default time interval is 24 hours and you can change it in the IdM Web UI.

After the time interval expires, you need to renew the ticket:

  • Using the kinit command.
  • Using IdM login credentials in the Web UI login dialog.

Procedure

  • Open the IdM Web UI.

    If Kerberos authentication works correctly and you have a valid ticket, you will be automatically authenticated and the Web UI opens.

    If the ticket is expired, it is necessary to authenticate yourself with credentials first. However, next time the IdM Web UI will open automatically without opening the login dialog.

    If you see an error message Authentication with Kerberos failed, verify that your browser is configured for Kerberos authentication. See Section 6.3, “Configuring the browser for Kerberos authentication”.

    firefox kerb auth failed

6.5. Configuring an external system for Kerberos authentication

This section describes how to configure an external system so that Identity Management (IdM) users can log in to IdM from the external system using their Kerberos credentials.

Enabling Kerberos authentication on external systems is especially useful when your infrastructure includes multiple realms or overlapping domains. It is also useful if the system has not been enrolled into any IdM domain through ipa-client-install.

To enable Kerberos authentication to IdM from a system that is not a member of the IdM domain, define an IdM-specific Kerberos configuration file on the external system.

Prerequisites

  • The krb5-workstation package is installed on the external system.

    To find out whether the package is installed, use the following CLI command:

    # yum list installed krb5-workstation
    Installed Packages
    krb5-workstation.x86_64    1.16.1-19.el8     @BaseOS

Procedure

  1. Copy the /etc/krb5.conf file from the IdM server to the external system. For example:

    # scp /etc/krb5.conf root@externalsystem.example.com:/etc/krb5_ipa.conf
    Warning

    Do not overwrite the existing krb5.conf file on the external system.

  2. On the external system, set the terminal session to use the copied IdM Kerberos configuration file:

    $ export KRB5_CONFIG=/etc/krb5_ipa.conf

    The KRB5_CONFIG variable exists only temporarily until you log out. To prevent this loss, export the variable with a different file name.

  3. Copy the Kerberos configuration snippets from the /etc/krb5.conf.d/ directory to the external system.
  4. Configure the browser on the external system, as described in Section 6.3, “Configuring the browser for Kerberos authentication”.

Users on the external system can now use the kinit utility to authenticate against the IdM server.

6.6. Web UI login for Active Directory users

To enable Web UI login for Active Directory users, define an ID override for each Active Directory user in the default trust view. For example:

[admin@server ~]$ ipa idoverrideuser-add 'Default Trust View' ad_user@ad.example.com

Chapter 7. Logging in to the Identity Management Web UI using one time passwords

Access to IdM Web UI can be secured using several methods. The basic one is password authentication.

To increase the security of password authentication, you can add a second step and require automatically generated one-time passwords (OTPs). The most common usage is to combine password connected with the user account and a time limited one time password generated by a hardware or software token.

The following sections help you to:

  • Understand how the OTP authentication works in IdM.
  • Configure OTP authentication on the IdM server.
  • Create OTP tokens and synchronize them with the FreeOTP app in your phone.
  • Authenticate to the IdM Web UI with the combination of user password and one time password.
  • Re-synchronize tokens in the Web UI.

7.1. Prerequisites

7.2. One time password (OTP) authentication in Identity Management

One-time passwords bring an additional step to your authentication security. The authentication uses your password + an automatically generated one time password.

To generate one time passwords, you can use a hardware or software token. IdM supports both software and hardware tokens.

Identity Management supports the following two standard OTP mechanisms:

  • The HMAC-Based One-Time Password (HOTP) algorithm is based on a counter. HMAC stands for Hashed Message Authentication Code.
  • The Time-Based One-Time Password (TOTP) algorithm is an extension of HOTP to support time-based moving factor.
Important

IdM does not support OTP logins for Active Directory trust users.

7.3. Enabling the one time password in the Web UI

The IdM Web UI allows you to configure hardware or software device to generate one-time passwords.

The one time password is entered just after the usual password in the dedicated field in the login dialog.

Only administrators can enable OTP authentication in the user settings.

Prerequisites

  • Administration privileges

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI with your username and password.
  2. Open the Identity → Users → Active users tab.

    web ui users

  3. Click your username to open the user settings.
  4. In the User authentication types, select Two factor authentication (password + OTP).
  5. Click Save.

At this point, the OTP authentication is enabled on the IdM server.

Now you or users themselves need to assign a new token ID to the user account.

7.4. Adding OTP tokens in the Web UI

The following section helps you to add token to the IdM Web UI and to your software token generator.

Prerequisites

  • Active user account on the IdM server.
  • Administrator has enabled OTP for the particular user account in the IdM Web UI.
  • A software device generating OTP tokens, for example FreeOTP.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI with your user name and password.
  2. To create the token in your mobile phone, open the Authentication → OTP Tokens tab.
  3. Click Add.

    web ui tokens tab

  4. In the Add OTP token dialog box, leave everything unfilled and click Add.

    At this stage, the IdM server creates a token with default parameters at the server and opens a page with a QR code.

  5. Copy the QR code into your mobile phone.
  6. Click OK to close the QR code.

Now you can generate one time passwords and log in with them to the IdM Web UI.

freeotp token

7.5. Logging into the Web UI with a one time password

This procedure describes the first login into the IdM Web UI using a one time password (OTP).

Prerequisites

  • OTP configuration enabled on the Identity Management server for the user account you are using for the OTP authentication. Administrators as well as users themselves can enable OTP.

    To enable the OTP configuration, see Section 7.3, “Enabling the one time password in the Web UI”

  • A hardware or software device generating OTP tokens configured.

Procedure

  1. In the Identity Management login screen, enter your user name or a user name of the IdM server administrator account.
  2. Add the password for the user name entered above.
  3. Generate a one time password on your device.
  4. Enter the one time password right after the password (without space).
  5. Click Log in.

    If the authentication fails, synchronize OTP tokens.

    If your CA uses a self-signed certificate, the browser issues a warning. Check the certificate and accept the security exception to proceed with the login.

    If the the IdM Web UI does not open, verify the DNS configuration of your Identity Management server.

After successful login, the IdM Web UI appears.

web ui users

7.6. Synchronizing OTP tokens using the Web UI

If the login with OTP (One Time Password) fails, OTP tokens are not synchronized correctly.

The following text describes token re-synchronization.

Prerequisites

  • A login screen opened.
  • A device generating OTP tokens configured.

Procedure

  1. On the IdM Web UI login screen, click Sync OTP Token.

    web ui login otp link

  2. In the login screen, enter your username and the Identity Management password.
  3. Generate one time password and enter it in the First OTP field.
  4. Generate another one time password and enter it in the Second OTP field.
  5. Optionally, enter the token ID.

    web ui login otp configuration

  6. Click Sync OTP Token.

After the successful synchronization, you can log in to the IdM server.

7.7. Changing expired passwords

Administrators of Identity Management can enforce you having to change your password at the next login. It means that you cannot successfully log in to the IdM Web UI until you change the password.

Password expiration can happen during your first login to the Web UI.

If the expiration password dialog appears, follow the instructions in the procedure.

Prerequisites

  • A login screen opened.
  • Active account to the IdM server.

Procedure

  1. In the password expiration login screen, enter the user name.
  2. Add the password for the user name entered above.
  3. In the OTP field, generate a one time password, if you use the one time password authentication.

    If you do not have enabled the OTP authentication, leave the field empty.

  4. Enter the new password twice for verification.
  5. Click Reset Password.

    web ui passwd expiration

After the successful password change, the usual login dialog displays. Log in with the new password.

Chapter 8. Configuring global IdM settings using Ansible playbooks

Using the Ansible config module, you can retrieve and set global configuration parameters for Identity Management (IdM).

This chapter includes the following sections:

8.1. Retrieving IdM configuration using an Ansible playbook

The following procedure describes how you can use an Ansible playbook to retrieve information about the current global IdM configuration.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define the IdM server from which you want to retrieve the IdM configuration in the [ipaserver] section. For example, to instruct Ansible to retrieve the data from server.idm.example.com, enter:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Open the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/config/retrieve-config.yml Ansible playbook file for editing:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle global IdM configuration
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: no
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - name: Query IPA global configuration
        ipaconfig:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
        register: serverconfig
    
      - debug:
          msg: "{{ serverconfig }}"
  3. Adapt the file by changing the following:

    • The password of IdM administrator.
    • Other values, if necessary.
  4. Save the file.
  5. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/config/retrieve-config.yml
    [...]
    TASK [debug]
    ok: [server.idm.example.com] => {
        "msg": {
            "ansible_facts": {
                "discovered_interpreter_
            },
            "changed": false,
            "config": {
                "ca_renewal_master_server": "server.idm.example.com",
                "configstring": [
                    "AllowNThash",
                    "KDC:Disable Last Success"
                ],
                "defaultgroup": "ipausers",
                "defaultshell": "/bin/bash",
                "emaildomain": "idm.example.com",
                "enable_migration": false,
                "groupsearch": [
                    "cn",
                    "description"
                ],
                "homedirectory": "/home",
                "maxhostname": "64",
                "maxusername": "64",
                "pac_type": [
                    "MS-PAC",
                    "nfs:NONE"
                ],
                "pwdexpnotify": "4",
                "searchrecordslimit": "100",
                "searchtimelimit": "2",
                "selinuxusermapdefault": "unconfined_u:s0-s0:c0.c1023",
                "selinuxusermaporder": [
                    "guest_u:s0$xguest_u:s0$user_
                ],
                "usersearch": [
                    "uid",
                    "givenname",
                    "sn",
                    "telephonenumber",
                    "ou",
                    "title"
                ]
            },
            "failed": false
        }
    }

8.2. Configuring the IdM CA renewal master server using an Ansible playbook

In an Identity Management (IdM) deployment that uses an embedded certificate authority (CA), the CA renewal master server maintains and renews IdM system certificates. It ensures nondisruptive IdM deployments.

For more details on the role of the IdM CA renewal master, see Using IdM CA renewal master.

The following procedure describes how you can use an Ansible playbook to configure the IdM CA renewal master server.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Optional: Identify the current IdM CA renewal master:

    $ ipa config-show | grep 'CA renewal master'
      IPA CA renewal master: server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  3. Open the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/config/set-ca-renewal-master-server.yml Ansible playbook file for editing:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle global DNS configuration
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: no
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - name: set ca_renewal_master_server
        ipaconfig:
          ipaadmin_password: SomeADMINpassword
          ca_renewal_master_server: carenewal.idm.example.com
  4. Adapt the file by changing:

    • The password of IdM administrator set by the ipaadmin_password variable.
    • The name of the master CA server set by the ca_renewal_master_server variable.
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook. Specify the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/config/set-ca-renewal-master-server.yml

Verification steps

You can verify that the CA renewal master has been changed:

  1. Log into ipaserver as IdM administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request the identity of the IdM master CA server:

    $ ipa config-show | grep ‘CA renewal master’
    IPA CA renewal master:  carenewal.idm.example.com

    The output shows the carenewal.idm.example.com server is the new CA renewal master.

8.3. Configuring the default shell for IdM users using an Ansible playbook

The shell is a program that accepts and interprets commands. Several shells are available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), such as bash, sh, ksh, zsh, fish, and others. Bash, or /bin/bash, is a popular shell on most Linux systems, and it is normally the default shell for user accounts on RHEL.

The following procedure describes how you can use an Ansible playbook to configure sh, an alternative shell, as the default shell for IdM users.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Optional: Use the retrieve-config.yml Ansible playbook to identify the current shell for IdM users. See Retrieving IdM configuration using an Ansible playbook for details.
  2. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  3. Open the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/config/ensure-config-options-are-set.yml Ansible playbook file for editing:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to ensure some config options are set
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      # Set defaultlogin and maxusername
      - ipaconfig:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          defaultshell: /bin/bash
          maxusername: 64
  4. Adapt the file by changing the following:

    • The password of IdM administrator set by the ipaadmin_password variable.
    • The default shell of the IdM users set by the defaultshell variable into /bin/sh.
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook. Specify the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/config/ensure-config-options-are-set.yml

Verification steps

You can verify that the default user shell has been changed by starting a new session in IdM:

  1. Log into ipaserver as IdM administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display the current shell:

    [admin@server /]$ echo "$SHELL"
    /bin/sh

    The logged-in user is using the sh shell.

Additional resources

  • You can see sample Ansible playbooks for configuring global IdM settings and a list of possible variables in the README-config.md Markdown file available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • You can see sample Ansible playbooks for various IdM configuration-related operations in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/config directory.

Chapter 9. Managing user accounts using the command line

This chapter includes basic description of user life cycle in IdM (Identity Management). The following sections show you how to:

  • Create user accounts
  • Activate stage user accounts
  • Preserve user accounts
  • Delete active, stage, or preserved user accounts
  • Restore preserved user accounts

9.1. User life cycle

IdM (Identity Management) supports three user account states:

  • Stage users are not allowed to authenticate. This is an initial state. Some of the user account properties required for active users cannot be set, for example, group membership.
  • Active users are allowed to authenticate. All required user account properties must be set in this state.
  • Preserved users are former active users that are considered inactive and cannot authenticate to IdM. Preserved users retain most of the account properties they had as active users, but they are not part of any user groups.

84 RHEL IdM 0420 life cycle

You can delete user entries permanently from the IdM database.

Important

Deleted user accounts cannot be restored. When you delete a user account, all the information associated with the account is permanently lost.

A new administrator can only be created by a user with administrator rights, such as the default admin user. If you accidentally delete all administrator accounts, the Directory Manager must create a new administrator manually in the Directory Server.

Warning

Do not delete the admin user. As admin is a pre-defined user required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands. If you want to define and use an alternative admin user, disable the pre-defined admin user with ipa user-disable admin after you granted admin permissions to at least one different user.

9.2. Adding users using the command line

You can add user as:

  • Active — user accounts which can be actively used by their users.
  • Stage — users cannot use these accounts. Use it if you want to prepare new user accounts. When users are ready to use their accounts, then you can activate them.

The following procedure describes adding active users to the IdM server with the ipa user-add command.

Similarly, you can create stage user accounts with the ipa stageuser-add command.

Note

IdM automatically assigns a unique user ID (UID) to the new user accounts. You can also do this manually, however, the server does not validate whether the UID number is unique. Due to this, multiple user entries might have the same ID number assigned. Red Hat recommends to prevent having multiple entries with the same UID.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Add user login, user’s first name, last name and optionally, you can also add their email address.

    $ ipa user-add user_login --first=first_name --last=last_name --email=email_address

    IdM supports user names that can be described by the following regular expression:

    [a-zA-Z0-9_.][a-zA-Z0-9_.-]{0,252}[a-zA-Z0-9_.$-]?
    Note

    User names ending with the trailing dollar sign ($) are supported to enable Samba 3.x machine support.

    If you add a user name containing uppercase characters, IdM automatically converts the name to lowercase when saving it. Therefore, IdM always requires to enter user names in lowercase when logging in. Additionally, it is not possible to add user names which differ only in letter casing, such as user and User.

    The default maximum length for user names is 32 characters. To change it, use the ipa config-mod --maxusername command. For example, to increase the maximum user name length to 64 characters:

    $ ipa config-mod --maxusername=64
     Maximum username length: 64
     ...

    The ipa user-add command includes a lot of parameters. To list them all, use the ipa help command:

    $ ipa help user-add

    For details about ipa help command, see What is the IPA help.

You can verify if the new user account is successfully created by listing all IdM user accounts:

$ ipa $ ipa user-find

This command lists all user accounts with details.

9.3. Activating users using the command line

To activate a user account by moving it from stage to active, use the ipa stageuser-activate command.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Activate the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa stageuser-activate user_login
    -------------------------
    Stage user user_login activated
    -------------------------
    ...

You can verify if the new user account is successfully created by listing all IdM user accounts:

$ ipa $ ipa user-find

This command lists all user accounts with details.

9.4. Preserving users using the command line

To preserve a user account, use the ipa user-del or ipa stageuser-del commands.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Preserve the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa user-del --preserve user_login
    --------------------
    Deleted user "user_login"
    --------------------

9.5. Deleting users using the command line

IdM (Identity Management) enables you to delete users permanently. You can delete:

  • Active users with the following command: ipa user-del
  • Stage users with the following command: ipa stageuser-del
  • Preserved users with the following command: ipa user-del

When deleting multiple users, use the --continue option to force the command to continue regardless of errors. A summary of the successful and failed operations is printed to the stdout standard output stream when the command completes.

$ ipa user-del --continue user1 user2 user3

If you do not use --continue, the command proceeds with deleting users until it encounters an error, after which it stops and exits.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Delete the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa user-del user_login
    --------------------
    Deleted user "user_login"
    --------------------

The user account has been permanently deleted from IdM.

9.6. Restoring users using the command line

You can restore a preserved users to:

  • Active users: ipa user-undel
  • Stage users: ipa user-stage

Restoring a user account does not restore all of the account’s previous attributes. For example, the user’s password is not restored and must be set again.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Activate the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa user-undel user_login
    ------------------------------
    Undeleted user account "user_login"
    ------------------------------

    Alternatively, you can restore user accounts as staged:

    $ ipa user-stage user_login
    ------------------------------
    Staged user account "user_login"
    ------------------------------

You can verify if the new user account is successfully created by listing all IdM user accounts:

$ ipa $ ipa user-find

This command lists all user accounts with details.

Chapter 10. Managing user accounts using the IdM Web UI

Identity Management (IdM) provides several stages that can help you to manage various user work life situations:

Creating a user account

Creating a stage user account before an employee starts their career in your company and be prepared in advance for the day when the employee appears in the office and want to activate the account.

You can omit this step and create the active user account directly. The procedure is similar to creating a stage user account.

Activating a user account
Activating the account the first working day of the employee.
Disabling a user account
If the user go to a parental leave for couple of months, you will need to disable the account temporarily.
Enabling a user account
When the user returns, you will need to re-enable the account.
Preserving a user account
If the user wants to leave the company, you will need to delete the account with a possibility to restore it because people can return to the company after some time.
Restoring a user account
Two years later, the user is back and you need to restore the preserved account.
Deleting a user account
If the employee the employee is dismissed you will delete the account without a backup.

10.1. User life cycle

IdM (Identity Management) supports three user account states:

  • Stage users are not allowed to authenticate. This is an initial state. Some of the user account properties required for active users cannot be set, for example, group membership.
  • Active users are allowed to authenticate. All required user account properties must be set in this state.
  • Preserved users are former active users that are considered inactive and cannot authenticate to IdM. Preserved users retain most of the account properties they had as active users, but they are not part of any user groups.

84 RHEL IdM 0420 life cycle

You can delete user entries permanently from the IdM database.

Important

Deleted user accounts cannot be restored. When you delete a user account, all the information associated with the account is permanently lost.

A new administrator can only be created by a user with administrator rights, such as the default admin user. If you accidentally delete all administrator accounts, the Directory Manager must create a new administrator manually in the Directory Server.

Warning

Do not delete the admin user. As admin is a pre-defined user required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands. If you want to define and use an alternative admin user, disable the pre-defined admin user with ipa user-disable admin after you granted admin permissions to at least one different user.

10.2. Adding users in the Web UI

Usually, you need to create a new user account before a new employee starts to work. Such a stage account is not accessible and you need to activate it later.

Note

Alternatively, you can create an active user account directly. For adding active user, follow the procedure below and add the user account in the Active users tab.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Stage Users tab.

    Alternatively, you can add the user account in the Users → Active users, however, you cannot add user groups to the account.

  3. Click the + Add icon.
  4. In the Add stage user dialog box, enter First name and Last name of the new user.
  5. [Optional] In the User login field, add a login name.

    If you leave it empty, the IdM server creates the login name in the following pattern: The first letter of the first name and the surname. The whole login name can have up to 32 characters.

  6. [Optional] In the GID drop down menu, select groups in which the user should be included.
  7. [Optional] In the Password and Verify password fields,
  8. Click on the Add button.

    idm user add stage

At this point, you can see the user account in the Stage Users table.

idm users stage

Note

If you click on the user name, you can edit advanced settings, such as adding a phone number, address, or occupation.

10.3. Activating stage users in the IdM Web UI

A stage user account must be activated before the user can log in to IdM and before the user can be added to an IdM group. This section describes how to activate stage user accounts.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.
  • At least one staged user account in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Stage users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user account you want to activate.
  4. Click on the Activate button.

    idm users stage

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

If the activation is successfull, the IdM Web UI displays a green confirmation that the user has been activated and the user account has been moved to Active users. The account is active and the user can authenticate to the IdM domain and IdM Web UI. The user is prompted to change their password on the first login.

idm users stage activated

Note

At this stage, you can add the active user account to user groups.

10.4. Disabling user accounts in the Web UI

You can disable active user accounts. Disabling a user account deactivates the account, therefore, user accounts cannot be used to authenticate and using IdM services, such as Kerberos, or perform any tasks.

Disabled user accounts still exist within IdM and all of the associated information remains unchanged. Unlike preserved user accounts, disabled user accounts remain in the active state and can be a member of user groups.

Note

After disabling a user account, any existing connections remain valid until the user’s Kerberos TGT and other tickets expire. After the ticket expires, the user will not be able to renew it.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user accounts you want to disable.
  4. Click on the Disable button.

    idm users disable

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

If the disabling procedure has been successful, you can verify in the Status column in the Active users table.

idm users disabled

10.5. Enabling user accounts in the Web UI

With IdM you can enable disabled active user accounts. Enabling a user account activates the disabled account.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.
  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user accounts you want to enable.
  4. Click on the Enable button.

    idm users disable

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

If the change has been successful, you can verify in the Status column in the Active users table.

10.6. Preserving active users in the IdM Web UI

Preserving user accounts enables you to remove accounts from the Active users tab, yet keeping these accounts in IdM.

Preserve the user account if the employee leaves the company. If you want to disable user accounts for a couple of weeks or months (parental leave, for example), disable the account. For details, see Section 10.4, “Disabling user accounts in the Web UI”. The preserved accounts are not active and users cannot use them to access your internal network, however, the account stays in the database with all the data.

You can move the restored accounts back to the active mode.

Note

The list of users in the preserved state can provide a history of past user accounts.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM (Identity Management) Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user accounts you want to preserve.
  4. Click on the Delete button.

    idm users active delete

  5. In the Remove users dialog box, switch the Delete mode radio button to preserve.
  6. Click on the Delete button.

    idm users preserving

As a result, the user account is moved to Preserved users.

If you need to restore preserved users, see the Restoring users in the IdM Web UI.

10.7. Restoring users in the IdM Web UI

IdM (Identity Management) enables you to restore preserved user accounts back in the active state.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Preserved users tab.
  3. Click the check-box at the user accounts you want to restore.
  4. Click on the Restore button.

    idm users preserved restore

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

The IdM Web UI displays a green confirmation and moves the user accounts to the Active users tab.

10.8. Deleting users in the IdM Web UI

Deleting users is an irreversible operation, causing the user accounts to be permanently deleted from the IdM database, including group memberships and passwords. Any external configuration for the user, such as the system account and home directory, is not deleted, but is no longer accessible through IdM.

You can delete:

  • Active users — the IdM Web UI offers you with the options:

  • Stage users — you can just delete stage users permanently.
  • Preserved users — you can delete preserved users permanently.

The following procedure describes deleting active users. Similarly, you can delete user accounts on:

  • The Stage users tab
  • The Preserved users tab

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.

    Alternatively, you can delete the user account in the Users → Stage users or Users → Preserved users.

  3. Click the Delete icon.
  4. In the Remove users dialog box, switch the Delete mode radio button to delete.
  5. Click on the Delete button.

The users accounts have been permanently deleted from IdM.

Chapter 11. Managing user accounts using Ansible playbooks

You can manage users in IdM using Ansible playbooks. This chapter describes using Ansible playbooks for the following operations:

11.1. Ensuring the presence of an IdM user using an Ansible playbook

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of a user in IdM using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • The ansible-freeipa package is installed on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the data of the user whose presence in IdM you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/add-user.yml file. For example, to create user named idm_user and add Password123 as the user password:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle users
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Create user idm_user
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: idm_user
          first: Alice
          last: Acme
          uid: 1000111
          gid: 10011
          phone: "+555123457"
          email: idm_user@acme.com
          passwordexpiration: "2023-01-19 23:59:59"
          password: "Password123"
          update_password: on_create

    You must use the following options to add a user:

    • name: the login name
    • first: the first name string
    • last: the last name string

    For the full list of available user options, see the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/README-user.md Markdown file.

    Note

    If you use the update_password: on_create option, Ansible only creates the user password when it creates the user. If the user is already created with a password, Ansible does not generate a new password.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-IdM-user.yml

Verification steps

  • You can verify if the new user account exists in IdM by using the ipa user-show command:

    1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

      $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
      Password:
      [admin@server /]$
    2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

      $ kinit admin
      Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
    3. Request information about idm_user:

      $ ipa user-show idm_user
        User login: idm_user
        First name: Alice
        Last name: Acme
        ....

    The user named idm_user is present in IdM.

11.2. Ensuring the presence of multiple IdM users using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of multiple users in IdM using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the data of the users whose presence you want to ensure in IdM. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/ensure-users-present.yml file. For example, to create users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, and idm_user_3, and add Password123 as the password of idm_user_1:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle users
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Create user idm_users
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          users:
          - name: idm_user_1
            first: Alice
            last: Acme
            uid: 10001
            gid: 10011
            phone: "+555123457"
            email: idm_user@acme.com
            passwordexpiration: "2023-01-19 23:59:59"
            password: "Password123"
          - name: idm_user_2
            first: Bob
            last: Acme
            uid: 100011
            gid: 10011
          - name: idm_user_3
            first: Eve
            last: Acme
            uid: 1000111
            gid: 10011
    Note

    If you do not specify the update_password: on_create option, Ansible re-sets the user password every time the playbook is run: if the user has changed the password since the last time the playbook was run, Ansible re-sets password.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-users.yml

Verification steps

  • You can verify if the user account exists in IdM by using the ipa user-show command:

    1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

      $ ssh administrator@server.idm.example.com
      Password:
      [admin@server /]$
    2. Display information about idm_user_1:

      $ ipa user-show idm_user_1
        User login: idm_user_1
        First name: Alice
        Last name: Acme
        Password: True
        ....

    The user named idm_user_1 is present in IdM.

11.3. Ensuring the presence of multiple IdM users from a JSON file using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes how you can ensure the presence of multiple users in IdM using an Ansible playbook. The users are stored in a JSON file.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary tasks. Reference the JSON file with the data of the users whose presence you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ensure-users-present-ymlfile.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Ensure users' presence
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Include users.json
        include_vars:
          file: users.json
    
      - name: Users present
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          users: "{{ users }}"
  3. Create the users.json file, and add the IdM users into it. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/users.json file. For example, to create users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, and idm_user_3, and add Password123 as the password of idm_user_1:

    {
      "users": [
       {
        "name": "idm_user_1",
        "first": "Alice",
        "last": "Acme",
        "password": "Password123"
       },
       {
        "name": "idm_user_2",
        "first": "Bob",
        "last": "Acme"
       },
       {
        "name": "idm_user_3",
        "first": "Eve",
        "last": "Acme"
       }
      ]
    }
  4. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-users-present-jsonfile.yml

Verification steps

  • You can verify if the user accounts are present in IdM using the ipa user-show command:

    1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

      $ ssh administrator@server.idm.example.com
      Password:
      [admin@server /]$
    2. Display information about idm_user_1:

      $ ipa user-show idm_user_1
        User login: idm_user_1
        First name: Alice
        Last name: Acme
        Password: True
        ....

    The user named idm_user_1 is present in IdM.

11.4. Ensuring the absence of users using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes how you can use an Ansible playbook to ensure that specific users are absent from IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the users whose absence from IdM you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/ensure-users-present.yml file. For example, to delete users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, and idm_user_3:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle users
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Delete users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, idm_user_3
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          users:
          - name: idm_user_1
          - name: idm_user_2
          - name: idm_user_3
          state: absent
  3. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/delete-users.yml

Verification steps

You can verify that the user accounts do not exist in IdM by using the ipa user-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh administrator@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request information about idm_user_1:

    $ ipa user-show idm_user_1
    ipa: ERROR: idm_user_1: user not found

    The user named idm_user_1 does not exist in IdM.

Additional resources

  • You can see sample Ansible playbooks for other IdM user-related actions such as preserving, deleting, enabling, disabling, unlocking and undeleting users in the README-user.md Markdown file available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory. The file also contains the definitions of ipauser variables.
  • You can also see sample Ansible playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user directory.

Chapter 12. Managing user groups in IdM CLI

This chapter introduces user groups management using the IdM CLI.

A user group is a set of users with common privileges, password policies, and other characteristics.

A user group in Identity Management (IdM) can include:

  • IdM users
  • other IdM user groups
  • external users, which are users that exist outside of IdM

12.1. The different group types in IdM

IdM supports the following types of groups:

POSIX groups (the default)

POSIX groups support Linux POSIX attributes for their members. Note that groups that interact with Active Directory cannot use POSIX attributes.

POSIX attributes identify users as separate entities. Examples of POSIX attributes relevant to users include uidNumber, a user number (UID), and gidNumber, a group number (GID).

Non-POSIX groups

Non-POSIX groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

All members of this type of group must belong to the IdM domain.

External groups

Use external groups to add group members that exist in an identity store outside of the IdM domain, such as:

  • A local system
  • An Active Directory domain
  • A directory service

External groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

Table 12.1. User groups created by default

Group nameDefault group members

ipausers

All IdM users

admins

Users with administrative privileges, including the default admin user

editors

This is a legacy group that no longer has any special privileges

trust admins

Users with privileges to manage the Active Directory trusts

When you add a user to a user group, the user gains the privileges and policies associated with the group. For example, to grant administrative privileges to a user, add the user to the admins group.

Warning

Do not delete the admins group. As admins is a pre-defined group required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands.

In addition, IdM creates user private groups by default whenever a new user is created in IdM. For more information about private groups, see Adding users without a private group.

12.2. Direct and indirect group members

User group attributes in IdM apply to both direct and indirect members: when group B is a member of group A, all users in group B are considered indirect members of group A.

For example, in the following diagram:

  • User 1 and User 2 are direct members of group A.
  • User 3, User 4, and User 5 are indirect members of group A.

Figure 12.1. Direct and Indirect Group Membership

84 RHEL IdM 0420 user group

If you set a password policy for user group A, the policy also applies to all users in user group B.

12.3. Adding a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to add a user group using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Add a user group by using the ipa group-add group_name command. For example, to create group_a:

    $ ipa group-add group_a
    ---------------------
    Added group "group_a"
    ---------------------
      Group name: group_a
      GID: 1133400009

    By default, ipa group-add adds a POSIX user group. To specify a different group type, add options to ipa group-add:

    You can specify a custom GID when adding a user group by using the --gid=custom_GID option. If you do this, be careful to avoid ID conflicts. If you do not specify a custom GID, IdM automatically assigns a GID from the available ID range.

12.4. Searching for user groups using IdM CLI

This section describes how to search for existing user groups using IdM CLI.

Procedure

  • Display all user groups by using the ipa group-find command. To specify a group type, add options to ipa group-find:

    • Display all POSIX groups using the ipa group-find --posix command.
    • Display all non-POSIX groups using the ipa group-find --nonposix command.
    • Display all external groups using the ipa group-find --external command.

      For more information on different group types, see The different group types in IdM.

12.5. Deleting a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to delete a user group using IdM CLI. Note that deleting a group does not delete the group members from IdM.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Delete a user group by using the ipa group-del group_name command. For example, to delete group_a:

    $ ipa group-del group_a
    --------------------------
    Deleted group "group_a"
    --------------------------

12.6. Adding a member to a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to add a member to a user group using IdM CLI. You can add both users and user groups as members of a user group. For more information, see The different group types in IdM and Direct and indirect group members.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Add a member to a user group by using the ipa group-add-member command.

    Specify the type of member using these options:

    • --users adds an IdM user
    • --external adds a user that exists outside the IdM domain, in the format of DOMAIN\user_name or user_name@domain
    • --groups adds an IdM user group

    For example, to add group_b as a member of group_a:

    $ ipa group-add-member group_a --groups=group_b
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Member users: user_a
    Member groups: group_b
    Indirect Member users: user_b
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

    Members of group_b are now indirect members of group_a.

Important

When adding a group as a member of another group, do not create recursive groups. For example, if Group A is a member of Group B, do not add Group B as a member of Group A. Recursive groups can cause unpredictable behavior.

Note

After you add a member to a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment. This is because when any given host resolves users, groups and netgroups, the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) first looks into its cache and performs server lookups only for missing or expired records.

12.7. Adding users without a user private group

By default, IdM creates user private groups (UPGs) whenever a new user is created in IdM. UPGs are a specific group type:

  • The UPG has the same name as the newly created user.
  • The user is the only member of the UPG. The UPG cannot contain any other members.
  • The GID of the private group matches the UID of the user.

However, it is possible to add users without creating a UPG.

12.7.1. Users without a user private group

If a NIS group or another system group already uses the GID that would be assigned to a user private group, it is necessary to avoid creating a UPG.

You can do this in two ways:

In both cases, IdM will require specifying a GID when adding new users, otherwise the operation will fail. This is because IdM requires a GID for the new user, but the default user group ipausers is a non-POSIX group and therefore does not have an associated GID. The GID you specify does not have to correspond to an already existing group.

Note

Specifying the GID does not create a new group. It only sets the GID attribute for the new user, because the attribute is required by IdM.

12.7.2. Adding a user without a user private group when private groups are globally enabled

You can add a user without creating a user private group (UPG) even when UPGs are enabled on the system. This requires manually setting a GID for the new user. For details on why this is needed, see Section 12.7.1, “Users without a user private group”.

Procedure

  • To prevent IdM from creating a UPG, add the --noprivate option to the ipa user-add command.

    Note that for the command to succeed, you must specify a custom GID. For example, to add a new user with GID 10000:

    $ ipa user-add jsmith --first=John --last=Smith --noprivate --gid 10000

12.7.3. Disabling user private groups globally for all users

You can disable user private groups (UPGs) globally. This prevents the creation of UPGs for all new users. Existing users are unaffected by this change.

Procedure

  1. Obtain administrator privileges:

    $ kinit admin
  2. IdM uses the Directory Server Managed Entries Plug-in to manage UPGs. List the instances of the plug-in:

    $ ipa-managed-entries --list
  3. To ensure IdM does not create UPGs, disable the plug-in instance responsible for managing user private groups:

    $ ipa-managed-entries -e "UPG Definition" disable
    Disabling Plugin
    Note

    To re-enable the UPG Definition instance later, use the ipa-managed-entries -e "UPG Definition" enable command.

  4. Restart Directory Server to load the new configuration.

    $ sudo systemctl restart dirsrv.target

    To add a user after UPGs have been disabled, you need to specify a GID. For more information, see Adding a user when user private groups are globally disabled

Verification steps

  • To check if UPGs are globally disabled, use the disable command again:

    $ ipa-managed-entries -e "UPG Definition" disable
    Plugin already disabled

12.7.4. Adding a user when user private groups are globally disabled

When user private groups (UPGs) are disabled globally, IdM does not assign a GID to a new user automatically. To successfully add a user, you must assign a GID manually or by using an automember rule. For details on why this is required, see Section 12.7.1, “Users without a user private group”.

Prerequisities

Procedure

  • To make sure adding a new user succeeds when creating UPGs is disabled, choose one of the following:

    • Specify a custom GID when adding a new user. The GID does not have to correspond to an already existing user group.

      For example, when adding a user from the command line, add the --gid option to the ipa user-add command.

    • Use an automember rule to add the user to an existing group with a GID.

12.8. Adding users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the IdM CLI

This section describes how to add users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the IdM CLI. Member managers can add users or groups to IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You must be logged in as the administrator. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • You must have the name of the user or group you are adding as member managers and the name of the group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  • Add a user as a member manager to an IdM user group by using the ipa group-add-member-manager command.

    For example, to add the user test as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-add-member-manager group_a --users=test
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by users: test
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

    User test can now manage members of group_a.

  • Add a group as a member manager to an IdM user group by using the ipa group-add-member-manager command.

    For example, to add the group group_admins as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-add-member-manager group_a --groups=group_admins
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by groups: group_admins
    Membership managed by users: test
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

    Group group_admins can now manage members of group_a.

Note

After you add a member manager to a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Using the ipa group-show command to verify the user and group were added as member managers.

    $ ipa group-show group_a
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by groups: group_admins
    Membership managed by users: test

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-add-member-manager --help for more details.

12.9. Viewing group members using IdM CLI

This section describes how to view members of a group using IdM CLI. You can view both direct and indirect group members. For more information, see Direct and indirect group members.

Procedure:

  • To list members of a group, use the ipa group-show group_name command. For example:

    $ ipa group-show group_a
      ...
      Member users: user_a
      Member groups: group_b
      Indirect Member users: user_b
    Note

    The list of indirect members does not include external users from trusted Active Directory domains. The Active Directory trust user objects are not visible in the Identity Management interface because they do not exist as LDAP objects within Identity Management.

12.10. Removing a member from a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to remove a member from a user group using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Optional. Use the ipa group-show command to confirm that the group includes the member you want to remove.
  2. Remove a member from a user group by using the ipa group-remove-member command.

    Specify members to remove using these options:

    • --users removes an IdM user
    • --external removes a user that exists outside the IdM domain, in the format of DOMAIN\user_name or user_name@domain
    • --groups removes an IdM user group

    For example, to remove user1, user2, and group1 from a group called group_name:

    $ ipa group-remove-member group_name --users=user1 --users=user2 --groups=group1

12.11. Removing users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the IdM CLI

This section describes how to remove users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the IdM CLI. Member managers can remove users or groups from IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You must be logged in as the administrator. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager user or group you are removing and the name of the group they are managing.

Procedure

  • Remove a user as a member manager of an IdM user group by using the ipa group-remove-member-manager command.

    For example, to remove the user test as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-remove-member-manager group_a --users=test
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by groups: group_admins
    ---------------------------
    Number of members removed 1
    ---------------------------

    User test can no longer manage members of group_a.

  • Remove a group as a member manager of an IdM user group by using the ipa group-remove-member-manager command.

    For example, to remove the group group_admins as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-remove-member-manager group_a --groups=group_admins
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    ---------------------------
    Number of members removed 1
    ---------------------------

    Group group_admins can no longer manage members of group_a.

Note

After you remove a member manager from a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Using the ipa group-show command to verify the user and group were removed as member managers.

    $ ipa group-show group_a
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-remove-member-manager --help for more details.

Chapter 13. Managing user groups in IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces user groups management using the IdM web UI.

A user group is a set of users with common privileges, password policies, and other characteristics.

A user group in Identity Management (IdM) can include:

  • IdM users
  • other IdM user groups
  • external users, which are users that exist outside of IdM

13.1. The different group types in IdM

IdM supports the following types of groups:

POSIX groups (the default)

POSIX groups support Linux POSIX attributes for their members. Note that groups that interact with Active Directory cannot use POSIX attributes.

POSIX attributes identify users as separate entities. Examples of POSIX attributes relevant to users include uidNumber, a user number (UID), and gidNumber, a group number (GID).

Non-POSIX groups

Non-POSIX groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

All members of this type of group must belong to the IdM domain.

External groups

Use external groups to add group members that exist in an identity store outside of the IdM domain, such as:

  • A local system
  • An Active Directory domain
  • A directory service

External groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

Table 13.1. User groups created by default

Group nameDefault group members

ipausers

All IdM users

admins

Users with administrative privileges, including the default admin user

editors

This is a legacy group that no longer has any special privileges

trust admins

Users with privileges to manage the Active Directory trusts

When you add a user to a user group, the user gains the privileges and policies associated with the group. For example, to grant administrative privileges to a user, add the user to the admins group.

Warning

Do not delete the admins group. As admins is a pre-defined group required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands.

In addition, IdM creates user private groups by default whenever a new user is created in IdM. For more information about private groups, see Adding users without a private group.

13.2. Direct and indirect group members

User group attributes in IdM apply to both direct and indirect members: when group B is a member of group A, all users in group B are considered indirect members of group A.

For example, in the following diagram:

  • User 1 and User 2 are direct members of group A.
  • User 3, User 4, and User 5 are indirect members of group A.

Figure 13.1. Direct and Indirect Group Membership

84 RHEL IdM 0420 user group

If you set a password policy for user group A, the policy also applies to all users in user group B.

13.3. Adding a user group using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to add a user group using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups, and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click Add to start adding the group.
  3. Fill out the information about the group. For more information about user group types, see The different group types in IdM.

    You can specify a custom GID for the group. If you do this, be careful to avoid ID conflicts. If you do not specify a custom GID, IdM automatically assigns a GID from the available ID range.

    user group add dialog
  4. Click Add to confirm.

13.4. Deleting a user group using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to delete a user group using the IdM Web UI. Note that deleting a group does not delete the group members from IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups.
  2. Select the group to delete.
  3. Click Delete.
  4. Click Delete to confirm.

13.5. Adding a member to a user group using IdM Web UI

You can add both users and user groups as members of a user group. For more information, see The different group types in IdM and Direct and indirect group members.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of group member you want to add: Users, User Groups, or External.

    groups add member updated
  4. Click Add.
  5. Select the check box next to one or more members you want to add.
  6. Click the rightward arrow to move the selected members to the group.

    groups add member dialog
  7. Click Add to confirm.

13.6. Adding users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the Web UI

This section describes how to add users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the Web UI. Member managers can add users or groups to IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must have the name of the user or group you are adding as member managers and the name of the group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of group member manager you want to add: Users or User Groups.

    groups add member manager
  4. Click Add.
  5. Select the check box next to one or more members you want to add.
  6. Click the rightward arrow to move the selected members to the group.

    groups add member managers users
  7. Click Add to confirm.
Note

After you add a member manager to a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Verify the newly added user or user group has been added to the member manager list of users or user groups:

    groups member manager added

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-add-member-manager --help for more information.

13.7. Viewing group members using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to view members of a group using the IdM Web UI. You can view both direct and indirect group members. For more information, see Direct and indirect group members.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Select Identity → Groups.
  2. Select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  3. Click the name of the group you want to view.
  4. Switch between Direct Membership and Indirect Membership.

    groups menu clean

13.8. Removing a member from a user group using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to remove a member from a user group using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of group member you want to remove: Users, User Groups, or External.

    groups add member updated
  4. Select the check box next to the member you want to remove.
  5. Click Delete.
  6. Click Delete to confirm.

13.9. Removing users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the Web UI

This section describes how to remove users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the Web UI. Member managers can remove users or groups from IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager user or group you are removing and the name of the group they are managing.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of member manager you want to remove: Users or User Groups.

    groups add member manager
  4. Select the check box next to the member manager you want to remove.
  5. Click Delete.
  6. Click Delete to confirm.
Note

After you remove a member manager from a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Verify the user or user group has been removed from the member manager list of users or user groups:

    groups member manager removed

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-add-member-manager --help for more details.

Chapter 14. Managing User Groups using Ansible Playbooks

This section introduces user group management using Ansible playbooks, including the following:

14.1. Ensuring the presence of IdM groups and group members using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of IdM groups and group members - both users and user groups - using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary user and group information:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle groups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Create group ops with gid 1234
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: ops
          gidnumber: 1234
    
      - name: Create group sysops
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: sysops
          user:
          - idm_user
    
      - name: Create group appops
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: appops
    
      - name: Add group members sysops and appops to group ops
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: ops
          group:
          - sysops
          - appops
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-group-members.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the ops group contains sysops and appops as direct members and idm_user as an indirect member by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about ops:

    ipaserver]$ ipa group-show ops
      Group name: ops
      GID: 1234
      Member groups: sysops, appops
      Indirect Member users: idm_user

    The appops and sysops groups - the latter including the idm_user user - exist in IdM.

Additional resources

  • For more information about ensuring the presence of user groups using Ansible, see the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/README-group.md Markdown file.

14.2. Ensuring the presence of member managers in IdM user groups using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of IdM member managers - both users and user groups - using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.
  • You must have the name of the user or group you are adding as member managers and the name of the group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary user and group member management information:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle membership management
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure user test is present for group_a
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: group_a
          membermanager_user: test
    
      - name: Ensure group_admins is present for group_a
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: group_a
          membermanager_group: group_admins
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-member-managers-user-groups.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the group_a group contains test as a member manager and group_admins is a member manager of group_a by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about managergroup1:

    ipaserver]$ ipa group-show group_a
      Group name: group_a
      GID: 1133400009
      Membership managed by groups: group_admins
      Membership managed by users: test

Additional resources

  • See ipa host-add-member-manager --help.
  • See the ipa man page.

14.3. Ensuring the absence of member managers in IdM user groups using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the absence of IdM member managers - both users and user groups - using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager user or group you are removing and the name of the group they are managing.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary user and group member management information:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle membership management
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure member manager user and group members are absent for group_a
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: group_a
          membermanager_user: test
          membermanager_group: group_admins
          action: member
          state: absent
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-member-managers-are-absent.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the group_a group does not contain test as a member manager and group_admins as a member manager of group_a by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about group_a:

    ipaserver]$ ipa group-show group_a
      Group name: group_a
      GID: 1133400009

Additional resources

  • See ipa host-remove-member-manager --help.
  • See the ipa man page.

Chapter 15. Automating group membership using IdM CLI

Using automatic group membership allows you to assign users and hosts to groups automatically based on their attributes. For example, you can:

  • Divide employees' user entries into groups based on the employees' manager, location, or any other attribute.
  • Divide hosts based on their class, location, or any other attribute.
  • Add all users or all hosts to a single global group.

This chapter covers the following topics:

15.1. Benefits of automatic group membership

Using automatic membership for users allows you to:

  • Reduce the overhead of manually managing group memberships

    You no longer have to assign every user and host to groups manually.

  • Improve consistency in user and host management

    Users and hosts are assigned to groups based on strictly defined and automatically evaluated criteria.

  • Simplify the management of group-based settings

    Various settings are defined for groups and then applied to individual group members, for example sudo rules, automount, or access control. Adding users and hosts to groups automatically makes managing these settings easier.

15.2. Automember rules

When configuring automatic group membership, the administrator defines automember rules. An automember rule applies to a specific user or host target group. It cannot apply to more than one group at a time.

After creating a rule, the administrator adds conditions to it. These specify which users or hosts get included or excluded from the target group:

  • Inclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an inclusive condition, it will be included in the target group.

  • Exclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an exclusive condition, it will not be included in the target group.

The conditions are specified as regular expressions in the Perl-compatible regular expressions (PCRE) format. For more information on PCRE, see the pcresyntax(3) man page.

Note

IdM evaluates exclusive conditions before inclusive conditions. In case of a conflict, exclusive conditions take precedence over inclusive conditions.

An automember rule applies to every entry created in the future. These entries will be automatically added to the specified target group. If an entry meets the conditions specified in multiple automember rules, it will be added to all the corresponding groups.

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM CLI.

15.3. Adding an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes adding an automember rule using the IdM CLI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

After adding an automember rule, you can add conditions to it using the procedure described in Adding a condition to an automember rule.

Note

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-add command to add an automember rule.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the target group name.
    • Grouping Type. This specifies whether the rule targets a user group or a host group. To target a user group, enter group. To target a host group, enter hostgroup.

    For example, to add an automember rule for a user group named user_group:

    $ ipa automember-add
    Automember Rule: user_group
    Grouping Type: group
    --------------------------------
    Added automember rule "user_group"
    --------------------------------
        Automember Rule: user_group

Verification steps

15.4. Adding a condition to an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to add a condition to an automember rule using the IdM CLI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Define one or more inclusive or exclusive conditions using the ipa automember-add-condition command.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the target rule name. See Automember rules for details.
    • Attribute Key. This specifies the entry attribute to which the filter will apply. For example, uid for users.
    • Grouping Type. This specifies whether the rule targets a user group or a host group. To target a user group, enter group. To target a host group, enter hostgroup.
    • Inclusive regex and Exclusive regex. These specify one or more conditions as regular expressions. If you only want to specify one condition, press Enter when prompted for the other.

    For example, the following condition targets all users with any value (.*) in their user login attribute (uid).

    $ ipa automember-add-condition
    Automember Rule: user_group
    Attribute Key: uid
    Grouping Type: group
    [Inclusive Regex]: .*
    [Exclusive Regex]:
    ----------------------------------
    Added condition(s) to "user_group"
    ----------------------------------
      Automember Rule: user_group
      Inclusive Regex: uid=.*
    ----------------------------
    Number of conditions added 1
    ----------------------------

    As another example, you can use an automembership rule to target all Windows users synchronized from Active Directory (AD). To achieve this, create a condition that that targets all users with ntUser in their objectClass attribute, which is shared by all AD users:

    $ ipa automember-add-condition
    Automember Rule: ad_users
    Attribute Key: objectclass
    Grouping Type: group
    [Inclusive Regex]: ntUser
    [Exclusive Regex]:
    -------------------------------------
    Added condition(s) to "ad_users"
    -------------------------------------
      Automember Rule: ad_users
      Inclusive Regex: objectclass=ntUser
    ----------------------------
    Number of conditions added 1
    ----------------------------

Verification steps

15.5. Viewing existing automember rules using IdM CLI

This section describes how to view existing automember rules using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-find command.
  2. When prompted, specify the Grouping type:

    • To target a user group, enter group.
    • To target a host group, enter hostgroup.

      For example:

    $ ipa automember-find
    Grouping Type: group
    ---------------
    1 rules matched
    ---------------
      Automember Rule: user_group
      Inclusive Regex: uid=.*
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

15.6. Deleting an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to delete an automember rule using the IdM CLI.

Deleting an automember rule also deletes all conditions associated with the rule. To remove only specific conditions from a rule, see Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-del command.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the rule you want to delete.
    • Grouping rule. This specifies whether the rule you want to delete is for a user group or a host group. Enter group or hostgroup.

15.7. Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to remove a specific condition from an automember rule.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-remove-condition command.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the name of the rule from which you want to remove a condition.
    • Attribute Key. This is the target entry attribute. For example, uid for users.
    • Grouping Type. This specifies whether the condition you want to delete is for a user group or a host group. Enter group or hostgroup.
    • Inclusive regex and Exclusive regex. These specify the conditions you want to remove. If you only want to specify one condition, press Enter when prompted for the other.

      For example:

    $ ipa automember-remove-condition
    Automember Rule: user_group
    Attribute Key: uid
    Grouping Type: group
    [Inclusive Regex]: .*
    [Exclusive Regex]:
    -----------------------------------
    Removed condition(s) from "user_group"
    -----------------------------------
      Automember Rule: user_group
    ------------------------------
    Number of conditions removed 1
    ------------------------------

15.8. Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM CLI

Automember rules apply automatically to user and host entries created after the rules were added. They are not applied retroactively to entries that existed before the rules were added.

To apply automember rules to previously added entries, you have to manually rebuild automatic membership. Rebuilding automatic membership re-evaluates all existing automember rules and applies them either to all user or hosts entries, or to specific entries.

Note

Rebuilding automatic membership does not remove user or host entries from groups, even if the entries no longer match the group’s inclusive conditions. To remove them manually, see Removing a member from a user group using IdM CLI or Removing IdM host group members using the CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • To rebuild automatic membership, enter the ipa automember-rebuild command. Use the following options to specify the entries to target:

    • To rebuild automatic membership for all users, use the --type=group option:

      $ ipa automember-rebuild --type=group
      --------------------------------------------------------
      Automember rebuild task finished. Processed (9) entries.
      --------------------------------------------------------
    • To rebuild automatic membership for all hosts, use the --type=hostgroup option.
    • To rebuild automatic membership for a specified user or users, use the --users=target_user option:

      $ ipa automember-rebuild --users=target_user1 --users=target_user2
      --------------------------------------------------------
      Automember rebuild task finished. Processed (2) entries.
      --------------------------------------------------------
    • To rebuild automatic membership for a specified host or hosts, use the --hosts=client.idm.example.com option.

15.9. Configuring a default automember group using IdM CLI

When you configure a default automember group, new user or host entries that do not match any automember rule are automatically added to this default group.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-default-group-set command to configure a default automember group.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Default (fallback) Group, which specifies the target group name.
    • Grouping Type, which specifies whether the target is a user group or a host group. To target a user group, enter group. To target a host group, enter hostgroup.

      For example:

      $ ipa automember-default-group-set
      Default (fallback) Group: default_user_group
      Grouping Type: group
      ---------------------------------------------------
      Set default (fallback) group for automember "default_user_group"
      ---------------------------------------------------
        Default (fallback) Group: cn=default_user_group,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=example,dc=com
    Note

    To remove the current default automember group, enter the ipa automember-default-group-remove command.

Verification steps

  • To verify that the group is set correctly, enter the ipa automember-default-group-show command. The command displays the current default automember group. For example:

    $ ipa automember-default-group-show
    Grouping Type: group
      Default (fallback) Group: cn=default_user_group,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=example,dc=com

Chapter 16. Automating group membership using IdM Web UI

Using automatic group membership enables you to assign users and hosts to groups automatically based on their attributes. For example, you can:

  • Divide employees' user entries into groups based on the employees' manager, location, or any other attribute.
  • Divide hosts based on their class, location, or any other attribute.
  • Add all users or all hosts to a single global group.

This chapter covers the following topics:

16.1. Benefits of automatic group membership

Using automatic membership for users allows you to:

  • Reduce the overhead of manually managing group memberships

    You no longer have to assign every user and host to groups manually.

  • Improve consistency in user and host management

    Users and hosts are assigned to groups based on strictly defined and automatically evaluated criteria.

  • Simplify the management of group-based settings

    Various settings are defined for groups and then applied to individual group members, for example sudo rules, automount, or access control. Adding users and hosts to groups automatically makes managing these settings easier.

16.2. Automember rules

When configuring automatic group membership, the administrator defines automember rules. An automember rule applies to a specific user or host target group. It cannot apply to more than one group at a time.

After creating a rule, the administrator adds conditions to it. These specify which users or hosts get included or excluded from the target group:

  • Inclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an inclusive condition, it will be included in the target group.

  • Exclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an exclusive condition, it will not be included in the target group.

The conditions are specified as regular expressions in the Perl-compatible regular expressions (PCRE) format. For more information on PCRE, see the pcresyntax(3) man page.

Note

IdM evaluates exclusive conditions before inclusive conditions. In case of a conflict, exclusive conditions take precedence over inclusive conditions.

An automember rule applies to every entry created in the future. These entries will be automatically added to the specified target group. If an entry meets the conditions specified in multiple automember rules, it will be added to all the corresponding groups.

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM Web UI.

16.3. Adding an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes adding an automember rule using the IdM Web UI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

Note

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target group of the new rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules.
  2. Click Add.
  3. In the Automember rule field, select the group to which the rule will apply. This is the target group name.

    automember rule add
  4. Click Add to confirm.
  5. Optional: You can add conditions to the new rule using the procedure described in Adding a condition to an automember rule using IdM Web UI.

16.4. Adding a condition to an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to add a condition to an automember rule using the IdM Web UI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules.
  2. Click on the rule to which you want to add a condition.
  3. In the Inclusive or Exclusive sections, click Add.

    automember condition add
  4. In the Attribute field, select the required attribute, for example uid.
  5. In the Expression field, define a regular expression.
  6. Click Add.

    For example, the following condition targets all users with any value (.*) in their user ID (uid) attribute.

    automember add

16.5. Viewing existing automember rules and conditions using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to view existing automember rules and conditions using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules to view the respective automember rules.
  2. Optional: Click on a rule to see the conditions for that rule in the Inclusive or Exclusive sections.

    automember conditions

16.6. Deleting an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to delete an automember rule using the IdM Web UI.

Deleting an automember rule also deletes all conditions associated with the rule. To remove only specific conditions from a rule, see Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules to view the respective automember rules.
  2. Select the check box next to the rule you want to remove.
  3. Click Delete.

    automember rule delete
  4. Click Delete to confirm.

16.7. Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to remove a specific condition from an automember rule using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules to view the respective automember rules.
  2. Click on a rule to see the conditions for that rule in the Inclusive or Exclusive sections.
  3. Select the check box next to the conditions you want to remove.
  4. Click Delete.

    automember condition remove
  5. Click Delete to confirm.

16.8. Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM Web UI

Automember rules apply automatically to user and host entries created after the rules were added. They are not applied retroactively to entries that existed before the rules were added.

To apply automember rules to previously added entries, you have to manually rebuild automatic membership. Rebuilding automatic membership re-evaluates all existing automember rules and applies them either to all user or hosts entries, or to specific entries.

Note

Rebuilding automatic membership does not remove user or host entries from groups, even if the entries no longer match the group’s inclusive conditions. To remove them manually, see Removing a member from a user group using IdM Web UI or Removing host group members in the IdM Web UI.

16.8.1. Rebuilding automatic membership for all users or hosts

This section describes how to rebuild automatic membership for all user or host entries.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Select IdentityUsers or Hosts.
  2. Click ActionsRebuild auto membership.

    automember rebuild

16.8.2. Rebuilding automatic membership for a single user or host only

This section describes how to rebuild automatic membership for a specific user or host entry.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Select IdentityUsers or Hosts.
  2. Click on the required user or host name.
  3. Click ActionsRebuild auto membership.

    automember rebuild single

16.9. Configuring a default user group using IdM Web UI

When you configure a default user group, new user entries that do not match any automember rule are automatically added to this default group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target user group you want to set as default exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select User group rules.
  2. In the Default user group field, select the group you want to set as the default user group.

    Setting a default user group

16.10. Configuring a default host group using IdM Web UI

When you configure a default host group, new host entries that do not match any automember rule are automatically added to this default group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target host group you want to set as default exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select Host group rules.
  2. In the Default host group field, select the group you want to set as the default host group.

    Setting a default host group

Chapter 17. Managing self-service rules in IdM using the CLI

This chapter introduces self-service rules in Identity Management (IdM) and describes how to create and edit self-service access rules in the command-line interface (CLI).

17.1. Self-service access control in IdM

Self-service access control rules define which operations an IdM entity can perform on its IdM Directory Server entry: for example, IdM users have the ability to update their own passwords.

This method of control allows an authenticated IdM entity to edit specific attributes within its LDAP entry, but does not allow add or delete operations on the entire entry.

Warning

Exercise care when working with self-service access control rules: configuring access control rules improperly can inadvertently elevate an entity’s privileges.

17.2. Creating self-service rules using the CLI

This procedure describes creating self-service access rules in IdM using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • To add a self-service rule, use the ipa selfservice-add command and specify the following two options:

    --permissions
    sets the read and write permissions the Access Control Instruction (ACI) grants.
    --attrs
    sets the complete list of attributes to which this ACI grants permission.

For example, to create a self-service rule allowing users to modify their own name details:

$ ipa selfservice-add "Users can manage their own name details" --permissions=write --attrs=givenname --attrs=displayname --attrs=title --attrs=initials
-----------------------------------------------------------
Added selfservice "Users can manage their own name details"
-----------------------------------------------------------
    Self-service name: Users can manage their own name details
    Permissions: write
    Attributes: givenname, displayname, title, initials

17.3. Editing self-service rules using the CLI

This procedure describes editing self-service access rules in IdM using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Optional: Display existing self-service rules with the ipa selfservice-find command.
  2. Optional: Display details for the self-service rule you want to modify with the ipa selfservice-show command.
  3. Use the ipa selfservice-mod command to edit a self-service rule.

For example:

$ ipa selfservice-mod "Users can manage their own name details" --attrs=givenname --attrs=displayname --attrs=title --attrs=initials --attrs=surname
--------------------------------------------------------------
Modified selfservice "Users can manage their own name details"
--------------------------------------------------------------
Self-service name: Users can manage their own name details
Permissions: write
Attributes: givenname, displayname, title, initials
Important

Using the ipa selfservice-mod command overwrites the previously defined permissions and attributes, so always include the complete list of existing permissions and attributes along with any new ones you want to define.

Verification steps

  • Use the ipa selfservice-show command to display the self-service rule you edited.
$ ipa selfservice-show "Users can manage their own name details"
--------------------------------------------------------------
Self-service name: Users can manage their own name details
Permissions: write
Attributes: givenname, displayname, title, initials

17.4. Deleting self-service rules using the CLI

This procedure describes deleting self-service access rules in IdM using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Use the ipa selfservice-del command to delete a self-service rule.

For example:

$ ipa selfservice-del "Users can manage their own name details"
-----------------------------------------------------------
Deleted selfservice "Users can manage their own name details"
-----------------------------------------------------------

Verification steps

  • Use the ipa selfservice-find command to display all self-service rules. The rule you just deleted should be missing.

Chapter 18. Managing self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces self-service rules in Identity Management (IdM) and describes how to create and edit self-service access rules in the web interface (IdM Web UI).

18.1. Self-service access control in IdM

Self-service access control rules define which operations an IdM entity can perform on its IdM Directory Server entry: for example, IdM users have the ability to update their own passwords.

This method of control allows an authenticated IdM entity to edit specific attributes within its LDAP entry, but does not allow add or delete operations on the entire entry.

Warning

Exercise care when working with self-service access control rules: configuring access control rules improperly can inadvertently elevate an entity’s privileges.

18.2. Creating self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This procedure describes how to create self-service access rules in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Self Service Permissions.
  2. Click Add at the top-right of the list of the self-service access rules:

    Adding a self-service rule

  3. The Add Self Service Permission window opens. Enter the name of the new self-service rule in the Self-service name field. Spaces are allowed:

    Form for adding a self-service rule

  4. Select the check boxes next to the attributes you want users to be able to edit.
  5. Optional: If an attribute you would like to provide access to is not listed, you can add a listing for it:

    1. Click the Add button.
    2. Enter the attribute name in the Attribute text field of the following Add Custom Attribute window.
    3. Click the OK button to add the attribute
    4. Verify that the new attribute is selected
  6. Click the Add button at the bottom of the form to save the new self-service rule.
    Alternatively, you can save and continue editing the self-service rule by clicking the Add and Edit button, or save and add further rules by clicking the Add and Add another button.

18.3. Editing self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This procedure describes how to edit self-service access rules in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Self Service Permissions.
  2. Click on the name of the self-service rule you want to modify.

    Editing an existing self-service rule

  3. The edit page only allows you to edit the list of attributes to you want to add or remove to the self-service rule. Select or deselect the appropriate check boxes.
  4. Click the Save button to save your changes to the self-service rule.

18.4. Deleting self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This procedure describes how to delete self-service access rules in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Self Service Permissions.
  2. Select the check box next to the rule you want to delete, then click on the Delete button on the right of the list.

    Deleting a self-service rule

  3. A dialog opens, click on Delete to confirm.

Chapter 19. Delegating permissions over users using IdM CLI

Delegation is one of the access control methods in IdM, along with self-service rules and role-based access control.

Delegation is similar to roles in that one group of users is assigned permission to manage the entries for another group of users. However, the delegated authority is limited to editing the values of specific attributes; it does not grant the ability to add or remove whole entries or control over unspecified attributes. Also, the groups in delegated authority are existing IdM user groups instead of roles specifically created for access controls.

This chapter covers the following topics:

19.1. Delegation rules

You can delegate permissions over users by creating delegation rules.

Delegation rules allow a specific user group to perform write (edit) operations on specific attributes for users in another user group. This form of access control rule is limited to editing the values of specific attributes; it does not grant the ability to add or remove whole entries or control over unspecified attributes.

Delegation rules use existing user groups in IdM. You can use delegation to, for example, allow the managers user group to manage selected attributes of users in the employees user group.

19.2. Creating a delegation rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to create a delegation rule using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-add command. Specify the following options:

    • --group: the group who is being granted permissions to the entries of users in the user group.
    • --membergroup: the group whose entries can be edited by members of the delegation group.
    • --permissions: whether users will have the right to view the given attributes (read) and add or change the given attributes (write). If you do not specify permissions, only the write permission will be added.
    • --attrs: the attributes which users in the member group are allowed to view or edit.

    For example:

$ ipa delegation-add "basic manager attributes" --permissions=read --permissions=write --attrs=businesscategory --attrs=departmentnumber --attrs=employeetype --attrs=employeenumber --group=managers --membergroup=employees
-------------------------------------------
Added delegation "basic manager attributes"
-------------------------------------------
  Delegation name: basic manager attributes
  Permissions: read, write
  Attributes: businesscategory, departmentnumber, employeetype, employeenumber
  Member user group: employees
  User group: managers

19.3. Viewing existing delegation rules using IdM CLI

This section describes how to view existing delegation rules using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-find command:
$ ipa delegation-find
--------------------
1 delegation matched
--------------------
  Delegation name: basic manager attributes
  Permissions: read, write
  Attributes: businesscategory, departmentnumber, employeenumber, employeetype
  Member user group: employees
  User group: managers
----------------------------
Number of entries returned 1
----------------------------

19.4. Modifying a delegation rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to modify an existing delegation rule using the IdM CLI.

Important

The --attrs option overwrites whatever the previous list of supported attributes was, so always include the complete list of attributes along with any new attributes. This also applies to the --permissions option.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-mod command with the desired changes. For example, to add the displayname attribute to the basic manager attributes example rule:

    $ ipa delegation-mod "basic manager attributes" --attrs=businesscategory --attrs=departmentnumber --attrs=employeetype --attrs=employeenumber --attrs=displayname
    ----------------------------------------------
    Modified delegation "basic manager attributes"
    ----------------------------------------------
      Delegation name: basic manager attributes
      Permissions: read, write
      Attributes: businesscategory, departmentnumber, employeetype, employeenumber, displayname
      Member user group: employees
      User group: managers

19.5. Deleting a delegation rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to delete an existing delegation rule using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-del command.
  • When prompted, enter the name of the delegation rule you want to delete:

    $ ipa delegation-del
    Delegation name: basic manager attributes
    ---------------------------------------------
    Deleted delegation "basic manager attributes"
    ---------------------------------------------

Chapter 20. Delegating permissions over users using IdM WebUI

Delegation is one of the access control methods in IdM, along with self-service rules and role-based access control.

Delegation is similar to roles in that one group of users is assigned permission to manage the entries for another group of users. However, the delegated authority is limited to editing the values of specific attributes; it does not grant the ability to add or remove whole entries or control over unspecified attributes. Also, the groups in delegated authority are existing IdM user groups instead of roles specifically created for access controls.

This chapter covers the following topics:

20.1. Delegation rules

You can delegate permissions over users by creating delegation rules.

Delegation rules allow a specific user group to perform write (edit) operations on specific attributes for users in another user group. This form of access control rule is limited to editing the values of specific attributes; it does not grant the ability to add or remove whole entries or control over unspecified attributes.

Delegation rules use existing user groups in IdM. You can use delegation to, for example, allow the managers user group to manage selected attributes of users in the employees user group.

20.2. Creating a delegation rule using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to create a delegation rule using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.
  2. Click Add.

    delegation list add
  3. In the Add delegation window, do the following:

    1. Name the new delegation rule.
    2. Set the permissions by selecting the check boxes that indicate whether users will have the right to view the given attributes (read) and add or change the given attributes (write).
    3. In the User group drop-down menu, select the group who is being granted permissions to view or edit the entries of users in the member group.
    4. In the Member user group drop-down menu, select the group whose entries can be edited by members of the delegation group.
    5. In the attributes box, select the check boxes by the attributes to which you want to grant permissions.

      delegation add UPDATED
    6. Click the Add button to save the new delegation rule.

20.3. Viewing existing delegation rules using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to view existing delegation rules using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.

    delegation list

20.4. Modifying a delegation rule using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to modify an existing delegation rule using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.

    delegation list
  2. Click on the rule you want to modify.
  3. Make the desired changes:

    • Change the name of the rule.
    • Change granted permissions by selecting the check boxes that indicate whether users will have the right to view the given attributes (read) and add or change the given attributes (write).
    • In the User group drop-down menu, select the group who is being granted permissions to view or edit the entries of users in the member group.
    • In the Member user group drop-down menu, select the group whose entries can be edited by members of the delegation group.
    • In the attributes box, select the check boxes by the attributes to which you want to grant permissions. To remove permissions to an attribute, uncheck the relevant check box.

      delegation modify
    • Click the Save button to save the changes.

20.5. Deleting a delegation rule using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to delete an existing delegation rule using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.
  2. Select the check box next to the rule you want to remove.
  3. Click Delete.

    delegation delete
  4. Click Delete to confirm.

Chapter 21. Managing role-based access controls in IdM using the CLI

This chapter introduces role-based access control in Identity Management (IdM) and describes the following operations in the command-line interface (CLI):

21.1. Role-based access control in IdM

Role-based access control (RBAC) in IdM grants a very different kind of authority to users compared to self-service and delegation access controls.

Role-based access control is composed of three parts:

  • Permissions grant the right to perform a specific task such as adding or deleting users, modifying a group, enabling read-access, etc.
  • Privileges combine permissions, for example all the permissions needed to add a new user.
  • Roles grant a set of privileges to users, user groups, hosts or host groups.

21.1.1. Permissions in IdM

Permissions are the lowest level unit of role-based access control, they define operations together with the LDAP entries to which those operations apply. Comparable to building blocks, permissions can be assigned to as many privileges as needed.
One or more rights define what operations are allowed:

  • write
  • read
  • search
  • compare
  • add
  • delete
  • all

These operations apply to three basic targets:

  • subtree: a domain name (DN); the subtree under this DN
  • target filter: an LDAP filter
  • target: DN with possible wildcards to specify entries

Additionally, the following convenience options set the corresponding attribute(s):

  • type: a type of object (user, group, etc); sets subtree and target filter
  • memberof: members of a group; sets a target filter
  • targetgroup: grants access to modify a specific group (such as granting the rights to manage group membership); sets a target

With IdM permissions, you can control which users have access to which objects and even which attributes of these objects. IdM enables you to allow or block individual attributes or change the entire visibility of a specific IdM function, such as users, groups, or sudo, to all anonymous users, all authenticated users, or just a certain group of privileged users.
For example, the flexibility of this approach to permissions is useful for an administrator who wants to limit access of users or groups only to the specific sections these users or groups need to access and to make the other sections completely hidden to them.

Note

A permission cannot contain other permissions.

21.1.2. Default managed permissions

Managed permissions are permissions that come by default with IdM. They behave like other permissions created by the user, with the following differences:

  • You cannot delete them or modify their name, location, and target attributes.
  • They have three sets of attributes:

    • Default attributes, the user cannot modify them, as they are managed by IdM
    • Included attributes, which are additional attributes added by the user
    • Excluded attributes, which are attributes removed by the user

A managed permission applies to all attributes that appear in the default and included attribute sets but not in the excluded set.

Note

While you cannot delete a managed permission, setting its bind type to permission and removing the managed permission from all privileges effectively disables it.

Names of all managed permissions start with System:, for example System: Add Sudo rule or System: Modify Services. Earlier versions of IdM used a different scheme for default permissions. For example, the user could not delete them and was only able to assign them to privileges. Most of these default permissions have been turned into managed permissions, however, the following permissions still use the previous scheme:

  • Add Automember Rebuild Membership Task
  • Add Configuration Sub-Entries
  • Add Replication Agreements
  • Certificate Remove Hold
  • Get Certificates status from the CA
  • Read DNA Range
  • Modify DNA Range
  • Read PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Modify PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Read Replication Agreements
  • Modify Replication Agreements
  • Remove Replication Agreements
  • Read LDBM Database Configuration
  • Request Certificate
  • Request Certificate ignoring CA ACLs
  • Request Certificates from a different host
  • Retrieve Certificates from the CA
  • Revoke Certificate
  • Write IPA Configuration
Note

If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the command line, the system does not allow you to change the attributes that you cannot modify, the command fails. If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the Web UI, the attributes that you cannot modify are disabled.

21.1.3. Privileges in IdM

A privilege is a group of permissions applicable to a role.
While a permission provides the rights to do a single operation, there are certain IdM tasks that require multiple permissions to succeed. Therefore, a privilege combines the different permissions required to perform a specific task.
For example, adding a user requires the following permissions:

  • Creating a new user entry
  • Resetting a user password
  • Adding the new user to the default IPA users group

Combining these three low-level tasks into a higher level task in the form of a privilege named Add User makes it easier to manage roles. Apart from users and user groups, privileges are also assigned to hosts and host groups, as well as network services. This practice permits a fine-grained control of operations by a set of users on a set of hosts using specific network services.

Note

A privilege may not contain other privileges.

21.1.4. Roles in IdM

A role is a list of privileges that users specified for the role possess.
In effect, permissions grant the ability to perform given low-level tasks (create a user entry, add an entry to a group, etc.), privileges combine one or more of these permissions needed for a higher-level task (such as creating a new user in a given group). Roles gather privileges together as needed: for example, a User Administrator role would be able to add, modify, and delete users.

Important

Roles are used to classify permitted actions. They are not used as a tool to implement privilege separation or to protect from privilege escalation.

Note

Roles can not contain other roles.

21.1.5. Predefined roles in Identity Management

Red Hat Identity Management provides the following range of pre-defined roles:

Table 21.1. Predefined Roles in Identity Management

RolePrivilegeDescription

Helpdesk

Modify Users and Reset passwords, Modify Group membership

Responsible for performing simple user administration tasks

IT Security Specialist

Netgroups Administrators, HBAC Administrator, Sudo Administrator

Responsible for managing security policy such as host-based access controls, sudo rules

IT Specialist

Host Administrators, Host Group Administrators, Service Administrators, Automount Administrators

Responsible for managing hosts

Security Architect

Delegation Administrator, Replication Administrators, Write IPA Configuration, Password Policy Administrator

Responsible for managing the Identity Management environment, creating trusts, creating replication agreements

User Administrator

User Administrators, Group Administrators, Stage User Administrators

Responsible for creating users and groups

21.2. Managing IdM permissions in the CLI

This section describes how to manage Identity Management (IdM) permissions using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create new permission entries with the ipa permission-add command.
    For example, to add a permission named dns admin:

    $ ipa permission-add "dns admin"
  2. Specify the properties of the permission with the following options:

    • --bindtype specifies the bind rule type. This option accepts the all, anonymous, and permission arguments. The permission bindtype means that only the users who are granted this permission via a role can exercise it.
      For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --bindtype=all

      If you do not specify --bindtype, then permission is the default value.

      Note

      It is not possible to add permissions with a non-default bind rule type to privileges. You also cannot set a permission that is already present in a privilege to a non-default bind rule type.

    • --right lists the rights granted by the permission, it replaces the deprecated --permissions option. The available values are add, delete, read, search, compare, write, all.

      You can set multiple attributes by using multiple --right options or with a comma-separated list inside curly braces. For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --right=read --right=write
      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --right={read,write}
      Note

      add and delete are entry-level operations (for example deleting a user, adding a group, etc.) while read, search, compare and write are more attribute-level: you can write to userCertificate but not read userPassword.

    • --attrs gives the list of attributes over which the permission is granted.
      You can set multiple attributes by using multiple --attrs options or by listing the options in a comma-separated list inside curly braces. For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --attrs=description --attrs=automountKey
      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --attrs={description,automountKey}

      The attributes provided with --attrs must exist and be allowed attributes for the given object type, otherwise the command fails with schema syntax errors.

    • --type defines the entry object type to which the permission applies, such as user, host, or service. Each type has its own set of allowed attributes.
      For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "manage service" --right=all --type=service --attrs=krbprincipalkey --attrs=krbprincipalname --attrs=managedby
    • --subtree gives a subtree entry; the filter then targets every entry beneath this subtree entry. Provide an existing subtree entry; --subtree does not accept wildcards or non-existent domain names (DNs). Include a DN within the directory.
      Because IdM uses a simplified, flat directory tree structure, --subtree can be used to target some types of entries, like automount locations, which are containers or parent entries for other configuration. For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "manage automount locations" --subtree="ldap://ldap.example.com:389/cn=automount,dc=example,dc=com" --right=write --attrs=automountmapname --attrs=automountkey --attrs=automountInformation
      Note

      The --type and --subtree options are mutually exclusive: you can see the inclusion of filters for --type as a simplification of --subtree, intending to make life easier for an admin.

    • --filter uses an LDAP filter to identify which entries the permission applies to.
      IdM automatically checks the validity of the given filter. The filter can be any valid LDAP filter, for example:

      $ ipa permission-add "manage Windows groups" --filter="(!(objectclass=posixgroup))" --right=write --attrs=description
    • --memberof sets the target filter to members of the given group after checking that the group exists. For example, to let the users with this permission modify the login shell of members of the engineers group:

      $ ipa permission-add ManageShell --right="write" --type=user --attr=loginshell --memberof=engineers
    • --targetgroup sets target to the specified user group after checking that the group exists. For example, to let those with the permission write the member attribute in the engineers group (so they can add or remove members):

      $ ipa permission-add ManageMembers --right="write" --subtree=cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=example,dc=test --attr=member --targetgroup=engineers
    • Optionally, you can specify a target domain name (DN):

      • --target specifies the DN to apply the permission to. Wildcards are accepted.
      • --targetto specifies the DN subtree where an entry can be moved to.
      • --targetfrom specifies the DN subtree from where an entry can be moved.

21.3. Command options for existing permissions

Use the following variants to modify existing permissions as needed:

  • To edit existing permissions, use the ipa permission-mod command. You can use the same command options as for adding permissions.
  • To find existing permissions, use the ipa permission-find command. You can use the same command options as for adding permissions.
  • To view a specific permission, use the ipa permission-show command.
    The --raw argument shows the raw 389-ds ACI that is generated. For example:

     $ ipa permission-show <permission> --raw
  • The ipa permission-del command deletes a permission completely.

Additional resources

For further details about the ipa permission commands, refer to the ipa man page and the ipa help command.

21.4. Managing IdM privileges in the CLI

This section describes how to manage Identity Management (IdM) privileges using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Add privilege entries using the ipa privilege-add command
    For example, to add a privilege named managing filesystems with a description:

    $ ipa privilege-add "managing filesystems" --desc="for filesystems"
  2. Assign the required permissions to the privilege group with the privilege-add-permission command
    For example, to add the permissions named managing automount and managing ftp services to the managing filesystems privilege:

    $ ipa privilege-add-permission "managing filesystems" --permissions="managing automount" --permissions="managing ftp services"

21.5. Command options for existing privileges

Use the following variants to modify existing privileges as needed:

  • To modify existing privileges, use the ipa privilege-mod command.
  • To find existing privileges, use the ipa privilege-find command.
  • To view a specific privilege, use the ipa privilege-show command.
  • The ipa privilege-remove-permission command removes one or more permissions from a privilege.
  • The ipa privilege-del command deletes a privilege completely.

Additional resources

For further details about the ipa privilege commands, refer to the ipa man page and the ipa help command.

21.6. Managing IdM roles in the CLI

This section describes how to manage Identity Management (IdM) roles using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Add new role entries using the ipa role-add command:

    $ ipa role-add --desc="User Administrator" useradmin
    ------------------------
    Added role "useradmin"
    ------------------------
    Role name: useradmin
    Description: User Administrator
  2. Add the required privileges to the role using the ipa role-add-privilege command:

    $ ipa role-add-privilege --privileges="user administrators" useradmin
    Role name: useradmin
    Description: User Administrator
    Privileges: user administrators
    ----------------------------
    Number of privileges added 1
    ----------------------------
  3. Add the required members to the role using the ipa role-add-member command. Allowed member types are: users, groups, hosts and hostgroups.
    For example, to add the group named useradmins to the previously created useradmin role:

    $ ipa role-add-member --groups=useradmins useradmin
    Role name: useradmin
    Description: User Administrator
    Member groups: useradmins
    Privileges: user administrators
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

21.7. Command options for existing roles

Use the following variants to modify existing roles as needed:

  • To modify existing roles, use the ipa role-mod command.
  • To find existing roles, use the ipa role-find command.
  • To view a specific role, use the ipa role-show command.
  • To remove a member from the role, use the ipa role-remove-member command.
  • The ipa role-remove-privilege command removes one or more privileges from a role.
  • The ipa role-del command deletes a role completely.

Additional resources

For further details about the ipa role commands, refer to the ipa man page and the ipa help command.

Chapter 22. Managing role-based access controls using the IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces role-based access control in Identity Management (IdM) and describes the following operations in the web interface (Web UI):

22.1. Role-based access control in IdM

Role-based access control (RBAC) in IdM grants a very different kind of authority to users compared to self-service and delegation access controls.

Role-based access control is composed of three parts:

  • Permissions grant the right to perform a specific task such as adding or deleting users, modifying a group, enabling read-access, etc.
  • Privileges combine permissions, for example all the permissions needed to add a new user.
  • Roles grant a set of privileges to users, user groups, hosts or host groups.

22.1.1. Permissions in IdM

Permissions are the lowest level unit of role-based access control, they define operations together with the LDAP entries to which those operations apply. Comparable to building blocks, permissions can be assigned to as many privileges as needed.
One or more rights define what operations are allowed:

  • write
  • read
  • search
  • compare
  • add
  • delete
  • all

These operations apply to three basic targets:

  • subtree: a domain name (DN); the subtree under this DN
  • target filter: an LDAP filter
  • target: DN with possible wildcards to specify entries

Additionally, the following convenience options set the corresponding attribute(s):

  • type: a type of object (user, group, etc); sets subtree and target filter
  • memberof: members of a group; sets a target filter
  • targetgroup: grants access to modify a specific group (such as granting the rights to manage group membership); sets a target

With IdM permissions, you can control which users have access to which objects and even which attributes of these objects. IdM enables you to allow or block individual attributes or change the entire visibility of a specific IdM function, such as users, groups, or sudo, to all anonymous users, all authenticated users, or just a certain group of privileged users.
For example, the flexibility of this approach to permissions is useful for an administrator who wants to limit access of users or groups only to the specific sections these users or groups need to access and to make the other sections completely hidden to them.

Note

A permission cannot contain other permissions.

22.1.2. Default managed permissions

Managed permissions are permissions that come by default with IdM. They behave like other permissions created by the user, with the following differences:

  • You cannot delete them or modify their name, location, and target attributes.
  • They have three sets of attributes:

    • Default attributes, the user cannot modify them, as they are managed by IdM
    • Included attributes, which are additional attributes added by the user
    • Excluded attributes, which are attributes removed by the user

A managed permission applies to all attributes that appear in the default and included attribute sets but not in the excluded set.

Note

While you cannot delete a managed permission, setting its bind type to permission and removing the managed permission from all privileges effectively disables it.

Names of all managed permissions start with System:, for example System: Add Sudo rule or System: Modify Services. Earlier versions of IdM used a different scheme for default permissions. For example, the user could not delete them and was only able to assign them to privileges. Most of these default permissions have been turned into managed permissions, however, the following permissions still use the previous scheme:

  • Add Automember Rebuild Membership Task
  • Add Configuration Sub-Entries
  • Add Replication Agreements
  • Certificate Remove Hold
  • Get Certificates status from the CA
  • Read DNA Range
  • Modify DNA Range
  • Read PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Modify PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Read Replication Agreements
  • Modify Replication Agreements
  • Remove Replication Agreements
  • Read LDBM Database Configuration
  • Request Certificate
  • Request Certificate ignoring CA ACLs
  • Request Certificates from a different host
  • Retrieve Certificates from the CA
  • Revoke Certificate
  • Write IPA Configuration
Note

If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the command line, the system does not allow you to change the attributes that you cannot modify, the command fails. If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the Web UI, the attributes that you cannot modify are disabled.

22.1.3. Privileges in IdM

A privilege is a group of permissions applicable to a role.
While a permission provides the rights to do a single operation, there are certain IdM tasks that require multiple permissions to succeed. Therefore, a privilege combines the different permissions required to perform a specific task.
For example, adding a user requires the following permissions:

  • Creating a new user entry
  • Resetting a user password
  • Adding the new user to the default IPA users group

Combining these three low-level tasks into a higher level task in the form of a privilege named Add User makes it easier to manage roles. Apart from users and user groups, privileges are also assigned to hosts and host groups, as well as network services. This practice permits a fine-grained control of operations by a set of users on a set of hosts using specific network services.

Note

A privilege may not contain other privileges.

22.1.4. Roles in IdM

A role is a list of privileges that users specified for the role possess.
In effect, permissions grant the ability to perform given low-level tasks (create a user entry, add an entry to a group, etc.), privileges combine one or more of these permissions needed for a higher-level task (such as creating a new user in a given group). Roles gather privileges together as needed: for example, a User Administrator role would be able to add, modify, and delete users.

Important

Roles are used to classify permitted actions. They are not used as a tool to implement privilege separation or to protect from privilege escalation.

Note

Roles can not contain other roles.

22.1.5. Predefined roles in Identity Management

Red Hat Identity Management provides the following range of pre-defined roles:

Table 22.1. Predefined Roles in Identity Management

RolePrivilegeDescription

Helpdesk

Modify Users and Reset passwords, Modify Group membership

Responsible for performing simple user administration tasks

IT Security Specialist

Netgroups Administrators, HBAC Administrator, Sudo Administrator

Responsible for managing security policy such as host-based access controls, sudo rules

IT Specialist

Host Administrators, Host Group Administrators, Service Administrators, Automount Administrators

Responsible for managing hosts

Security Architect

Delegation Administrator, Replication Administrators, Write IPA Configuration, Password Policy Administrator

Responsible for managing the Identity Management environment, creating trusts, creating replication agreements

User Administrator

User Administrators, Group Administrators, Stage User Administrators

Responsible for creating users and groups

22.2. Managing permissions in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to manage permissions in Identity Management (IdM) using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. To add a new permission, open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Permissions:

    Permissions task

  2. The list of permissions opens: Click the Add button at the top of the list of the permissions:

    Adding a new permission

  3. The Add Permission form opens. Specify the name of the new permission and define its properties accordingly:

    Form for adding a permission

  4. Select the appropriate Bind rule type:

    • permission is the default permission type, granting access through privileges and roles
    • all specifies that the permission applies to all authenticated users
    • anonymous specifies that the permission applies to all users, including unauthenticated users

      Note

      It is not possible to add permissions with a non-default bind rule type to privileges. You also cannot set a permission that is already present in a privilege to a non-default bind rule type.

  5. Choose the rights to grant with this permisthsion in Granted rights.
  6. Define the method to identify the target entries for the permission:

    • Type specifies an entry type, such as user, host, or service. If you choose a value for the Type setting, a list of all possible attributes which will be accessible through this ACI for that entry type appears under Effective Attributes. Defining Type sets Subtree and Target DN to one of the predefined values.
    • Subtree (required) specifies a subtree entry; every entry beneath this subtree entry is then targeted. Provide an existing subtree entry, as Subtree does not accept wildcards or non-existent domain names (DNs). For example: cn=automount,dc=example,dc=com
    • Extra target filter uses an LDAP filter to identify which entries the permission applies to. The filter can be any valid LDAP filter, for example: (!(objectclass=posixgroup))
      IdM automatically checks the validity of the given filter. If you enter an invalid filter, IdM warns you about this when you attempt to save the permission.
    • Target DN specifies the domain name (DN) and accepts wildcards. For example: uid=*,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=com
    • Member of group sets the target filter to members of the given group. After you specify the filter settings and click Add, IdM validates the filter. If all the permission settings are correct, IdM will perform the search. If some of the permissions settings are incorrect, IdM will display a message informing you about which setting is set incorrectly.
  7. Add attributes to the permission:

    • If you set Type, choose the Effective attributes from the list of available ACI attributes.
    • If you did not use Type, add the attributes manually by writing them into the Effective attributes field. Add a single attribute at a time; to add multiple attributes, click Add to add another input field.

      Important

      If you do not set any attributes for the permission, then the permissions includes all attributes by default.

  8. Finish adding the permissions with the Add buttons at the bottom of the form:

    • Click the Add button to save the permission and go back to the list of permissions.
    • Alternatively, you can save the permission and continue adding additional permissions in the same form by clicking the Add and Add another button
    • The Add and Edit button enables you to save and continue editing the newly created permission.
  9. Optional. You can also edit the properties of an existing permission by clicking its name from the list of permissions to display the Permission settings page.
  10. Optional. If you need to remove an existing permission, click the Delete button once you ticked the check box next to its name in the list, to display The Remove permissions dialog.

    Note

    Operations on default managed permissions are restricted: the attributes you cannot modify are disabled in the IdM Web UI and you cannot delete the managed permissions completely.
    However, you can effectively disable a managed permission that has a bind type set to permission, by removing the managed permission from all privileges.

For example, to let those with the permission write the member attribute in the engineers group (so they can add or remove members):
Example for adding a permission

22.3. Managing privileges in the IdM WebUI

This section describes how to manage privileges in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. To add a new privilege, open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Privileges:

    Privileges task

  2. The list of privileges opens. Click the Add button at the top of the list of privileges:

    Adding a new privilege

  3. The Add Privilege form opens. Enter the name and a description of the privilege:

    Form for adding a privilege

  4. Click the Add and Edit button in order to save the new privilege and continue to the privilege configuration page to add permissions.
  5. Edit the properties of privileges by clicking on the privileges name in the privileges list. The privileges configuration page opens.
  6. The Permissions tab displays a list of permissions included in the selected privilege. Click the Add button at the top of the list to add permissions to the privilege:

    Adding Permissions

  7. Tick the check box next to the name of each permission to add, and use the > button to move the permissions to the Prospective column:

    Selecting Permissions

  8. Confirm by clicking the Add button.
  9. Optional. If you need to remove permissions, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to the relevant permission: the Remove privileges from permissions dialog opens.
  10. Optional. If you need to delete an existing privilege, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to its name in the list: the Remove privileges dialog opens.

22.4. Managing roles in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to manage roles in Identity Management (IdM) using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. To add a new role, open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Roles:

    Roles task

  2. The list of roles opens. Click the Add button at the top of the list of the role-based access control instructions.

    Adding a new role

  3. The Add Role form opens. Enter the role name and a description:

    Form for adding a role

  4. Click the Add and Edit button to save the new role and go to the role configuration page to add privileges and users.
  5. Edit the properties of roles by clicking on the roles name in the role list. The roles configuration page opens.
  6. Add members using the Users, Users Groups, Hosts, Host Groups or Services tabs, by clicking the Add button on top of the relevant list(s).

    Adding users

  7. In the window that opens, select the members on the left and use the > button to move them to the Prospective column.

    Selecting Users

  8. At the top of the Privileges tab, click Add.

    Adding Privileges

  9. Select the privileges on the left and use the > button to move them to the Prospective column.

    Selecting Privileges

  10. Click the Add button to save.
  11. Optional. If you need to remove privileges or members from a role, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to the name of the entity you want to remove. A dialog opens.
  12. Optional. If you need to remove an existing role, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to its name in the list, to display the Remove roles dialog.

Chapter 23. Using an ID view to override a user attribute value on an IdM client

If an Identity Management (IdM) user would like to override some of their user or group attributes stored in the IdM LDAP server, for example the login name, home directory, certificate used for authentication, or SSH keys, you as IdM administrator can redefine these values for a specific IdM client, using IdM ID views. For example, you can specify a different home directory for a user on the IdM client that the user most commonly uses for logging in to IdM.

This chapter describes how to redefine a POSIX attribute value associated with an IdM user on a host enrolled into IdM as a client. Specifically, the chapter describes how to redefine the user login name and home directory.

This chapter includes the following sections:

23.1. ID views

An ID view in Identity Management (IdM) is an IdM client-side view specifying the following information:

  • New values for centrally defined POSIX user or group attributes
  • The client host or hosts on which the new values apply.

An ID view contains one or more overrides. An override is a specific replacement of a centrally defined POSIX attribute value.

You can only define an ID view for an IdM client centrally on IdM servers. You cannot configure client-side overrides for an IdM client locally.

For example, you can use ID views to achieve the following goals:

  • Define different attribute values for different environments. For example, you can allow the IdM administrator or another IdM user to have different home directories on different IdM clients: you can configure /home/encrypted/username to be this user’s home directory on one IdM client and /dropbox/username on another client. Using ID views in this situation is convenient as alternatively, for example, changing fallback_homedir, override_homedir or other home directory variables in the client’s /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file would affect all users. See Adding an ID view to override an IdM user home directory on an IdM client for an example procedure.
  • Replace a previously generated attribute value with a different value, such as overriding a user’s UID. This ability can be useful when you want to achieve a system-wide change that would otherwise be difficult to do on the LDAP side, for example make 1009 the UID of an IdM user. IdM ID ranges, which are used to generate an IdM user UID, never start as low as 1000 or even 10000. If a reason exists for an IdM user to impersonate a local user with UID 1009 on all IdM clients, you can use ID views to override the UID of this IdM user that was generated when the user was created in IdM.
Important

You can only apply ID views to IdM clients, not to IdM servers.

Additional resources

  • You can also use ID views in environments involving Active Directory (AD). For details, see the ID Views and Migrating Existing Environments to Trust chapter in the Windows integration guide.
  • You can also configure ID views for hosts that are not part of a centralized identity management domain. For details, see the SSSD Client-side Views chapter in the System-level authentication guide.

23.2. Potential negative impact of ID views on SSSD performance

When you define an ID view, IdM places the desired override value in the IdM server’s System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) cache. The SSSD running on an IdM client then retrieves the override value from the server cache.

Applying an ID view can have a negative impact on System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) performance, because certain optimizations and ID views cannot run at the same time. For example, ID views prevent SSSD from optimizing the process of looking up groups on the server:

  • With ID views, SSSD must check every member on the returned list of group member names if the group name is overridden.
  • Without ID views, SSSD can only collect the user names from the member attribute of the group object.

This negative effect becomes most apparent when the SSSD cache is empty or after you clear the cache, which makes all entries invalid.

23.3. Attributes an ID view can override

ID views consist of user and group ID overrides. The overrides define the new POSIX attribute values.

User and group ID overrides can define new values for the following POSIX attributes:

User attributes
  • Login name (uid)
  • GECOS entry (gecos)
  • UID number (uidNumber)
  • GID number (gidNumber)
  • Login shell (loginShell)
  • Home directory (homeDirectory)
  • SSH public keys (ipaSshPubkey)
  • Certificate (userCertificate)
Group attributes
  • Group name (cn)
  • Group GID number (gidNumber)

23.4. Getting help for ID view commands

You can get help for commands involving Identity Management (IdM) ID views on the IdM command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

  • You have obtained a Kerberos ticket for an IdM user.

Procedure

  • To display all commands used to manage ID views and overrides:

    $ ipa help idviews
    ID Views
    
    Manage ID Views
    
    IPA allows to override certain properties of users and groups[...]
    [...]
    Topic commands:
      idoverridegroup-add          Add a new Group ID override
      idoverridegroup-del          Delete a Group ID override
    [...]
  • To display detailed help for a particular command, add the --help option to the command:

    $ ipa idview-add --help
    Usage: ipa [global-options] idview-add NAME [options]
    
    Add a new ID View.
    Options:
      -h, --help      show this help message and exit
      --desc=STR      Description
    [...]

23.5. Using an ID view to override the login name of an IdM user on a specific host

This section describes how to create an ID view for a specific Identity Management (IdM) client that overrides a POSIX attribute value associated with a specific IdM user. The procedure uses the example of an ID view that enables an IdM user named idm_user to log in to an IdM client named host1 using the user_1234 login name.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a user with the required privileges, for example admin.

Procedure

  1. Create a new ID view. For example, to create an ID view named example_for_host1:

    $ ipa idview-add example_for_host1
    ---------------------------
    Added ID View "example_for_host1"
    ---------------------------
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
  2. Add a user override to the example_for_host1 ID view. To override the user login:

    • Enter the ipa idoverrideuser-add command
    • Add the name of the ID view
    • Add the user name, also called the anchor
    • Add the --login option:

      $ ipa idoverrideuser-add example_for_host1 idm_user --login=user_1234
      -----------------------------
      Added User ID override "idm_user"
      -----------------------------
        Anchor to override: idm_user
        User login: user_1234

      For a list of the available options, run ipa idoverrideuser-add --help.

      Note

      The ipa idoverrideuser-add --certificate command replaces all existing certificates for the account in the specified ID view. To append an additional certificate, use the ipa idoverrideuser-add-cert command instead:

      $ ipa idoverrideuser-add-cert example_for_host1 user --certificate="MIIEATCC..."
  3. Optional: Using the ipa idoverrideuser-mod command, you can specify new attribute values for an existing user override.
  4. Apply example_for_host1 to the host1.idm.example.com host:

    $ ipa idview-apply example_for_host1 --hosts=host1.idm.example.com
    -----------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------
    hosts: host1.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
    ---------------------------------------------
    Note

    The ipa idview-apply command also accepts the --hostgroups option. The option applies the ID view to hosts that belong to the specified host group, but does not associate the ID view with the host group itself. Instead, the --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

    This means that if a host is added to the host group in the future, the ID view does not apply to the new host.

  5. To apply the new configuration to the host1.idm.example.com system immediately:

    1. SSH to the system as root:

      $ ssh root@host1
      Password:
    2. Clear the SSSD cache:

      root@host1 ~]# sss_cache -E
    3. Restart the SSSD daemon:
    root@host1 ~]# systemctl restart sssd

Verification steps

  • If you have the credentials of user_1234, you can use them to log in to IdM on host1:

    1. SSH to host1 using user_1234 as the login name:

      [root@r8server ~]# ssh user_1234@host1.idm.example.com
      Password:
      
      Last login: Sun Jun 21 22:34:25 2020 from 192.168.122.229
      [user_1234@host1 ~]$
    2. Display the working directory:

      [user_1234@host1 ~]$ pwd
      /home/idm_user/
  • Alternatively, if you have root credentials on host1, you can use them to check the output of the id command for idm_user and user_1234:

    [root@host1 ~]# id idm_user
    uid=779800003(user_1234) gid=779800003(idm_user) groups=779800003(idm_user)
    [root@host1 ~]# user_1234
    uid=779800003(user_1234) gid=779800003(idm_user) groups=779800003(idm_user)

23.6. Modifying an IdM ID view

An ID view in Identity Management (IdM) overrides a POSIX attribute value associated with a specific IdM user. This section describes how to modify an existing ID view. Specifically, it describes how to modify an ID view to enable the user named idm_user to use the /home/user_1234/ directory as the user home directory instead of /home/idm_user/ on the host1.idm.example.com IdM client.

Prerequisites

  • You have root access to host1.idm.example.com.
  • You are logged in as a user with the required privileges, for example admin.
  • You have an ID view configured for idm_user that applies to the host1 IdM client.

Procedure

  1. As root, create the directory that you want idm_user to use on host1.idm.example.com as the user home directory:

    [root@host1 /]# mkdir /home/user_1234/
  2. Change the ownership of the directory:

    [root@host1 /]# chown idm_user:idm_user /home/user_1234/
  3. Display the ID view, including the hosts to which the ID view is currently applied. To display the ID view named example_for_host1:

    $ ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
      dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
      User object override: idm_user
      Hosts the view applies to: host1.idm.example.com
      objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

    The output shows that the ID view currently applies to host1.idm.example.com.

  4. Modify the user override of the example_for_host1 ID view. To override the user home directory:

    • Enter the ipa idoverrideuser-add command
    • Add the name of the ID view
    • Add the user name, also called the anchor
    • Add the --homedir option:

      $ ipa idoverrideuser-mod example_for_host1 idm_user --homedir=/home/user_1234
      -----------------------------
      Modified an User ID override "idm_user"
      -----------------------------
        Anchor to override: idm_user
        User login: user_1234
        Home directory: /home/user_1234/

    For a list of the available options, run ipa idoverrideuser-mod --help.

  5. To apply the new configuration to the host1.idm.example.com system immediately:

    1. SSH to the system as root:

      $ ssh root@host1
      Password:
    2. Clear the SSSD cache:

      root@host1 ~]# sss_cache -E
    3. Restart the SSSD daemon:
    root@host1 ~]# systemctl restart sssd

Verification steps

  1. SSH to host1 as idm_user:

    [root@r8server ~]# ssh idm_user@host1.idm.example.com
    Password:
    
    Last login: Sun Jun 21 22:34:25 2020 from 192.168.122.229
    [user_1234@host1 ~]$
  2. Print the working directory:

    [user_1234@host1 ~]$ pwd
    /home/user_1234/

23.7. Adding an ID view to override an IdM user home directory on an IdM client

An ID view in Identity Management (IdM) overrides a POSIX attribute value associated with a specific IdM user. This section describes how to create an ID view that applies to idm_user on an IdM client named host1 to enable the user to use the /home/user_1234/ directory as the user home directory instead of /home/idm_user/.

Prerequisites

  • You have root access to host1.idm.example.com.
  • You are logged in as a user with the required privileges, for example admin.

Procedure

  1. As root, create the directory that you want idm_user to use on host1.idm.example.com as the user home directory:

    [root@host1 /]# mkdir /home/user_1234/
  2. Change the ownership of the directory:

    [root@host1 /]# chown idm_user:idm_user /home/user_1234/
  3. Create an ID view. For example, to create an ID view named example_for_host1:

    $ ipa idview-add example_for_host1
    ---------------------------
    Added ID View "example_for_host1"
    ---------------------------
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
  4. Add a user override to the example_for_host1 ID view. To override the user home directory:

    • Enter the ipa idoverrideuser-add command
    • Add the name of the ID view
    • Add the user name, also called the anchor
    • Add the --homedir option:
    $ ipa idoverrideuser-add example_for_host1 idm_user --homedir=/home/user_1234
    -----------------------------
    Added User ID override "idm_user"
    -----------------------------
      Anchor to override: idm_user
      Home directory: /home/user_1234/
  5. Apply example_for_host1 to the host1.idm.example.com host:

    $ ipa idview-apply example_for_host1 --hosts=host1.idm.example.com
    -----------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------
    hosts: host1.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
    ---------------------------------------------
    Note

    The ipa idview-apply command also accepts the --hostgroups option. The option applies the ID view to hosts that belong to the specified host group, but does not associate the ID view with the host group itself. Instead, the --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

    This means that if a host is added to the host group in the future, the ID view does not apply to the new host.

  6. To apply the new configuration to the host1.idm.example.com system immediately:

    1. SSH to the system as root:

      $ ssh root@host1
      Password:
    2. Clear the SSSD cache:

      root@host1 ~]# sss_cache -E
    3. Restart the SSSD daemon:
    root@host1 ~]# systemctl restart sssd

Verification steps

  1. SSH to host1 as idm_user:

    [root@r8server ~]# ssh idm_user@host1.idm.example.com
    Password:
    Activate the web console with: systemctl enable --now cockpit.socket
    
    Last login: Sun Jun 21 22:34:25 2020 from 192.168.122.229
    [idm_user@host1 /]$
  2. Print the working directory:

    [idm_user@host1 /]$ pwd
    /home/user_1234/

23.8. Applying an ID view to an IdM host group

The ipa idview-apply command accepts the --hostgroups option. However, the option acts as a one-time operation that applies the ID view to hosts that currently belong to the specified host group, but does not dynamically associate the ID view with the host group itself. The --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

If you add a new host to the host group later, you must apply the ID view to the new host manually, using the ipa idview-apply command with the --hosts option.

Similarly, if you remove a host from a host group, the ID view is still assigned to the host after the removal. To unapply the ID view from the removed host, you must run the ipa idview-unapply id_view_name --hosts=name_of_the_removed_host command.

This section describes how to achieve the following goals:

  1. How to create a host group and add hosts to it.
  2. How to apply an ID view to the host group.
  3. How to add a new host to the host group and apply the ID view to the new host.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create a host group and add hosts to it:

    1. Create a host group. For example, to create a host group named baltimore:

      [root@master ~]# ipa hostgroup-add --desc="Baltimore hosts" baltimore
      ---------------------------
      Added hostgroup "baltimore"
      ---------------------------
      Host-group: baltimore
      Description: Baltimore hosts
    2. Add hosts to the host group. For example, to add the host102 and host103 to the baltimore host group:

      [root@master ~]# ipa hostgroup-add-member --hosts={host102,host103} baltimore
      Host-group: baltimore
      Description: Baltimore hosts
      Member hosts: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 2
      -------------------------
  2. Apply an ID view to the hosts in the host group. For example, to apply the example_for_host1 ID view to the baltimore host group:

    [root@master ~]# ipa idview-apply --hostgroups=baltimore
    ID View Name: example_for_host1
    -----------------------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------------------
      hosts: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 2
    ---------------------------------------------
  3. Add a new host to the host group and apply the ID view to the new host:

    1. Add a new host to the host group. For example, to add the somehost.idm.example.com host to the baltimore host group:

      [root@master ~]# ipa hostgroup-add-member --hosts=somehost.idm.example.com baltimore
        Host-group: baltimore
        Description: Baltimore hosts
        Member hosts:  host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com,somehost.idm.example.com
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 1
      -------------------------
    2. Optionally, display the ID view information. For example, to display the details about the example_for_host1 ID view:

      [root@master ~]# ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
        dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
        ID View Name: example_for_host1
      [...]
        Hosts the view applies to: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
        objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

      The output shows that the ID view is not applied to somehost.idm.example.com, the newly-added host in the baltimore host group.

    3. Apply the ID view to the new host. For example, to apply the example_for_host1 ID view to somehost.idm.example.com:

      [root@master ~]# ipa idview-apply --host=somehost.idm.example.com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
      -----------------------------------------
      Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
      -----------------------------------------
        hosts: somehost.idm.example.com
      ---------------------------------------------
      Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
      ---------------------------------------------

Verification steps

  • Display the ID view information again:

    [root@master ~]# ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
      dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
    [...]
      Hosts the view applies to: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com, somehost.idm.example.com
      objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

    The output shows that ID view is now applied to somehost.idm.example.com, the newly-added host in the baltimore host group.

Chapter 24. Adjusting ID ranges manually

An IdM master generates unique user ID (UID) and group ID (GID) numbers. By creating and assigning different ID ranges to replicas, it also ensures that they never generate the same ID numbers. By default, this process is automatic. However, you can manually adjust the IdM ID range during the IdM master installation, or manually define a replica’s DNA ID range.

24.1. ID ranges

ID numbers are divided into ID ranges. Keeping separate numeric ranges for individual servers and replicas eliminates the chance that an ID number issued for an entry is already used by another entry on another server or replica.

Note that there are two distinct types of ID ranges:

  • The IdM ID range, which is assigned during the IdM master installation. This range cannot be modified after it is created. However, if you need to, you can create a new IdM ID range in addition to the original one. For more information, see Automatic ID ranges assignment and Adding a new IdM ID range.
  • The Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID ranges, which can be modified by the user. These have to fit within an existing IdM ID range. For more information, see Adjusting DNA ID ranges manually.

    Replicas can also have a next DNA ID range assigned. A replica uses its next range when it runs out of IDs in its current range. Next ranges are assigned automatically when a replica is deleted or you can set them manually.

The ranges are updated and shared between the master and replicas by the DNA plug-in, as part of the back end 389 Directory Server instance for the domain.

The DNA range definition is set by two attributes: the server’s next available number (the low end of the DNA range) and its maximum value (the top end of the DNA range). The initial bottom range is set during the plug-in instance configuration. After that, the plug-in updates the bottom value. Breaking the available numbers into ranges allows the servers to continually assign numbers without overlapping with each other.

24.2. Automatic ID ranges assignment

By default, an IdM ID range is automatically assigned during the IdM master installation. The ipa-server-install command randomly selects and assigns a range of 200,000 IDs from a total of 10,000 possible ranges. Selecting a random range in this way significantly reduces the probability of conflicting IDs in case you decide to merge two separate IdM domains in the future.

Note

This IdM ID range cannot be modified after it is created. You can only manually adjust the Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID ranges, using the commands described in Adjusting DNA ID ranges manually. A DNA range matching the IdM ID range is automatically created during installation.

If you have a single IdM server installed, it controls the whole DNA ID range. When you install a new replica and the replica requests its own DNA ID range, the initial ID range for the master splits and is distributed between the master and replica: the replica receives half of the remaining DNA ID range that is available on the initial master. The master and replica then use their respective portions of the original ID range for new user or group entries. Also, if the replica is close to depleting its allocated ID range and fewer than 100 IDs remain, the replica contacts the other available servers to request a new DNA ID range.

Important

When you install a replica, it does not immediately receive an ID range. A replica receives an ID range the first time the DNA plug-in is used, for example when you first add a user. Until then, the replica has no ID range defined.

If the initial master stops functioning before the replica requests a DNA ID range from it, the replica is unable to contact the master to request the ID range. Attempting to add a new user on the replica then fails. In such situations, you can find out what ID range is assigned to the disabled master, and assign an ID range to the replica manually.

24.3. Assigning the IdM ID range manually during server installation

You can override the default behavior and set an IdM ID range manually instead of having it assigned randomly.

Important

Do not set ID ranges that include UID values of 1000 and lower; these values are reserved for system use. Also, do not set an ID range that would include the 0 value; the SSSD service does not handle the 0 ID value.

Procedure

  • You can define the IdM ID range manually during server installation by using the following two options with ipa-server-install:

    • --idstart gives the starting value for UID and GID numbers.
    • --idmax gives the maximum UID and GID number; by default, the value is the --idstart starting value plus 199,999.

Verification steps

  • To check if the ID range was assigned correctly, you can display the assigned IdM ID range by using the ipa idrange-find command:

    # ipa idrange-find
    ---------------
    1 range matched
    ---------------
      Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_id_range
      First Posix ID of the range: 882200000
      Number of IDs in the range: 200000
      Range type: local domain range
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

24.4. Adding a new IdM ID range

In some cases, you may want to create a new IdM ID range in addition to the original one; for example, when a replica has run out of IDs and the original IdM ID range is depleted.

Important

Adding a new IdM ID range does not create new DNA ID ranges automatically. You need to assign new DNA ID ranges manually as needed. For more information on how to do this, see Adjusting DNA ID ranges manually.

Procedure

  • To create a new IdM ID range, use the ipa idrange-add command. You need to specify the new range name, the first ID number of the range and the range size:
# ipa idrange-add IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range --base-id=1000000 --range-size=200000
------------------------------------------
Added ID range "IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range"
------------------------------------------
  Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range
  First Posix ID of the range: 1000000
  Number of IDs in the range: 200000
  Range type: local domain range

Verification steps

  • You can check if the new range is set correctly by using the ipa idrange-find command:
# ipa idrange-find
----------------
2 ranges matched
----------------
  Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_id_range
  First Posix ID of the range: 882200000
  Number of IDs in the range: 200000
  Range type: local domain range

  Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range
  First Posix ID of the range: 1000000
  Number of IDs in the range: 200000
  Range type: local domain range
----------------------------
Number of entries returned 2
----------------------------

24.5. Displaying currently assigned DNA ID ranges

You can display both the currently active Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID range on a server, as well as its next DNA range if it has one assigned.

Procedure

  • To display which DNA ID ranges are configured for the servers in the topology, use the following commands:

    • ipa-replica-manage dnarange-show displays the current DNA ID range that is set on all servers or, if you specify a server, only on the specified server, for example:

      # ipa-replica-manage dnarange-show
      masterA.example.com: 1001-1500
      masterB.example.com: 1501-2000
      masterC.example.com: No range set
      
      # ipa-replica-manage dnarange-show masterA.example.com
      masterA.example.com: 1001-1500
    • ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-show displays the next DNA ID range currently set on all servers or, if you specify a server, only on the specified server, for example:

      # ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-show
      masterA.example.com: 2001-2500
      masterB.example.com: No on-deck range set
      masterC.example.com: No on-deck range set
      
      # ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-show masterA.example.com
      masterA.example.com: 2001-2500

24.6. Automatic DNA ID range extension

When you delete a functioning replica, the ipa-replica-manage del command retrieves the DNA ID ranges that were assigned to the replica and adds them as a next range to another available IdM replica. This ensures that DNA ID ranges are used efficiently.

After you delete a replica, you can verify which DNA ID ranges are configured for other servers by using the commands described in Displaying currently assigned DNA ID ranges.

24.7. Manual DNA ID range adjustment

In certain situations, it is necessary to manually adjust a Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID range, for example when:

  • A replica has run out of IDs and the IdM ID range is depleted

    A replica has exhausted the DNA ID range that was assigned to it, and requesting additional IDs failed because no more free IDs are available in the IdM range.

    To solve this situation, extend the DNA ID range assigned to the replica. You can do this in two ways:

    • Shorten the DNA ID range assigned to a different replica, then assign the newly available values to the depleted replica.
    • Create a new IdM ID range, then set a new DNA ID range for the replica within this created IdM range.

      For information on how to create a new IdM ID range, see Adding a new IdM ID range.

  • A replica stopped functioning

    A replica’s DNA ID range is not automatically retrieved when the replica dies and needs to be deleted, which means the DNA ID range previously assigned to the replica becomes unavailable. You want to recover the DNA ID range and make it available for other replicas.

    If you want to recover a DNA ID range belonging to a replica that stopped functioning and assign it to another server, you first need to find out what the ID range values are, before manually assigning that range to a different server. Also, to avoid duplicate UIDs or GIDs, make sure that no ID value from the recovered range was previously assigned to a user or group; you can do this by examining the UIDs and GIDs of existing users and groups.

You can manually adjust a DNA ID range for a replica using the commands in Adjusting DNA ID ranges manually.

Note

If you assign a new DNA ID range, the UIDs of the already existing entries on the server or replica stay the same. This does not pose a problem because even if you change the current DNA ID range, IdM keeps a record of what ranges were assigned in the past.

24.8. Adjusting DNA ID ranges manually

In some cases, you may need to manually adjust Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID ranges for existing replicas, for example to reassign a DNA ID range assigned to a non-functioning replica. For more information, see Manual DNA ID range adjustment.

When adjusting a DNA ID range manually, make sure that the newly adjusted range is included in the IdM ID range; you can check this using the ipa idrange-find command. Otherwise, the command will fail.

Important

Be careful not to create overlapping ID ranges. If any of the ID ranges you assign to servers or replicas overlap, it could result in two different servers assigning the same ID value to different entries.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • To define the current DNA ID range for a specified server, use the ipa-replica-manage dnarange-set:

    # ipa-replica-manage dnarange-set masterA.example.com 1250-1499
  • To define the next DNA ID range for a specified server, use the ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-set:

    # ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-set masterB.example.com 1500-5000

Verification steps

Chapter 25. Configuring IdM for external provisioning of users

As a system administrator, you can configure Identity Management (IdM) to support the provisioning of users by an external solution for managing identities.

Rather than use the ipa utility, the administrator of the external provisioning system can access the IdM LDAP using the ldapmodify utility. The administrator can add individual stage users from the CLI using ldapmodify or using an LDIF file.

The assumption is that you, as an IdM administrator, fully trust your external provisioning system to only add validated users. However, at the same time you do not want to assign the administrators of the external provisioning system the IdM role of User Administrator to enable them to add new active users directly.

You can configure a script to automatically move the staged users created by the external provisioning system to active users automatically.

This chapter contains these sections:

  1. Preparing Identity Management (IdM) to use an external provisioning system to add stage users to IdM.
  2. Creating a script to move the users added by the external provisioning system from stage to active users.
  3. Using an external provisioning system to add an IdM stage user. You can do that in two ways:

Additional materials

For examples and templates for using ldapmodify as a full IdM administrator to perform user and group management operations that require higher privileges, see Using ldapmodify.

25.1. Preparing IdM accounts for automatic activation of stage user accounts

This procedure shows how to configure two IdM user accounts to be used by an external provisioning system. By adding the accounts to a group with an appropriate password policy, you enable the external provisioning system to manage user provisioning in IdM. In the following, the user account to be used by the external system to add stage users is named provisionator. The user account to be used to automatically activate the stage users is named activator.

Prerequisites

  • The host on which you perform the procedure is enrolled into IdM.

Procedure

  1. Log in as IdM administrator:

    $ kinit admin
  2. Create a user named provisionator with the privileges to add stage users.

    1. Add the provisionator user account:
    $ ipa user-add provisionator --first=provisioning --last=account --password
    1. Grant the provisionator user the required privileges.

      1. Create a custom role, System Provisioning, to manage adding stage users:

        $ ipa role-add --desc "Responsible for provisioning stage users" "System Provisioning"
      2. Add the Stage User Provisioning privilege to the role. This privilege provides the ability to add stage users:

        $ ipa role-add-privilege "System Provisioning" --privileges="Stage User Provisioning"
      3. Add the provisionator user to the role:

        $ ipa role-add-member --users=provisionator "System Provisioning"
      4. Verify that the provisionator exists in IdM:
      $ ipa user-find provisionator --all --raw
      --------------
      1 user matched
      --------------
        dn: uid=provisionator,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
        uid: provisionator
        [...]
  3. Create a user, activator, with the privileges to manage user accounts.

    1. Add the activator user account:

      $ ipa user-add activator --first=activation --last=account --password
    2. Grant the activator user the required privileges by adding the user to the default User Administrator role:

      $ ipa role-add-member --users=activator "User Administrator"
  4. Create a user group for application accounts:

    $ ipa group-add application-accounts
  5. Update the password policy for the group. The following policy prevents password expiration and lockout for the account but compensates the potential risks by requiring complex passwords:

    $ ipa pwpolicy-add application-accounts --maxlife=10000 --minlife=0 --history=0 --minclasses=4 --minlength=8 --priority=1 --maxfail=0 --failinterval=1 --lockouttime=0
  6. (Optional) Verify that the password policy exists in IdM:

    $ ipa pwpolicy-show application-accounts
      Group: application-accounts
      Max lifetime (days): 10000
      Min lifetime (hours): 0
      History size: 0
    [...]
  7. Add the provisioning and activation accounts to the group for application accounts:

    $ ipa group-add-member application-accounts --users={provisionator,activator}
  8. Change the passwords for the user accounts:

    $ kpasswd provisionator
    $ kpasswd activator

    Changing the passwords is necessary because new IdM users passwords expire immediately.

Additional resources:

25.2. Configuring automatic activation of IdM stage user accounts

This procedure shows how to create a script for activating stage users. The system runs the script automatically at specified time intervals. This ensures that new user accounts are automatically activated and available for use shortly after they are created.

Important

The procedure assumes that the owner of the external provisioning system has already validated the users and that they do not require additional validation on the IdM side before the script adds them to IdM.

It is sufficient to enable the activation process on only one of your IdM servers.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Generate a keytab file for the activation account:

    # ipa-getkeytab -s server.idm.example.com -p "activator" -k /etc/krb5.ipa-activation.keytab

    If you want to enable the activation process on more than one IdM server, generate the keytab file on one server only. Then copy the keytab file to the other servers.

  2. Create a script, /usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all, with the following contents to activate all users:

    #!/bin/bash
    
    kinit -k -i activator
    
    ipa stageuser-find --all --raw | grep "  uid:" | cut -d ":" -f 2 | while read uid; do ipa stageuser-activate ${uid}; done
  3. Edit the permissions and ownership of the ipa-activate-all script to make it executable:

    # chmod 755 /usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all
    # chown root:root /usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all
  4. Create a systemd unit file, /etc/systemd/system/ipa-activate-all.service, with the following contents:

    [Unit]
    Description=Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated
    
    [Service]
    Environment=KRB5_CLIENT_KTNAME=/etc/krb5.ipa-activation.keytab
    Environment=KRB5CCNAME=FILE:/tmp/krb5cc_ipa-activate-all
    ExecStart=/usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all
  5. Create a systemd timer, /etc/systemd/system/ipa-activate-all.timer, with the following contents:

    [Unit]
    Description=Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated
    
    [Timer]
    OnBootSec=15min
    OnUnitActiveSec=1min
    
    [Install]
    WantedBy=multi-user.target
  6. Reload the new configuration:

    # systemctl daemon-reload
  7. Enable ipa-activate-all.timer:

    # systemctl enable ipa-activate-all.timer
  8. Start ipa-activate-all.timer:

    # systemctl start ipa-activate-all.timer
  9. (Optional) Verify that the ipa-activate-all.timer daemon is running:

    # systemctl status ipa-activate-all.timer
    ● ipa-activate-all.timer - Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated
       Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/ipa-activate-all.timer; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
       Active: active (waiting) since Wed 2020-06-10 16:34:55 CEST; 15s ago
      Trigger: Wed 2020-06-10 16:35:55 CEST; 44s left
    
    Jun 10 16:34:55 server.idm.example.com systemd[1]: Started Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated.

25.3. Adding an IdM stage user defined in an LDIF file

This section describes how an administrator of an external provisioning system can access IdM LDAP and use an LDIF file to add stage users. While the example below shows adding one single user, multiple users can be added in one file in bulk mode.

Prerequisites

  • IdM administrator has created the provisionator account and a password for it. For details, see Preparing IdM accounts for automatic activation of stage user accounts.
  • You as the external administrator know the password of the provisionator account.
  • You can SSH to the IdM server from your LDAP server.
  • You are able to supply the minimal set of attributes that an IdM stage user must have to allow the correct processing of the user life cycle, namely:

    • The distinguished name (dn)
    • The common name (cn)
    • The last name (sn)
    • The uid

Procedure

  1. On the external server, create an LDIF file that contains information about the new user:

    dn: uid=stageidmuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
    changetype: add
    objectClass: top
    objectClass: inetorgperson
    uid: stageidmuser
    sn: surname
    givenName: first_name
    cn: full_name
  2. Transfer the LDIF file from the external server to the IdM server:

    $ scp add-stageidmuser.ldif provisionator@server.idm.example.com:/provisionator/
    Password:
    add-stageidmuser.ldif                                                                                          100%  364   217.6KB/s   00:00
  3. Use the SSH protocol to connect to the IdM server as provisionator:

    $ ssh provisionator@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [provisionator@server ~]$
  4. On the IdM server, obtain the Kerberos ticket-granting ticket (TGT) for the provisionator account:

    [provisionator@server ~]$ kinit provisionator
  5. Enter the ldapadd command with the -f option and the name of the LDIF file. Specify the name of the IdM server and the port number:

    ~]$ ldapadd -h server.idm.example.com -p 389 -f  add-stageidmuser.ldif
    SASL/GSSAPI authentication started
    SASL username: provisionator@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    SASL SSF: 256
    SASL data security layer installed.
    adding the entry "uid=stageidmuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com"

25.4. Adding an IdM stage user directly from the CLI using ldapmodify

This section describes how an administrator of an external provisioning system can access the Identity Management (IdM) LDAP and use the ldapmodify utility to add a stage user.

Prerequisites

  • The IdM administrator has created the provisionator account and a password for it. For details, see Preparing IdM accounts for automatic activation of stage user accounts.
  • You as the external administrator know the password of the provisionator account.
  • You can SSH to the IdM server from your LDAP server.
  • You are able to supply the minimal set of attributes that an IdM stage user must have to allow the correct processing of the user life cycle, namely:

    • The distinguished name (dn)
    • The common name (cn)
    • The last name (sn)
    • The uid

Procedure

  1. Use the SSH protocol to connect to the IdM server using your IdM identity and credentials:

    $ ssh provisionator@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [provisionator@server ~]$
  2. Obtain the TGT of the provisionator account, an IdM user with a role to add new stage users:

    $ kinit provisionator
  3. Enter the ldapmodify command and specify Generic Security Services API (GSSAPI) as the Simple Authentication and Security Layer (SASL) mechanism to use for authentication. Specify the name of the IdM server and the port:

    # ldapmodify -h server.idm.example.com -p 389 -Y GSSAPI
    SASL/GSSAPI authentication started
    SASL username: provisionator@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    SASL SSF: 56
    SASL data security layer installed.
  4. Enter the dn of the user you are adding:

    dn: uid=stageuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
  5. Enter add as the type of change you are performing:

    changetype: add
  6. Specify the LDAP object class categories required to allow the correct processing of the user life cycle:

    objectClass: top
    objectClass: inetorgperson

    You can specify additional object classes.

  7. Enter the uid of the user:

    uid: stageuser
  8. Enter the cn of the user:

    cn: Babs Jensen
  9. Enter the last name of the user:

    sn: Jensen
  10. Press Enter again to confirm that this is the end of the entry:

    [Enter]
    
    adding new entry "uid=stageuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com"
  11. Exit the connection using Ctrl + C.

Verification steps

Verify the contents of the stage entry to make sure your provisioning system added all required POSIX attributes and the stage entry is ready to be activated.

  • To display the new stage user’s LDAP attributes, enter the ipa stageuser-show --all --raw command:

    $ ipa stageuser-show stageuser --all --raw
      dn: uid=stageuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
      uid: stageuser
      sn: Jensen
      cn: Babs Jensen
      has_password: FALSE
      has_keytab: FALSE
      nsaccountlock: TRUE
      objectClass: top
      objectClass: inetorgperson
      objectClass: organizationalPerson
      objectClass: person
    1. Note that the user is explicitly disabled by the nsaccountlock attribute.

Chapter 26. Using ldapmodify to manage IdM users externally

You can modify Identity Management (IdM) LDAP directly from the command-line interface (CLI) using the ldapmodify and ldapdelete utilities. The utilities provide full functionality for adding, editing, and deleting your directory contents. You can use these utilities to manage both the configuration entries of the server and the data in the user entries. The utilities can also be used to write scripts to perform bulk management of one or more directories.

26.1. Templates for managing IdM user accounts externally

This section describes templates for various user management operations in IdM. The templates show which attributes you must modify using ldapmodify to achieve the following goals:

  • Adding a new stage user
  • Modifying a user’s attribute
  • Enabling a user
  • Disabling a user
  • Preserving a user

The templates are formatted in the LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF). LDIF is a standard plain text data interchange format for representing LDAP directory content and update requests.

Using the templates, you can configure the LDAP provider of your provisioning system to manage IdM user accounts.

For detailed example procedures, see the following sections:

Templates for adding a new stage user

  • A template for adding a user with UID and GID assigned automatically. The distinguished name (DN) of the created entry must start with uid=user_login:

    dn: uid=user_login,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
    changetype: add
    objectClass: top
    objectClass: inetorgperson
    uid: user_login
    sn: surname
    givenName: first_name
    cn: full_name
  • A template for adding a user with UID and GID assigned statically:

    dn: uid=user_login,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
    changetype: add
    objectClass: top
    objectClass: person
    objectClass: inetorgperson
    objectClass: organizationalperson
    objectClass: posixaccount
    uid: user_login
    uidNumber: UID_number
    gidNumber: GID_number
    sn: surname
    givenName: first_name
    cn: full_name
    homeDirectory: /home/user_login

    You are not required to specify any IdM object classes when adding stage users. IdM adds these classes automatically after the users are activated.

Templates for modifying existing users

  • Modifying a user’s attribute:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    replace: attribute_to_modify
    attribute_to_modify: new_value
  • Disabling a user:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    replace: nsAccountLock
    nsAccountLock: TRUE
  • Enabling a user:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    replace: nsAccountLock
    nsAccountLock: FALSE

    Updating the nssAccountLock attribute has no effect on stage and preserved users. Even though the update operation completes successfully, the attribute value remains nssAccountLock: TRUE.

  • Preserving a user:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modrdn
    newrdn: uid=user_login
    deleteoldrdn: 0
    newsuperior: cn=deleted users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
Note

Before modifying a user, obtain the user’s distinguished name (DN) by searching using the user’s login. In the following example, the user_allowed_to_modify_user_entries user is a user allowed to modify user and group information, for example activator or IdM administrator. The password in the example is this user’s password:

[...]
# ldapsearch -LLL -x -D "uid=user_allowed_to_modify_user_entries,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com" -w "Secret123" -H ldap://r8server.idm.example.com -b "cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com" uid=test_user
dn: uid=test_user,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
memberOf: cn=ipausers,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com

26.2. Templates for managing IdM group accounts externally

This section describes templates for various user group management operations in IdM. The templates show which attributes you must modify using ldapmodify to achieve the following aims:

  • Creating a new group
  • Deleting an existing group
  • Adding a member to a group
  • Removing a member from a group

The templates are formatted in the LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF). LDIF is a standard plain text data interchange format for representing LDAP directory content and update requests.

Using the templates, you can configure the LDAP provider of your provisioning system to manage IdM group accounts.

Creating a new group

dn: cn=group_name,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
changetype: add
objectClass: top
objectClass: ipaobject
objectClass: ipausergroup
objectClass: groupofnames
objectClass: nestedgroup
objectClass: posixgroup
uid: group_name
cn: group_name
gidNumber: GID_number

Modifying groups

  • Deleting an existing group:

    dn: group_distinguished_name
    changetype: delete
  • Adding a member to a group:

    dn: group_distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    add: member
    member: uid=user_login,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com

    Do not add stage or preserved users to groups. Even though the update operation completes successfully, the users will not be updated as members of the group. Only active users can belong to groups.

  • Removing a member from a group:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    delete: member
    member: uid=user_login,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
Note

Before modifying a group, obtain the group’s distinguished name (DN) by searching using the group’s name.

# ldapsearch -YGSSAPI -H ldap://server.idm.example.com -b "cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com" "cn=group_name"
dn: cn=group_name,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
ipaNTSecurityIdentifier: S-1-5-21-1650388524-2605035987-2578146103-11017
cn: testgroup
objectClass: top
objectClass: groupofnames
objectClass: nestedgroup
objectClass: ipausergroup
objectClass: ipaobject
objectClass: posixgroup
objectClass: ipantgroupattrs
ipaUniqueID: 569bf864-9d45-11ea-bea3-525400f6f085
gidNumber: 1997010017

26.3. Preserving an IdM user with ldapmodify

This section describes how to use ldapmodify to preserve an IdM user; that is, how to deactivate a user account after the employee has left the company.

Prerequisites

  • You can authenticate as an IdM user with a role to preserve users.

Procedure

  1. Log in as an IdM user with a role to preserve users:

    $ kinit admin
  2. Enter the ldapmodify command and specify the Generic Security Services API (GSSAPI) as the Simple Authentication and Security Layer (SASL) mechanism to be used for authentication:

    # ldapmodify -Y GSSAPI
    SASL/GSSAPI authentication started
    SASL username: admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    SASL SSF: 256
    SASL data security layer installed.
  3. Enter the dn of the user you want to preserve:

    dn: uid=user1,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
  4. Enter modrdn as the type of change you want to perform:

    changetype: modrdn
  5. Specify the newrdn for the user:

    newrdn: uid=user1
  6. Indicate that you want to preserve the user:

    deleteoldrdn: 0
  7. Specify the new superior DN:

    newsuperior: cn=deleted users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com

    Preserving a user moves the entry to a new location in the directory information tree (DIT). For this reason, you must specify the DN of the new parent entry as the new superior DN.

  8. Press Enter again to confirm that this is the end of the entry:

    [Enter]
    
    modifying rdn of entry "uid=user1,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com"
  9. Exit the connection using Ctrl + C.

Verification steps

  • Verify that the user has been preserved by listing all preserved users:

    $ ipa user-find --preserved=true
    --------------
    1 user matched
    --------------
      User login: user1
      First name: First 1
      Last name: Last 1
      Home directory: /home/user1
      Login shell: /bin/sh
      Principal name: user1@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: user1@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Email address: user1@idm.example.com
      UID: 1997010003
      GID: 1997010003
      Account disabled: True
      Preserved user: True
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

Chapter 27. Managing Hosts in IdM CLI

This chapter introduces hosts and host entries in Identity Management (IdM), and the following operations performed when managing hosts and host entries in IdM CLI:

The chapter also contains an overview table of the prerequisites, the context, and the consequences of these operations.

27.1. Hosts in IdM

Identity Management (IdM) manages these identities:

  • Users
  • Services
  • Hosts

A host represents a machine. As an IdM identity, a host has an entry in the IdM LDAP, that is the 389 Directory Server instance of the IdM server.

The host entry in IdM LDAP is used to establish relationships between other hosts and even services within the domain. These relationships are part of delegating authorization and control to hosts within the domain. Any host can be used in host-based access control (HBAC) rules.

IdM domain establishes a commonality between machines, with common identity information, common policies, and shared services. Any machine that belongs to a domain functions as a client of the domain, which means it uses the services that the domain provides. IdM domain provides three main services specifically for machines:

  • DNS
  • Kerberos
  • Certificate management

Hosts in IdM are closely connected with the services running on them:

  • Service entries are associated with a host.
  • A host stores both the host and the service Kerberos principals.

27.2. Host enrollment

This section describes enrolling hosts as IdM clients and what happens during and after the enrollment. The section compares the enrollment of IdM hosts and IdM users. The section also outlines alternative types of authentication available to hosts.

Enrolling a host consists of:

  • Creating a host entry in IdM LDAP: possibly using the ipa host-add command in IdM CLI, or the equivalent IdM Web UI operation.
  • Configuring IdM services on the host, for example the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD), Kerberos, and certmonger, and joining the host to the IdM domain.

The two actions can be performed separately or together.

If performed separately, they allow for dividing the two tasks between two users with different levels of privilege. This is useful for bulk deployments.

The ipa-client-install command can perform the two actions together. The command creates a host entry in IdM LDAP if that entry does not exist yet, and configures both the Kerberos and SSSD services for the host. The command brings the host within the IdM domain and allows it to identify the IdM server it will connect with. If the host belongs to a DNS zone managed by IdM, ipa-client-install adds DNS records for the host too. The command must be run on the client.

27.2.1. User privileges required for host enrollment

The host enrollment operation requires authentication to prevent an unprivileged user from adding unwanted machines to the IdM domain. The privileges required depend on several factors, for example:

  • If a host entry is created separately from running ipa-client-install
  • If a one-time password (OTP) is used for enrollment
User privileges for optionally manually creating a host entry in IdM LDAP

The user privilege required for creating a host entry in IdM LDAP using the ipa host-add CLI command or the IdM Web UI is Host Administrators. The Host Administrators privilege can be obtained through the IT Specialist role.

User privileges for joining the client to the IdM domain

Hosts are configured as IdM clients during the execution of the ipa-client-install command. The level of credentials required for executing the ipa-client-install command depends on which of the following enrolling scenarios you find yourself in:

  • The host entry in IdM LDAP does not exist. For this scenario, you need a full administrator’s credentials or the Host Administrators role. A full administrator is a member of the admins group. The Host Administrators role provides privileges to add hosts and enroll hosts. For details about this scenario, see Installing a client using user credentials: interactive installation.
  • The host entry in IdM LDAP exists. For this scenario, you need a limited administrator’s credentials to execute ipa-client-install successfully. The limited administrator in this case has the Enrollment Administrator role, which provides the Host Enrollment privilege. For details, see Installing a client using user credentials: interactive installation.
  • The host entry in IdM LDAP exists, and an OTP has been generated for the host by a full or limited administrator. For this scenario, you can install an IdM client as an ordinary user if you run the ipa-client-install command with the --password option, supplying the correct OTP. For details, see Installing a client by using a one-time password: Interactive installation.

After enrollment, IdM hosts authenticate every new session to be able to access IdM resources. Machine authentication is required for the IdM server to trust the machine and to accept IdM connections from the client software installed on that machine. After authenticating the client, the IdM server can respond to its requests.

27.2.2. Enrollment and authentication of IdM hosts and users: comparison

There are many similarities between users and hosts in IdM. This section describes some of the similarities that can be observed during the enrollment stage as well as those that concern authentication during the deployment stage.

  • The enrollment stage (Table 27.1, “User and host enrollment”):

    • An administrator can create an LDAP entry for both a user and a host before the user or host actually join IdM: for the stage user, the command is ipa stageuser-add; for the host, the command is ipa host-add.
    • A file containing a key table or, abbreviated, keytab, a symmetric key resembling to some extent a user password, is created during the execution of the ipa-client-install command on the host, resulting in the host joining the IdM realm. Analogically, a user is asked to create a password when they activate their account, thus joining the IdM realm.
    • While the user password is the default authentication method for a user, the keytab is the default authentication method for a host. The keytab is stored in a file on the host.

    Table 27.1. User and host enrollment

    ActionUserHost

    Pre-enrollment

    $ ipa stageuser-add user_name [--password]

    $ ipa host-add host_name [--random]

    Activating the account

    $ ipa stageuser-activate user_name

    $ ipa-client install [--password] (must be run on the host itself)

  • The deployment stage (Table 27.2, “User and host session authentication”):

    • When a user starts a new session, the user authenticates using a password; similarly, every time it is switched on, the host authenticates by presenting its keytab file. The System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) manages this process in the background.
    • If the authentication is successful, the user or host obtains a Kerberos ticket granting ticket (TGT).
    • The TGT is then used to obtain specific tickets for specific services.

    Table 27.2. User and host session authentication

     UserHost

    Default means of authentication

    Password

    Keytabs

    Starting a session (ordinary user)

    $ kinit user_name

    [switch on the host]

    The result of successful authentication

    TGT to be used to obtain access to specific services

    TGT to be used to obtain access to specific services

TGTs and other Kerberos tickets are generated as part of the Kerberos services and policies defined by the server. The initial granting of a Kerberos ticket, the renewing of the Kerberos credentials, and even the destroying of the Kerberos session are all handled automatically by the IdM services.

27.2.3. Alternative authentication options for IdM hosts

Apart from keytabs, IdM supports two other types of machine authentication:

  • SSH keys. The SSH public key for the host is created and uploaded to the host entry. From there, the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) uses IdM as an identity provider and can work in conjunction with OpenSSH and other services to reference the public keys located centrally in IdM.
  • Machine certificates. In this case, the machine uses an SSL certificate that is issued by the IdM server’s certificate authority and then stored in IdM’s Directory Server. The certificate is then sent to the machine to present when it authenticates to the server. On the client, certificates are managed by a service called certmonger.

27.3. Host Operations

This section lists the most common operations related to host enrollment and enablement, and explains the prerequisites, the context, and the consequences of performing them.

Table 27.3. Host operations part 1

ActionWhat are the prerequisites of the action?When does it make sense to run the command?How is the action performed by a system administrator? What command(s) does he run?

Enrolling a client

see Preparing the system for Identity Management client installation in Installing_Identity_Management

When you want the host to join the IdM realm.

Enrolling machines as clients in the IdM domain is a two-part process. A host entry is created for the client (and stored in the 389 Directory Server instance) when the ipa host-add command is run, and then a keytab is created to provision the client. Both parts are performed automatically by the ipa-client-install command. It is also possible to perform those steps separately; this allows for administrators to prepare machines and IdM in advance of actually configuring the clients. This allows more flexible setup scenarios, including bulk deployments.

Disabling a client

The host must have an entry in IdM. The host needs to have an active keytab.

When you want to remove the host from the IdM realm temporarily, perhaps for maintenance purposes.

ipa host-disable host_name

Enabling a client

The host must have an entry in IdM.

When you want the temporarily disabled host to become active again.

ipa-getkeytab

Re-enrolling a client

The host must have en entry in IdM.

When the original host has been lost but you have installed a host with the same host name.

ipa-client-install --keytab or ipa-client-install --force-join

Un-enrolling a client

The host must have an entry in IdM.

When you want to remove the host from the IdM realm permanently.

ipa-client-install --uninstall

Table 27.4. Host operations part 2

ActionOn which machine can the administrator run the command(s)?What happens when the action is performed? What are the consequences for the host’s functioning in IdM? What limitations are introduced/removed?

Enrolling a client

In the case of a two-step enrollment: ipa host-add can be run on any IdM client; the second step of ipa-client-install must be run on the client itself

By default this configures SSSD to connect to an IdM server for authentication and authorization. Optionally one can instead configure the Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) and the Name Switching Service (NSS) to work with an IdM server over Kerberos and LDAP.

Disabling a client

Any machine in IdM, even the host itself

The host’s Kerberos key and SSL certificate are invalidated, and all services running on the host are disabled.

Enabling a client

Any machine in IdM. If run on the disabled host, LDAP credentials need to be supplied.

The host’s Kerberos key and the SSL certificate are made valid again, and all IdM services running on the host are re-enabled.

Re-enrolling a client

The host to be re-enrolled. LDAP credentials need to be supplied.

A new Kerberos key is generated for the host, replacing the previous one.

Un-enrolling a client

The host to be un-enrolled.

The command unconfigures IdM and attempts to return the machine to its previous state. Part of this process is to unenroll the host from the IdM server. Unenrollment consists of disabling the principal key on the IdM server. The machine principal in /etc/krb5.keytab (host/<fqdn>@REALM) is used to authenticate to the IdM server to unenroll itself. If this principal does not exist then unenrollment will fail and an administrator will need to disable the host principal (ipa host-disable <fqdn>).

27.4. Host entry in IdM LDAP

This section describes what a host entry in Identity Management (IdM) looks like and what attributes it can contain.

An LDAP host entry contains all relevant information about the client within IdM:

  • Service entries associated with the host
  • The host and service principal
  • Access control rules
  • Machine information, such as its physical location and operating system
Note

Note that the IdM Web UI IdentityHosts tab does not show all the information about a particular host stored in the IdM LDAP.

27.4.1. Host entry configuration properties

A host entry can contain information about the host that is outside its system configuration, such as its physical location, MAC address, keys, and certificates.

This information can be set when the host entry is created if it is created manually. Alternatively, most of this information can be added to the host entry after the host is enrolled in the domain.

Table 27.5. Host Configuration Properties

UI FieldCommand-Line OptionDescription

Description

--desc=description

A description of the host.

Locality

--locality=locality

The geographic location of the host.

Location

--location=location

The physical location of the host, such as its data center rack.

Platform

--platform=string

The host hardware or architecture.

Operating system

--os=string

The operating system and version for the host.

MAC address

--macaddress=address

The MAC address for the host. This is a multi-valued attribute. The MAC address is used by the NIS plug-in to create a NIS ethers map for the host.

SSH public keys

--sshpubkey=string

The full SSH public key for the host. This is a multi-valued attribute, so multiple keys can be set.

Principal name (not editable)

--principalname=principal

The Kerberos principal name for the host. This defaults to the host name during the client installation, unless a different principal is explicitly set in the -p. This can be changed using the command-line tools, but cannot be changed in the UI.

Set One-Time Password

--password=string

This option sets a password for the host which can be used in bulk enrollment.

-

--random

This option generates a random password to be used in bulk enrollment.

-

--certificate=string

A certificate blob for the host.

-

--updatedns

This sets whether the host can dynamically update its DNS entries if its IP address changes.

27.5. Adding IdM host entries from IdM CLI

This section describes how to add host entries in Identity Management (IdM) using the command-line interface (CLI).

Host entries are created using the host-add command. This commands adds the host entry to the IdM Directory Server. Consult the ipa host manpage by typing ipa help host in your CLI to get the full list of options available with host-add.

There are a few different scenarios when adding a host to IdM:

  • At its most basic, specify only the client host name to add the client to the Kerberos realm and to create an entry in the IdM LDAP server:

    $ ipa host-add client1.example.com
  • If the IdM server is configured to manage DNS, add the host to the DNS resource records using the --ip-address option.

    Example 27.1. Creating Host Entries with Static IP Addresses

    $ ipa host-add --ip-address=192.168.166.31 client1.example.com
  • If the host to be added does not have a static IP address or if the IP address is not known at the time the client is configured, use the --force option with the ipa host-add command.

    Example 27.2. Creating Host Entries with DHCP

    $ ipa host-add --force client1.example.com

    For example, laptops may be preconfigured as IdM clients, but they do not have IP addresses at the time they are configured. Using --force essentially creates a placeholder entry in the IdM DNS service. When the DNS service dynamically updates its records, the host’s current IP address is detected and its DNS record is updated.

27.6. Deleting host entries from IdM CLI

  • Use the host-del command to delete host records. If your IdM domain has integrated DNS, use the --updatedns option to remove the associated records of any kind for the host from the DNS:

    $ ipa host-del --updatedns client1.example.com

27.7. Re-enrolling an Identity Management client

27.7.1. Client re-enrollment in IdM

This section describes how to re-enroll an Identity Management (IdM) client.

If a client machine has been destroyed and lost connection with the IdM servers, for example due to the client’s hardware failure, and you still have its keytab, you can re-enroll the client. In this scenario, you want to get the client back in the IdM environment with the same hostname.

During the re-enrollment, the client generates a new Kerberos key and SSH keys, but the identity of the client in the LDAP database remains unchanged. After the re-enrollment, the host has its keys and other information in the same LDAP object with the same FQDN as previously, before the machine’s loss of connection with the IdM servers.

Important

You can only re-enroll clients whose domain entry is still active. If you uninstalled a client (using ipa-client-install --uninstall) or disabled its host entry (using ipa host-disable), you cannot re-enroll it.

You cannot re-enroll a client after you have renamed it. This is because in Identity Management, the key attribute of the client’s entry in LDAP is the client’s hostname, its FQDN. As opposed to re-enrolling a client, during which the client’s LDAP object remains unchanged, the outcome of renaming a client is that the client has its keys and other information in a different LDAP object with a new FQDN. Thus the only way to rename a client is to uninstall the host from IdM, change the host’s hostname, and install it as an IdM client with a new name. For details on how to rename a client, see Section 27.8, “Renaming Identity Management client systems”.

27.7.1.1. What happens during client re-enrollment

During re-enrollment, Identity Management:

  • Revokes the original host certificate
  • Creates new SSH keys
  • Generates a new keytab

27.7.2. Re-enrolling a client by using user credentials: Interactive re-enrollment

This procedure describes re-enrolling an Identity Management client interactively by using the credentials of an authorized user.

  1. Re-create the client machine with the same host name.
  2. Run the ipa-client-install --force-join command on the client machine:

    # ipa-client-install --force-join
  3. The script prompts for a user whose identity will be used to re-enroll the client. This could be, for example, a hostadmin user with the Enrollment Administrator role:

    User authorized to enroll computers: hostadmin
    Password for hostadmin@EXAMPLE.COM:

Additional resources

27.7.3. Re-enrolling a client by using the client keytab: Non-interactive re-enrollment

Prerequisites

  • Back up the original client keytab file, for example in the /tmp or /root directory.

Procedure

This procedure describes re-enrolling an Identity Management (IdM) client non-interactively by using the keytab of the client system. For example, re-enrollment using the client keytab is appropriate for an automated installation.

  1. Re-create the client machine with the same host name.
  2. Copy the keytab file from the backup location to the /etc/ directory on the re-created client machine.
  3. Use the ipa-client-install utility to re-enroll the client, and specify the keytab location with the --keytab option:

    # ipa-client-install --keytab /etc/krb5.keytab
    Note

    The keytab specified in the --keytab option is only used when authenticating to initiate the enrollment. During the re-enrollment, IdM generates a new keytab for the client.

27.7.4. Testing an Identity Management client after installation

The Command-Line Interface informs you that the ipa-client-install was successful, but you can also do your own test.

To test that the Identity Management client can obtain information about users defined on the server, check that you are able to resolve a user defined on the server. For example, to check the default admin user:

[user@client1 ~]$ id admin
uid=1254400000(admin) gid=1254400000(admins) groups=1254400000(admins)

To test that authentication works correctly, su - as another IdM user:

[user@client1 ~]$ su - idm_user
Last login: Thu Oct 18 18:39:11 CEST 2018 from 192.168.122.1 on pts/0
[idm_user@client1 ~]$

27.8. Renaming Identity Management client systems

The following sections describe how to change the host name of an Identity Management client system.

Warning

Renaming a client is a manual procedure. Do not perform it unless changing the host name is absolutely required.

Renaming an Identity Management client involves:

  1. Preparing the host. For details, see Section 27.8.1, “Prerequisites”
  2. Uninstalling the IdM client from the host. For details, see Section 27.8.2, “Uninstalling an Identity Management client”
  3. Renaming the host. For details, see Section 27.8.3, “Renaming the host system”
  4. Installing the IdM client on the host with the new name. For details, see Section 27.8.4, “Re-installing an Identity Management client”
  5. Configuring the host after the IdM client installation. For details, see Section 27.8.5, “Re-adding services, re-generating certificates, and re-adding host groups”

27.8.1. Prerequisites

Before uninstalling the current client, make note of certain settings for the client. You will apply this configuration after re-enrolling the machine with a new host name.

  • Identify which services are running on the machine:

    • Use the ipa service-find command, and identify services with certificates in the output:

      $ ipa service-find old-client-name.example.com
    • In addition, each host has a default host service which does not appear in the ipa service-find output. The service principal for the host service, also called a host principal, is host/old-client-name.example.com.
  • For all service principals displayed by ipa service-find old-client-name.example.com, determine the location of the corresponding keytabs on the old-client-name.example.com system:

    # find / -name "*.keytab"

    Each service on the client system has a Kerberos principal in the form service_name/host_name@REALM, such as ldap/old-client-name.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM.

  • Identify all host groups to which the machine belongs.

    # ipa hostgroup-find old-client-name.example.com

27.8.2. Uninstalling an Identity Management client

Uninstalling a client removes the client from the Identity Management domain, along with all of the specific Identity Management configuration of system services, such as System Security Services Daemon (SSSD). This restores the previous configuration of the client system.

Procedure

  1. Run the ipa-client-install --uninstall command:

    [root@client]# ipa-client-install --uninstall
  2. Remove the DNS entries for the client host manually from the server:

    [root@server]# ipa dnsrecord-del
    Record name: old-client-client
    Zone name: idm.example.com
    No option to delete specific record provided.
    Delete all? Yes/No (default No): yes
    ------------------------
    Deleted record "old-client-name"
  3. For each identified keytab other than /etc/krb5.keytab, remove the old principals:

    [root@client ~]# ipa-rmkeytab -k /path/to/keytab -r EXAMPLE.COM
  4. On an IdM server, remove the host entry. This removes all services and revokes all certificates issued for that host:

    [root@server ~]# ipa host-del client.example.com

27.8.3. Renaming the host system

Rename the machine as required. For example:

[root@client]# hostnamectl set-hostname new-client-name.example.com

You can now re-install the Identity Management client to the Identity Management domain with the new host name.

27.8.4. Re-installing an Identity Management client

Install an client on your renamed host following the procedure described in Installing an Identity Management client: Basic scenario in Installing Identity Management.

27.8.5. Re-adding services, re-generating certificates, and re-adding host groups

  1. On the Identity Management (IdM) server, add a new keytab for every service identified in Section 27.8.1, “Prerequisites”.

    [root@server ~]# ipa service-add service_name/new-client-name
  2. Generate certificates for services that had a certificate assigned in Section 27.8.1, “Prerequisites”. You can do this:

    • Using the IdM administration tools
    • Using the certmonger utility
  3. Re-add the client to the host groups identified in Section 27.8.1, “Prerequisites”.

27.9. Disabling and Re-enabling Host Entries

This section describes how to disable and re-enable hosts in Identity Management (IdM).

27.9.1. Disabling Hosts

Complete this procedure to disable a host entry in IdM.

Domain services, hosts, and users can access an active host. There can be situations when it is necessary to remove an active host temporarily, for maintenance reasons, for example. Deleting the host in such situations is not desired as it removes the host entry and all the associated configuration permanently. Instead, choose the option of disabling the host.

Disabling a host prevents domain users from accessing it without permanently removing it from the domain. This can be done by using the host-disable command. Disabling a host kills the host’s current, active keytabs.

For example:

$ kinit admin
$ ipa host-disable client.example.com

As a result of disabling a host, the host becomes unavailable to all IdM users, hosts and services.

Important

Disabling a host entry not only disables that host. It disables every configured service on that host as well.

27.9.2. Re-enabling Hosts

This section describes how to re-enable a disabled IdM host.

Disabling a host killed its active keytabs, which removed the host from the IdM domain without otherwise touching its configuration entry.

To re-enable a host, use the ipa-getkeytab command, adding:

  • the -s option to specify which IdM server to request the keytab from
  • the -p option to specify the principal name
  • the -k option to specify the file to which to save the keytab.

For example, to request a new host keytab from server.example.com for client.example.com, and store the keytab in the /etc/krb5.keytab file:

$  ipa-getkeytab -s server.example.com -p host/client.example.com -k /etc/krb5.keytab -D "cn=directory manager" -w password
Note

You can also use the administrator’s credentials, specifying -D "uid=admin,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=example,dc=com". It is important that the credentials correspond to a user allowed to create the keytab for the host.

If the ipa-getkeytab command is run on an active IdM client or server, then it can be run without any LDAP credentials (-D and -w) if the user has a TGT obtained using, for example, kinit admin. To run the command directly on the disabled host, supply LDAP credentials to authenticate to the IdM server.

Chapter 28. Adding host entries from IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces hosts in Identity Management (IdM) and the operation of adding a host entry in the IdM Web UI.

28.1. Hosts in IdM

Identity Management (IdM) manages these identities:

  • Users
  • Services
  • Hosts

A host represents a machine. As an IdM identity, a host has an entry in the IdM LDAP, that is the 389 Directory Server instance of the IdM server.

The host entry in IdM LDAP is used to establish relationships between other hosts and even services within the domain. These relationships are part of delegating authorization and control to hosts within the domain. Any host can be used in host-based access control (HBAC) rules.

IdM domain establishes a commonality between machines, with common identity information, common policies, and shared services. Any machine that belongs to a domain functions as a client of the domain, which means it uses the services that the domain provides. IdM domain provides three main services specifically for machines:

  • DNS
  • Kerberos
  • Certificate management

Hosts in IdM are closely connected with the services running on them:

  • Service entries are associated with a host.
  • A host stores both the host and the service Kerberos principals.

28.2. Host enrollment

This section describes enrolling hosts as IdM clients and what happens during and after the enrollment. The section compares the enrollment of IdM hosts and IdM users. The section also outlines alternative types of authentication available to hosts.

Enrolling a host consists of:

  • Creating a host entry in IdM LDAP: possibly using the ipa host-add command in IdM CLI, or the equivalent IdM Web UI operation.
  • Configuring IdM services on the host, for example the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD), Kerberos, and certmonger, and joining the host to the IdM domain.

The two actions can be performed separately or together.

If performed separately, they allow for dividing the two tasks between two users with different levels of privilege. This is useful for bulk deployments.

The ipa-client-install command can perform the two actions together. The command creates a host entry in IdM LDAP if that entry does not exist yet, and configures both the Kerberos and SSSD services for the host. The command brings the host within the IdM domain and allows it to identify the IdM server it will connect with. If the host belongs to a DNS zone managed by IdM, ipa-client-install adds DNS records for the host too. The command must be run on the client.

28.2.1. User privileges required for host enrollment

The host enrollment operation requires authentication to prevent an unprivileged user from adding unwanted machines to the IdM domain. The privileges required depend on several factors, for example:

  • If a host entry is created separately from running ipa-client-install
  • If a one-time password (OTP) is used for enrollment
User privileges for optionally manually creating a host entry in IdM LDAP

The user privilege required for creating a host entry in IdM LDAP using the ipa host-add CLI command or the IdM Web UI is Host Administrators. The Host Administrators privilege can be obtained through the IT Specialist role.

User privileges for joining the client to the IdM domain

Hosts are configured as IdM clients during the execution of the ipa-client-install command. The level of credentials required for executing the ipa-client-install command depends on which of the following enrolling scenarios you find yourself in:

  • The host entry in IdM LDAP does not exist. For this scenario, you need a full administrator’s credentials or the Host Administrators role. A full administrator is a member of the admins group. The Host Administrators role provides privileges to add hosts and enroll hosts. For details about this scenario, see Installing a client using user credentials: interactive installation.
  • The host entry in IdM LDAP exists. For this scenario, you need a limited administrator’s credentials to execute ipa-client-install successfully. The limited administrator in this case has the Enrollment Administrator role, which provides the Host Enrollment privilege. For details, see Installing a client using user credentials: interactive installation.
  • The host entry in IdM LDAP exists, and an OTP has been generated for the host by a full or limited administrator. For this scenario, you can install an IdM client as an ordinary user if you run the ipa-client-install command with the --password option, supplying the correct OTP. For details, see Installing a client by using a one-time password: Interactive installation.

After enrollment, IdM hosts authenticate every new session to be able to access IdM resources. Machine authentication is required for the IdM server to trust the machine and to accept IdM connections from the client software installed on that machine. After authenticating the client, the IdM server can respond to its requests.

28.2.2. Enrollment and authentication of IdM hosts and users: comparison

There are many similarities between users and hosts in IdM. This section describes some of the similarities that can be observed during the enrollment stage as well as those that concern authentication during the deployment stage.

  • The enrollment stage (Table 28.1, “User and host enrollment”):

    • An administrator can create an LDAP entry for both a user and a host before the user or host actually join IdM: for the stage user, the command is ipa stageuser-add; for the host, the command is ipa host-add.
    • A file containing a key table or, abbreviated, keytab, a symmetric key resembling to some extent a user password, is created during the execution of the ipa-client-install command on the host, resulting in the host joining the IdM realm. Analogically, a user is asked to create a password when they activate their account, thus joining the IdM realm.
    • While the user password is the default authentication method for a user, the keytab is the default authentication method for a host. The keytab is stored in a file on the host.

    Table 28.1. User and host enrollment

    ActionUserHost

    Pre-enrollment

    $ ipa stageuser-add user_name [--password]

    $ ipa host-add host_name [--random]

    Activating the account

    $ ipa stageuser-activate user_name

    $ ipa-client install [--password] (must be run on the host itself)

  • The deployment stage (Table 28.2, “User and host session authentication”):

    • When a user starts a new session, the user authenticates using a password; similarly, every time it is switched on, the host authenticates by presenting its keytab file. The System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) manages this process in the background.
    • If the authentication is successful, the user or host obtains a Kerberos ticket granting ticket (TGT).
    • The TGT is then used to obtain specific tickets for specific services.

    Table 28.2. User and host session authentication

     UserHost

    Default means of authentication

    Password

    Keytabs

    Starting a session (ordinary user)

    $ kinit user_name

    [switch on the host]

    The result of successful authentication

    TGT to be used to obtain access to specific services

    TGT to be used to obtain access to specific services

TGTs and other Kerberos tickets are generated as part of the Kerberos services and policies defined by the server. The initial granting of a Kerberos ticket, the renewing of the Kerberos credentials, and even the destroying of the Kerberos session are all handled automatically by the IdM services.

28.2.3. Alternative authentication options for IdM hosts

Apart from keytabs, IdM supports two other types of machine authentication:

  • SSH keys. The SSH public key for the host is created and uploaded to the host entry. From there, the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) uses IdM as an identity provider and can work in conjunction with OpenSSH and other services to reference the public keys located centrally in IdM.
  • Machine certificates. In this case, the machine uses an SSL certificate that is issued by the IdM server’s certificate authority and then stored in IdM’s Directory Server. The certificate is then sent to the machine to present when it authenticates to the server. On the client, certificates are managed by a service called certmonger.

28.3. Host entry in IdM LDAP

This section describes what a host entry in Identity Management (IdM) looks like and what attributes it can contain.

An LDAP host entry contains all relevant information about the client within IdM:

  • Service entries associated with the host
  • The host and service principal
  • Access control rules
  • Machine information, such as its physical location and operating system
Note

Note that the IdM Web UI IdentityHosts tab does not show all the information about a particular host stored in the IdM LDAP.

28.3.1. Host entry configuration properties

A host entry can contain information about the host that is outside its system configuration, such as its physical location, MAC address, keys, and certificates.

This information can be set when the host entry is created if it is created manually. Alternatively, most of this information can be added to the host entry after the host is enrolled in the domain.

Table 28.3. Host Configuration Properties

UI FieldCommand-Line OptionDescription

Description

--desc=description

A description of the host.

Locality

--locality=locality

The geographic location of the host.

Location

--location=location

The physical location of the host, such as its data center rack.

Platform

--platform=string

The host hardware or architecture.

Operating system

--os=string

The operating system and version for the host.

MAC address

--macaddress=address

The MAC address for the host. This is a multi-valued attribute. The MAC address is used by the NIS plug-in to create a NIS ethers map for the host.

SSH public keys

--sshpubkey=string

The full SSH public key for the host. This is a multi-valued attribute, so multiple keys can be set.

Principal name (not editable)

--principalname=principal

The Kerberos principal name for the host. This defaults to the host name during the client installation, unless a different principal is explicitly set in the -p. This can be changed using the command-line tools, but cannot be changed in the UI.

Set One-Time Password

--password=string

This option sets a password for the host which can be used in bulk enrollment.

-

--random

This option generates a random password to be used in bulk enrollment.

-

--certificate=string

A certificate blob for the host.

-

--updatedns

This sets whether the host can dynamically update its DNS entries if its IP address changes.

28.4. Adding Host Entries from the Web UI

  1. Open the Identity tab, and select the Hosts subtab.
  2. Click Add at the top of the hosts list.

    Figure 28.1. Adding Host Entries

    hosts list
  3. Enter the machine name and select the domain from the configured zones in the drop-down list. If the host has already been assigned a static IP address, then include that with the host entry so that the DNS entry is fully created.

    The Class field has no specific purpose at the moment.

    Figure 28.2. Add Host Wizard

    host add

    DNS zones can be created in IdM. If the IdM server does not manage the DNS server, the zone can be entered manually in the menu area, like a regular text field.

    Note

    Select the Force check box if you want to skip checking whether the host is resolvable via DNS.

  4. Click the Add and Edit button to go directly to the expanded entry page and enter more attribute information. Information about the host hardware and physical location can be included with the host entry.

    Figure 28.3. Expanded Entry Page

    host attr

Chapter 29. Managing hosts using Ansible playbooks

Ansible is an automation tool used to configure systems, deploy software, and perform rolling updates. Ansible includes support for Identity Management (IdM), and you can use Ansible modules to automate host management.

This chapter describes the following operations performed when managing hosts and host entries using Ansible playbooks:

29.1. Ensuring the presence of an IdM host entry with FQDN using Ansible playbooks

This section describes ensuring the presence of host entries in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks. The host entries are only defined by their fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs).

Specifying the FQDN name of the host is enough if at least one of the following conditions applies:

  • The IdM server is not configured to manage DNS.
  • The host does not have a static IP address or the IP address is not known at the time the host is configured. Adding a host defined only by an FQDN essentially creates a placeholder entry in the IdM DNS service. For example, laptops may be preconfigured as IdM clients, but they do not have IP addresses at the time they are configured. When the DNS service dynamically updates its records, the host’s current IP address is detected and its DNS record is updated.
Note

Without Ansible, host entries are created in IdM using the ipa host-add command. The result of adding a host to IdM is the state of the host being present in IdM. Because of the Ansible reliance on idempotence, to add a host to IdM using Ansible, you must create a playbook in which you define the state of the host as present: state: present.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • The ansible-freeipa package is installed on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the FQDN of the host whose presence in IdM you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/host/add-host.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Host present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Host host01.idm.example.com present
        ipahost:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: host01.idm.example.com
          state: present
          force: yes
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-host-is-present.yml
Note

The procedure results in a host entry in the IdM LDAP server being created but not in enrolling the host into the IdM Kerberos realm. For that, you must deploy the host as an IdM client. For details, see Installing an Identity Management client using an Ansible playbook.

Verification steps

  1. Log in to your IdM server as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
  2. Enter the ipa host-show command and specify the name of the host:

    $ ipa host-show host01.idm.example.com
      Host name: host01.idm.example.com
      Principal name: host/host01.idm.example.com@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: host/host01.idm.example.com@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Password: False
      Keytab: False
      Managed by: host01.idm.example.com

The output confirms that host01.idm.example.com exists in IdM.

29.2. Ensuring the presence of an IdM host entry with DNS information using Ansible playbooks

This section describes ensuring the presence of host entries in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks. The host entries are defined by their fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs) and their IP addresses.

Note

Without Ansible, host entries are created in IdM using the ipa host-add command. The result of adding a host to IdM is the state of the host being present in IdM. Because of the Ansible reliance on idempotence, to add a host to IdM using Ansible, you must create a playbook in which you define the state of the host as present: state: present.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • The ansible-freeipa package is installed on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the host whose presence in IdM you want to ensure. In addition, if the IdM server is configured to manage DNS and you know the IP address of the host, specify a value for the ip_address parameter. The IP address is necessary for the host to exist in the DNS resource records. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/host/host-present.yml file. You can also include other, additional information:

    ---
    - name: Host present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure host01.idm.example.com is present
        ipahost:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: host01.idm.example.com
          description: Example host
          ip_address: 192.168.0.123
          locality: Lab
          ns_host_location: Lab
          ns_os_version: CentOS 7
          ns_hardware_platform: Lenovo T61
          mac_address:
          - "08:00:27:E3:B1:2D"
          - "52:54:00:BD:97:1E"
          state: present
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-host-is-present.yml
Note

The procedure results in a host entry in the IdM LDAP server being created but not in enrolling the host into the IdM Kerberos realm. For that, you must deploy the host as an IdM client. For details, see Installing an Identity Management client using an Ansible playbook.

Verification steps

  1. Log in to your IdM server as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
  2. Enter the ipa host-show command and specify the name of the host:

    $ ipa host-show host01.idm.example.com
      Host name: host01.idm.example.com
      Description: Example host
      Locality: Lab
      Location: Lab
      Platform: Lenovo T61
      Operating system: CentOS 7
      Principal name: host/host01.idm.example.com@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: host/host01.idm.example.com@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      MAC address: 08:00:27:E3:B1:2D, 52:54:00:BD:97:1E
      Password: False
      Keytab: False
      Managed by: host01.idm.example.com

The output confirms host01.idm.example.com exists in IdM.

29.3. Ensuring the presence of multiple IdM host entries with random passwords using Ansible playbooks

The ipahost module allows the system administrator to ensure the presence or absence of multiple host entries in IdM using just one Ansible task. This section describes how to ensure the presence of multiple host entries that are only defined by their fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs). Running the Ansible playbook generates random passwords for the hosts.

Note

Without Ansible, host entries are created in IdM using the ipa host-add command. The result of adding a host to IdM is the state of the host being present in IdM. Because of the Ansible reliance on idempotence, to add a host to IdM using Ansible, you must create a playbook in which you define the state of the host as present: state: present.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • The ansible-freeipa package is installed on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the hosts whose presence in IdM you want to ensure. To make the Ansible playbook generate a random password for each host even when the host already exists in IdM and update_password is limited to on_create, add the random: yes and force: yes options. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example from the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/README-host.md Markdown file:

    ---
    - name: Ensure hosts with random password
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Hosts host01.idm.example.com and host02.idm.example.com present with random passwords
        ipahost:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          hosts:
          - name: host01.idm.example.com
            random: yes
            force: yes
          - name: host02.idm.example.com
            random: yes
            force: yes
        register: ipahost
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-hosts-are-present.yml
    [...]
    TASK [Hosts host01.idm.example.com and host02.idm.example.com present with random passwords]
    changed: [r8server.idm.example.com] => {"changed": true, "host": {"host01.idm.example.com": {"randompassword": "0HoIRvjUdH0Ycbf6uYdWTxH"}, "host02.idm.example.com": {"randompassword": "5VdLgrf3wvojmACdHC3uA3s"}}}

Verification steps

  1. Log in to your IdM server as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
  2. Enter the ipa host-show command and specify the name of one of the hosts:

    $ ipa host-show host01.idm.example.com
      Host name: host01.idm.example.com
      Password: True
      Keytab: False
      Managed by: host01.idm.example.com

The output confirms host01.idm.example.com exists in IdM with a random password.

29.4. Ensuring the presence of an IdM host entry with multiple IP addresses using Ansible playbooks

This section describes how to ensure the presence of a host entry in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks. The host entry is defined by its fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) and its multiple IP addresses.

Note

In contrast to the ipa host utility, the Ansible ipahost module can ensure the presence or absence of several IPv4 and IPv6 addresses for a host. The ipa host-mod command cannot handle IP addresses.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • The ansible-freeipa package is installed on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file. Specify, as the name of the ipahost variable, the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the host whose presence in IdM you want to ensure. Specify each of the multiple IPv4 and IPv6 ip_address values on a separate line by using the - ip_address syntax. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/host/host-member-ipaddresses-present.yml file. You can also include additional information:

    ---
    - name: Host member IP addresses present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure host101.example.com IP addresses present
        ipahost:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: host01.idm.example.com
          ip_address:
          - 192.168.0.123
          - fe80::20c:29ff:fe02:a1b3
          - 192.168.0.124
          - fe80::20c:29ff:fe02:a1b4
          force: yes
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-host-with-multiple-IP-addreses-is-present.yml
Note

The procedure creates a host entry in the IdM LDAP server but does not enroll the host into the IdM Kerberos realm. For that, you must deploy the host as an IdM client. For details, see Installing an Identity Management client using an Ansible playbook.

Verification steps

  1. Log in to your IdM server as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
  2. Enter the ipa host-show command and specify the name of the host:

    $ ipa host-show host01.idm.example.com
      Principal name: host/host01.idm.example.com@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: host/host01.idm.example.com@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Password: False
      Keytab: False
      Managed by: host01.idm.example.com

    The output confirms that host01.idm.example.com exists in IdM.

  3. To verify that the multiple IP addresses of the host exist in the IdM DNS records, enter the ipa dnsrecord-show command and specify the following information:

    • The name of the IdM domain
    • The name of the host

      $ ipa dnsrecord-show idm.example.com host01
      [...]
        Record name: host01
        A record: 192.168.0.123, 192.168.0.124
        AAAA record: fe80::20c:29ff:fe02:a1b3, fe80::20c:29ff:fe02:a1b4

    The output confirms that all the IPv4 and IPv6 addresses specified in the playbook are correctly associated with the host01.idm.example.com host entry.

29.5. Ensuring the absence of an IdM host entry using Ansible playbooks

This section describes how to ensure the absence of host entries in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks.

Prerequisites

  • IdM administrator credentials

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the host whose absence from IdM you want to ensure. If your IdM domain has integrated DNS, use the updatedns: yes option to remove the associated records of any kind for the host from the DNS.

    To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/host/delete-host.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Host absent
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Host host01.idm.example.com absent
        ipahost:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: host01.idm.example.com
          updatedns: yes
          state: absent
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-host-absent.yml
Note

The procedure results in:

  • The host not being present in the IdM Kerberos realm.
  • The host entry not being present in the IdM LDAP server.

To remove the specific IdM configuration of system services, such as System Security Services Daemon (SSSD), from the client host itself, you must run the ipa-client-install --uninstall command on the client. For details, see Uninstalling an IdM client.

Verification steps

  1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about host01.idm.example.com:

    $ ipa host-show host01.idm.example.com
    ipa: ERROR: host01.idm.example.com: host not found

The output confirms that the host does not exist in IdM.

Additional resources

  • You can see the definitions of the ipahost variables as well as sample Ansible playbooks for ensuring the presence, absence, and disablement of hosts in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/README-host.md Markdown file.
  • Additional playbooks are in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/host directory.

Chapter 30. Managing host groups using the IdM CLI

This chapter introduces host groups in Identity Management (IdM) and describes the following operations to manage host groups and their members in the command-line interface (CLI):

  • Viewing host groups and their members
  • Creating host groups
  • Deleting host groups
  • Adding host group members
  • Removing host group members
  • Adding host group member managers
  • Removing host group member managers

30.1. Host groups in IdM

IdM host groups can be used to centralize control over important management tasks, particularly access control.

Definition of host groups

A host group is an entity that contains a set of IdM hosts with common access control rules and other characteristics. For example, you can define host groups based on company departments, physical locations, or access control requirements.

A host group in IdM can include:

  • IdM servers and clients
  • Other IdM host groups

Host groups created by default

By default, the IdM server creates the host group ipaservers for all IdM server hosts.

Direct and indirect group members

Group attributes in IdM apply to both direct and indirect members: when host group B is a member of host group A, all members of host group B are considered indirect members of host group A.

30.2. Viewing IdM host groups using the CLI

This section describes how to view IdM host groups using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Find all host groups using the ipa hostgroup-find command.

    $ ipa hostgroup-find
    -------------------
    1 hostgroup matched
    -------------------
      Host-group: ipaservers
      Description: IPA server hosts
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

    To display all attributes of a host group, add the --all option. For example:

    $ ipa hostgroup-find --all
    -------------------
    1 hostgroup matched
    -------------------
      dn: cn=ipaservers,cn=hostgroups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=local
      Host-group: ipaservers
      Description: IPA server hosts
      Member hosts: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
      ipauniqueid: xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx
      objectclass: top, groupOfNames, nestedGroup, ipaobject, ipahostgroup
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

30.3. Creating IdM host groups using the CLI

This section describes how to create IdM host groups using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Add a host group using the ipa hostgroup-add command.
    For example, to create an IdM host group named group_name and give it a description:

    $ ipa hostgroup-add --desc 'My new host group' group_name
    ---------------------
    Added hostgroup "group_name"
    ---------------------
      Host-group: group_name
      Description: My new host group
    ---------------------

30.4. Deleting IdM host groups using the CLI

This section describes how to delete IdM host groups using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Delete a host group using the ipa hostgroup-del command.
    For example, to delete the IdM host group named group_name:

    $ ipa hostgroup-del group_name
    --------------------------
    Deleted hostgroup "group_name"
    --------------------------
Note

Removing a group does not delete the group members from IdM.

30.5. Adding IdM host group members using the CLI

You can add hosts as well as host groups as members to an IdM host group using a single command.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.
  • An active Kerberos ticket. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • Optional. Use the ipa hostgroup-find command to find hosts and host groups.

Procedure

  1. To add a member to a host group, use the ipa hostgroup-add-member and provide the relevant information. You can specify the type of member to add using these options:

    • Use the --hosts option to add one or more hosts to an IdM host group.
      For example, to add the host named example_member to the group named group_name:

      $ ipa hostgroup-add-member group_name --hosts example_member
      Host-group: group_name
      Description: My host group
      Member hosts: example_member
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 1
      -------------------------
    • Use the --hostgroups option to add one or more host groups to an IdM host group.
      For example, to add the host group named nested_group to the group named group_name:

      $ ipa hostgroup-add-member group_name --hostgroups nested_group
      Host-group: group_name
      Description: My host group
      Member host-groups: nested_group
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 1
      -------------------------
    • You can add multiple hosts and multiple host groups to an IdM host group in one single command using the following syntax:

      $ ipa hostgroup-add-member group_name --hosts={host1,host2} --hostgroups={group1,group2}
Important

When adding a host group as a member of another host group, do not create recursive groups. For example, if Group A is a member of Group B, do not add Group B as a member of Group A. Recursive groups can cause unpredictable behavior.

30.6. Removing IdM host group members using the CLI

You can remove hosts as well as host groups from an IdM host group using a single command.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.
  • An active Kerberos ticket. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • Optional. Use the ipa hostgroup-find command to confirm that the group includes the member you want to remove.

Procedure

  1. To remove a host group member, use the ipa hostgroup-remove-member command and provide the relevant information. You can specify the type of member to remove using these options:

    • Use the --hosts option to remove one or more hosts from an IdM host group.
      For example, to remove the host named example_member from the group named group_name:

      $ ipa hostgroup-remove-member group_name --hosts example_member
      Host-group: group_name
      Description: My host group
      -------------------------
      Number of members removed 1
      -------------------------
    • Use the --hostgroups option to remove one or more host groups from an IdM host group.
      For example, to remove the host group named nested_group from the group named group_name:

      $ ipa hostgroup-remove-member group_name --hostgroups example_member
      Host-group: group_name
      Description: My host group
      -------------------------
      Number of members removed 1
      -------------------------
Note

Removing a group does not delete the group members from IdM.

  • You can remove multiple hosts and multiple host groups from an IdM host group in one single command using the following syntax:

    $ ipa hostgroup-remove-member group_name --hosts={host1,host2} --hostgroups={group1,group2}

30.7. Adding IdM host group member managers using the CLI

You can add hosts as well as host groups as member managers to an IdM host group using a single command. Member managers can add hosts or host groups to IdM host groups but cannot change the attributes of a host group.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.
  • An active Kerberos ticket. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • You must have the name of the host or host group you are adding as member managers and the name of the host group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  1. Optional. Use the ipa hostgroup-find command to find hosts and host groups.
  2. To add a member manager to a host group, use the ipa hostgroup-add-member-manager.

    For example, to add the user named example_member as a member manager to the group named group_name:

    $ ipa hostgroup-add-member-manager group_name --user example_member
    Host-group: group_name
    Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
    Member host-groups: project_admins
    Member of netgroups: group_name
    Membership managed by users: example_member
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------
  3. Use the --groups option to add one or more host groups as a member manager to an IdM host group.

    For example, to add the host group named admin_group as a member manager to the group named group_name:

    $ ipa hostgroup-add-member-manager group_name --groups admin_group
    Host-group: group_name
    Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
    Member host-groups: project_admins
    Member of netgroups: group_name
    Membership managed by groups: admin_group
    Membership managed by users: example_member
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------
Note

After you add a member manager to a host group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Using the ipa group-show command to verify the host user and host group were added as member managers.

    $ ipa hostgroup-show group_name
    Host-group: group_name
    Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
    Member host-groups: project_admins
    Membership managed by groups: admin_group
    Membership managed by users: example_member

Additional resources

  • See ipa hostgroup-add-member-manager --help for more details.
  • See ipa hostgroup-show --help for more details.

30.8. Removing IdM host group member managers using the CLI

You can remove hosts as well as host groups as member managers from an IdM host group using a single command. Member managers can remove hosts group member managers from IdM host groups but cannot change the attributes of a host group.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.
  • An active Kerberos ticket. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager host group you are removing and the name of the host group they are managing.

Procedure

  1. Optional. Use the ipa hostgroup-find command to find hosts and host groups.
  2. To remove a member manager from a host group, use the ipa hostgroup-remove-member-manager command.

    For example, to remove the user named example_member as a member manager from the group named group_name:

    $ ipa hostgroup-remove-member-manager group_name --user example_member
    Host-group: group_name
    Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
    Member host-groups: project_admins
    Member of netgroups: group_name
    Membership managed by groups: nested_group
    ---------------------------
    Number of members removed 1
    ---------------------------
  3. Use the --groups option to remove one or more host groups as a member manager from an IdM host group.

    For example, to remove the host group named nested_group as a member manager from the group named group_name:

    $ ipa hostgroup-remove-member-manager group_name --groups nested_group
    Host-group: group_name
    Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
    Member host-groups: project_admins
    Member of netgroups: group_name
    ---------------------------
    Number of members removed 1
    ---------------------------
Note

After you remove a member manager from a host group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Use the ipa group-show command to verify that the host user and host group were removed as member managers.

    $ ipa hostgroup-show group_name
    Host-group: group_name
    Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
    Member host-groups: project_admins

Additional resources

  • See ipa hostgroup-remove-member-manager --help for more details.
  • See ipa hostgroup-show --help for more details.

Chapter 31. Managing host groups using the IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces host groups in Identity Management (IdM) and describes the following operations to manage host groups and their members in the Web interface (Web UI):

  • Viewing host groups and their members
  • Creating host groups
  • Deleting host groups
  • Adding host group members
  • Removing host group members
  • Adding host group member managers
  • Removing host group member managers

31.1. Host groups in IdM

IdM host groups can be used to centralize control over important management tasks, particularly access control.

Definition of host groups

A host group is an entity that contains a set of IdM hosts with common access control rules and other characteristics. For example, you can define host groups based on company departments, physical locations, or access control requirements.

A host group in IdM can include:

  • IdM servers and clients
  • Other IdM host groups

Host groups created by default

By default, the IdM server creates the host group ipaservers for all IdM server hosts.

Direct and indirect group members

Group attributes in IdM apply to both direct and indirect members: when host group B is a member of host group A, all members of host group B are considered indirect members of host group A.

31.2. Viewing host groups in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to view IdM host groups using the Web interface (Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups, and select the Host Groups tab.

    • The page lists the existing host groups and their descriptions.
    • You can search for a specific host group.

    idm viewing host groups

  2. Click on a group in the list to display the hosts that belong to this group. You can limit results to direct or indirect members.

    idm viewing host group members

  3. Select the Host Groups tab to display the host groups that belong to this group (nested host groups). You can limit results to direct or indirect members.

    idm viewing host group members nested group

31.3. Creating host groups in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to create IdM host groups using the Web interface (Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups, and select the Host Groups tab.
  2. Click Add. The Add host group dialog appears.
  3. Provide the information about the group: name (required) and description (optional).
  4. Click Add to confirm.

    idm creating host groups

31.4. Deleting host groups in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to delete IdM host groups using the Web interface (Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select the Host Groups tab.
  2. Select the IdM host group to remove, and click Delete. A confirmation dialog appears.
  3. Click Delete to confirm

    idm deleting host groups

Note

Removing a host group does not delete the group members from IdM.

31.5. Adding host group members in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to add host group members in IdM using the web interface (Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select the Host Groups tab.
  2. Click the name of the group to which you want to add members.
  3. Click the tab Hosts or Host groups depending on the type of members you want to add. The corresponding dialog appears.
  4. Select the hosts or host groups to add, and click the > arrow button to move them to the Prospective column.
  5. Click Add to confirm.

    idm adding host group members

31.6. Removing host group members in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to remove host group members in IdM using the web interface (Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select the Host Groups tab.
  2. Click the name of the group from which you want to remove members.
  3. Click the tab Hosts or Host groups depending on the type of members you want to remove.
  4. Select the check box next to the member you want to remove.
  5. Click Delete. A confirmation dialog appears.

    idm removing host group members

  6. Click Delete to confirm. The selected members are deleted.

31.7. Adding IdM host group member managers using the Web UI

This section describes how to add users or user groups as host group member managers in IdM using the web interface (Web UI). Member managers can add hosts group member managers to IdM host groups but cannot change the attributes of a host group.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.
  • You are logged-in to the IdM Web UI. For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.
  • You must have the name of the host group you are adding as member managers and the name of the host group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select the Host Groups tab.

    hostgroups
  2. Click the name of the group to which you want to add member managers.
  3. Click the member managers tab User Groups or Users depending on the type of member managers you want to add. The corresponding dialog appears.
  4. Click Add.

    group membermanagers
  5. Select the users or user groups to add, and click the > arrow button to move them to the Prospective column.
  6. Click Add to confirm.
Note

After you add a member manager to a host group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • On the Host Group dialog, verify the user group or user has been added to the member managers list of groups or users.

    membermanager added

31.8. Removing IdM host group member managers using the Web UI

This section describes how to remove users or user groups as host group member managers in IdM using the web interface (Web UI). Member managers can remove hosts group member managers from IdM host groups but cannot change the attributes of a host group.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.
  • You are logged-in to the IdM Web UI. For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager host group you are removing and the name of the host group they are managing.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select the Host Groups tab.

    hostgroup tab
  2. Click the name of the group from which you want to remove member managers.
  3. Click the member managers tab User Groups or Users depending on the type of member managers you want to remove. The corresponding dialog appears.
  4. Select the user or user groups to remove and click Delete.
  5. Click Delete to confirm.

    idm removing host group member managers
    Note

    After you remove a member manager from a host group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • On the Host Group dialog, verify the user group or user has been removed from the member managers list of groups or users.

    remove membermanager verification

Chapter 32. Managing host groups using Ansible playbooks

This chapter describes using Ansible to perform the following operations involving host groups in Identity Management (IdM):

32.1. Ensuring the presence of IdM host groups using Ansible playbooks

This section describes how to ensure the presence of host groups in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks.

Note

Without Ansible, host group entries are created in IdM using the ipa hostgroup-add command. The result of adding a host group to IdM is the state of the host group being present in IdM. Because of the Ansible reliance on idempotence, to add a host group to IdM using Ansible, you must create a playbook in which you define the state of the host group as present: state: present.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it with the list of IdM servers to target:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host group information. For example, to ensure the presence of a host group named databases, specify name: databases in the - ipahostgroup task. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/ensure-hostgroup-is-present.yml file.

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle hostgroups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      # Ensure host-group databases is present
      - ipahostgroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: databases
          state: present

    In the playbook, state: present signifies a request to add the host group to IdM unless it already exists there.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-hostgroup-is-present.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

    $ kinit admin
    Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
  3. Display information about the host group whose presence in IdM you wanted to ensure:

    $ ipa hostgroup-show databases
      Host-group: databases

The databases host group exists in IdM.

32.2. Ensuring the presence of hosts in IdM host groups using Ansible playbooks

This section describes how to ensure the presence of hosts in host groups in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it with the list of IdM servers to target:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host information. Specify the name of the host group using the name parameter of the ipahostgroup variable. Specify the name of the host with the host parameter of the ipahostgroup variable. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the examples in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/hostgroup/ensure-hosts-and-hostgroups-are-present-in-hostgroup.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle hostgroups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      # Ensure host-group databases is present
      - ipahostgroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: databases
          host:
          - db.idm.example.com
          action: member

    This playbook adds the db.idm.example.com host to the databases host group. The action: member line indicates that when the playbook is run, no attempt is made to add the databases group itself. Instead, only an attempt is made to add db.idm.example.com to databases.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-hosts-or-hostgroups-are-present-in-hostgroup.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

    $ kinit admin
    Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
  3. Display information about a host group to see which hosts are present in it:

    $ ipa hostgroup-show databases
      Host-group: databases
      Member hosts: db.idm.example.com

The db.idm.example.com host is present as a member of the databases host group.

32.3. Nesting IdM host groups using Ansible playbooks

This section describes ensuring the presence of nested host groups in Identity Management (IdM) host groups using Ansible playbooks.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it with the list of IdM servers to target:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host group information. To ensure that a nested host group A exists in a host group B: in the Ansible playbook, specify, among the - ipahostgroup variables, the name of the host group B using the name variable. Specify the name of the nested hostgroup A with the hostgroup variable. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the examples in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/hostgroup/ensure-hosts-and-hostgroups-are-present-in-hostgroup.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle hostgroups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      # Ensure hosts and hostgroups are present in existing databases hostgroup
      - ipahostgroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: databases
          hostgroup:
          - mysql-server
          - oracle-server
          action: member

    This Ansible playbook ensures the presence of the myqsl-server and oracle-server host groups in the databases host group. The action: member line indicates that when the playbook is run, no attempt is made to add the databases group itself to IdM.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-hosts-or-hostgroups-are-present-in-hostgroup.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

    $ kinit admin
    Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
  3. Display information about the host group in which nested host groups are present:

    $ ipa hostgroup-show databases
      Host-group: databases
      Member hosts: db.idm.example.com
      Member host-groups: mysql-server, oracle-server

The mysql-server and oracle-server host groups exist in the databases host group.

32.4. Ensuring the presence of member managers in IDM host groups using Ansible Playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of member managers in IdM hosts and host groups using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.
  • You must have the name of the host or host group you are adding as member managers and the name of the host group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host and host group member management information:

    ---
    
    - name: Playbook to handle host group membership management
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure member manager user example_member is present for group_name
          ipahostgroup:
            ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
            name: group_name
            membermanager_user: example_member
    
      - name: Ensure member manager group project_admins is present for group_name
          ipahostgroup:
            ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
            name: group_name
            membermanager_group: project_admins
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-member-managers-host-groups.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the group_name group contains example_member and project_admins as member managers by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about testhostgroup:

    ipaserver]$ ipa hostgroup-show group_name
      Host-group: group_name
      Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
      Member host-groups: testhostgroup2
      Membership managed by groups: project_admins
      Membership managed by users: example_member

Additional resources

  • See ipa hostgroup-add-member-manager --help.
  • See the ipa man page.

32.5. Ensuring the absence of hosts from IdM host groups using Ansible playbooks

This section describes how to ensure the absence of hosts from host groups in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it with the list of IdM servers to target:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host and host group information. Specify the name of the host group using the name parameter of the ipahostgroup variable. Specify the name of the host whose absence from the host group you want to ensure using the host parameter of the ipahostgroup variable. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the examples in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/hostgroup/ensure-hosts-and-hostgroups-are-absent-in-hostgroup.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle hostgroups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      # Ensure host-group databases is absent
      - ipahostgroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: databases
          host:
          - db.idm.example.com
          action: member
          state: absent

    This playbook ensures the absence of the db.idm.example.com host from the databases host group. The action: member line indicates that when the playbook is run, no attempt is made to remove the databases group itself.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-hosts-or-hostgroups-are-absent-in-hostgroup.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

    $ kinit admin
    Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
  3. Display information about the host group and the hosts it contains:

    $ ipa hostgroup-show databases
      Host-group: databases
      Member host-groups: mysql-server, oracle-server

The db.idm.example.com host does not exist in the databases host group.

32.6. Ensuring the absence of nested host groups from IdM host groups using Ansible playbooks

This section describes how to ensure the absence of nested host groups from outer host groups in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it with the list of IdM servers to target:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host group information. Specify, among the - ipahostgroup variables, the name of the outer host group using the name variable. Specify the name of the nested hostgroup with the hostgroup variable. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the examples in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/hostgroup/ensure-hosts-and-hostgroups-are-absent-in-hostgroup.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle hostgroups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      # Ensure hosts and hostgroups are absent in existing databases hostgroup
      - ipahostgroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: databases
          hostgroup:
          - mysql-server
          - oracle-server
          action: member
          state: absent

    This playbook makes sure that the mysql-server and oracle-server host groups are absent from the databases host group. The action: member line indicates that when the playbook is run, no attempt is made to ensure the databases group itself is deleted from IdM.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-hosts-or-hostgroups-are-absent-in-hostgroup.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

    $ kinit admin
    Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
  3. Display information about the host group from which nested host groups should be absent:

    $ ipa hostgroup-show databases
      Host-group: databases

The output confirms that the mysql-server and oracle-server nested host groups are absent from the outer databases host group.

32.7. Ensuring the absence of IdM host groups using Ansible playbooks

This section describes how to ensure the absence of host groups in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks.

Note

Without Ansible, host group entries are removed from IdM using the ipa hostgroup-del command. The result of removing a host group from IdM is the state of the host group being absent from IdM. Because of the Ansible reliance on idempotence, to remove a host group from IdM using Ansible, you must create a playbook in which you define the state of the host group as absent: state: absent.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it with the list of IdM servers to target:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host group information. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/ensure-hostgroup-is-absent.yml file.

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle hostgroups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - Ensure host-group databases is absent
        ipahostgroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: databases
          state: absent

    This playbook ensures the absence of the databases host group from IdM. The state: absent means a request to delete the host group from IdM unless it is already deleted.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-hostgroup-is-absent.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

    $ kinit admin
    Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
  3. Display information about the host group whose absence you ensured:

    $ ipa hostgroup-show databases
    ipa: ERROR: databases: host group not found

The databases host group does not exist in IdM.

32.8. Ensuring the absence of member managers from IdM host groups using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the absence of member managers in IdM hosts and host groups using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.
  • You must have the name of the user or user group you are removing as member managers and the name of the host group they are managing.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary host and host group member management information:

    ---
    
    - name: Playbook to handle host group membership management
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure member manager host and host group members are absent for group_name
        ipahostgroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: group_name
          membermanager_user: example_member
          membermanager_group: project_admins
          action: member
          state: absent
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-member-managers-host-groups-are-absent.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the group_name group does not contain example_member or project_admins as member managers by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about testhostgroup:

    ipaserver]$ ipa hostgroup-show group_name
      Host-group: group_name
      Member hosts: server.idm.example.com
      Member host-groups: testhostgroup2

Additional resources

  • See ipa hostgroup-add-member-manager --help.
  • See the ipa man page.

Chapter 33. Managing Kerberos ticket policies

Kerberos ticket policies in Identity Management (IdM) set restrictions on Kerberos ticket access, duration, and renewal. You can configure Kerberos ticket policies for the Key Distribution Center (KDC) running on your IdM server.

This chapter presents the following Kerberos ticket management topics and tasks:

33.1. The role of the IdM KDC

Identity Management’s authentication mechanisms use the Kerberos infrastructure established by the Key Distribution Center (KDC). The KDC is the trusted authority that stores credential information and ensures the authenticity of data originating from entities within the IdM network.

Each IdM user, service, and host acts as a Kerberos client and is identified by a unique Kerberos principal:

  • For users: identifier@REALM, such as admin@EXAMPLE.COM
  • For services: service/fully-qualified-hostname@REALM, such as http/master.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
  • For hosts: host/fully-qualified-hostname@REALM, such as host/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM

The following image is a simplification of the communication between a Kerberos client, the KDC, and a Kerberized application that the client wants to communicate with.

Kerberos KDC flow of communication
  1. A Kerberos client identifies itself to the KDC by authenticating as a Kerberos principal. For example, an IdM user performs kinit username and provides their password.
  2. The KDC checks for the principal in its database, authenticates the client, and evaluates Kerberos ticket policies to determine whether to grant the request.
  3. The KDC issues the client a ticket-granting ticket (TGT) with a lifecycle and authentication indicators according to the appropriate ticket policy.
  4. With the TGT, the client requests a service ticket from the KDC to communicate with a Kerberized service on a target host.
  5. The KDC checks if the client’s TGT is still valid, and evaluates the service ticket request against ticket policies.
  6. The KDC issues the client a service ticket.
  7. With the service ticket, the client can initiate encrypted communication with the service on the target host.

33.2. IdM Kerberos ticket policy types

IdM Kerberos ticket policies implement the following ticket policy types:

Connection policy

To protect Kerberized services with different levels of security, you can define connection policies to enforce rules based on which pre-authentication mechanism a client used to retrieve a ticket-granting ticket (TGT).

For example, you can require smart card authentication to connect to client1.example.com, and require two-factor authentication to access the testservice application on client2.example.com.

To enforce connection policies, associate authentication indicators with services. Only clients that have the required authentication indicators in their service ticket requests are able to access those services. For more information, see Kerberos authentication indicators.

Ticket lifecycle policy

Each Kerberos ticket has a lifetime and a potential renewal age: you can renew a ticket before it reaches its maximum lifetime, but not after it exceeds its maximum renewal age.

The default global ticket lifetime is one day (86400 seconds) and the default global maximum renewal age is one week (604800 seconds). To adjust these global values, see Configuring the global ticket lifecycle policy.

You can also define your own ticket lifecycle policies:

33.3. Kerberos authentication indicators

The Kerberos Key Distribution Center (KDC) attaches authentication indicators to a ticket-granting ticket (TGT) based on which pre-authentication mechanism the client used prove its identity:

otp
two-factor authentication (password + One-Time Password)
radius
RADIUS authentication (commonly for 802.1x authentication)
pkinit
PKINIT, smart card, or certificate authentication
hardened
hardened passwords (SPAKE or FAST)[1]

The KDC then attaches the authentication indicators from the TGT to any service ticket requests that stem from it. The KDC enforces policies such as service access control, maximum ticket lifetime, and maximum renewable age based on the authentication indicators.

33.3.1. Authentication indicators and IdM services

If you associate a service or a host with an authentication indicator, only clients that used the corresponding authentication mechanism to obtain a TGT will be able to access it. The KDC, not the application or service, checks for authentication indicators in service ticket requests, and grants or denies requests based on Kerberos connection policies.

For example, to require two-factor authentication to connect to host secure.example.com, associate the otp authentication indicator with the host/secure.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM Kerberos principal. Only users who used a One-Time password to obtain their initial TGT from the KDC will be able to log in.

If a service or a host has no authentication indicators assigned to it, it will accept tickets authenticated by any mechanism.

Additional resources



[1] A hardened password is protected against brute-force password dictionary attacks by using Single-Party Public-Key Authenticated Key Exchange (SPAKE) pre-authentication and/or Flexible Authentication via Secure Tunneling (FAST) armoring.

33.4. Enforcing authentication indicators for an IdM service

This procedure describes creating an IdM service and configuring it to require particular Kerberos authentication indicators from incoming service ticket requests.

By associating authentication indicators with an IdM service, only clients who used those specific pre-authentication mechanisms to obtain their initial ticket-granting ticket (TGT) will be able to access the service.

33.4.1. Creating an IdM service entry and its Kerberos keytab

Adding an IdM service entry to IdM for a service running on an IdM host creates a corresponding Kerberos principal, and allows the service to request an SSL certificate, a Kerberos keytab, or both.

The following procedure describes creating an IdM service entry and generating an associated Kerberos keytab for encrypting communication with that service.

Prerequisites

  • Your service can store a Kerberos principal, an SSL certificate, or both.

Procedure

  1. Add an IdM service with the ipa service-add command to create a Kerberos principal associated with it. For example, to create the IdM service entry for the testservice application that runs on host client.example.com:

    [root@client ~]# ipa service-add testservice/client.example.com
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Modified service "testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM"
    -------------------------------------------------------------
      Principal name: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Managed by: client.example.com
  2. Generate and store a Kerberos keytab for the service on the client.

    [root@client ~]# ipa-getkeytab -k /etc/testservice.keytab -p testservice/client.example.com
    Keytab successfully retrieved and stored in: /etc/testservice.keytab

Verification steps

  1. Display information about an IdM service with the ipa service-show command.

    [root@server ~]# ipa service-show testservice/client.example.com
      Principal name: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Keytab: True
      Managed by: client.example.com
  2. Display the contents of the service’s Kerberos keytab with the klist command.

    [root@server etc]# klist -ekt /etc/testservice.keytab
    Keytab name: FILE:/etc/testservice.keytab
    KVNO Timestamp           Principal
    ---- ------------------- ------------------------------------------------------
       2 04/01/2020 17:52:55 testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM (aes256-cts-hmac-sha1-96)
       2 04/01/2020 17:52:55 testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM (aes128-cts-hmac-sha1-96)
       2 04/01/2020 17:52:55 testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM (camellia128-cts-cmac)
       2 04/01/2020 17:52:55 testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM (camellia256-cts-cmac)

33.4.2. Associating authentication indicators with an IdM service

This procedure describes configuring a service to require particular Kerberos authentication indicators from incoming service ticket requests.

Prerequisites

Warning

Do not assign authentication indicators to internal IdM services. The following IdM services cannot perform the interactive authentication steps required by PKINIT and multi-factor authentication methods:

host/server.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
HTTP/server.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
ldap/server.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
DNS/server.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
cifs/server.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM

Procedure

  • Use the ipa service-mod command to specify one or more required authentication indicators for a service, identified with the --auth-ind argument.

    Authentication method--auth-ind value

    Two-factor authentication

    otp

    RADIUS authentication

    radius

    PKINIT, smart card, or certificate authentication

    pkinit

    Hardened passwords (SPAKE or FAST)

    hardened

    For example, to require that a user was authenticated with smart card or OTP authentication to retrieve a service ticket for the testservice principal on host client.example.com:

    [root@server ~]# ipa service-mod testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM --auth-ind otp --auth-ind pkinit
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Modified service "testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM"
    -------------------------------------------------------------
      Principal name: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Authentication Indicators: otp, pkinit
      Managed by: client.example.com
Note

To remove all authentication indicators from a service, provide an empty list of indicators:

[root@server ~]# ipa service-mod testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM --auth-ind ''
------------------------------------------------------
Modified service "testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM"
------------------------------------------------------
  Principal name: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
  Principal alias: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
  Managed by: client.example.com

Verification steps

  • Display information about an IdM service, including the authentication indicators it requires, with the ipa service-show command.

    [root@server ~]# ipa service-show testservice/client.example.com
      Principal name: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM
      Authentication Indicators: otp, pkinit
      Keytab: True
      Managed by: client.example.com

Additional resources

33.4.3. Retrieving a Kerberos service ticket for an IdM service

The following procedure describes retrieving a Kerberos service ticket for an IdM service. You can use this procedure to test Kerberos ticket policies.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Use the kvno command with the -S option to retrieve a service ticket, and specify the name of the IdM service and the fully-qualified domain name of the host that manages it.

    [root@server ~]# kvno -S testservice client.example.com
    testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM: kvno = 1
Note

If you need to access an IdM service and your current ticket-granting ticket (TGT) does not possess the required authentication indicators associated with it, clear your current Kerberos credentials cache with the kdestroy command and retrieve a new TGT:

[root@server ~]# kdestroy

For example, if you initially retrieved a TGT by authenticating with a password, and you need to access an IdM service that has the pkinit authentication indicator associated with it, destroy your current credentials cache and re-authenticate with a smart card. See Kerberos authentication indicators.

Verification steps

  • Use the klist command to verify that the service ticket is in the default Kerberos credentials cache.

    [root@server etc]# klist_
    Ticket cache: KCM:1000
    Default principal: admin@EXAMPLE.COM
    
    Valid starting       Expires              Service principal
    04/01/2020 12:52:42  04/02/2020 12:52:39  krbtgt/EXAMPLE.COM@EXAMPLE.COM
    04/01/2020 12:54:07 04/02/2020 12:52:39 testservice/client.example.com@EXAMPLE.COM

33.4.4. Additional resources

33.5. Configuring the global ticket lifecycle policy

The global ticket policy applies to all service tickets and to users that do not have any per-user ticket policies defined.

The following procedure describes adjusting the maximum ticket lifetime and maximum ticket renewal age for the global Kerberos ticket policy using the ipa krbtpolicy-mod command.

While using the ipa krbtpolicy-mod command, specify at least one of the following arguments:

  • --maxlife for the maximum ticket lifetime in seconds
  • --maxrenew for the maximum renewable age in seconds

Procedure

  1. To modify the global ticket policy:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-mod --maxlife=$((8*60*60)) --maxrenew=$((24*60*60))
      Max life: 28800
      Max renew: 86400

    In this example, the maximum lifetime is set to eight hours (8 * 60 minutes * 60 seconds) and the maximum renewal age is set to one day (24 * 60 minutes * 60 seconds).

  2. Optional: To reset the global Kerberos ticket policy to the default installation values:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-reset
      Max life: 86400
      Max renew: 604800

Verification steps

  • Display the global ticket policy:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-show
      Max life: 28800
      Max renew: 86640

Additional resources

33.6. Configuring global ticket policies per authentication indicator

This procedure describes adjusting the global maximum ticket lifetime and maximum renewable age for each authentication indicator. These settings apply to users that do not have per-user ticket policies defined.

Use the ipa krbtpolicy-mod command to specify the global maximum lifetime or maximum renewable age for Kerberos tickets depending on the authentication indicators attached to them.

Procedure

  • For example, to set the global two-factor ticket lifetime and renewal age values to one week, and the global smart card ticket lifetime and renewal age values to two weeks:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-mod --otp-maxlife=604800 --otp-maxrenew=604800 --pkinit-maxlife=172800 --pkinit-maxrenew=172800

Verification steps

  • Display the global ticket policy:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-show
      Max life: 86400
      OTP max life: 604800
      PKINIT max life: 172800
      Max renew: 604800
      OTP max renew: 604800
      PKINIT max renew: 172800

    Notice that the OTP and PKINIT values are different from the global default Max life and Max renew values.

Additional resources

33.7. Configuring the default ticket policy for a user

You can define a unique Kerberos ticket policy that only applies to a single user. These per-user settings override the global ticket policy, for all authentication indicators.

Use the ipa krbtpolicy-mod username command, and specify at least one of the following arguments:

  • --maxlife for the maximum ticket lifetime in seconds
  • --maxrenew for the maximum renewable age in seconds

Procedure

  1. For example, to set the IdM admin user’s maximum ticket lifetime to two days and maximum renewal age to two weeks:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-mod admin --maxlife=172800 --maxrenew=1209600
      Max life: 172800
      Max renew: 1209600
  2. Optional: To reset the ticket policy for a user:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-reset admin

Verification steps

  • Display the effective Kerberos ticket policy that applies to a user:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-show admin
      Max life: 172800
      Max renew: 1209600

Additional resources

33.8. Configuring individual authentication indicator ticket policies for a user

As an administrator, you can define Kerberos ticket policies for a user that differ per authentication indicator. For example, you can configure a policy to allow the IdM admin user to renew a ticket for two days if it was obtained with OTP authentication, and a week if it was obtained with smart card authentication.

These per-authentication indicator settings will override the user’s default ticket policy, the global default ticket policy, and any global authentication indicator ticket policy.

Use the ipa krbtpolicy-mod username command to set custom maximum lifetime and maximum renewable age values for a user’s Kerberos tickets depending on the authentication indicators attached to them.

Procedure

  1. For example, to allow the IdM admin user to renew a Kerberos ticket for two days if it was obtained with One-Time Password authentication, set the --otp-maxrenew option:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-mod admin --otp-maxrenew=$((2*24*60*60))
      OTP max renew: 172800
  2. Optional: To reset the ticket policy for a user:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-reset username

Verification steps

  • Display the effective Kerberos ticket policy that applies to a user:

    [root@server ~]# ipa krbtpolicy-show admin
      Max life: 28800
      Max renew: 86640

Additional resources

33.9. Authentication indicator options for the krbtpolicy-mod command

Specify values for authentication indicators with the following arguments.

Table 33.1. Authentication indicator options for the krbtpolicy-mod command

Authentication indicatorArgument for maximum lifetimeArgument for maximum renewal age

otp

--otp-maxlife

--otp-maxrenew

radius

--radius-maxlife

--radius-maxrenew

pkinit

--pkinit-maxlife

--pkinit-maxrenew

hardened

--hardened-maxlife

--hardened-maxrenew

Chapter 34. Defining IdM Password Policies

This chapter describes Identity Management (IdM) password policies and how to add a new password policy in IdM using an Ansible playbook.

34.1. What is a password policy

A password policy is a set of rules that passwords must meet. For example, a password policy can define the minimum password length and the maximum password lifetime. All users affected by this policy are required to set a sufficiently long password and change it frequently enough to meet the specified conditions. In this way, password policies help reduce the risk of someone discovering and misusing a user’s password.

34.2. Password policies in IdM

Passwords are the most common way for Identity Management (IdM) users to authenticate to the IdM Kerberos domain. Password policies define the requirements that these IdM user passwords must meet.

Note

The IdM password policy is set in the underlying LDAP directory, but the Kerberos Key Distribution Center (KDC) enforces the password policy.

Password policy attributes lists the attributes you can use to define a password policy in IdM.

Table 34.1. Password Policy Attributes

AttributeExplanationExample

Max lifetime

The maximum amount of time in days that a password is valid before a user must reset it.

Max lifetime = 90

User passwords are valid only for 90 days. After that, IdM prompts users to change them.

Min lifetime

The minimum amount of time in hours that must pass between two password change operations.

Min lifetime = 1

After users change their passwords, they must wait at least 1 hour before changing them again.

History size

The number of previous passwords that are stored. A user cannot reuse a password from their password history but can reuse old passwords that are not stored.

History size = 0

In this case, the password history is empty and users can reuse any of their previous passwords.

Character classes

The number of different character classes the user must use in the password. The character classes are:

* Uppercase characters

* Lowercase characters

* Digits

* Special characters, such as comma (,), period (.), asterisk (*)

* Other UTF-8 characters

Using a character three or more times in a row decreases the character class by one. For example:

* Secret1 has 3 character classes: uppercase, lowercase, digits

* Secret111 has 2 character classes: uppercase, lowercase, digits, and a -1 penalty for using 1 repeatedly

Character classes = 0

The default number of classes required is 0. To configure the number, run the ipa pwpolicy-mod command with the --minclasses option.

See also the Important note below this table.

Min length

The minimum number of characters in a password.

Min length = 8

Users cannot use passwords shorter than 8 characters.

Max failures

The maximum number of failed login attempts before IdM locks the user account.

Max failures = 6

IdM locks the user account when the user enters a wrong password 7 times in a row.

Failure reset interval

The amount of time in seconds after which IdM resets the current number of failed login attempts.

Failure reset interval = 60

If the user waits for more than 1 minute after the number of failed login attempts defined in Max failures, the user can attempt to log in again without risking a user account lock.

Lockout duration

The amount of time in seconds that the user account is locked after the number of failed login attempts defined in Max failures.

Lockout duration = 600

Users with locked accounts are unable to log in for 10 minutes.

Important

Use the English alphabet and common symbols for the character classes requirement if you have a diverse set of hardware that may not have access to international characters and symbols. For more information about character class policies in passwords, see What characters are valid in a password? in Red Hat Knowledgebase.

34.3. Ensuring the presence of a password policy in IdM using an Ansible playbook

This section describes how to ensure the presence of a password policy in Identity Management (IdM) using an Ansible playbook.

In the default global_policy password policy in IdM, the number of different character classes in the password is set to 0. The history size is also set to 0.

Complete this procedure to enforce a stronger password policy for an IdM group using an Ansible playbook.

Note

You can only define a password policy for an IdM group. You cannot define a password policy for an individual user.

Prerequisites

  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.
  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • The group for which you are ensuring the presence of a password policy exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define the FQDN of your IdM server in the [ipaserver] section:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create your Ansible playbook file that defines the password policy whose presence you want to ensure. To simplify this step, copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/pwpolicy/pwpolicy_present.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Tests
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure presence of pwpolicy for group ops
        ipapwpolicy:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: ops
          minlife: 7
          maxlife: 49
          history: 5
          priority: 1
          lockouttime: 300
          minlength: 8
          minclasses: 4
          maxfail: 3
          failinterval: 5

    For details on what the individual variables mean, see Password policy attributes.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory_/new_pwpolicy_present.yml

You have successfully used an Ansible playbook to ensure that a password policy for the ops group is present in IdM.

Important

The priority of the ops password policy is set to 1, whereas the global_policy password policy has no priority set. For this reason, the ops policy automatically supersedes global_policy for the ops group and is enforced immediately.

global_policy serves as a fallback policy when no group policy is set for a user, and it can never take precedence over a group policy.

Additional resources

  • For more details about using Ansible to define password policies in IdM and about playbook variables, see the README-pwpolicy.md Markdown file available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • For more details about how password policy priorities work in IdM, see Password policy priorities in RHEL 7 documentation.

Chapter 35. Managing expiring password notifications

You can use the Expiring Password Notification (EPN) tool, provided by the ipa-client-epn package, to build a list of Identity Management (IdM) users whose passwords are expiring in a configured amount of time. To install, configure, and use the EPN tool, refer to the relevant sections.

35.1. What is the Expiring Password Notification tool

The Expiring Password Notification (EPN) tool is a standalone tool you can use to build a list of Identity Management (IdM) users whose passwords are expiring in a configured amount of time.

IdM administrators can use EPN to:

  • Display a list of affected users in JSON format, which is created when run in dry-run mode.
  • Calculate how many emails will be sent for a given day or date range.
  • Send password expiration email notifications to users.
  • Configure the ipa-epn.timer to run the EPN tool daily and send an email to users whose passwords are expiring within the defined future date ranges.
  • Customize the email notification to send to users.
Note

If a user account is disabled, no email notifications are sent if the password is going to expire.

35.2. Installing the Expiring Password Notification tool

This procedure describes how to install the Expiring Password Notification (EPN) tool.

Prerequisites

  • Install the EPN tool on either an Identity Management (IdM) replica or an IdM client with a local Postfix SMTP server configured as a smart host.

Procedure

  • Install the EPN tool:

    # dnf install ipa-client-epn

35.3. Running the EPN tool to send emails to users whose passwords are expiring

This procedure describes how to run the Expiring Password Notification (EPN) tool to send emails to users whose passwords are expiring.

Note

The EPN tool is stateless. If the EPN tool fails to email any of the users whose passwords are expiring on a given day, the EPN tool does not save a list of those users.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Update the epn.conf configuration file to set the options for the EPN tool to notify users of upcoming password expiration.

    # vi /etc/ipa/epn.conf
  2. Update the notify_ttls as required. The default is to notify users whose passwords are expiring in 28, 14, 7, 3, and 1 day(s).

    notify_ttls = 28, 14, 7, 3, 1
  3. Configure your SMTP server and port:

    smtp_server = localhost
    smtp_port = 25
  4. Specify the email address from which the email expiration notification is sent. Any unsuccessfully delivered emails are returned to this address.

    mail_from =admin-email@example.com
  5. Save the /etc/ipa/epn.conf file.
  6. Run the EPN tool in dry-run mode to generate a list of the users to whom the password expiration email notification would be sent if you run the tool without the --dry-run option.

    ipa-epn --dry-run
    [
        {
         "uid": "user5",
         "cn": "user 5",
         "krbpasswordexpiration": "2020-04-17 15:51:53",
         "mail": "['user5@ipa.test']"
        }
    ]
    [
        {
         "uid": "user6",
         "cn": "user 6",
         "krbpasswordexpiration": "2020-12-17 15:51:53",
         "mail": "['user5@ipa.test']"
         }
    ]
    The IPA-EPN command was successful
    Note

    If the list of users returned is very large and you run the tool without the --dry-run option, this might cause an issue with your email server.

  7. Run the EPN tool without the --dry-run option to send expiration emails to the list of all the users returned when you ran the EPN tool in dry-run mode:

    ipa-epn
    [
      {
         "uid": "user5",
         "cn": "user 5",
         "krbpasswordexpiration": "2020-10-01 15:51:53",
         "mail": "['user5@ipa.test']"
      }
    ]
    [
      {
        "uid": "user6",
        "cn": "user 6",
        "krbpasswordexpiration": "2020-12-17 15:51:53",
        "mail": "['user5@ipa.test']"
      }
    ]
    The IPA-EPN command was successful
  8. You can add EPN to any monitoring system and invoke it with the --from-nbdays and --to-nbdays options to determine how many users passwords are going to expire within a specific time frame:

    # ipa-epn --from-nbdays 8 --to-nbdays 12
    Note

    If you invoke the EPN tool with the --from-nbdays and --to-nbdays options, it is automatically executed in dry-run mode.

Verification steps

  • Run the EPN tool and verify an email notification is sent.

Additional resources

  • See ipa-epn man page.
  • See epn.conf man page.

35.4. Enabling the ipa-epn.timer to send an email to all users whose passwords are expiring

This procedure describes how to use ipa-epn.timer to run the Expiring Password Notification (EPN) tool to send emails to users whose passwords are expiring. The ipa-epn.timer parses the epn.conf file and sends an email to users whose passwords are expiring within the defined future date ranges configured in that file.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Start the ipa-epn.timer:

    systemctl start ipa-epn.timer

Once you start the timer, by default, the EPN tool is run every day at 1am.

Additional resources

  • See the ipa-epn man page.

35.5. Modifying the Expiring Password Notification email template

This procedure describes how to customize the Expiring Password Notification (EPN) email message template.

Prerequisites

  • The ipa-client-epn package is installed.

Procedure

  1. Open the EPN message template:

    # vi /etc/ipa/epn/expire_msg.template
  2. Update the template text as required.

    Hi {{ fullname }},
    
    Your password will expire on {{ expiration }}.
    
    Please change it as soon as possible.

    You can use the following variables in the template.

    • User ID: uid
    • Full name: fullname
    • First name: first
    • Last name: last
    • Password expiration date: expiration
  3. Save the message template file.

Verification steps

  • Run the EPN tool and verify the email notification contains the updated text.

Additional resources

  • See the ipa-epn man page.

Chapter 36. Granting sudo access to an IdM user on an IdM client

36.1. Sudo access on an IdM client

System administrators can grant sudo access to allow non-root users to execute administrative commands that are normally reserved for the root user. Consequently, when users need to perform an administrative command normally reserved for the root user, they precede that command with sudo. After entering their password, the command is executed as if they were the root user.

If a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 host is enrolled as an Identity Management (IdM) client, you can specify sudo rules defining which IdM users can perform which commands on the host in the following ways:

  • Locally in the /etc/sudoers file
  • Centrally in IdM

This chapter describes creating a central sudo rule for an IdM client using IdM Web UI. For details on creating local sudo rules on a RHEL 8 host, see Managing sudo access.

Note that you can also define central IdM sudo rules using the IdM command-line interface.

36.2. Granting sudo access to an IdM user on an IdM client using IdM Web UI

In Identity Management (IdM), you can grant sudo access for a specific command to an IdM user account on a specific IdM host. First, add a sudo command and then create a sudo rule for one or more commands.

Complete this procedure to create the idm_user_reboot sudo rule to grant idm_user the permission to run the /usr/sbin/reboot command on the idmclient machine.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as IdM administrator.
  • You have created a user account for idm_user in IdM and unlocked the account by creating a password for the user. For details on adding a new IdM user using the command-line interface, see Adding users using the command line.
  • No local idm_user account has been created on idmclient. The idm_user user is not listed in the local /etc/passwd file.

Procedure

  1. Add the /usr/sbin/reboot command to the IdM database of sudo commands:

    1. Navigate to PolicySudoSudo Commands.
    2. Click Add in the upper right corner to open the Add sudo command dialog box.
    3. Enter the command you want the user to be able to perform using sudo: /usr/sbin/reboot.

      Figure 36.1. Adding IdM sudo command

      adding IdM sudo command
    4. Click Add.
  2. Use the new sudo command entry to create a sudo rule to allow idm_user to reboot the idmclient machine:

    1. Navigate to PolicySudoSudo rules.
    2. Click Add in the upper right corner to open the Add sudo rule dialog box.
    3. Enter the name of the sudo rule: idm_user_reboot.
    4. Click Add and Edit.
    5. Specify the user:

      1. In the Who section, check the Specified Users and Groups radio button.
      2. In the User category the rule applies to subsection, click Add to open the Add users into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box.
      3. In the Add users into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box in the Available column, check the idm_user checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.
      4. Click Add.
    6. Specify the host:

      1. In the Access this host section, check the Specified Hosts and Groups radio button.
      2. In the Host category this rule applies to subsection, click Add to open the Add hosts into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box.
      3. In the Add hosts into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box in the Available column, check the idmclient.idm.example.com checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.
      4. Click Add.
      1. Specify the commands:

        1. In the Command category the rule applies to subsection of the Run Commands section, check the Specified Commands and Groups radio button.
        2. In the Sudo Allow Commands subsection, click Add to open the Add allow sudo commands into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box.
        3. In the Add allow sudo commands into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box in the Available column, check the /usr/sbin/reboot checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.
        4. Click Add to return to the idm_sudo_reboot page.

          Figure 36.2. Adding IdM sudo rule

          IdM sudo rule WebUI
    7. Click Save in the top left corner.

The new rule is enabled by default.

Verification steps

Test that the sudo rule that you have set up on the IdM server works on idmclient by verifying that idm_user can now reboot idmclient using sudo. Note that propagating the changes from the server to the client can take a few minutes.

  1. Log in to idmclient as idm_user.
  2. Reboot the machine using sudo. Enter the password for idm_user when prompted:

    $ sudo /usr/sbin/reboot
    [sudo] password for idm_user:

If sudo is configured correctly, the machine reboots.

36.3. Using an Ansible playbook to ensure sudo access for an IdM user on an IdM client

In Identity Management (IdM), you can ensure sudo access to a specific command is granted to an IdM user account on a specific IdM host.

Complete this procedure to ensure a sudo rule named idm_user_reboot exists. The rule grants idm_user the permission to run the /usr/sbin/reboot command on the idmclient machine.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaservers in it:

    [ipaservers]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Add one or more sudo commands:

    1. Create an ensure-reboot-sudocmd-is-present.yml Ansible playbook that ensures the presence of the /usr/sbin/reboot command in the IdM database of sudo commands. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/sudocmd/ensure-sudocmd-is-present.yml file:

      ---
      - name: Playbook to manage sudo command
        hosts: ipaserver
        become: true
      
        tasks:
        # Ensure sudo command is present
        - ipasudocmd:
            ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
            name: /usr/sbin/reboot
            state: present
    2. Run the playbook:

      $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-reboot-sudocmd-is-present.yml
  3. Create a sudo rule that references the commands:

    1. Create an ensure-sudorule-for-idmuser-on-idmclient-is-present.yml Ansible playbook that uses the sudo command entry to ensure the presence of a sudo rule. The sudo rule allows idm_user to reboot the idmclient machine. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/sudorule/ensure-sudorule-is-present.yml file:

      ---
      - name: Tests
        hosts: ipaserver
        become: true
      
        tasks:
        # Ensure a sudorule is present granting idm_user the permission to run /usr/sbin/reboot on idmclient
        - ipasudorule:
            ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
            name: idm_user_reboot
            description: A test sudo rule.
            allow_sudocmd: /usr/sbin/reboot
            host: idmclient.idm.example.com
            user: idm_user
            state: present
    2. Run the playbook:

      $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-sudorule-for-idmuser-on-idmclient-is-present.yml

Verification steps

Test that the sudo rule whose presence you have ensured on the IdM server works on idmclient by verifying that idm_user can reboot idmclient using sudo. Note that it can take a few minutes for the changes made on the server to take effect on the client.

  1. Log in to idmclient as idm_user.
  2. Reboot the machine using sudo. Enter the password for idm_user when prompted:

    $ sudo /usr/sbin/reboot
    [sudo] password for idm_user:

If sudo is configured correctly, the machine reboots.

Additional materials

  • For more details on how to apply sudo commands, command groups, and rules in IdM using an Ansible playbook including the descriptions of playbook variables, see the README-sudocmd.md, README-sudocmdgroup.md, and README-sudorule.md Markdown files available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.

Chapter 37. Ensuring the presence of host-based access control rules in IdM using Ansible playbooks

This chapter describes Identity Management (IdM) host-based access policies and how to define them using Ansible.

Ansible is an automation tool used to configure systems, deploy software, and perform rolling updates. It includes support for Identity Management (IdM).

37.1. Host-based access control rules in IdM

Host-based access control (HBAC) rules define which users or user groups can access which hosts or host groups by using which services or services in a service group. As a system administrator, you can use HBAC rules to achieve the following goals:

  • Limit access to a specified system in your domain to members of a specific user group.
  • Allow only a specific service to be used to access systems in your domain.

By default, IdM is configured with a default HBAC rule named allow_all, which means universal access to every host for every user via every relevant service in the entire IdM domain.

You can fine-tune access to different hosts by replacing the default allow_all rule with your own set of HBAC rules. For centralized and simplified access control management, you can apply HBAC rules to user groups, host groups, or service groups instead of individual users, hosts, or services.

37.2. Ensuring the presence of an HBAC rule in IdM using an Ansible playbook

This section describes how to ensure the presence of a host-based access control (HBAC) rule in Identity Management (IdM) using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create your Ansible playbook file that defines the HBAC policy whose presence you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/hbacrule/ensure-hbacrule-allhosts-present.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle hbacrules
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      # Ensure idm_user can access client.idm.example.com via the sshd service
      - ipahbacrule:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: login
          user: idm_user
          host: client.idm.example.com
          hbacsvc:
          - sshd
          state: present
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-new-hbacrule-present.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI as administrator.
  2. Navigate to PolicyHost-Based-Access-ControlHBAC Test.
  3. In the Who tab, select idm_user.
  4. In the Accessing tab, select client.idm.example.com.
  5. In the Via service tab, select sshd.
  6. In the Rules tab, select login.
  7. In the Run test tab, click the Run test button. If you see ACCESS GRANTED, the HBAC rule is implemented successfully.

Additional resources

  • For more details about and examples of, configuring HBAC services, service groups, and rules using Ansible, see the README-hbacsvc.md, README-hbacsvcgroup.md, and README-hbacrule.md Markdown files. These files are available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa directory. Also see the playbooks available in the relevant subdirectories of the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks directory.

Chapter 38. Public key certificates in Identity Management

This chapter describes X.509 public key certificates, which are used to authenticate users, hosts and services in Identity Management (IdM). In addition to authentication, X.509 certificates also enable digital signing and encryption to provide privacy, integrity and non-repudiation.

A certificate contains the following information:

  • The subject that the certificate authenticates.
  • The issuer, that is the CA that has signed the certificate.
  • The start and end date of the validity of the certificate.
  • The valid uses of the certificate.
  • The public key of the subject.

A message encrypted by the public key can only be decrypted by a corresponding private key. While a certificate and the public key it includes can be made publicly available, the user, host or service must keep their private key secret.

38.1. Certificate authorities in IdM

Certificate authorities operate in a hierarchy of trust. In an IdM environment with an internal Certificate Authority (CA), all the IdM hosts, users and services trust certificates that have been signed by the CA. Apart from this root CA, IdM supports sub-CAs to which the root CA has granted the ability to sign certificates in their turn. Frequently, the certificates that such sub-CAs are able to sign are certificates of a specific kind, for example VPN certificates. Finally, IdM supports using external CAs. The table below presents the specifics of using the individual types of CA in IdM.

Table 38.1. Comparison of using integrated and external CAs in IdM

Name of CADescriptionUseUseful links

The ipa CA

An integrated CA based on the Dogtag upstream project

Integrated CAs can create, revoke, and issue certificates for users, hosts, and services.

Using the ipa CA to request a new user certificate and exporting it to the client

IdM sub-CAs

An integrated CA that is subordinate to the ipa CA

IdM sub-CAs are CAs to which the ipa CA has granted the ability to sign certificates. Frequently, these certificates are of a specific kind, for example VPN certificates.

Restricting an application to trust only a subset of certificates

External CAs

An external CA is a CA other than the integrated IdM CA or its sub-CAs.

Using IdM tools, you add certificates issued by these CAs to users, services, or hosts as well as remove them.