Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift

Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3

For Use with Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3

Red Hat Customer Content Services

Abstract

This guide consists of basic information and instructions to get started with Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3 for OpenShift

Chapter 1. Introduction

1.1. What Is Red Hat Single Sign-On?

Red Hat Single Sign-On is an integrated sign-on solution available as a Red Hat JBoss Middleware for OpenShift containerized image. The Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image provides an authentication server for users to centrally log in, log out, register, and manage user accounts for web applications, mobile applications, and RESTful web services.

Red Hat offers multiple OpenShift application templates utilizing the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image version number 7.3.2.GA. These define the resources needed to develop Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA server based deployment and can be split into the following two categories:

  • Templates using HTTPS and JGroups keystores and a truststore for the Red Hat Single Sign-On server, all prepared beforehand. These secure the TLS communication using passthrough TLS termination:

    • sso73-https: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA backed by internal H2 database on the same pod.
    • sso73-mysql: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA backed by ephemeral MySQL database on a separate pod.
    • sso73-mysql-persistent: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA backed by persistent MySQL database on a separate pod.
    • sso73-postgresql: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA backed by ephemeral PostgreSQL database on a separate pod.
    • sso73-postgresql-persistent: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA backed by persistent PostgreSQL database on a separate pod.
  • Templates using OpenShift’s internal service serving x509 certificate secrets to automatically create the HTTPS keystore used for serving secure content. The JGroups cluster traffic is authenticated using the AUTH protocol and encrypted using the ASYM_ENCRYPT protocol. The Red Hat Single Sign-On server truststore is also created automatically, containing the /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/service-ca.crt CA certificate file, which is used to sign the certificate for HTTPS keystore. Moreover, the truststore for the Red Hat Single Sign-On server is pre-populated with the all known, trusted CA certificate files found in the Java system path. These templates secure the TLS communication using re-encryption TLS termination:

    • sso73-x509-https: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA with auto-generated HTTPS keystore and Red Hat Single Sign-On truststore, backed by internal H2 database. The ASYM_ENCRYPT JGroups protocol is used for encryption of cluster traffic.
    • sso73-x509-mysql-persistent: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA with auto-generated HTTPS keystore and Red Hat Single Sign-On truststore, backed by persistent MySQL database. The ASYM_ENCRYPT JGroups protocol is used for encryption of cluster traffic.
    • sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent: Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA with auto-generated HTTPS keystore and Red Hat Single Sign-On truststore, backed by persistent PostgreSQL database. The ASYM_ENCRYPT JGroups protocol is used for encryption of cluster traffic.

Other templates that integrate with Red Hat Single Sign-On are also available:

  • eap64-sso-s2i: Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 6.4.
  • eap71-sso-s2i: Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1.
  • datavirt63-secure-s2i: Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization 6.3.

These templates contain environment variables specific to Red Hat Single Sign-On that enable automatic Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration when deployed.

See Automatic and Manual Red Hat Single Sign-On Client Registration Methods for more information.

Chapter 2. Before You Begin

2.1. Comparison: Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift Image and Red Hat Single Sign-On

The Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image version number 7.3.2.GA is based on Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA. There are some differences in functionality between the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image and Red Hat Single Sign-On:

  • The Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image includes all of the functionality of Red Hat Single Sign-On. In addition, the Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled JBoss EAP image automatically handles OpenID Connect or SAML client registration and configuration for .war deployments that contain <auth-method>KEYCLOAK</auth-method> or <auth-method>KEYCLOAK-SAML</auth-method> in their respective web.xml files.

2.2. Version Compatibility and Support

See the xPaaS part of the OpenShift and Atomic Platform Tested Integrations page for details about OpenShift image version compatibility.

2.3. Deprecated Image Streams and Application Templates for Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift

Important

The Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image version number 7.0 and 7.1 are deprecated and they will no longer receive updates of image and application templates.

To deploy new applications, it is recommended to use the version 7.2 or 7.3.2.GA of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image along with the application templates specific to these image versions.

2.4. Initial Setup

The Tutorials in this guide follow on from and assume an OpenShift instance similar to that created by performing the installation of the OpenShift Container Platform cluster.

Important

For information related to updating the existing database when migrating Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image from previous versions to version 7.3.2.GA, see the Updating Existing Database when Migrating Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift Image to a new version section.

Chapter 3. Get Started

3.1. Using the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift Image Streams and Application Templates

Important

Red Hat JBoss Middleware for OpenShift images are pulled on demand from the secured Red Hat Registry: registry.redhat.io, which requires authentication. To retrieve content, you will need to log into the registry using the Red Hat account.

To consume container images from registry.redhat.io in shared environments such as OpenShift, it is recommended for an administrator to use a Registry Service Account, also referred to as authentication tokens, in place of an individual person’s Red Hat Customer Portal credentials.

To create a Registry Service Account, navigate to the Registry Service Account Management Application, and log in if necessary.

  1. From the Registry Service Accounts page, click Create Service Account.
  2. Provide a name for the Service Account, for example registry.redhat.io-sa. It will be prepended with a fixed, random string.

    1. Enter a description for the Service Account, for example Service account to consume container images from registry.redhat.io..
    2. Click Create.
  3. After the Service Account was created, click the registry.redhat.io-sa link in the Account name column of the table presented on the Registry Service Accounts page.
  4. Finally, click the OpenShift Secret tab, and perform all steps listed on that page.

See the Red Hat Container Registry Authentication article for more information.

To update to the latest Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift images, run the following commands:

  1. On your master host(s), ensure that you are logged in as a cluster administrator or a user with project administrator access to the global openshift project.

    $ oc login -u system:admin
  2. Run the following commands to update the core set of Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA resources for OpenShift in the openshift project:

    $ for resource in sso73-image-stream.json \
      sso73-https.json \
      sso73-mysql.json \
      sso73-mysql-persistent.json \
      sso73-postgresql.json \
      sso73-postgresql-persistent.json \
      sso73-x509-https.json \
      sso73-x509-mysql-persistent.json \
      sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent.json
    do
      oc replace -n openshift --force -f \
      https://raw.githubusercontent.com/jboss-container-images/redhat-sso-7-openshift-image/sso73-dev/templates/${resource}
    done
  3. Run the following command to install the Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA OpenShift image streams in the openshift project:

    $ oc -n openshift import-image redhat-sso73-openshift:1.0

3.2. Deploying the Red Hat Single Sign-On Image

3.2.1. Preparing the Deployment

Log in to the OpenShift CLI with a user that holds the cluster:admin role.

  1. Create a new project:

    $ oc new-project sso-app-demo
  2. Add the view role to the default service account. This enables the service account to view all the resources in the sso-app-demo namespace, which is necessary for managing the cluster.

    $ oc policy add-role-to-user view system:serviceaccount:$(oc project -q):default

3.2.2. Deploying the Red Hat Single Sign-On Image using the Application Template

3.2.2.1. Deploying the Template via OpenShift CLI

  1. List the available Red Hat Single Sign-On application templates:

    $ oc get templates -n openshift -o name | grep -o 'sso73.\+'
    sso73-https
    sso73-mysql
    sso73-mysql-persistent
    sso73-postgresql
    sso73-postgresql-persistent
    sso73-x509-https
    sso73-x509-mysql-persistent
    sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent
  2. Deploy the selected one:

    $ oc new-app --template=sso73-x509-https
    --> Deploying template "openshift/sso73-x509-https" to project sso-app-demo
    
         Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3 (Ephemeral)
         ---------
         An example Red Hat Single Sign-On 7 application. For more information about using this template, see <link xlink:href="https://github.com/jboss-openshift/application-templates">https://github.com/jboss-openshift/application-templates</link>.
    
         A new Red Hat Single Sign-On service has been created in your project. The admin username/password for accessing the master realm via the Red Hat Single Sign-On console is IACfQO8v/nR7llVSVb4Dye3TNRbXoXhRpAKTmiCRc. The HTTPS keystore used for serving secure content, the JGroups keystore used for securing JGroups communications, and server truststore used for securing Red Hat Single Sign-On requests were automatically created via OpenShift's service serving x509 certificate secrets.
    
         * With parameters:
            * Application Name=sso
            * JGroups Cluster Password=jg0Rssom0gmHBnooDF3Ww7V4Mu5RymmB # generated
            * Datasource Minimum Pool Size=
            * Datasource Maximum Pool Size=
            * Datasource Transaction Isolation=
            * ImageStream Namespace=openshift
            * Red Hat Single Sign-On Administrator Username=IACfQO8v # generated
            * Red Hat Single Sign-On Administrator Password=nR7llVSVb4Dye3TNRbXoXhRpAKTmiCRc # generated
            * Red Hat Single Sign-On Realm=
            * Red Hat Single Sign-On Service Username=
            * Red Hat Single Sign-On Service Password=
            * Container Memory Limit=1Gi
    
    --> Creating resources ...
        service "sso" created
        service "secure-sso" created
        service "sso-ping" created
        route "sso" created
        route "secure-sso" created
        deploymentconfig "sso" created
    --> Success
        Run 'oc status' to view your app.

3.2.2.2. Deploying the Template via the OpenShift Web Console

Alternatively, perform the following steps to deploy the Red Hat Single Sign-On template via the OpenShift web console:

  1. Log in to the OpenShift web console and select the sso-app-demo project space.
  2. Click Add to Project, then Browse Catalog to list the default image streams and templates.
  3. Use the Filter by Keyword search bar to limit the list to those that match sso. You may need to click Middleware, then Integration to show the desired application template.
  4. Select an Red Hat Single Sign-On application template. This example uses Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3 (Ephemeral).
  5. Click Next in the Information step.
  6. From the Add to Project drop-down menu, select the sso-app-demo project space. Then click Next.
  7. Select Do not bind at this time radio button in the Binding step. Click Create to continue.
  8. In the Results step, click the Continue to the project overview link to verify the status of the deployment.

3.2.3. Accessing the Administrator Console of the Red Hat Single Sign-On Pod

After the template got deployed, identify the available routes:

$ oc get routes
NAMEHOST/PORTPATHSERVICESPORTTERMINATIONWILDCARD

sso

sso-sso-app-demo.openshift.example.com

 

sso

<all>

reencrypt

None

and access the Red Hat Single Sign-On administrator console at:

  • https://sso-sso-app-demo.openshift.example.com/auth/admin

using the administrator account.

Chapter 4. Advanced Concepts

These cover additional configuration topics, such as seting up keystores and a truststore for the Red Hat Single Sign-On server, creating an administrator account, an overview of available Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration methods, and guidance on configuring clustering.

4.2. Customizing the Hostname for the Red Hat Single Sign-On Server

The hostname SPI introduced a flexible way to configure the hostname for the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. There are two built-in providers. The first is request, which uses the request headers to determine the hostname. This is the default setting for Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image. The second is fixed, which allows configuring a fixed hostname. The latter makes sure that only valid hostnames can be used and allows internal applications to invoke Red Hat Single Sign-On server through an alternative URL.

Run the following commands to set the fixed hostname SPI provider for the Red Hat Single Sign-On server:

  1. Deploy the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image with SSO_HOSTNAME environment variable set to the desired hostname of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server.

    $ oc new-app --template=sso-cd-x509-https \
      -p SSO_HOSTNAME="rh-sso-server.openshift.example.com"
  2. Identify the name of the route for the Red Hat Single Sign-On service.

    $ oc get routes
    NAMEHOST/PORTPATHSERVICESPORTTERMINATIONWILDCARD

    sso

    sso-sso-app-demo.openshift.example.com

     

    sso

    <all>

    reencrypt

    None

  3. Change the host: field to match the hostname specified as the value of the SSO_HOSTNAME environment variable above.

    Note

    Adjust the rh-sso-server.openshift.example.com value in the following command as necessary.

    $ oc patch route/sso --type=json -p '[{"op": "replace", "path": "/spec/host", "value": "rh-sso-server.openshift.example.com"}]'

    If successful, the previous command will return the following output:

    route "sso" patched

4.2.1. Connecting to an external database

Red Hat Single Sign-On can be configured to connect to an external (to OpenShift cluster) database. In order to achieve this, you need to modify the sso-{database name} Endpoints object to point to the proper address. The procedure has been described in OpenShift manual.

Tip: The easiest way to get started is to deploy Red Hat Single Sign-On from a template and then modify the Endpoints object. You might also need to update some of the datasource configuration variables in the DeploymentConfig. Once you’re done, just roll a new deployment out.

4.3. Creating the Administrator Account for Red Hat Single Sign-On Server

Red Hat Single Sign-On does not provide any pre-configured management account out of the box. This administrator account is necessary for logging into the master realm’s management console and perform server maintenance operations such as, creating realms or users, or registering applications intended to be secured by Red Hat Single Sign-On.

The administrator account can be created:

Note

Red Hat Single Sign-On allows an initial administrator account to be created via the Welcome Page web form, but only if the Welcome Page is accessed from localhost; this method of administrator account creation is not applicable for the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image.

4.3.1. Creating the Administrator Account Using Template Parameters

When deploying Red Hat Single Sign-On application template, the SSO_ADMIN_USERNAME and SSO_ADMIN_PASSWORD parameters denote the username and password of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server’s administrator account to be created for the master realm.

Note

Both of these parameters are required. If not specified, they are auto generated and displayed as an OpenShift instructional message when the template is instantiated.

Important

The lifespan of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server’s administrator account depends upon the storage type used to store the Red Hat Single Sign-On server’s database:

  • For an in-memory database mode (sso73-https and sso73-x509-https templates) the account exists throughout the lifecycle of the particular Red Hat Single Sign-On pod (stored account data is lost upon pod destruction),
  • For an ephemeral database mode (sso73-mysql and sso73-postgresql templates) the account exists throughout the lifecycle of the database pod (even if the Red Hat Single Sign-On pod is destructed, the stored account data is preserved under the assumption that the database pod is still running),
  • For persistent database mode (sso73-mysql-persistent, sso73-x509-mysql-persistent, sso73-postgresql-persistent, and sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent templates) the account exists throughout the lifecycle of the persistent medium used to hold the database data. This means that the stored account data is preserved even when both the Red Hat Single Sign-On and the database pods are destructed.

It is a common practice to deploy an Red Hat Single Sign-On application template to get the corresponding OpenShift deployment config for the application, and then reuse that deployment config multiple times (every time a new Red Hat Single Sign-On application needs to be instantiated).

Warning

In the case of ephemeral or persistent database mode, after creating the RH_SSO server’s administrator account, remove the SSO_ADMIN_USERNAME and SSO_ADMIN_PASSWORD variables from the deployment config before deploying new Red Hat Single Sign-On applications.

Important

Run the following commands to prepare the previously created deployment config of the Red Hat Single Sign-On application for reuse after the administrator account has been created:

  1. Identify the deployment config of the Red Hat Single Sign-On application.

    $ oc get dc -o name
    deploymentconfig/sso
    deploymentconfig/sso-mysql
  2. Clear the SSO_ADMIN_USERNAME and SSO_ADMIN_PASSWORD variables setting.

    $ oc set env dc/sso \
      -e SSO_ADMIN_USERNAME="" \
      -e SSO_ADMIN_PASSWORD=""

4.3.2. Creating the Administrator Account via Remote Shell Session to Red Hat Single Sign-On Pod

Run following commands to create an administrator account for the master realm of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server, when deploying the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image directly from the image stream (without the template), after the Red Hat Single Sign-On application pod has been started:

  1. Identify the Red Hat Single Sign-On application pod.

    $ oc get pods
    NAME                READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    sso-12-pt93n        1/1       Running   0          1m
    sso-mysql-6-d97pf   1/1       Running   0          2m
  2. Open a remote shell session to the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift container.

    $ oc rsh sso-12-pt93n
    sh-4.2$
  3. Create the Red Hat Single Sign-On server administrator account for the master realm at the command line with the add-user-keycloak.sh script.

    sh-4.2$ cd /opt/eap/bin/
    sh-4.2$ ./add-user-keycloak.sh \
            -r master \
            -u sso_admin \
            -p sso_password
    Added 'sso_admin' to '/opt/eap/standalone/configuration/keycloak-add-user.json', restart server to load user
    Note

    The 'sso_admin' / 'sso_password' credentials in the example above are for demonstration purposes only. Refer to the password policy applicable within your organization for guidance on how to create a secure user name and password.

  4. Restart the underlying JBoss EAP server instance to load the newly added user account. Wait for the server to restart properly.

    sh-4.2$ ./jboss-cli.sh --connect ':reload'
    {
        "outcome" => "success",
        "result" => undefined
    }
    Warning

    When restarting the server it is important to restart just the JBoss EAP process within the running Red Hat Single Sign-On container, and not the whole container. This is because restarting the whole container will recreate it from scratch, without the Red Hat Single Sign-On server administration account for the master realm.

  5. Log in to the master realm’s administration console of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server using the credentials created in the steps above. In the browser, navigate to http://sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin for the Red Hat Single Sign-On web server, or to https://secure-sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin for the encrypted Red Hat Single Sign-On web server, and specify the user name and password used to create the administrator user.

4.4. Deployment Process

Once deployed, the sso73-https and sso73-x509-https templates create a single pod that contains both the database and the Red Hat Single Sign-On servers. The sso73-mysql, sso73-mysql-persistent, sso73-x509-mysql-persistent, sso73-postgresql, sso73-postgresql-persistent, and sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent templates create two pods, one for the database server and one for the Red Hat Single Sign-On web server.

After the Red Hat Single Sign-On web server pod has started, it can be accessed at its custom configured hostnames, or at the default hostnames:

  • http://sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin: for the Red Hat Single Sign-On web server, and
  • https://secure-sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin: for the encrypted Red Hat Single Sign-On web server.

Use the administrator user credentials to log in into the master realm’s administration console.

4.5. Red Hat Single Sign-On Clients

Clients are Red Hat Single Sign-On entities that request user authentication. A client can be an application requesting Red Hat Single Sign-On to provide user authentication, or it can be making requests for access tokens to start services on behalf of an authenticated user. See the Managing Clients chapter of the Red Hat Single Sign-On documentation for more information.

Red Hat Single Sign-On provides OpenID-Connect and SAML client protocols.
OpenID-Connect is the preferred protocol and utilizes three different access types:

  • public: Useful for JavaScript applications that run directly in the browser and require no server configuration.
  • confidential: Useful for server-side clients, such as EAP web applications, that need to perform a browser login.
  • bearer-only: Useful for back-end services that allow bearer token requests.

It is required to specify the client type in the <auth-method> key of the application web.xml file. This file is read by the image at deployment. Set the value of <auth-method> element to:

  • KEYCLOAK for the OpenID Connect client.
  • KEYCLOAK-SAML for the SAML client.

The following is an example snippet for the application web.xml to configure an OIDC client:

...
<login-config>
        <auth-method>KEYCLOAK</auth-method>
</login-config>
...

4.5.1. Automatic and Manual Red Hat Single Sign-On Client Registration Methods

A client application can be automatically registered to an Red Hat Single Sign-On realm by using credentials passed in variables specific to the eap64-sso-s2i, eap71-sso-s2i, and datavirt63-secure-s2i templates.

Alternatively, you can manually register the client application by configuring and exporting the Red Hat Single Sign-On client adapter and including it in the client application configuration.

4.5.1.1. Automatic Red Hat Single Sign-On Client Registration

Automatic Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration is determined by Red Hat Single Sign-On environment variables specific to the eap64-sso-s2i, eap71-sso-s2i, and datavirt63-secure-s2i templates. The Red Hat Single Sign-On credentials supplied in the template are then used to register the client to the Red Hat Single Sign-On realm during deployment of the client application.

The Red Hat Single Sign-On environment variables included in the eap64-sso-s2i, eap71-sso-s2i, and datavirt63-secure-s2i templates are:

VariableDescription

HOSTNAME_HTTP

Custom hostname for http service route. Leave blank for default hostname of <application-name>.<project>.<default-domain-suffix>

HOSTNAME_HTTPS

Custom hostname for https service route. Leave blank for default hostname of <application-name>.<project>.<default-domain-suffix>

SSO_URL

The Red Hat Single Sign-On web server authentication address: https://secure-sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth

SSO_REALM

The Red Hat Single Sign-On realm created for this procedure.

SSO_USERNAME

The name of the realm management user.

SSO_PASSWORD

The password of the user.

SSO_PUBLIC_KEY

The public key generated by the realm. It is located in the Keys tab of the Realm Settings in the Red Hat Single Sign-On console.

SSO_BEARER_ONLY

If set to true, the OpenID Connect client is registered as bearer-only.

SSO_ENABLE_CORS

If set to true, the Red Hat Single Sign-On adapter enables Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS).

If the Red Hat Single Sign-On client uses the SAML protocol, the following additional variables need to be configured:

VariableDescription

SSO_SAML_KEYSTORE_SECRET

Secret to use for access to SAML keystore. The default is sso-app-secret.

SSO_SAML_KEYSTORE

Keystore filename in the SAML keystore secret. The default is keystore.jks.

SSO_SAML_KEYSTORE_PASSWORD

Keystore password for SAML. The default is mykeystorepass.

SSO_SAML_CERTIFICATE_NAME

Alias for keys/certificate to use for SAML. The default is jboss.

See Example Workflow: Automatically Registering EAP Application in Red Hat Single Sign-On with OpenID-Connect Client for an end-to-end example of the automatic client registration method using an OpenID-Connect client.

4.5.1.2. Manual Red Hat Single Sign-On Client Registration

Manual Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration is determined by the presence of a deployment file in the client application’s ../configuration/ directory. These files are exported from the client adapter in the Red Hat Single Sign-On web console. The name of this file is different for OpenID-Connect and SAML clients:

OpenID-Connect

../configuration/secure-deployments

SAML

../configuration/secure-saml-deployments

These files are copied to the Red Hat Single Sign-On adapter configuration section in the standalone-openshift.xml at when the application is deployed.

There are two methods for passing the Red Hat Single Sign-On adapter configuration to the client application:

  • Modify the deployment file to contain the Red Hat Single Sign-On adapter configuration so that it is included in the standalone-openshift.xml file at deployment, or
  • Manually include the OpenID-Connect keycloak.json file, or the SAML keycloak-saml.xml file in the client application’s ../WEB-INF directory.

See Example Workflow: Manually Configure an Application to Use Red Hat Single Sign-On Authentication, Using SAML Client for an end-to-end example of the manual Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration method using a SAML client.

4.6. Limitations

OpenShift does not currently accept OpenShift role mapping from external providers. If Red Hat Single Sign-On is used as an authentication gateway for OpenShift, users created in Red Hat Single Sign-On must have the roles added using the OpenShift Administrator oc adm policy command.

For example, to allow an Red Hat Single Sign-On-created user to view a project namespace in OpenShift:

$ oc adm policy add-role-to-user view <user-name> -n <project-name>

Chapter 5. Tutorials

5.1. Example Workflow: Updating Existing Database to Migrate to New Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift Image Version

Important
  • Rolling updates from previous versions of Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift to version 7.3.2.GA are not supported as databases and caches are not backward compatible.
  • Stop all instances running some of previous versions of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift before upgrading. They cannot run concurrently against the same database.
  • Pre-generated scripts are not available, they are generated dynamically depending on the database.

Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA can automatically migrate the database schema, or you can choose to do it manually.

Note

By default the database is automatically migrated when you start Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA for the first time.

5.1.1. Automatic Database Migration

This process assumes that you are running some previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, backed by MySQL or PostgreSQL database (deployed in ephemeral or persistent mode), running on a separate pod.

Important

Stop all pods running the previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image before upgrading to Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA, as they cannot run concurrently against the same database.

Use the following steps to automatically migrate the database schema:

  1. Identify the deployment config used to deploy the containers, running previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image.

    $ oc get dc -o name --selector=application=sso
    deploymentconfig/sso
    deploymentconfig/sso-postgresql
  2. Stop all pods running the previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image in the current namespace.

    $ oc scale --replicas=0 dc/sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" scaled
  3. Update the image change trigger in the existing deployment config to reference the Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA image.

    $ oc patch dc/sso --type=json -p '[{"op": "replace", "path": "/spec/triggers/0/imageChangeParams/from/name", "value": "redhat-sso73-openshift:1.0"}]'
    "sso" patched
  4. Start rollout of the new Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA images based on the latest image defined in the image change triggers.

    $ oc rollout latest dc/sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" rolled out
  5. Deploy Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA containers using the modified deployment config.

    $ oc scale --replicas=1 dc/sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" scaled
  6. (Optional) Verify the database has been successfully updated.

    $ oc get pods --selector=application=sso
    NAME                     READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    sso-4-vg21r              1/1       Running   0          1h
    sso-postgresql-1-t871r   1/1       Running   0          2h
    $ oc logs sso-4-vg21r | grep 'Updating'
    11:23:45,160 INFO  [org.keycloak.connections.jpa.updater.liquibase.LiquibaseJpaUpdaterProvider] (ServerService Thread Pool -- 58) Updating database. Using changelog META-INF/jpa-changelog-master.xml

5.1.2. Manual Database Migration

Important

Pre-generated scripts are not available. They are generated dynamically depending on the database. With Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA one can generate and export these to an SQL file that can be manually applied to the database afterwards. To dynamically generate the SQL migration file for the database:

  1. Configure Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA with the correct datasource,
  2. Set following configuration options in the standalone-openshift.xml file:

    1. initializeEmpty=false,
    2. migrationStrategy=manual, and
    3. migrationExport to the location on the file system of the pod, where the output SQL migration file should be stored (e.g. migrationExport="${jboss.home.dir}/keycloak-database-update.sql").

See database configuration of Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA for further details.

The database migration process handles the data schema update and performs manipulation of the data, therefore, stop all pods running the previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image before dynamic generation of the SQL migration file.

This process assumes that you are running some previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, backed by MySQL or PostgreSQL database (deployed in ephemeral or persistent mode), running on a separate pod.

Perform the following to generate and get the SQL migration file for the database:

  1. Prepare template of OpenShift database migration job to generate the SQL file.

    $ cat job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml.orig
    apiVersion: batch/v1
    kind: Job
    metadata:
      name: job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73
    spec:
      autoSelector: true
      parallelism: 0
      completions: 1
      template:
        metadata:
          name: job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73
        spec:
          containers:
          - env:
            - name: DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING
              value: <<DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING_VALUE>>
            - name: <<PREFIX>>_JNDI
              value: <<PREFIX_JNDI_VALUE>>
            - name: <<PREFIX>>_USERNAME
              value: <<PREFIX_USERNAME_VALUE>>
            - name: <<PREFIX>>_PASSWORD
              value: <<PREFIX_PASSWORD_VALUE>>
            - name: <<PREFIX>>_DATABASE
              value: <<PREFIX_DATABASE_VALUE>>
            - name: TX_DATABASE_PREFIX_MAPPING
              value: <<TX_DATABASE_PREFIX_MAPPING_VALUE>>
            - name: <<SERVICE_HOST>>
              value: <<SERVICE_HOST_VALUE>>
            - name: <<SERVICE_PORT>>
              value: <<SERVICE_PORT_VALUE>>
            image: <<SSO_IMAGE_VALUE>>
            imagePullPolicy: Always
            name: job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73
            # Keep the pod running after the SQL migration
            # file was generated, so we can retrieve it
            command:
              - "/bin/bash"
              - "-c"
              - "/opt/eap/bin/openshift-launch.sh || sleep 600"
          restartPolicy: Never
    $ cp job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml.orig \
         job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml
  2. From deployment config used to run the previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, copy the datasource definition and database access credentials to appropriate places of the template of the database migration job.

    Use the following script to copy DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING and TX_DATABASE_PREFIX_MAPPING variable values, together with values of environment variables specific to particular datasource (<PREFIX>_JNDI, <PREFIX>_USERNAME, <PREFIX>_PASSWORD, and <PREFIX>_DATABASE) from the deployment config named sso to the database job migration template named job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml.

    Note

    Although the DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING environment variable allows a comma-separated list of <name>-<database_type>=<PREFIX> triplets as its value, this example script accepts only one datasource triplet definition for demonstration purposes. You can modify the script for handling multiple datasource definition triplets.

    $ cat mirror_sso_dc_db_vars.sh
    #!/bin/bash
    
    # IMPORTANT:
    #
    # If the name of the SSO deployment config differs from 'sso'
    # or if the file name of the YAML definition of the migration
    # job is different, update the following two variables
    SSO_DC_NAME="sso"
    JOB_MIGRATION_YAML="job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml"
    
    # Get existing variables of the $SSO_DC_NAME deployment config
    # in an array
    declare -a SSO_DC_VARS=( \
      $(oc set env dc/${SSO_DC_NAME} --list \
      | sed '/^#/d') \
    )
    
    # Get the PREFIX used in the names of environment variables
    PREFIX=$( \
      grep -oP 'DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING=[^ ]+' \
      <<< "${SSO_DC_VARS[@]}" \
    )
    PREFIX=${PREFIX##*=}
    
    # Substitute:
    # * <<PREFIX>> with actual $PREFIX value and
    # * <<PREFIX with "<<$PREFIX" value
    # The order in which these replacements are made is important!
    sed -i "s#<<PREFIX>>#${PREFIX}#g" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
    sed -i "s#<<PREFIX#<<${PREFIX}#g" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
    
    # Construct the array of environment variables
    # specific to the datasource
    declare -a DB_VARS=(JNDI USERNAME PASSWORD DATABASE)
    
    # Prepend $PREFIX to each item of the datasource array
    DB_VARS=( "${DB_VARS[@]/#/${PREFIX}_}" )
    
    # Add DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING and TX_DATABASE_PREFIX_MAPPING
    # variables to datasource array
    DB_VARS=( \
      "${DB_VARS[@]}" \
      DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING \
      TX_DATABASE_PREFIX_MAPPING \
    )
    
    # Construct the SERVICE from DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING
    SERVICE=$( \
      grep -oP 'DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING=[^ ]' \
      <<< "${SSO_DC_VARS[@]}" \
    )
    SERVICE=${SERVICE#*=}
    SERVICE=${SERVICE%=*}
    SERVICE=${SERVICE^^}
    SERVICE=${SERVICE//-/_}
    
    # If the deployment config contains <<SERVICE>>_SERVICE_HOST
    # and <<SERVICE>>_SERVICE_PORT variables, add them to the
    # datasource array. Their values also need to be propagated into
    # yaml definition of the migration job.
    HOST_PATTERN="${SERVICE}_SERVICE_HOST=[^ ]"
    PORT_PATTERN="${SERVICE}_SERVICE_PORT=[^ ]"
    if
      grep -Pq "${HOST_PATTERN}" <<< "${SSO_DC_VARS[@]}" &&
      grep -Pq "${PORT_PATTERN}" <<< "${SSO_DC_VARS[@]}"
    then
      DB_VARS=( \
        "${DB_VARS[@]}" \
        "${SERVICE}_SERVICE_HOST" \
        "${SERVICE}_SERVICE_PORT" \
      )
    # If they are not defined, delete their placeholder rows in
    # yaml definition file (since if not defined they are not
    # expanded which make the yaml definition invalid).
    else
      for KEY in "HOST" "PORT"
      do
        sed -i "/SERVICE_${KEY}/d" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
      done
    fi
    
    # Substitute:
    # * <<SERVICE_HOST>> with ${SERVICE}_SERVICE_HOST and
    # * <<SERVICE_HOST_VALUE>> with <<${SERVICE}_SERVICE_HOST_VALUE>>
    # The order in which replacements are made is important!
    # Do this for both "HOST" and "PORT"
    for KEY in "HOST" "PORT"
    do
      PATTERN_1="<<SERVICE_${KEY}>>"
      REPL_1="${SERVICE}_SERVICE_${KEY}"
      sed -i "s#${PATTERN_1}#${REPL_1}#g" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
      PATTERN_2="<<SERVICE_${KEY}_VALUE>>"
      REPL_2="<<${SERVICE}_SERVICE_${KEY}_VALUE>>"
      sed -i "s#${PATTERN_2}#${REPL_2}#g" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
    done
    
    # Propagate the values of the datasource array items into
    # yaml definition of the migration job
    for VAR in "${SSO_DC_VARS[@]}"
    do
      IFS=$'=' read KEY VALUE <<< $VAR
      if grep -q $KEY <<< ${DB_VARS[@]}
      then
        KEY+="_VALUE"
        # Enwrap integer port value with double quotes
        if [[ ${KEY} =~ ${SERVICE}_SERVICE_PORT_VALUE ]]
        then
          sed -i "s#<<${KEY}>>#\"${VALUE}\"#g" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
        # Character values do not need quotes
        else
          sed -i "s#<<${KEY}>>#${VALUE}#g" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
        fi
        # Verify that the value has been successfully propagated.
        if
          grep -q '(JNDI|USERNAME|PASSWORD|DATABASE)' <<< "${KEY}" &&
          grep -q "<<PREFIX${KEY#${PREFIX}}" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML} ||
          grep -q "<<${KEY}>>" ${JOB_MIGRATION_YAML}
        then
          echo "Failed to update value of ${KEY%_VALUE}! Aborting."
          exit 1
        else
          printf '%-60s%-40s\n' \
                 "Successfully updated ${KEY%_VALUE} to:" \
                 "$VALUE"
        fi
      fi
    done

    Run the script.

    $ chmod +x ./mirror_sso_dc_db_vars.sh
    $ ./mirror_sso_dc_db_vars.sh
    Successfully updated DB_SERVICE_PREFIX_MAPPING to:          sso-postgresql=DB
    Successfully updated DB_JNDI to:                            java:jboss/datasources/KeycloakDS
    Successfully updated DB_USERNAME to:                        userxOp
    Successfully updated DB_PASSWORD to:                        tsWNhQHK
    Successfully updated DB_DATABASE to:                        root
    Successfully updated TX_DATABASE_PREFIX_MAPPING to:         sso-postgresql=DB
  3. Build the Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA database migration image using the pre-configured source and wait for the build to finish.

    $ oc get is -n openshift | grep sso73 | cut -d ' ' -f1
    redhat-sso73-openshift
    $ oc new-build redhat-sso73-openshift:1.0~https://github.com/iankko/openshift-examples.git#KEYCLOAK-8500 \
      --context-dir=sso-manual-db-migration \
      --name=sso73-db-migration-image
    --> Found image bf45ac2 (7 days old) in image stream "openshift/redhat-sso73-openshift" under tag "1.0" for "redhat-sso73-openshift:1.0"
    
        Red Hat SSO 7.3.2.GA
        ---------------
        Platform for running Red Hat SSO
    
        Tags: sso, sso7, keycloak
    
        * A source build using source code from https://github.com/iankko/openshift-examples.git#KEYCLOAK-8500 will be created
          * The resulting image will be pushed to image stream "sso73-db-migration-image:latest"
          * Use 'start-build' to trigger a new build
    
    --> Creating resources with label build=sso73-db-migration-image ...
        imagestream "sso73-db-migration-image" created
        buildconfig "sso73-db-migration-image" created
    --> Success
        Build configuration "sso73-db-migration-image" created and build triggered.
        Run 'oc logs -f bc/sso73-db-migration-image' to stream the build progress.
    $ oc logs -f bc/sso73-db-migration-image --follow
    Cloning "https://github.com/iankko/openshift-examples.git#KEYCLOAK-8500" ...
    ...
    Push successful
  4. Update the template of the database migration job (job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml) with reference to the built sso73-db-migration-image image.

    1. Get the docker pull reference for the image.

      $ PULL_REF=$(oc get istag -n $(oc project -q) --no-headers | grep sso73-db-migration-image | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 2)
    2. Replace the <<SSO_IMAGE_VALUE>> field in the job template with the pull specification.

      $ sed -i "s#<<SSO_IMAGE_VALUE>>#$PULL_REF#g" job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml
    3. Verify that the field is updated.
  5. Instantiate database migration job from the job template.

    $ oc create -f job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73.yaml
    job "job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73" created
    Important

    The database migration process handles the data schema update and performs manipulation of the data, therefore, stop all pods running the previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image before dynamic generation of the SQL migration file.

  6. Identify the deployment config used to deploy the containers, running previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image.

    $ oc get dc -o name --selector=application=sso
    deploymentconfig/sso
    deploymentconfig/sso-postgresql
  7. Stop all pods running the previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image in the current namespace.

    $ oc scale --replicas=0 dc/sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" scaled
  8. Run the database migration job and wait for the pod to be running correctly.

    $ oc get jobs
    NAME                            DESIRED   SUCCESSFUL   AGE
    job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73   1         0            3m
    $ oc scale --replicas=1 job/job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73
    job "job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73" scaled
    $ oc get pods
    NAME                                  READY     STATUS      RESTARTS   AGE
    sso-postgresql-1-n5p16                1/1       Running     1          19h
    job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73-b87bb   1/1       Running     0          1m
    sso73-db-migration-image-1-build      0/1       Completed   0          27m
    Note

    By default, the database migration job terminates automatically after 600 seconds after the migration file is generated. You can adjust this time period.

  9. Get the dynamically generated SQL database migration file from the pod.

    $ mkdir -p ./db-update
    $ oc rsync job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73-b87bb:/opt/eap/keycloak-database-update.sql ./db-update
    receiving incremental file list
    keycloak-database-update.sql
    
    sent 30 bytes  received 29,726 bytes  59,512.00 bytes/sec
    total size is 29,621  speedup is 1.00
  10. Inspect the keycloak-database-update.sql file for changes to be performed within manual database update to Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA version.
  11. Apply the database update manually.

    • Run the following commands if running some previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, backed by the PostgreSQL database deployed in ephemeral or persistent mode, running on a separate pod:

      1. Copy the generated SQL migration file to the PostgreSQL pod.

        $ oc rsync --no-perms=true ./db-update/ sso-postgresql-1-n5p16:/tmp
        sending incremental file list
        
        sent 77 bytes  received 11 bytes  176.00 bytes/sec
        total size is 26,333  speedup is 299.24
      2. Start a shell session to the PostgreSQL pod.

        $ oc rsh sso-postgresql-1-n5p16
        sh-4.2$
      3. Use the psql tool to apply database update manually.

        sh-4.2$ alias psql="/opt/rh/rh-postgresql95/root/bin/psql"
        sh-4.2$ psql --version
        psql (PostgreSQL) 9.5.4
        sh-4.2$ psql -U <PREFIX>_USERNAME -d <PREFIX>_DATABASE -W -f /tmp/keycloak-database-update.sql
        Password for user <PREFIX>_USERNAME:
        INSERT 0 1
        INSERT 0 1
        ...
        Important

        Replace <PREFIX>_USERNAME and <PREFIX>_DATABASE with the actual database credentials retrieved in previous section. Also use value of <PREFIX>_PASSWORD as the password for the database, when prompted.

      4. Close the shell session to the PostgreSQL pod. Continue with updating image change trigger step.
    • Run the following commands if running some previous version of the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, backed by the MySQL database deployed in ephemeral or persistent mode, running on a separate pod:

      1. Given the pod situation similar to the following:

        $ oc get pods
        NAME                                  READY     STATUS      RESTARTS   AGE
        sso-mysql-1-zvhk3                     1/1       Running     0          1h
        job-to-migrate-db-to-sso73-m202t   1/1       Running     0          11m
        sso73-db-migration-image-1-build      0/1       Completed   0          13m
      2. Copy the generated SQL migration file to the MySQL pod.

        $ oc rsync --no-perms=true ./db-update/ sso-mysql-1-zvhk3:/tmp
        sending incremental file list
        keycloak-database-update.sql
        
        sent 24,718 bytes  received 34 bytes  49,504.00 bytes/sec
        total size is 24,594  speedup is 0.99
      3. Start a shell session to the MySQL pod.

        $ oc rsh sso-mysql-1-zvhk3
        sh-4.2$
      4. Use the mysql tool to apply database update manually.

        sh-4.2$ alias mysql="/opt/rh/rh-mysql57/root/bin/mysql"
        sh-4.2$ mysql --version
        /opt/rh/rh-mysql57/root/bin/mysql  Ver 14.14 Distrib 5.7.16, for Linux (x86_64) using  EditLine wrapper
        sh-4.2$ mysql -D <PREFIX>_DATABASE -u <PREFIX>_USERNAME -p < /tmp/keycloak-database-update.sql
        Enter password:
        sh-4.2$ echo $?
        0
        Important

        Replace <PREFIX>_USERNAME and <PREFIX>_DATABASE with the actual database credentials retrieved in previous section. Also use value of <PREFIX>_PASSWORD as the password for the database, when prompted.

      5. Close the shell session to the MySQL pod. Continue with updating image change trigger step.
  1. Update the image change trigger in the existing deployment config to reference the Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA image.

    $ oc patch dc/sso --type=json -p '[{"op": "replace", "path": "/spec/triggers/0/imageChangeParams/from/name", "value": "redhat-sso73-openshift:1.0"}]'
    "sso" patched
  2. Start rollout of the new Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA images based on the latest image defined in the image change triggers.

    $ oc rollout latest dc/sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" rolled out
  3. Deploy the Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA containers using the modified deployment config.

    $ oc scale --replicas=1 dc/sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" scaled

5.2. Example Workflow: Migrating The Red Hat Single Sign-On Server’s Database Across Environments

This tutorial focuses on migrating the Red Hat Single Sign-On server database from one environment to another or migrating to a different database. It assumes steps described in Preparing Red Hat Single Sign-On Authentication for OpenShift Deployment section have been performed already.

5.2.1. Deploying the Red Hat Single Sign-On MySQL Application Template

  1. Log in to the OpenShift web console and select the sso-app-demo project space.
  2. Click Add to project to list the default image streams and templates.
  3. Use the Filter by keyword search bar to limit the list to those that match sso. You may need to click See all to show the desired application template.
  4. Select sso73-mysql Red Hat Single Sign-On application template. When deploying the template ensure to keep the SSO_REALM variable unset (default value).

    Important

    Export and import of Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA database is triggered at Red Hat Single Sign-On server boot time and its paramaters are passed in via Java system properties. This means during one Red Hat Single Sign-On server boot only one of the possible migration actions (either export, or import) can be performed.

    Warning

    When the SSO_REALM configuration variable is set on the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, a database import is performed in order to create the Red Hat Single Sign-On server realm requested in the variable. For the database export to be performed correctly, the SSO_REALM configuration variable cannot be simultaneously defined on such image.

  5. Click Create to deploy the application template and start pod deployment. This may take a couple of minutes.

    Then access the Red Hat Single Sign-On web console at https://secure-sso-<sso-app-demo>.<openshift32.example.com>/auth/admin using the administrator account.

    Note

    This example workflow uses a self-generated CA to provide an end-to-end workflow for demonstration purposes. Accessing the Red Hat Single Sign-On web console will prompt an insecure connection warning.
    For production environments, Red Hat recommends that you use an SSL certificate purchased from a verified Certificate Authority.

5.2.3. Export the Red Hat Single Sign-On database as a JSON file on the OpenShift pod

  1. Get the Red Hat Single Sign-On deployment config and scale it down to zero.

    $ oc get dc -o name
    deploymentconfig/sso
    deploymentconfig/sso-mysql
    
    $ oc scale --replicas=0 dc sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" scaled
  2. Instruct the Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA server deployed on Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image to perform database export at Red Hat Single Sign-On server boot time.

    $ oc set env dc/sso \
      -e "JAVA_OPTS_APPEND= \
        -Dkeycloak.migration.action=export \
        -Dkeycloak.migration.provider=singleFile \
        -Dkeycloak.migration.file=/tmp/demorealm-export.json"
  3. Scale the Red Hat Single Sign-On deployment config back up. This will start the Red Hat Single Sign-On server and export its database.

    $ oc scale --replicas=1 dc sso
    deploymentconfig "sso" scaled
  4. (Optional) Verify that the export was successful.

    $ oc get pods
    NAME                READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    sso-4-ejr0k         1/1       Running   0          27m
    sso-mysql-1-ozzl0   1/1       Running   0          4h
    
    $ oc logs sso-4-ejr0k | grep 'Export'
    09:24:59,503 INFO  [org.keycloak.exportimport.singlefile.SingleFileExportProvider] (ServerService Thread Pool -- 57) Exporting model into file /tmp/demorealm-export.json
    09:24:59,998 INFO  [org.keycloak.services] (ServerService Thread Pool -- 57) KC-SERVICES0035: Export finished successfully

5.2.4. Retrieve and import the exported JSON file

  1. Retrieve the JSON file of the Red Hat Single Sign-On database from the pod.

    $ oc get pods
    NAME                READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    sso-4-ejr0k         1/1       Running   0          2m
    sso-mysql-1-ozzl0   1/1       Running   0          4h
    
    $ oc rsync sso-4-ejr0k:/tmp/demorealm-export.json .
  2. (Optional) Import the JSON file of the Red Hat Single Sign-On database into an Red Hat Single Sign-On server running in another environment.

    Note

    For importing into an Red Hat Single Sign-On server not running on OpenShift, see the Export and Import section of the RH SSO Server Administration Guide.

    Use the administration console of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server to import the resources from previously exported JSON file into the Red Hat Single Sign-On server’s database, when the Red Hat Single Sign-On server is running as a Red Hat Single Sign-On 7.3.2.GA container on OpenShift:

    1. Log into the master realm’s administration console of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server using the credentials used to create the administrator user. In the browser, navigate to http://sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin for the Red Hat Single Sign-On web server, or to https://secure-sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin for the encrypted Red Hat Single Sign-On web server.
    2. At the top of the sidebar choose the name of the Red Hat Single Sign-On realm, the users, clients, realm roles, and client roles should be imported to. This example uses master realm.
    3. Click the Import link under Manage section at the bottom of the sidebar.
    4. In the page that opens, click Select file and then specify the location of the exported demorealm-export.json JSON file on the local file system.
    5. From the Import from realm drop-down menu, select the name of the Red Hat Single Sign-On realm from which the data should be imported. This example uses master realm.
    6. Choose which of users, clients, realm roles, and client roles should be imported (all of them are imported by default).
    7. Choose a strategy to perform, when a resource already exists (one of Fail, Skip, or Overwrite).

      Note

      The attempt to import an object (user, client, realm role, or client role) fails if object with the same identifier already exists in the current database. Use Skip strategy to import the objects that are present in the demorealm-export.json file, but do not exist in current database.

    8. Click Import to perform the import.

      Note

      When importing objects from a non-master realm to master realm or vice versa, after clicking the Import button, it is sometimes possible to encounter an error like the following one:

      Example of Possible Error Message when Performing Partial Import from Previously Exported JSON File

      In such cases, it is necessary first to create the missing clients, having the Access Type set to bearer-only. These clients can be created by manual copy of their characteristics from the source Red Hat Single Sign-On server, on which the export JSON file was created, to the target Red Hat Single Sign-On server, where the JSON file is imported. After creation of the necessary clients, click the Import button again.

      To suppress the above error message, it is needed to create the missing realm-management client, of the bearer-only Access Type, and click the Import button again.

      Note

      For Skip import strategy, the newly added objects are marked as ADDED and the object which were skipped are marked as SKIPPED, in the Action column on the import result page.

      Important

      The administration console import allows you to overwrite resources if you choose (Overwrite strategy). On a production system use this feature with caution.

5.3. Example Workflow: Configuring OpenShift to use Red Hat Single Sign-On for Authentication

Configure OpenShift to use the Red Hat Single Sign-On deployment as the authorization gateway for OpenShift. This follows on from Example Workflow: Preparing and Deploying the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, in which Red Hat Single Sign-On was deployed on OpenShift.

This example adds Red Hat Single Sign-On as an authentication method alongside the identity providers configured during the installation of the OpenShift Container Platform cluster. Once configured, the Red Hat Single Sign-On method will be also available (together with the configured identity providers) for the user login to your OpenShift web console.

5.3.1. Configuring Red Hat Single Sign-On Credentials

Log in to the encrypted Red Hat Single Sign-On web server at https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift32.example.com/auth/admin using the administrator account created during the Red Hat Single Sign-On deployment.

Create a Realm

  1. Hover your cursor over the realm namespace (default is Master) at the top of the sidebar and click Add Realm.
  2. Enter a realm name (this example uses OpenShift) and click Create.

Create a User

Create a test user that can be used to demonstrate the Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled OpenShift login:

  1. Click Users in the Manage sidebar to view the user information for the realm.
  2. Click Add User.
  3. Enter a valid Username (this example uses testuser) and any additional optional information and click Save.
  4. Edit the user configuration:

    1. Click the Credentials tab in the user space and enter a password for the user.
    2. Ensure the Temporary Password option is set to Off so that it does not prompt for a password change later on, and click Reset Password to set the user password. A pop-up window prompts for additional confirmation.

Create and Configure an OpenID-Connect Client

See the Managing Clients chapter of the Red Hat Single Sign-On Server Administration Guide for more information.

  1. Click Clients in the Manage sidebar and click Create.
  2. Enter the Client ID. This example uses openshift-demo.
  3. Select a Client Protocol from the drop-down menu (this example uses openid-connect) and click Save. You will be taken to the configuration Settings page of the openshift-demo client.
  4. From the Access Type drop-down menu, select confidential. This is the access type for server-side applications.
  5. In the Valid Redirect URIs dialog, enter the URI for the OpenShift web console, which is https://openshift.example.com:8443/* in this example.

The client Secret is needed to configure OpenID-Connect on the OpenShift master in the next section. You can copy it now from under the Credentials tab. The secret is <7b0384a2-b832-16c5-9d73-2957842e89h7> for this example.

5.3.2. Configuring OpenShift Master for Red Hat Single Sign-On Authentication

Log in to the OpenShift master CLI. You must have the required permissions to edit the /etc/origin/master/master-config.yaml file.

  1. Edit the /etc/origin/master/master-config.yaml file and find the identityProviders. For example, in the case the OpenShift master is configured with the HTPassword identity provider, the identityProviders section will look similar to the following one:

    identityProviders:
    - challenge: true
      login: true
      name: htpasswd_auth
      provider:
        apiVersion: v1
        file: /etc/origin/openshift-passwd
        kind: HTPasswdPasswordIdentityProvider

    Add Red Hat Single Sign-On as a secondary identity provider with content similar to the following snippet:

    - name: rh_sso
      challenge: false
      login: true
      mappingMethod: add
      provider:
        apiVersion: v1
        kind: OpenIDIdentityProvider
        clientID: openshift-demo
        clientSecret: 7b0384a2-b832-16c5-9d73-2957842e89h7
        ca: xpaas.crt
        urls:
          authorize: https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift32.example.com/auth/realms/OpenShift/protocol/openid-connect/auth
          token: https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift32.example.com/auth/realms/OpenShift/protocol/openid-connect/token
          userInfo: https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift32.example.com/auth/realms/OpenShift/protocol/openid-connect/userinfo
        claims:
          id:
          - sub
          preferredUsername:
          - preferred_username
          name:
          - name
          email:
          - email
    1. The Red Hat Single Sign-On Secret hash for the clientSecret can be found in the Red Hat Single Sign-On web console: Clientsopenshift-demoCredentials
    2. The endpoints for the urls can be found by making a request with the Red Hat Single Sign-On application. For example:

      <curl -k https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift32.example.com/auth/realms/OpenShift/.well-known/openid-configuration | python -m json.tool>

      The response includes the authorization_endpoint, token_endpoint, and userinfo_endpoint.

    3. This example workflow uses a self-generated CA to provide an end-to-end workflow for demonstration purposes. For this reason, the ca is provided as <ca: xpaas.crt>. This CA certificate must also be copied into the /etc/origin/master folder. This is not necessary if using a certificate purchased from a verified Certificate Authority.
  2. Save the configuration and restart the OpenShift master:

    $ systemctl restart atomic-openshift-master

5.3.3. Logging in to OpenShift

Navigate to the OpenShift web console, which in this example is https://openshift.example.com:8443/console. The OpenShift login page now has the option to use either htpasswd_auth or rh-sso. The former is still available because it is present in the /etc/origin/master/master-config.yaml.

Select rh-sso and log in to OpenShift with the testuser user created earlier in Red Hat Single Sign-On. No projects are visible to testuser until they are added in the OpenShift CLI. This is the only way to provide user privileges in OpenShift because it currently does not accept external role mapping.

To provide testuser view privileges for the sso-app-demo, use the OpenShift CLI:

$ oc adm policy add-role-to-user view testuser -n sso-app-demo

5.4. Example Workflow: Creating OpenShift Application from Existing Maven Binaries and Securing it Using Red Hat Single Sign-On

To deploy existing applications on OpenShift, you can use the binary source capability.

5.4.1. Deploy Binary Build of EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP Service Invocation Application and Secure it Using Red Hat Single Sign-On

The following example uses both app-jee-jsp and service-jee-jaxrs quickstarts to deploy EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP service application that authenticates using the Red Hat Single Sign-On.

Prerequisite:

Important

This guide assumes the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image has been previously deployed using one of the following templates:

  • sso73-mysql
  • sso73-mysql-persistent
  • sso73-postgresql
  • sso73-postgresql-persistent
  • sso73-x509-mysql-persistent
  • sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent

5.4.1.1. Create Red Hat Single Sign-On Realm, Roles, and User for the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP Application

The EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP service application requires dedicated Red Hat Single Sign-On realm, username, and password to be able to authenticate using Red Hat Single Sign-On. Perform the following steps after the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image has been deployed:

Create the Red Hat Single Sign-On Realm

  1. Login to the administration console of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server.

    https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift.example.com/auth/admin

    Use the credentials of the Red Hat Single Sign-On administrator user.

  2. Hover your cursor over the realm namespace (default is Master) at the top of the sidebar and click Add Realm.
  3. Enter a realm name (this example uses demo) and click Create.

Copy the Public Key

In the newly created demo realm, click the Keys tab, then select Active tab, and copy the public key of type RSA that has been generated.

Note

The Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image version 7.3.2.GA generates multiple keys by default, for example HS256, RS256, or AES. To copy the public key information for the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift 7.3.2.GA image, click the Keys tab, then select Active tab, and click the Public key button of that row in the keys table, where type of the key matches RSA. Then select and copy the content of the pop-up window that appears.

The information about the public key is necessary later to deploy the Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP application.

Create Red Hat Single Sign-On Roles

Note

The service-jee-jaxrs quickstart exposes three endpoints by the service:

  • public - Requires no authentication.
  • secured - Can be invoked by users with the user role.
  • admin - Can be invoked by users with the admin role.

Create user and admin roles in Red Hat Single Sign-On. These roles will be assigned to an Red Hat Single Sign-On application user to authenticate access to user applications.

  1. Click Roles in the Configure sidebar to list the roles for this realm.

    Note

    This is a new realm, so there should only be the default (offline_access and uma_authorization) roles.

  2. Click Add Role.
  3. Enter the role name (user) and click Save.

Repeat these steps for the admin role.

Create the Red Hat Single Sign-On Realm Management User

  1. Click Users in the Manage sidebar to view the user information for the realm.
  2. Click Add User.
  3. Enter a valid Username (this example uses the user appuser) and click Save.
  4. Edit the user configuration:

    1. Click the Credentials tab in the user space and enter a password for the user (this example uses the password apppassword).
    2. Ensure the Temporary Password option is set to Off so that it does not prompt for a password change later on, and click Reset Password to set the user password. A pop-up window will prompt you to confirm.

5.4.1.2. Assign user Red Hat Single Sign-On Role to the Realm Management User

Perform the following steps to tie the previously created appuser with the user Red Hat Single Sign-On role:

  1. Click Role Mappings to list the realm and client role configuration. In Available Roles, select the user role created earlier, and click Add selected>.
  2. Click Client Roles, select realm-management entry from the list, select each record in the Available Roles list.

    Note

    You can select multiple items at once by holding the Ctrl key and simultaneously clicking the first impersonation entry. While keeping the Ctrl key and the left mouse button pressed, move to the end of the list to the view-clients entry and ensure each record is selected.

  3. Click Add selected> to assign the roles to the client.

5.4.1.3. Prepare Red Hat Single Sign-On Authentication for OpenShift Deployment of the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP Application

  1. Create a new project for the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP application.

    $ oc new-project eap-app-demo
  2. Add the view role to the default service account. This enables the service account to view all the resources in the eap-app-demo namespace, which is necessary for managing the cluster.

    $ oc policy add-role-to-user view system:serviceaccount:$(oc project -q):default
  3. The EAP template requires an SSL keystore and a JGroups keystore. This example uses keytool, a package included with the Java Development Kit, to generate self-signed certificates for these keystores.

    1. Generate a secure key for the SSL keystore (this example uses password as password for the keystore).

      $ keytool -genkeypair \
      -dname "CN=secure-eap-app-eap-app-demo.openshift.example.com" \
      -alias https \
      -storetype JKS \
      -keystore eapkeystore.jks
    2. Generate a secure key for the JGroups keystore (this example uses password as password for the keystore).

      $ keytool -genseckey \
      -alias jgroups \
      -storetype JCEKS \
      -keystore eapjgroups.jceks
    3. Generate the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 for OpenShift secrets with the SSL and JGroup keystore files.

      $ oc secret new eap-ssl-secret eapkeystore.jks
      $ oc secret new eap-jgroup-secret eapjgroups.jceks
    4. Add the EAP application secret to the default service account.

      $ oc secrets link default eap-ssl-secret eap-jgroup-secret

5.4.1.4. Deploy Binary Build of the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP Application

  1. Clone the source code.

    $ git clone https://github.com/keycloak/keycloak-quickstarts.git
  2. Configure the Red Hat JBoss Middleware Maven repository.
  3. Build both the service-jee-jaxrs and app-jee-jsp applications.

    1. Build the service-jee-jaxrs application.

      $ cd keycloak-quickstarts/service-jee-jaxrs/
      $ mvn clean package -DskipTests
      [INFO] Scanning for projects...
      [INFO]
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      [INFO] Building Keycloak Quickstart: service-jee-jaxrs 3.1.0.Final
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      ...
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      [INFO] BUILD SUCCESS
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      [INFO] Total time: 2.153 s
      [INFO] Finished at: 2017-06-26T12:06:12+02:00
      [INFO] Final Memory: 25M/241M
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2. Comment out the app-jee-jsp/config/keycloak.json requirement of the maven-enforcer-plugin plugin and build the app-jee-jsp application.

      service-jee-jaxrs]$ cd ../app-jee-jsp/
      app-jee-jsp]$ sed -i /\<executions\>/s/^/\<\!--/ pom.xml
      app-jee-jsp]$ sed -i '/\(<\/executions>\)/a\-->' pom.xml
      app-jee-jsp]$ mvn clean package -DskipTests
      [INFO] Scanning for projects...
      [INFO]
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      [INFO] Building Keycloak Quickstart: app-jee-jsp 3.1.0.Final
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      ...
      [INFO] Building war: /tmp/github/keycloak-quickstarts/app-jee-jsp/target/app-jsp.war
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      [INFO] BUILD SUCCESS
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      [INFO] Total time: 3.018 s
      [INFO] Finished at: 2017-06-26T12:22:25+02:00
      [INFO] Final Memory: 35M/310M
      [INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Important

      The app-jee-jsp quickstart requires you to configure the adapter, and that the adapter configuration file (keycloak.json) is present in the config/ directory in the root of the quickstart to successfully build the quickstart. But since this example configures the adapter later via selected environment variables available for the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 for OpenShift image, it is not necessary to specify the form of keycloak.json adapter configuration file at this moment.

  1. Prepare the directory structure on the local file system.

    Application archives in the deployments/ subdirectory of the main binary build directory are copied directly to the standard deployments directory of the image being built on OpenShift. For the application to deploy, the directory hierarchy containing the web application data must be correctly structured.

    Create the main directory for the binary build on the local file system and deployments/ subdirectory within it. Copy the previously built WAR archives of both the service-jee-jaxrs and app-jee-jsp quickstarts to the deployments/ subdirectory:

    app-jee-jsp]$ ls
    config  pom.xml  README.md  src  target
    app-jee-jsp]$ mkdir -p sso-eap7-bin-demo/deployments
    app-jee-jsp]$ cp target/app-jsp.war sso-eap7-bin-demo/deployments/
    app-jee-jsp]$ cp ../service-jee-jaxrs/target/service.war sso-eap7-bin-demo/deployments/
    app-jee-jsp]$ tree sso-eap7-bin-demo/
    sso-eap7-bin-demo/
    |__ deployments
        |__ app-jsp.war
        |__ service.war
    
    1 directory, 2 files
    Note

    The location of the standard deployments directory depends on the underlying base image, that was used to deploy the application. See the following table:

    Table 5.1. Standard Location of the Deployments Directory

    Name of the Underlying Base Image(s)Standard Location of the Deployments Directory

    EAP for OpenShift 6.4 and 7.1

    $JBOSS_HOME/standalone/deployments

    Java S2I for OpenShift

    /deployments

    JWS for OpenShift

    $JWS_HOME/webapps

  2. Identify the image stream for EAP 6.4 / 7.1 image.

    $ oc get is -n openshift | grep eap | cut -d ' ' -f 1
    jboss-eap64-openshift
    jboss-eap71-openshift
  1. Create new binary build, specifying image stream and application name.

    Note

    Replace --image-stream=jboss-eap71-openshift parameter with the --image-stream=jboss-eap64-openshift one in the following oc command to deploy the JSP application on top of JBoss EAP 6.4 for OpenShift image.

    $ oc new-build --binary=true \
    --image-stream=jboss-eap71-openshift \
    --name=eap-app
    --> Found image 31895a4 (3 months old) in image stream "openshift/jboss-eap71-openshift" under tag "latest" for "jboss-eap71-openshift"
    
        JBoss EAP 7.2
        -------------
        Platform for building and running JavaEE applications on JBoss EAP 7.2
    
        Tags: builder, javaee, eap, eap7
    
        * A source build using binary input will be created
          * The resulting image will be pushed to image stream "eap-app:latest"
          * A binary build was created, use 'start-build --from-dir' to trigger a new build
    
    --> Creating resources with label build=eap-app ...
        imagestream "eap-app" created
        buildconfig "eap-app" created
    --> Success
  2. Start the binary build. Instruct oc executable to use main directory of the binary build we created in previous step as the directory containing binary input for the OpenShift build. In the working directory of app-jee-jsp issue the following command.

    app-jee-jsp]$ oc start-build eap-app \
    --from-dir=./sso-eap7-bin-demo/ \
    --follow
    Uploading directory "sso-eap7-bin-demo" as binary input for the build ...
    build "eap-app-1" started
    Receiving source from STDIN as archive ...
    Copying all war artifacts from /home/jboss/source/. directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    Copying all ear artifacts from /home/jboss/source/. directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    Copying all rar artifacts from /home/jboss/source/. directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    Copying all jar artifacts from /home/jboss/source/. directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    Copying all war artifacts from /home/jboss/source/deployments directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    '/home/jboss/source/deployments/app-jsp.war' -> '/opt/eap/standalone/deployments/app-jsp.war'
    '/home/jboss/source/deployments/service.war' -> '/opt/eap/standalone/deployments/service.war'
    Copying all ear artifacts from /home/jboss/source/deployments directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    Copying all rar artifacts from /home/jboss/source/deployments directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    Copying all jar artifacts from /home/jboss/source/deployments directory into /opt/eap/standalone/deployments for later deployment...
    Pushing image 172.30.82.129:5000/eap-app-demo/eap-app:latest ...
    Pushed 6/7 layers, 86% complete
    Pushed 7/7 layers, 100% complete
    Push successful
  3. Create a new OpenShift application based on the build.

    $ oc new-app eap-app
    --> Found image 6b13d36 (2 minutes old) in image stream "eap-app-demo/eap-app" under tag "latest" for "eap-app"
    
        eap-app-demo/eap-app-1:aa2574d9
        -------------------------------
        Platform for building and running JavaEE applications on JBoss EAP 7.2
    
        Tags: builder, javaee, eap, eap7
    
        * This image will be deployed in deployment config "eap-app"
        * Ports 8080/tcp, 8443/tcp, 8778/tcp will be load balanced by service "eap-app"
          * Other containers can access this service through the hostname "eap-app"
    
    --> Creating resources ...
        deploymentconfig "eap-app" created
        service "eap-app" created
    --> Success
        Run 'oc status' to view your app.
  4. Stop all running containers of the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP application in the current namespace.

    $ oc get dc -o name
    deploymentconfig/eap-app
    $ oc scale dc/eap-app --replicas=0
    deploymentconfig "eap-app" scaled
  5. Further configure the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP application prior the deployment.

    1. Configure the application with proper details about the Red Hat Single Sign-On server instance.

      Warning

      Ensure to replace the value of SSO_PUBLIC_KEY variable below with the actual content of the RSA public key for the demo realm, that has been copied.

      $ oc set env dc/eap-app \
      -e HOSTNAME_HTTP="eap-app-eap-app-demo.openshift.example.com" \
      -e HOSTNAME_HTTPS="secure-eap-app-eap-app-demo.openshift.example.com" \
      -e SSO_DISABLE_SSL_CERTIFICATE_VALIDATION="true" \
      -e SSO_USERNAME="appuser" \
      -e SSO_PASSWORD="apppassword" \
      -e SSO_REALM="demo" \
      -e SSO_URL="https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift.example.com/auth" \
      -e SSO_PUBLIC_KEY="MIIBIjANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQEFAAOCAQ8AMIIBCgKCAQEAkdhXyKx97oIoO6HwnV/MiX2EHO55Sn+ydsPzbjJevI5F31UvUco9uA8dGl6oM8HrnaWWv+i8PvmlaRMhhl6Xs68vJTEc6d0soP+6A+aExw0coNRp2PDwvzsXVWPvPQg3+iytStxu3Icndx+gC0ZYnxoRqL7rY7zKcQBScGEr78Nw6vZDwfe6d/PQ6W4xVErNytX9KyLFVAE1VvhXALyqEM/EqYGLmpjw5bMGVKRXnhmVo9E88CkFDH8E+aPiApb/gFul1GJOv+G8ySLoR1c8Y3L29F7C81odkVBp2yMm3RVFIGSPTjHqjO/nOtqYIfY4Wyw9mRIoY5SyW7044dZXRwIDAQAB" \
      -e SSO_SECRET="0bb8c399-2501-4fcd-a183-68ac5132868d"
      deploymentconfig "eap-app" updated
    2. Configure the application with details about both the SSL and JGroups keystore.

      $ oc set env dc/eap-app \
      -e HTTPS_KEYSTORE_DIR="/etc/eap-secret-volume" \
      -e HTTPS_KEYSTORE="eapkeystore.jks" \
      -e HTTPS_PASSWORD="password" \
      -e JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_SECRET="eap-jgroup-secret" \
      -e JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_KEYSTORE_DIR="/etc/jgroups-encrypt-secret-volume" \
      -e JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_KEYSTORE="eapjgroups.jceks" \
      -e JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_PASSWORD="password"
      deploymentconfig "eap-app" updated
    3. Define OpenShift volumes for both the SSL and JGroups secrets created earlier.

      $ oc volume dc/eap-app --add \
      --name="eap-keystore-volume" \
      --type=secret \
      --secret-name="eap-ssl-secret" \
      --mount-path="/etc/eap-secret-volume"
      deploymentconfig "eap-app" updated
      $ oc volume dc/eap-app --add \
      --name="eap-jgroups-keystore-volume" \
      --type=secret \
      --secret-name="eap-jgroup-secret" \
      --mount-path="/etc/jgroups-encrypt-secret-volume"
      deploymentconfig "eap-app" updated
    4. Configure the deployment config of the application to run application pods under the default OpenShift service account (default setting).

      $ oc patch dc/eap-app --type=json \
      -p '[{"op": "add", "path": "/spec/template/spec/serviceAccountName", "value": "default"}]'
      "eap-app" patched
  6. Deploy container of the EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP application using the modified deployment config.

    $ oc scale dc/eap-app --replicas=1
    deploymentconfig "eap-app" scaled
  7. Expose the service as route.

    $ oc get svc -o name
    service/eap-app
    $ oc get route
    No resources found.
    $ oc expose svc/eap-app
    route "eap-app" exposed
    $ oc get route
    NAME      HOST/PORT                                    PATH      SERVICES   PORT       TERMINATION   WILDCARD
    eap-app   eap-app-eap-app-demo.openshift.example.com             eap-app    8080-tcp                 None

5.4.1.5. Access the Application

Access the application in your browser using the URL http://eap-app-eap-app-demo.openshift.example.com/app-jsp. You should see output like on the following image:

Red Hat Single Sign-On Example JSP Application

Perform the following to test the application:

  • Click the INVOKE PUBLIC button to access the public endpoint that doesn’t require authentication.

    You should see the Message: public output.

  • Click the LOGIN button to be redirected for user authentication to the Red Hat Single Sign-On server instance against the demo realm.

    Specify the username and password of the Red Hat Single Sign-On user configured earlier (appuser / apppassword). Click Log in. The look of the application changes as detailed in the following image:

    sso app jee jsp logged in

  • Click the INVOKE SECURED button to access the secured endpoint.

    You should see the Message: secured output.

  • Click the INVOKE ADMIN button to access the admin endpoint.

    You should see 403 Forbidden output.

    Note

    The admin endpoint requires users with admin Red Hat Single Sign-On role to invoke properly. Access for the appuser is forbidden because they only have user role privilege, which allows them to access the secured endpoint.

    Perform the following steps to add the appuser to the admin Red Hat Single Sign-On role:

    1. Access the administration console of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server’s instance.

      https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift.example.com/auth/admin.

      Use the credentials of the Red Hat Single Sign-On administrator user.

    2. Click Users in the Manage sidebar to view the user information for the demo realm.
    3. Click View all users button.
    4. Click the ID link for the appuser or alternatively click the Edit button in the Actions column.
    5. Click the Role Mappings tab.
    6. Select admin entry from the Available Roles list in the Realm Roles row.
    7. Click Add selected> button to add the admin role to the user.
    8. Return to EAP 6.4 / 7.1 JSP service application.

      http://eap-app-eap-app-demo.openshift.example.com/app-jsp.

    9. Click the LOGOUT button to reload role mappings for the appuser.
    10. Click the LOGIN button again and provider appuser credentials.
    11. Click the INVOKE ADMIN button again.

      You should see the Message: admin output already.

5.5. Example Workflow: Automatically Registering EAP Application in Red Hat Single Sign-On with OpenID-Connect Client

This follows on from Example Workflow: Preparing and Deploying the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, in which Red Hat Single Sign-On was deployed on OpenShift. This example prepares Red Hat Single Sign-On realm, role, and user credentials for an EAP project using an OpenID-Connect client adapter. These credentials are then provided in the EAP for OpenShift template for automatic Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration. Once deployed, the Red Hat Single Sign-On user can be used to authenticate and access JBoss EAP.

Note

This example uses a OpenID-Connect client but an SAML client could also be used. See Red Hat Single Sign-On Clients and Automatic and Manual Red Hat Single Sign-On Client Registration Methods for more information on the differences between OpenID-Connect and SAML clients.

5.5.1. Preparing Red Hat Single Sign-On Authentication for OpenShift Deployment

Log in to the OpenShift CLI with a user that holds the cluster:admin role.

  1. Create a new project:

    $ oc new-project eap-app-demo
  2. Add the view role to the default service account. This enables the service account to view all the resources in the eap-app-demo namespace, which is necessary for managing the cluster.

    $ oc policy add-role-to-user view system:serviceaccount:$(oc project -q):default
  3. The EAP template requires an SSL keystore and a JGroups keystore.
    This example uses keytool, a package included with the Java Development Kit, to generate self-signed certificates for these keystores. The following commands will prompt for passwords.

    1. Generate a secure key for the SSL keystore:

      $ keytool -genkeypair -alias https -storetype JKS -keystore eapkeystore.jks
    2. Generate a secure key for the JGroups keystore:

      $ keytool -genseckey -alias jgroups -storetype JCEKS -keystore eapjgroups.jceks
  4. Generate the EAP for OpenShift secrets with the SSL and JGroup keystore files:

    $ oc secret new eap-ssl-secret eapkeystore.jks
    $ oc secret new eap-jgroup-secret eapjgroups.jceks
  5. Add the EAP secret to the default service account:

    $ oc secrets link default eap-ssl-secret eap-jgroup-secret

5.5.2. Preparing the Red Hat Single Sign-On Credentials

Log in to the encrypted Red Hat Single Sign-On web server at https://secure-sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin using the administrator account created during the Red Hat Single Sign-On deployment.

Create a Realm

  1. Hover your cursor over the realm namespace at the top of the sidebar and click*Add Realm*.
  2. Enter a realm name (this example uses eap-demo) and click Create.

Copy the Public Key

In the newly created eap-demo realm, click the Keys tab and copy the generated public key. This example uses the variable <realm-public-key> for brevity. This is used later to deploy the Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled JBoss EAP image.

Create a Role

Create a role in Red Hat Single Sign-On with a name that corresponds to the JEE role defined in the web.xml of the example EAP application. This role is assigned to an Red Hat Single Sign-On application user to authenticate access to user applications.

  1. Click Roles in the Configure sidebar to list the roles for this realm. This is a new realm, so there should only be the default offline_access role.
  2. Click Add Role.
  3. Enter the role name (this example uses the role eap-user-role) and click Save.

Create Users and Assign Roles

Create two users: - Assign the realm management user the realm-management roles to handle automatic Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration in the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. - Assign the application user the JEE role, created in the previous step, to authenticate access to user applications.

Create the realm management user:

  1. Click Users in the Manage sidebar to view the user information for the realm.
  2. Click Add User.
  3. Enter a valid Username (this example uses the user eap-mgmt-user) and click Save.
  4. Edit the user configuration. Click the Credentials tab in the user space and enter a password for the user. After the password has been confirmed you can click Reset Password to set the user password. A pop-up window prompts for additional confirmation.
  5. Click Role Mappings to list the realm and client role configuration. In the Client Roles drop-down menu, select realm-management and add all of the available roles to the user. This provides the user Red Hat Single Sign-On server rights that can be used by the JBoss EAP image to create clients.

Create the application user:

  1. Click Users in the Manage sidebar to view the user information for the realm.
  2. Click Add User.
  3. Enter a valid Username and any additional optional information for the application user and click Save.
  4. Edit the user configuration. Click the Credentials tab in the user space and enter a password for the user. After the password has been confirmed you can click Reset Password to set the user password. A pop-up window prompts for additional confirmation.
  5. Click Role Mappings to list the realm and client role configuration. In Available Roles, add the role created earlier.

5.5.3. Deploy the Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled JBoss EAP Image

  1. Return to the OpenShift web console and click Add to project to list the default image streams and templates.
  2. Use the Filter by keyword search bar to limit the list to those that match sso. You may need to click See all to show the desired application template.
  3. Select the eap71-sso-s2i image to list all of the deployment parameters. Include the following Red Hat Single Sign-On parameters to configure the Red Hat Single Sign-On credentials during the EAP build:

    VariableExample Value

    APPLICATION_NAME

    sso

    HOSTNAME_HTTPS

    secure-sample-jsp.eap-app-demo.openshift32.example.com

    HOSTNAME_HTTP

    sample-jsp.eap-app-demo.openshift32.example.com

    SOURCE_REPOSITORY_URL

    https://repository-example.com/developer/application

    SSO_URL

    https://secure-sso-sso-app-demo.openshift32.example.com/auth

    SSO_REALM

    eap-demo

    SSO_USERNAME

    eap-mgmt-user

    SSO_PASSWORD

    password

    SSO_PUBLIC_KEY

    <realm-public-key>

    HTTPS_KEYSTORE

    eapkeystore.jks

    HTTPS_PASSWORD

    password

    HTTPS_SECRET

    eap-ssl-secret

    JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_KEYSTORE

    eapjgroups.jceks

    JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_PASSWORD

    password

    JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_SECRET

    eap-jgroup-secret

  4. Click Create to deploy the JBoss EAP image.

It may take several minutes for the JBoss EAP image to deploy.

5.5.4. Log in to the JBoss EAP Server Using Red Hat Single Sign-On

  1. Access the JBoss EAP application server and click Login. You are redirected to the Red Hat Single Sign-On login.
  2. Log in using the Red Hat Single Sign-On user created in the example. You are authenticated against the Red Hat Single Sign-On server and returned to the JBoss EAP application server.

5.6. Example Workflow: Manually Registering EAP Application in Red Hat Single Sign-On with SAML Client

This follows on from Example Workflow: Preparing and Deploying the Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift image, in which Red Hat Single Sign-On was deployed on OpenShift.

This example prepares Red Hat Single Sign-On realm, role, and user credentials for an EAP project and configures an EAP for OpenShift deployment. Once deployed, the Red Hat Single Sign-On user can be used to authenticate and access JBoss EAP.

Note

This example uses a SAML client but an OpenID-Connect client could also be used. See Red Hat Single Sign-On Clients and Automatic and Manual Red Hat Single Sign-On Client Registration Methods for more information on the differences between SAML and OpenID-Connect clients.

5.6.1. Preparing the Red Hat Single Sign-On Credentials

Log in to the encrypted Red Hat Single Sign-On web server at https://secure-sso-<project-name>.<hostname>/auth/admin using the administrator account created during the Red Hat Single Sign-On deployment.

Create a Realm

  1. Hover your cursor over the realm namespace (default is Master) at the top of the sidebar and click Add Realm.
  2. Enter a realm name (this example uses saml-demo) and click Create.

Copy the Public Key

In the newly created saml-demo realm, click the Keys tab and copy the generated public key. This example uses the variable realm-public-key for brevity. This is needed later to deploy the Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled JBoss EAP image.

Create a Role

Create a role in Red Hat Single Sign-On with a name that corresponds to the JEE role defined in the web.xml of the example EAP application. This role will be assigned to an Red Hat Single Sign-On application user to authenticate access to user applications.

  1. Click Roles in the Configure sidebar to list the roles for this realm. This is a new realm, so there should only be the default offline_access role.
  2. Click Add Role.
  3. Enter the role name (this example uses the role saml-user-role) and click Save.

Create Users and Assign Roles

Create two users: - Assign the realm management user the realm-management roles to handle automatic Red Hat Single Sign-On client registration in the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. - Assign the application user the JEE role, created in the previous step, to authenticate access to user applications.

Create the realm management user:

  1. Click Users in the Manage sidebar to view the user information for the realm.
  2. Click Add User.
  3. Enter a valid Username (this example uses the user app-mgmt-user) and click Save.
  4. Edit the user configuration. Click the Credentials tab in the user space and enter a password for the user. After the password has been confirmed you can click Reset Password to set the user password. A pop-up window prompts for additional confirmation.

Create the application user:

  1. Click Users in the Manage sidebar to view the user information for the realm.
  2. Click Add User.
  3. Enter a valid Username and any additional optional information for the application user and click Save.
  4. Edit the user configuration. Click the Credentials tab in the user space and enter a password for the user. After the password has been confirmed you can click Reset Password to set the user password. A pop-up window prompts for additional confirmation.
  5. Click Role Mappings to list the realm and client role configuration. In Available Roles, add the role created earlier.

Create and Configure a SAML Client:

Clients are Red Hat Single Sign-On entities that request user authentication. This example configures a SAML client to handle authentication for the EAP application. This section saves two files, keystore.jks and keycloak-saml-subsystem.xml that are needed later in the procedure.

Create the SAML Client:

  1. Click Clients in the Configure sidebar to list the clients in the realm. Click Create.
  2. Enter a valid Client ID. This example uses sso-saml-demo.
  3. In the Client Protocol drop-down menu, select saml.
  4. Enter the Root URL for the application. This example uses https://demoapp-eap-app-demo.openshift32.example.com.
  5. Click Save.

Configure the SAML Client:

In the Settings tab, set the Root URL and the Valid Redirect URLs for the new sso-saml-demo client:

  1. For the Root URL, enter the same address used when creating the client. This example uses https://demoapp-eap-app-demo.openshift32.example.com.
  2. For the Valid Redirect URLs, enter an address for users to be redirected to at when they log in or out. This example uses a redirect address relative to the root https://demoapp-eap-app-demo.openshift32.example.com/*.

Export the SAML Keys:

  1. Click the SAML Keys tab in the sso-saml-demo client space and click Export.
  2. For this example, leave the Archive Format as JKS. This example uses the default Key Alias of sso-saml-demo and default Realm Certificate Alias of saml-demo.
  3. Enter the Key Password and the Store Password. This example uses password for both.
  4. Click Download and save the keystore-saml.jks file for use later.
  5. Click the sso-saml-demo client to return to the client space ready for the next step.

Download the Client Adapter:

  1. Click Installation.
  2. Use the Format Option drop-down menu to select a format. This example uses Keycloak SAML Wildfly/JBoss Subsystem.
  3. Click Download and save the file keycloak-saml-subsystem.xml.

The keystore-saml.jks will be used with the other EAP keystores in the next section to create an OpenShift secret for the EAP application project. Copy the keystore-saml.jks file to an OpenShift node.
The keycloak-saml-subsystem.xml will be modified and used in the application deployment. Copy it into the /configuration folder of the application as secure-saml-deployments.

5.6.2. Preparing Red Hat Single Sign-On Authentication for OpenShift Deployment

Log in to the OpenShift CLI with a user that holds the cluster:admin role.

  1. Create a new project:

    $ oc new-project eap-app-demo
  2. Add the view role to the default service account. This enables the service account to view all the resources in the eap-app-demo namespace, which is necessary for managing the cluster.

    $ oc policy add-role-to-user view system:serviceaccount:$(oc project -q):default
  3. The EAP template requires an SSL keystore and a JGroups keystore.
    This example uses keytool, a package included with the Java Development Kit, to generate self-signed certificates for these keystores. The following commands will prompt for passwords.

    1. Generate a secure key for the SSL keystore:

      $ keytool -genkeypair -alias https -storetype JKS -keystore eapkeystore.jks
    2. Generate a secure key for the JGroups keystore:

      $ keytool -genseckey -alias jgroups -storetype JCEKS -keystore eapjgroups.jceks
  4. Generate the EAP for OpenShift secrets with the SSL and JGroup keystore files:

    $ oc secret new eap-ssl-secret eapkeystore.jks
    $ oc secret new eap-jgroup-secret eapjgroups.jceks
  5. Add the EAP application secret to the EAP service account created earlier:

    $ oc secrets link default eap-ssl-secret eap-jgroup-secret

5.6.3. Modifying the secure-saml-deployments File

The keycloak-saml-subsystem.xml, exported from the Red Hat Single Sign-On client in a previous section, should have been copied into the /configuration folder of the application and renamed secure-saml-deployments. EAP searches for this file when it starts and copies it to the standalone-openshift.xml file inside the Red Hat Single Sign-On SAML adapter configuration.

  1. Open the /configuration/secure-saml-deployments file in a text editor.
  2. Replace the YOUR-WAR.war value of the secure-deployment name tag with the application .war file. This example uses sso-saml-demo.war.
  3. Replace the SPECIFY YOUR LOGOUT PAGE! value of the logout page tag with the url to redirect users when they log out of the application. This example uses /index.jsp.
  4. Delete the <PrivateKeyPem> and <CertificatePem> tags and keys and replace it with keystore information:

    ...
    <Keys>
      <Key signing="true">
        <KeyStore file= "/etc/eap-secret-volume/keystore-saml.jks" password="password">
          <PrivateKey alias="sso-saml-demo" password="password"/>
          <Certificate alias="sso-saml-demo"/>
        </KeyStore>
      </Key>
    </Keys>

    The mount path of the keystore-saml.jks (in this example /etc/eap-secret-volume/keystore-saml.jks) can be specified in the application template with the parameter EAP_HTTPS_KEYSTORE_DIR.
    The aliases and passwords for the PrivateKey and the Certificate were configured when the SAML Keys were exported from the Red Hat Single Sign-On client.

  5. Delete the second <CertificatePem> tag and key and replace it with the the realm certificate information:

    ...
    <Keys>
      <Key signing="true">
        <KeyStore file="/etc/eap-secret-volume/keystore-saml.jks" password="password">
          <Certificate alias="saml-demo"/>
        </KeyStore>
      </Key>
    </Keys>
    ...

    The certificate alias and password were configured when the SAML Keys were exported from the Red Hat Single Sign-On client.

  6. Save and close the /configuration/secure-saml-deployments file.

5.6.4. Configuring SAML Client Registration in the Application web.xml

The client type must also be specified by the <auth-method> key in the application web.xml. This file is read by the image at deployment.

Open the application web.xml file and ensure it includes the following:

...
<login-config>
  <auth-method>KEYCLOAK-SAML</auth-method>
</login-config>
...

5.6.5. Deploying the Application

You do not need to include any Red Hat Single Sign-On configuration for the image because that has been configured in the application itself. Navigating to the application login page redirects you to the Red Hat Single Sign-On login. Log in to the application through Red Hat Single Sign-On using the application user user created earlier.

Chapter 6. Reference

6.1. Artifact Repository Mirrors

A repository in Maven holds build artifacts and dependencies of various types (all the project jars, library jar, plugins or any other project specific artifacts). It also specifies locations from where to download artifacts from, while performing the S2I build. Besides using central repositories, it is a common practice for organizations to deploy a local custom repository (mirror).

Benefits of using a mirror are:

  • Availability of a synchronized mirror, which is geographically closer and faster.
  • Ability to have greater control over the repository content.
  • Possibility to share artifacts across different teams (developers, CI), without the need to rely on public servers and repositories.
  • Improved build times.

Often, a repository manager can serve as local cache to a mirror. Assuming that the repository manager is already deployed and reachable externally at http://10.0.0.1:8080/repository/internal/, the S2I build can then use this manager by supplying the MAVEN_MIRROR_URL environment variable to the build configuration of the application as follows:

  1. Identify the name of the build configuration to apply MAVEN_MIRROR_URL variable against:

    $ oc get bc -o name
    buildconfig/sso
  2. Update build configuration of sso with a MAVEN_MIRROR_URL environment variable

    $ oc set env bc/sso \
      -e MAVEN_MIRROR_URL="http://10.0.0.1:8080/repository/internal/"
    buildconfig "sso" updated
  3. Verify the setting

    $ oc set env bc/sso --list
    # buildconfigs sso
    MAVEN_MIRROR_URL=http://10.0.0.1:8080/repository/internal/
  4. Schedule new build of the application
Note

During application build, you will notice that Maven dependencies are pulled from the repository manager, instead of the default public repositories. Also, after the build is finished, you will see that the mirror is filled with all the dependencies that were retrieved and used during the build.

A repository in Maven holds build artifacts and dependencies of various types (all the project jars, library jar, plugins or any other project specific artifacts). It also specifies locations from where to download artifacts from, while performing the S2I build. Besides using central repositories, it is a common practice for organizations to deploy a local custom repository (mirror).

Benefits of using a mirror are:

  • Availability of a synchronized mirror, which is geographically closer and faster.
  • Ability to have greater control over the repository content.
  • Possibility to share artifacts across different teams (developers, CI), without the need to rely on public servers and repositories.
  • Improved build times.

Often, a repository manager can serve as local cache to a mirror. Assuming that the repository manager is already deployed and reachable externally at http://10.0.0.1:8080/repository/internal/, the S2I build can then use this manager by supplying the MAVEN_MIRROR_URL environment variable to the build configuration of the application as follows:

  1. Identify the name of the build configuration to apply MAVEN_MIRROR_URL variable against:

    $ oc get bc -o name
    buildconfig/sso
  2. Update build configuration of sso with a MAVEN_MIRROR_URL environment variable

    $ oc set env bc/sso \
      -e MAVEN_MIRROR_URL="http://10.0.0.1:8080/repository/internal/"
    buildconfig "sso" updated
  3. Verify the setting

    $ oc set env bc/sso --list
    # buildconfigs sso
    MAVEN_MIRROR_URL=http://10.0.0.1:8080/repository/internal/
  4. Schedule new build of the application
Note

During application build, you will notice that Maven dependencies are pulled from the repository manager, instead of the default public repositories. Also, after the build is finished, you will see that the mirror is filled with all the dependencies that were retrieved and used during the build.

6.2. Environment Variables

6.2.1. Information Environment Variables

The following information environment variables are designed to convey information about the image and should not be modified by the user:

Table 6.1. Information Environment Variables

Variable NameDescriptionExample Value

AB_JOLOKIA_AUTH_OPENSHIFT

-

true

AB_JOLOKIA_HTTPS

-

true

AB_JOLOKIA_PASSWORD_RANDOM

-

true

JBOSS_IMAGE_NAME

Image name, same as Name label.

redhat-sso-7/sso72-openshift

JBOSS_IMAGE_RELEASE

Image release, same as Release label.

dev

JBOSS_IMAGE_VERSION

Image version, same as Version label.

1.1

JBOSS_MODULES_SYSTEM_PKGS

-

org.jboss.logmanager,jdk.nashorn.api

STI_BUILDER

Provides OpenShift S2I support for jee project types.

jee

6.2.2. Configuration Environment Variables

Configuration environment variables are designed to conveniently adjust the image without requiring a rebuild, and should be set by the user as desired.

Table 6.2. Configuration Environment Variables

Variable NameDescriptionExample Value

AB_JOLOKIA_AUTH_OPENSHIFT

Switch on client authentication for OpenShift TLS communication. The value of this parameter can be a relative distinguished name which must be contained in a presented client’s certificate. Enabling this parameter will automatically switch Jolokia into https communication mode. The default CA cert is set to /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/ca.crt.

true

AB_JOLOKIA_CONFIG

If set uses this file (including path) as Jolokia JVM agent properties (as described in Jolokia’s reference manual). If not set, the /opt/jolokia/etc/jolokia.properties file will be created using the settings as defined in this document, otherwise the rest of the settings in this document are ignored.

/opt/jolokia/custom.properties

AB_JOLOKIA_DISCOVERY_ENABLED

Enable Jolokia discovery. Defaults to false.

true

AB_JOLOKIA_HOST

Host address to bind to. Defaults to 0.0.0.0.

127.0.0.1

AB_JOLOKIA_HTTPS

Switch on secure communication with https. By default self-signed server certificates are generated if no serverCert configuration is given in AB_JOLOKIA_OPTS. NOTE: If the values is set to an empty string, https is turned off. If the value is set to a non empty string, https is turned on.

true

AB_JOLOKIA_ID

Agent ID to use ($HOSTNAME by default, which is the container id).

openjdk-app-1-xqlsj

AB_JOLOKIA_OFF

If set disables activation of Jolokia (i.e. echos an empty value). By default, Jolokia is enabled. NOTE: If the values is set to an empty string, https is turned off. If the value is set to a non empty string, https is turned on.

true

AB_JOLOKIA_OPTS

Additional options to be appended to the agent configuration. They should be given in the format "key=value, key=value, …<200b> "

backlog=20

AB_JOLOKIA_PASSWORD

Password for basic authentication. By default authentication is switched off.

mypassword

AB_JOLOKIA_PASSWORD_RANDOM

If set, a random value is generated for AB_JOLOKIA_PASSWORD, and it is saved in the /opt/jolokia/etc/jolokia.pw file.

true

AB_JOLOKIA_PORT

Port to use (Default: 8778).

5432

AB_JOLOKIA_USER

User for basic authentication. Defaults to jolokia.

myusername

CONTAINER_CORE_LIMIT

A calculated core limit as described in CFS Bandwidth Control.

2

GC_ADAPTIVE_SIZE_POLICY_WEIGHT

The weighting given to the current Garbage Collection (GC) time versus previous GC times.

90

GC_MAX_HEAP_FREE_RATIO

Maximum percentage of heap free after GC to avoid shrinking.

40

GC_MAX_METASPACE_SIZE

The maximum metaspace size.

100

GGC_TIME_RATIOC_MIN_HEAP_FREE_RATIO

Minimum percentage of heap free after GC to avoid expansion.

20

GC_TIME_RATIO

Specifies the ratio of the time spent outside the garbage collection (for example, the time spent for application execution) to the time spent in the garbage collection.

4

JAVA_DIAGNOSTICS

Set this to get some diagnostics information to standard out when things are happening.

true

JAVA_INITIAL_MEM_RATIO

This is used to calculate a default initial heap memory based the maximal heap memory. The default is 100 which means 100% of the maximal heap is used for the initial heap size. You can skip this mechanism by setting this value to 0 in which case no -Xms option is added.

100

JAVA_MAX_MEM_RATIO

It is used to calculate a default maximal heap memory based on a containers restriction. If used in a Docker container without any memory constraints for the container then this option has no effect. If there is a memory constraint then -Xmx is set to a ratio of the container available memory as set here. The default is 50 which means 50% of the available memory is used as an upper boundary. You can skip this mechanism by setting this value to 0 in which case no -Xmx option is added.

40

JAVA_OPTS_APPEND

Server startup options.

-Dkeycloak.migration.action=export -Dkeycloak.migration.provider=dir -Dkeycloak.migration.dir=/tmp

MQ_SIMPLE_DEFAULT_PHYSICAL_DESTINATION

For backwards compatability, set to true to use MyQueue and MyTopic as physical destination name defaults instead of queue/MyQueue and topic/MyTopic.

false

OPENSHIFT_KUBE_PING_LABELS

Clustering labels selector.

app=sso-app

OPENSHIFT_KUBE_PING_NAMESPACE

Clustering project namespace.

myproject

SCRIPT_DEBUG

If set to true, ensurses that the bash scripts are executed with the -x option, printing the commands and their arguments as they are executed.

true

SSO_ADMIN_PASSWORD

Password of the administrator account for the master realm of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. Required. If no value is specified, it is auto generated and displayed as an OpenShift Instructional message when the template is instantiated.

adm-password

SSO_ADMIN_USERNAME

Username of the administrator account for the master realm of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. Required. If no value is specified, it is auto generated and displayed as an OpenShift Instructional message when the template is instantiated.

admin

SSO_HOSTNAME

Custom hostname for the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. Not set by default. If not set, the request hostname SPI provider, which uses the request headers to determine the hostname of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server is used. If set, the fixed hostname SPI provider, with the hostname of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server set to the provided variable value, is used. See dedicated Customizing Hostname for the Red Hat Single Sign-On Server section for additional steps to be performed, when SSO_HOSTNAME variable is set.

rh-sso-server.openshift.example.com

SSO_REALM

Name of the realm to be created in the Red Hat Single Sign-On server if this environment variable is provided.

demo

SSO_SERVICE_PASSWORD

The password for the Red Hat Single Sign-On service user.

mgmt-password

SSO_SERVICE_USERNAME

The username used to access the Red Hat Single Sign-On service. This is used by clients to create the application client(s) within the specified Red Hat Single Sign-On realm. This user is created if this environment variable is provided.

sso-mgmtuser

SSO_TRUSTSTORE

The name of the truststore file within the secret.

truststore.jks

SSO_TRUSTSTORE_DIR

Truststore directory.

/etc/sso-secret-volume

SSO_TRUSTSTORE_PASSWORD

The password for the truststore and certificate.

mykeystorepass

SSO_TRUSTSTORE_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the truststore file. Used for sso-truststore-volume volume.

truststore-secret

Available application templates for Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenShift can combine the aforementioned configuration variables with common OpenShift variables (for example APPLICATION_NAME or SOURCE_REPOSITORY_URL), product specific variables (e.g. HORNETQ_CLUSTER_PASSWORD), or configuration variables typical to database images (e.g. MYSQL_FT_MAX_WORD_LEN) yet. All of these different types of configuration variables can be adjusted as desired to achieve the deployed Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled application will align with the intended use case as much as possible. The list of configuration variables, available for each category of application templates for Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled applications, is described below.

6.2.3. Template variables for all Red Hat Single Sign-On images

Table 6.3. Configuration Variables Available For All Red Hat Single Sign-On Images

VariableDescription

APPLICATION_NAME

The name for the application.

DB_MAX_POOL_SIZE

Sets xa-pool/max-pool-size for the configured datasource.

DB_TX_ISOLATION

Sets transaction-isolation for the configured datasource.

DB_USERNAME

Database user name.

HOSTNAME_HTTP

Custom hostname for http service route. Leave blank for default hostname, e.g.: <application-name>.<project>.<default-domain-suffix>.

HOSTNAME_HTTPS

Custom hostname for https service route. Leave blank for default hostname, e.g.: <application-name>.<project>.<default-domain-suffix>.

HTTPS_KEYSTORE

The name of the keystore file within the secret. If defined along with HTTPS_PASSWORD and HTTPS_NAME, enable HTTPS and set the SSL certificate key file to a relative path under $JBOSS_HOME/standalone/configuration.

HTTPS_KEYSTORE_TYPE

The type of the keystore file (JKS or JCEKS).

HTTPS_NAME

The name associated with the server certificate (e.g. jboss). If defined along with HTTPS_PASSWORD and HTTPS_KEYSTORE, enable HTTPS and set the SSL name.

HTTPS_PASSWORD

The password for the keystore and certificate (e.g. mykeystorepass). If defined along with HTTPS_NAME and HTTPS_KEYSTORE, enable HTTPS and set the SSL key password.

HTTPS_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the keystore file.

IMAGE_STREAM_NAMESPACE

Namespace in which the ImageStreams for Red Hat Middleware images are installed. These ImageStreams are normally installed in the openshift namespace. You should only need to modify this if you’ve installed the ImageStreams in a different namespace/project.

JGROUPS_CLUSTER_PASSWORD

JGroups cluster password.

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_KEYSTORE

The name of the keystore file within the secret.

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_NAME

The name associated with the server certificate (e.g. secret-key).

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_PASSWORD

The password for the keystore and certificate (e.g. password).

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the keystore file.

SSO_ADMIN_USERNAME

Username of the administrator account for the master realm of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. Required. If no value is specified, it is auto generated and displayed as an OpenShift instructional message when the template is instantiated.

SSO_ADMIN_PASSWORD

Password of the administrator account for the master realm of the Red Hat Single Sign-On server. Required. If no value is specified, it is auto generated and displayed as an OpenShift instructional message when the template is instantiated.

SSO_REALM

Name of the realm to be created in the Red Hat Single Sign-On server if this environment variable is provided.

SSO_SERVICE_USERNAME

The username used to access the Red Hat Single Sign-On service. This is used by clients to create the application client(s) within the specified Red Hat Single Sign-On realm. This user is created if this environment variable is provided.

SSO_SERVICE_PASSWORD

The password for the Red Hat Single Sign-On service user.

SSO_TRUSTSTORE

The name of the truststore file within the secret.

SSO_TRUSTSTORE_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the truststore file. Used for sso-truststore-volume volume.

SSO_TRUSTSTORE_PASSWORD

The password for the truststore and certificate.

6.2.4. Template variables specific to sso73-mysql, sso73-mysql-persistent, and sso73-x509-mysql-persistent

Table 6.4. Configuration Variables Specific To Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled MySQL Applications With Ephemeral Or Persistent Storage

VariableDescription

DB_USERNAME

Database user name.

DB_PASSWORD

Database user password.

DB_JNDI

Database JNDI name used by application to resolve the datasource, e.g. java:/jboss/datasources/mysql.

MYSQL_AIO

Controls the innodb_use_native_aio setting value if the native AIO is broken.

MYSQL_FT_MAX_WORD_LEN

The maximum length of the word to be included in a FULLTEXT index.

MYSQL_FT_MIN_WORD_LEN

The minimum length of the word to be included in a FULLTEXT index.

MYSQL_LOWER_CASE_TABLE_NAMES

Sets how the table names are stored and compared.

MYSQL_MAX_CONNECTIONS

The maximum permitted number of simultaneous client connections.

6.2.5. Template variables specific to sso73-postgresql, sso73-postgresql-persistent, and sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent

Table 6.5. Configuration Variables Specific To Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled PostgreSQL Applications With Ephemeral Or Persistent Storage

VariableDescription

DB_USERNAME

Database user name.

DB_PASSWORD

Database user password.

DB_JNDI

Database JNDI name used by application to resolve the datasource, e.g. java:/jboss/datasources/postgresql

POSTGRESQL_MAX_CONNECTIONS

The maximum number of client connections allowed. This also sets the maximum number of prepared transactions.

POSTGRESQL_SHARED_BUFFERS

Configures how much memory is dedicated to PostgreSQL for caching data.

6.2.6. Template variables specific to sso73-mysql-persistent, sso73-x509-mysql-persistent, sso73-postgresql-persistent, and sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent

Table 6.6. Configuration Variables Specific To Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled MySQL / PostgreSQL Applications With Persistent Storage

VariableDescription

VOLUME_CAPACITY

Size of persistent storage for database volume.

6.2.7. Template variables for general eap64 and eap71 S2I images

Table 6.7. Configuration Variables For EAP 6.4 and EAP 7 Applications Built Via S2I

VariableDescription

APPLICATION_NAME

The name for the application.

ARTIFACT_DIR

Artifacts directory.

AUTO_DEPLOY_EXPLODED

Controls whether exploded deployment content should be automatically deployed.

CONTEXT_DIR

Path within Git project to build; empty for root project directory.

GENERIC_WEBHOOK_SECRET

Generic build trigger secret.

GITHUB_WEBHOOK_SECRET

GitHub trigger secret.

HORNETQ_CLUSTER_PASSWORD

HornetQ cluster administrator password.

HORNETQ_QUEUES

Queue names.

HORNETQ_TOPICS

Topic names.

HOSTNAME_HTTP

Custom host name for http service route. Leave blank for default host name, e.g.: <application-name>.<project>.<default-domain-suffix>.

HOSTNAME_HTTPS

Custom host name for https service route. Leave blank for default host name, e.g.: <application-name>.<project>.<default-domain-suffix>.

HTTPS_KEYSTORE_TYPE

The type of the keystore file (JKS or JCEKS).

HTTPS_KEYSTORE

The name of the keystore file within the secret. If defined along with HTTPS_PASSWORD and HTTPS_NAME, enable HTTPS and set the SSL certificate key file to a relative path under $JBOSS_HOME/standalone/configuration.

HTTPS_NAME

The name associated with the server certificate (e.g. jboss). If defined along with HTTPS_PASSWORD and HTTPS_KEYSTORE, enable HTTPS and set the SSL name.

HTTPS_PASSWORD

The password for the keystore and certificate (e.g. mykeystorepass). If defined along with HTTPS_NAME and HTTPS_KEYSTORE, enable HTTPS and set the SSL key password.

HTTPS_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the keystore file.

IMAGE_STREAM_NAMESPACE

Namespace in which the ImageStreams for Red Hat Middleware images are installed. These ImageStreams are normally installed in the openshift namespace. You should only need to modify this if you’ve installed the ImageStreams in a different namespace/project.

JGROUPS_CLUSTER_PASSWORD

JGroups cluster password.

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_KEYSTORE

The name of the keystore file within the secret.

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_NAME

The name associated with the server certificate (e.g. secret-key).

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_PASSWORD

The password for the keystore and certificate (e.g. password).

JGROUPS_ENCRYPT_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the keystore file.

SOURCE_REPOSITORY_REF

Git branch/tag reference.

SOURCE_REPOSITORY_URL

Git source URI for application.

6.2.8. Template variables specific to eap64-sso-s2i and eap71-sso-s2i for automatic client registration

Table 6.8. Configuration Variables For EAP 6.4 and EAP 7 Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled Applications Built Via S2I

VariableDescription

SSO_URL

Red Hat Single Sign-On server location.

SSO_REALM

Name of the realm to be created in the Red Hat Single Sign-On server if this environment variable is provided.

SSO_USERNAME

The username used to access the Red Hat Single Sign-On service. This is used to create the application client(s) within the specified Red Hat Single Sign-On realm. This should match the SSO_SERVICE_USERNAME specified through one of the sso73- templates.

SSO_PASSWORD

The password for the Red Hat Single Sign-On service user.

SSO_PUBLIC_KEY

Red Hat Single Sign-On public key. Public key is recommended to be passed into the template to avoid man-in-the-middle security attacks.

SSO_SECRET

The Red Hat Single Sign-On client secret for confidential access.

SSO_SERVICE_URL

Red Hat Single Sign-On service location.

SSO_TRUSTSTORE_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the truststore file. Used for sso-truststore-volume volume.

SSO_TRUSTSTORE

The name of the truststore file within the secret.

SSO_TRUSTSTORE_PASSWORD

The password for the truststore and certificate.

SSO_BEARER_ONLY

Red Hat Single Sign-On client access type.

SSO_DISABLE_SSL_CERTIFICATE_VALIDATION

If true SSL communication between EAP and the Red Hat Single Sign-On Server is insecure (i.e. certificate validation is disabled with curl)

SSO_ENABLE_CORS

Enable CORS for Red Hat Single Sign-On applications.

6.2.9. Template variables specific to eap64-sso-s2i and eap71-sso-s2i for automatic client registration with SAML clients

Table 6.9. Configuration Variables For EAP 6.4 and EAP 7 Red Hat Single Sign-On-enabled Applications Built Via S2I Using SAML Protocol

VariableDescription

SSO_SAML_CERTIFICATE_NAME

The name associated with the server certificate.

SSO_SAML_KEYSTORE_PASSWORD

The password for the keystore and certificate.

SSO_SAML_KEYSTORE

The name of the keystore file within the secret.

SSO_SAML_KEYSTORE_SECRET

The name of the secret containing the keystore file.

SSO_SAML_LOGOUT_PAGE

Red Hat Single Sign-On logout page for SAML applications.

6.3. Exposed Ports

Port NumberDescription

8443

HTTPS

8778

Jolokia monitoring

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