Chapter 2. Changes

Review these changes carefully before upgrading.

2.1. RH-SSO 7.3

The following changes have occurred from RH-SSO 7.2 to RH-SSO 7.3.

2.1.1. Changes to Authorization Services

We added support for UMA 2.0. This version of the UMA specification introduced some important changes on how permissions are obtained from the server.

Here are the main changes introduced by UMA 2.0 support. See Authorization Services Guide for details.

Authorization API was removed
Prior to UMA 2.0 (UMA 1.0), client applications were using the Authorization API to obtain permissions from the server in the format of a RPT. The new version of UMA specification has removed the Authorization API which was also removed from Red Hat Single Sign-On. In UMA 2.0, RPTs can now be obtained from the token endpoint by using a specific grant type. See Authorization Services Guide for details.
Entitlement API was removed
With the introduction of UMA 2.0, we decided to leverage the token endpoint and UMA grant type to allow obtaining RPTs from Red Hat Single Sign-On and avoid having different APIs. The functionality provided by the Entitlement API was kept the same and is still possible to obtain permissions for a set of one or more resources and scopes or all permissions from the server in case no resource or scope is provided. See Authorization Services Guide for details.
Changes to UMA Discovery Endpoint
UMA Discovery document changed, see Authorization Services Guide for details.
Changes to Red Hat Single Sign-On Authorization JavaScript Adapter

The Red Hat Single Sign-On Authorization JavaScript Adapter (keycloak-authz.js) changed in order to comply with the changes introduced by UMA 2.0 while keeping the same behavior as before. The main change is on how you invoke both authorization and entitlement methods which now expect a specific object type representing an authorization request. This new object type provides more flexibility on how permissions can be obtained from the server by supporting the different parameters supported by the UMA grant type. See Authorization Services Guide for details.

One of the main changes introduced by this release is that you are no longer required to exchange access tokens with RPTs in
order to access resources protected by a resource server (when not using UMA). Depending on how the policy enforcer is configured on the resource server side, you can just send regular
access tokens as a bearer token and permissions will still be enforced.
Changes to Red Hat Single Sign-On Authorization Client Java API
When upgrading to the new version of Red Hat Single Sign-On Authorization Client Java API, you’ll notice that some representation classes were moved to a different package in org.keycloak:keycloak-core.

2.1.2. Client Templates changed to Client Scopes

We added support for Client Scopes, which requires some attention during migration.

Client Templates changed to Client Scopes
Client Templates were changed to Client Scopes. If you had any Client Templates, their protocol mappers and role scope mappings will be preserved.
Spaces replaced in the names
Client templates with the space character in the name were renamed by replacing spaces with an underscore, because spaces are not allowed in the name of client scopes. For example, a client template my template will be changed to client scope my_template.
Linking Client Scopes to Clients
For clients which had the client template, the corresponding client scope is now added as Default Client Scope to the client. So protocol mappers and role scope mappings will be preserved on the client.
Realm Default Client Scopes not linked with existing clients
During the migration, the list of built-in client scopes is added to each realm as well as list of Realm Default Client Scopes. However, existing clients are NOT upgraded and new client scopes are NOT automatically added to them. Also all the protocol mappers and role scope mappings are kept on existing clients. In the new version, when you create a new client, it automatically has Realm Default Client Scopes attached to it and it does not have any protocol mappers attached to it. We did not change existing clients during migration as it would be impossible to properly detect customizations, which you will have for protocol mappers of the clients, for example. If you want to update existing clients (remove protocol mappers from them and link them with client scopes), you will need to do it manually.
Consents need to be confirmed again
The client scopes change required the refactoring of consents. Consents now point to client scopes, not to roles or protocol mappers. Because of this change, the previously confirmed persistent consents by users are not valid anymore and users need to confirm the consent page again after the migration.
Some configuration switches removed
The switch Scope Param Required was removed from Role Detail. The switches Consent Required and Consent Text were removed from the Protocol Mapper details. Those switches were replaced by the Client Scope feature.

2.1.3. New default client scopes

We have added new realm default client scopes roles and web-origins. These client scopes contain protocol mappers to add the roles of the user and allowed web origins to the token. During migration, these client scopes should be automatically added to all the OpenID Connect clients as default client scopes. Hence no setup should be required after database migration is finished.

2.1.3.1. Protocol mapper SPI addition

Related to this, there is a small addition in the (unsupported) Protocol Mappers SPI. You can be affected only if you implemented a custom ProtocolMapper. There is a new getPriority() method on the ProtocolMapper interface. The method has the default implementation set to return 0. If your protocol mapper implementation relies on the roles in the access token realmAccess or resourceAccess properties, you may need to increase the priority of your mapper.

2.1.3.2. Audience resolving

Audiences of all the clients, for which authenticated user has at least one client role in the token, are automatically added to the aud claim in the access token now. On the other hand, an access token may not automatically contain the audience of the frontend client, for which it was issued. Read the Server Administration Guide for more details.

2.1.4. Upgrade to EAP 7.2

The Red Hat Single Sign-On server was upgraded to use EAP 7.2 as the underlying container. This does not directly involve any specific Red Hat Single Sign-On server functionality, but there are few changes related to the migration, which worth mentioning.

Dependency updates
The dependencies were updated to the versions used by EAP 7.2 server. For example, Infinispan is now 9.3.1.Final.
Configuration changes
There are few configuration changes in the standalone(-ha).xml and domain.xml files. You should follow the Section 3.1.2, “Upgrading Red Hat Single Sign-On server” section to handle the migration of configuration files automatically.
Cross-Datacenter Replication changes
  • You will need to upgrade JDG server to version 7.2.3. The older version may still work, but it is not guaranteed as we don’t test it anymore.
  • There is a need to add protocolVersion property with the value 2.6 to the configuration of the remote-store element in the Red Hat Single Sign-On configuration. This is required as there is a need to downgrade the version of HotRod protocol to be compatible with the version used by JDG 7.2.3.

2.1.5. Hostname configuration

In previous versions it was recommended to use a filter to specify permitted hostnames. It is now possible to set a fixed hostname which makes it easier to make sure the valid hostname is used and also allows internal applications to invoke Red Hat Single Sign-On through an alternative URL, for example an internal IP address. It is recommended that you switch to this approach in production.

2.1.6. JavaScipt Adapter Promise

To use native JavaScript promise with the JavaScript adapter it is now required to set promiseType to native in the init options.

In the past if native promise was available a wrapper was returned that provided both the legacy Keycloak promise and the native promise. This was causing issues as the error handler was not always set prior to the native error event, which resulted in Uncaught (in promise) error.

2.1.7. Microsoft Identity Provider updated to use the Microsoft Graph API

The Microsoft Identity Provider implementation in Red Hat Single Sign-On used to rely on the Live SDK endpoints for authorization and obtaining the user profile. From November 2018 onwards, Microsoft is removing support for the Live SDK API in favor of the new Microsoft Graph API. The Red Hat Single Sign-On identity provider has been updated to use the new endpoints so if this integration is in use make sure you upgrade to the latest Red Hat Single Sign-On version.

Legacy client applications registered under "Live SDK applications" won’t work with the Microsoft Graph endpoints due to changes in the id format of the applications. If you run into an error saying that the application identifier was not found in the directory, you will have to register the client application again in the Microsoft Application Registration portal to obtain a new application id.

2.1.8. Google Identity Provider updated to use Google Sign-in authentication system

The Google Identity Provider implementation in Red Hat Single Sign-On used to rely on the Google+ API endpoints endpoints for authorization and obtaining the user profile. From March 2019 onwards, Google is removing support for the Google+ API in favor of the new Google Sign-in authentication system. The Red Hat Single Sign-On identity provider has been updated to use the new endpoints so if this integration is in use make sure you upgrade to the latest Red Hat Single Sign-On version.

If you run into an error saying that the application identifier was not found in the directory, you will have to register the client application again in the Google API Console portal to obtain a new application id and secret.

It is possible that you will need to adjust custom mappers for non-standard claims that were provided by Google+ user information endpoint and are provided under different name by Google Sign-in API. Please consult Google documentation for the most up-to-date information on available claims.

2.1.9. LinkedIn Social Broker Updated to Version 2 of LinkedIn APIs

Accordingly with LinkedIn, all developers need to migrate to version 2.0 of their APIs and OAuth 2.0. As such, we have updated our LinkedIn Social Broker.

Existing deployments using this broker may start experiencing errors when fetching user’s profile using version 2 of LinkedIn APIs. This error may be related with the lack of permissions granted to the client application used to configure the broker which may not be authorized to access the Profile API or request specific OAuth2 scopes during the authentication process.

Even for newly created LinkedIn client applications, you need to make sure that the client is able to request the r_liteprofile and r_emailaddress OAuth2 scopes, at least, as well that the client application can fetch current member’s profile from the https://api.linkedin.com/v2/me endpoint.

Due to these privacy restrictions imposed by LinkedIn in regards to access to member’s information and the limited set of claims returned by the current member’s Profile API, the LinkedIn Social Broker is now using the member’s email address as the default username. That means that the r_emailaddress is always set when sending authorization requests during the authentication.

2.2. RH-SSO 7.2

The following changes have occurred from RH-SSO 7.1 to RH-SSO 7.2.

2.2.1. New Password Hashing algorithms

We have added two new password hashing algorithms (pbkdf2-sha256 and pbkdf2-sha512). New realms will use the pbkdf2-sha256 hashing algorithm with 27500 hashing iterations. Since pbkdf2-sha256 is slightly faster than pbkdf2 the iterations was increased to 27500 from 20000.

Existing realms are upgraded if the password policy contains the default value for the hashing algorithm (not specified) and iteration (20000). If you have changed the hashing iterations, you need to manually change to pbkdf2-sha256 if you’d like to use the more secure hashing algorithm.

2.2.2. ID Token requires scope=openid

In RH-SSO 7.0, the ID Token was returned regardless if scope=openid query parameter was present or not in authorization request. This is incorrect according to the OpenID Connect specification.

In RH-SSO 7.1, we added this query parameter to adapters, but left the old behavior to accommodate migration.

In RH-SSO 7.2, this behavior has changed and the scope=openid query parameter is now required to mark the request as an OpenID Connect request. If this query parameter is omitted the ID Token will not be generated.

2.2.3. Microsoft SQL Server requires extra dependency

Microsoft JDBC Driver 6.0 requires additional dependency added to the JDBC driver module. If you observe an NoClassDefFoundError error when using Microsoft SQL Server please add the following dependency to your JDBC driver module.xml file:

<module name="javax.xml.bind.api"/>

2.2.4. Added session_state parameter to OpenID Connect Authentication Response

The OpenID Connect Session Management specification requires that the parameter session_state is present in the OpenID Connect Authentication Response.

In RH-SSO 7.1, we did not have this parameter, but now Red Hat Single Sign-On adds this parameter by default, as required by the specification.

However, some OpenID Connect / OAuth2 adapters, and especially older Red Hat Single Sign-On adapters (such as RH-SSO 7.1 and older), may have issues with this new parameter.

For example, the parameter will be always present in the browser URL after successful authentication to the client application. If you use RH-SSO 7.1 or a legacy OAuth2 / OpenID Connect adapter, it may be useful to disable adding the session_state parameter to the authentication response. This can be done for the particular client in the Red Hat Single Sign-On admin console, in client details in the section with OpenID Connect Compatibility Modes, described in Section 4.1, “Compatibility with older adapters”. There is the Exclude Session State From Authentication Response switch, which can be turned on to prevent adding the session_state parameter to the Authentication Response.

2.2.5. Microsoft Identity Provider updated to use the Microsoft Graph API

The Microsoft Identity Provider implementation in Red Hat Single Sign-On up to version 7.2.4 relies on the Live SDK endpoints for authorization and obtaining the user profile. From November 2018 onwards, Microsoft is removing support for the Live SDK API in favor of the new Microsoft Graph API. The Red Hat Single Sign-On identity provider has been updated to use the new endpoints so if this integration is in use make sure you upgrade to Red Hat Single Sign-On version 7.2.5 or later.

Legacy client applications registered under "Live SDK applications" won’t work with the Microsoft Graph endpoints due to changes in the id format of the applications. If you run into an error saying that the application identifier was not found in the directory, you will have to register the client application again in the Microsoft Application Registration portal to obtain a new application id.

2.2.6. Google Identity Provider updated to use Google Sign-in authentication system

The Google Identity Provider implementation in Red Hat Single Sign-On up to version 7.2.5 relies on the Google+ API endpoints endpoints for authorization and obtaining the user profile. From March 2019 onwards, Google is removing support for the Google+ API in favor of the new Google Sign-in authentication system. The Red Hat Single Sign-On identity provider has been updated to use the new endpoints so if this integration is in use make sure you upgrade to Red Hat Single Sign-On version 7.2.6 or later.

If you run into an error saying that the application identifier was not found in the directory, you will have to register the client application again in the Google API Console portal to obtain a new application id and secret.

It is possible that you will need to adjust custom mappers for non-standard claims that were provided by Google+ user information endpoint and are provided under different name by Google Sign-in API. Please consult Google documentation for the most up-to-date information on available claims.

2.2.7. LinkedIn Social Broker Updated to Version 2 of LinkedIn APIs

Accordingly with LinkedIn, all developers need to migrate to version 2.0 of their APIs and OAuth 2.0. As such, we have updated our LinkedIn Social Broker so if this integration is in use make sure you upgrade to Red Hat Single Sign-On version 7.2.6 or later.

Existing deployments using this broker may start experiencing errors when fetching user’s profile using version 2 of LinkedIn APIs. This error may be related with the lack of permissions granted to the client application used to configure the broker which may not be authorized to access the Profile API or request specific OAuth2 scopes during the authentication process.

Even for newly created LinkedIn client applications, you need to make sure that the client is able to request the r_liteprofile and r_emailaddress OAuth2 scopes, at least, as well that the client application can fetch current member’s profile from the https://api.linkedin.com/v2/me endpoint.

Due to these privacy restrictions imposed by LinkedIn in regards to access to member’s information and the limited set of claims returned by the current member’s Profile API, the LinkedIn Social Broker is now using the member’s email address as the default username. That means that the r_emailaddress is always set when sending authorization requests during the authentication.

2.3. RH-SSO 7.1

The following changes have occurred from RH-SSO 7.0 to RH-SSO 7.1.

2.3.1. Realm Keys

For RH-SSO 7.0, only one set of keys could be associated with a realm. This meant that when changing the keys, all current cookies and tokens would be invalidated and all users would have to re-authenticate. For RH-SSO 7.1, support for multiple keys for one realm has been added. At any given time, one set of keys is the active set used for creating signatures, but there can be multiple keys used to verify signatures. This means that old cookies and tokens can be verified, then refreshed with the new signatures, allowing users to remain authenticated when keys are changed. There are also some changes to how keys are managed through the Admin Console and Admin REST API; for more details see Realm Keys in the Server Administration Guide.

To allow seamless key rotation you must remove hard-coded keys from client adapters. The client adapters will automatically retrieve keys from the server as long as the realm key is not specified. Client adapters will also retrieve new keys automatically when keys are rotated.

2.3.2. Client Redirect URI Matching

For RH-SSO 7.0, query parameters are ignored when matching valid redirect URIs for a client. For RH-SSO 7.1, query parameters are no longer ignored. If you need to include query parameters in the redirect URI you must specify the query parameters in the valid redirect URI for the client (for example, https://hostname/app/login?foo=bar) or use a wildcard (for example, https://hostname/app/login/*). Fragments are also no longer permitted in Valid Redirect URIs (that is, https://hostname/app#fragment).

2.3.3. Automatically Redirect to Identity Provider

For RH-SSO 7.1, identity providers cannot be set as the default authentication provider. To automatically redirect to an identity provider for RH-SSO 7.1, you must now configure the identity provider redirector. For more information see Default Identity Provider in the Server Administration Guide. If you previously had an identity provider with the default authentication provider option set, this value is automatically used as the value for the identity provider redirector when the server is upgraded to RH-SSO 7.1.

2.3.4. Admin REST API

For RH-SSO 7.0, paginated endpoints in the Admin REST API return all results if the maxResults query parameter was not specified. This could cause issues with a temporary high load and requests timing out when a large number of results were returned (for example, users). For RH-SSO 7.1, a maximum of 100 results are returned if a value for maxResults is not specified. You can return all results by specifying maxResults as -1.

2.3.5. Server Configuration

For RH-SSO 7.0, server configuration is split between the keycloak-server.json file and the standalone/domain.xml or domain.xml file. For RH-SSO 7.1, the keycloak-server.json file has been removed and all server configuration is done through the standalone.xml or domain.xml file. The upgrading procedure for RH-SSO 7.1 automatically migrates the server configuration from the keycloak-server.json file to the standalone.xml or domain.xml file.

2.3.6. Key Encryption Algorithm in SAML Assertions

For RH-SSO 7.1, keys in SAML assertions and documents are now encrypted using the RSA-OAEP encryption scheme. To use encrypted assertions, ensure your service providers support this encryption scheme. In the event that you have service providers that do not support RSA-OAEP, RH-SSO can be configured to use the legacy RSA-v1.5 encryption scheme by starting the server with the system property “keycloak.saml.key_trans.rsa_v1.5” set to true. If you do this, you should upgrade your service providers as soon as possible to be able to revert to the more secure RSA-OAEP encryption scheme.