Chapter 3. Performing Additional Configuration on Capsule Server

3.1. Installing the katello Agent

Installing the katello agent is recommended to allow remote updates of clients. The base system of a Capsule Server is a client of Satellite Server and therefore should also have the katello agent installed.

Before You Begin

  • You must have enabled the Satellite Tools repositories in Satellite Server.
  • You must have synchronized the Satellite Tools repositories in Satellite Server.

To Install katello-agent:

  1. Log into the system.
  2. Enable the Satellite tools repository for this version of Satellite.

    # subscription-manager repos \
    --enable=rhel-7-server-satellite-tools-6.4-rpms
  3. Install the package.

    # yum install katello-agent

3.2. Enabling Remote Execution on Capsule Server

If you want to run commands on a Capsule Server’s hosts, ensure that you enable the remote execution.

Note

Remote execution on external Capsules is disabled by default. To use remote execution on a Capsule Server you need to enable it by running the following command:

# satellite-installer --scenario capsule \
--enable-foreman-proxy-plugin-remote-execution-ssh

3.3. Enabling OpenSCAP on External Capsules

On Satellite Server and the integrated Capsule of your Satellite Server, OpenSCAP is enabled by default.

If you want to use the OpenSCAP plug-in and content on an external Capsule, you must enable OpenSCAP on each Capsule.

Procedure

To enable OpenSCAP, enter the following command:

# satellite-installer --scenario capsule \
--enable-foreman-proxy-plugin-openscap

3.4. Adding Life Cycle Environments to Capsule Servers

If your Capsule Server has the content functionality enabled, you must add an environment so that Capsule can synchronize content from Satellite Server and provide content to host systems.

Do not assign the Library lifecycle environment to your Capsule Server because it triggers an automated Capsule sync every time the CDN updates a repository. This might consume multiple system resources on Capsules, network bandwidth between Satellite and Capsules, and available disk space on Capsules.

You can use Hammer CLI on Satellite Server or the Satellite web UI.

Procedure

To add a life cycle environment to Capsule Server, complete the following step:

  1. In the Satellite web UI, navigate to Infrastructure > Capsules, and select the Capsule that you want to add a life cycle to.
  2. Click Edit and click the Life Cycle Environments tab.
  3. From the left menu, select the life cycle environments that you want to add to Capsule, and then click Submit.
  4. To synchronize Capsule’s content, click the Overview tab, and then click Synchronize.
  5. Select either Optimized Sync or Complete Sync.

For CLI Users

  1. To display a list of all Capsule Servers, enter the following command:

    # hammer capsule list

    Note the ID that returns.

  2. Using the ID, verify the details of your Capsule Server:

    # hammer capsule info --id capsule_id
  3. Verify the life cycle environments available and note the environment ID:

    # hammer capsule content available-lifecycle-environments \
    --id capsule_id
  4. To view the life cycle environments available for your Capsule Server, enter the following command and note the ID and the organization name:

    # hammer capsule content available-lifecycle-environments --id capsule_id
  5. Add the life cycle environment to your Capsule Server:

    # hammer capsule content add-lifecycle-environment \
    --id capsule_id --organization "My_Organization" \
    --environment-id environment_id

    Repeat for each life cycle environment you want to add to Capsule Server.

    To synchronize all content from your Satellite Server environment to Capsule Server, enter the following command:

    # hammer capsule content synchronize --id capsule_id

    To synchronize a specific life cycle environment from your Satellite Server to Capsule Server, enter the following command:

    # hammer capsule content synchronize --id external_capsule_id \
    --environment-id environment_id

3.5. Enabling Power Management on Managed Hosts

When you enable the baseboard management controller (BMC) module on the Capsule Server, you can use power management commands on managed hosts using the intelligent platform management interface (IPMI) or a similar protocol.

The BMC service on the satellite Capsule Server enables you to perform a range of power management tasks. The underlying protocol for this feature is IPMI; also referred to as the BMC function. IPMI uses a special network interface on the managed hardware that is connected to a dedicated processor that runs independently of the host’s CPUs. In many instances the BMC functionality is built into chassis-based systems as part of chassis management (a dedicated module in the chassis).

For more information on the BMC service, see Configuring an Additional Network Interface in Managing Hosts.

Before You Begin

  • All managed hosts must have a network interface, with type BMC. Satellite uses this NIC to pass the appropriate credentials to the host.

Enable Power Management on Managed Hosts

  1. Run the installer with the options to enable BMC.

    # satellite-installer --scenario capsule \
    --foreman-proxy-bmc "true" \
    --foreman-proxy-bmc-default-provider "freeipmi"

3.6. Configuring DNS, DHCP, and TFTP on Capsule Server

You can configure DNS, DHCP, and TFTP on Capsule Server.

You can also configure Capsule Server to use external DNS and DHCP services. See Configuring External Services for more information.

To view a complete list of configurable options, enter the satellite-installer --scenario capsule --help command.

Before You Begin

  • You must have the correct network name (dns-interface) for the DNS server.
  • You must have the correct interface name (dhcp-interface) for the DHCP server.

Configure DNS, DHCP, and TFTP on Capsule Server

  1. Run capsule installer with the options applicable to your environment.

    The following example shows full provisioning services:

    # satellite-installer --scenario capsule \
    --foreman-proxy-dns true \
    --foreman-proxy-dns-managed true \
    --foreman-proxy-dns-interface eth0 \
    --foreman-proxy-dns-zone example.com \
    --foreman-proxy-dns-forwarders 172.17.13.1 \
    --foreman-proxy-dns-reverse 13.17.172.in-addr.arpa \
    --foreman-proxy-dhcp true \
    --foreman-proxy-dhcp-managed true \
    --foreman-proxy-dhcp-interface eth0 \
    --foreman-proxy-dhcp-range "172.17.13.100 172.17.13.150" \
    --foreman-proxy-dhcp-gateway 172.17.13.1 \
    --foreman-proxy-dhcp-nameservers 172.17.13.2 \
    --foreman-proxy-tftp true \
    --foreman-proxy-tftp-managed true \
    --foreman-proxy-tftp-servername $(hostname)

For more information about configuring DHCP, DNS, and TFTP services, see the Configuring Network Services section in the Provisioning Guide.

3.7. Configuring Capsule Server with a Custom Server Certificate

Red Hat Satellite 6 includes default SSL certificates to enable encrypted communications between the Satellite Server, Capsule Servers, and all hosts. You can replace the default certificates with custom certificates if required. For example, your company’s security policy might dictate that SSL certificates must be obtained from a specific Certificate Authority.

Prerequisites

To use custom certificates on each Capsule Server, complete these procedures:

3.7.1. Obtain an SSL Certificate for Capsule Server

Important

Use PEM encoding for the SSL Certificates.

Note
  • Do not use the Satellite Server’s certificate on any Capsule Server as each server’s certificate is unique.

Procedure

On Satellite Server, obtain custom SSL certificates for Capsule Server:

  1. Create a directory to store all the source certificate files, accessible only to the root user, for example /root/capsule_cert.

    # mkdir /root/capsule_cert

    In these examples, the directory is /root/capsule_cert. If you have multiple Capsule Servers, name the directory to match. For example, if you have Capsule Servers named capsule_apac and capsule_emea, you might create directories named capsule_apac and capsule_emea respectively. This is not required, but reduces the risk of using files from one Capsule Server on another Capsule Server.

  2. Create a private key with which to sign the Certificate Signing Request (CSR).

    Note

    If you already have a private key for the Capsule Server, skip this step.

    # openssl genrsa -out /root/capsule_cert/capsule_cert_key.pem 4096
  3. Create the /root/capsule_cert/openssl.cnf configuration file for the Certificate Signing Request (CSR) and include the following content. In the [ req_distinguished_name ] section, enter information about your organization.

    Note

    The certificate’s Common Name (CN) and the Subject Alternative Name (SAN) DNS.1 must match the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the server on which it is used. If you are requesting a certificate for a Satellite Server, this is the FQDN of Satellite Server. If you are requesting a certificate for a Capsule Server, this is the FQDN of Capsule Server.

    To confirm a server’s FQDN, enter the following command on that server: hostname -f.

    [ req ]
    req_extensions = v3_req
    distinguished_name = req_distinguished_name
    x509_extensions = usr_cert
    prompt = no
    
    [ req_distinguished_name ]
    C  = Country Name (2 letter code)
    ST = State or Province Name (full name)
    L  = Locality Name (eg, city)
    O  = Organization Name (eg, company)
    OU = The division of your organization handling the certificate
    CN = capsule.example.com
    
    [ v3_req ]
    # Extensions to add to a certificate request
    basicConstraints = CA:FALSE
    keyUsage = digitalSignature, nonRepudiation, keyEncipherment, dataEncipherment
    extendedKeyUsage = serverAuth, clientAuth, codeSigning, emailProtection
    subjectAltName = @alt_names
    
    [ usr_cert ]
    basicConstraints=CA:FALSE
    nsCertType = client, server, email
    keyUsage = nonRepudiation, digitalSignature, keyEncipherment
    extendedKeyUsage = serverAuth, clientAuth, codeSigning, emailProtection
    nsComment = "OpenSSL Generated Certificate"
    subjectKeyIdentifier=hash
    authorityKeyIdentifier=keyid,issuer
    
    [ alt_names ]
    DNS.1 = capsule.example.com
  4. Generate the Certificate Signing Request (CSR):

    # openssl req -new \
    -key /root/capsule_cert/capsule_cert_key.pem \
    -out /root/capsule_cert/capsule_cert_csr.pem \
    -config /root/capsule_cert/openssl.cnf
  5. Send the certificate signing request to the Certificate Authority. The same Certificate Authority must sign certificates for Satellite Server and Capsule Server.

    When you submit the request, specify the lifespan of the certificate. The method for sending the certificate signing request varies, so consult the Certificate Authority for the preferred method. In response to the request you can expect to receive a Certificate Authority bundle, and a signed certificate, in separate files.

3.7.2. Validate the Capsule Server’s SSL Certificate

On the Satellite Server, validate the Capsule Server’s certificate input files with the katello-certs-check command. This process requires that you have copied the Capsule Server key, CSR, and SSL certificate from Capsule Server to Satellite Server.

# katello-certs-check \
   -c /root/capsule_cert/capsule_cert.pem \      1
   -k /root/capsule_cert/capsule_cert_key.pem \  2
   -b /root/capsule_cert/ca_cert_bundle.pem      3
1
Capsule Server certificate file, provided by your Certificate Authority
2
Capsule Server’s private key, used to sign the certificate
3
Certificate Authority bundle, provided by your Certificate Authority

If the certificate is successfully validated, the output contains the following information.

Validation succeeded

Retain a copy of the example capsule-certs-generate command that is output by the katello-certs-check command for use in the following procedure.

Proceed to Section 3.7.3, “Create the Capsule Server’s Certificate Archive File”.

3.7.3. Create the Capsule Server’s Certificate Archive File

The Capsule Server’s installer requires the server certificates to be in an archive file. To create this file, use the capsule-certs-generate command on the Satellite Server.

The capsule-certs-generate command must be run once for every external Capsule Server. In these examples, capsule.example.com is the example FQDN and capsule_certs.tar the example archive file’s name. Replace these with values appropriate to your environment, taking care not to overwrite an existing certificate archive file. For example, if you have Capsule Servers named capsule1 and capsule2, you can name the certificate archive files capsule1_certs.tar and capsule2_certs.tar.

The capsule-certs-generate command, including parameters, is output by the katello-certs-check when run on Satellite Server. For more information, see Configuring Satellite Server with a Custom Server Certificate in Installing Satellite Server from a Connected Network.

  1. In an editor, prepare a copy of the capsule-certs-generate command.
  2. Edit the values for --foreman-proxy-fqdn to match the Capsule Server’s FQDN, and --certs-tar to the file path and name for the certificate archive file.
  3. If the Capsule Server has not already been installed, remove the --certs-update-server parameter. This is used only to update an existing Capsule Server’s certificate.
  4. Copy the modified capsule-certs-generate command from the text editor to the terminal.
  5. Run the modified capsule-certs-generate command.

    Example capsule-certs-generate command

    # capsule-certs-generate --foreman-proxy-fqdn capsule.example.com \
    --certs-tar  /root/capsule_cert/capsule_certs.tar \
    --server-cert /root/capsule_cert/capsule_cert.pem \
    --server-key /root/capsule_cert/capsule_cert_key.pem \
    --server-ca-cert /root/capsule_cert/ca_cert_bundle.pem \
    --certs-update-server

  6. On the Satellite Server, copy the certificate archive file to the Capsule Server, providing the root user’s password when prompted.

    In this example the archive file is copied to the root user’s home directory, but you may prefer to copy it elsewhere.

    # scp /root/capsule_cert/capsule_certs.tar root@capsule.example.com:

Retain a copy of the example satellite-installer command that is output by the capsule-certs-generate command for use in the following procedure.

Proceed to Section 3.7.4, “Install the Capsule Server’s Custom Certificate”.

3.7.4. Install the Capsule Server’s Custom Certificate

Warning

Complete this procedure on the Capsule Server.

To install the Capsule Server’s custom certificates, run the satellite-installer script with custom parameters. The command, including parameters, is output by the capsule-certs-generate command in Section 3.7.3, “Create the Capsule Server’s Certificate Archive File”.

  1. In an editor, prepare a copy of the satellite-installer command.
  2. Edit the value for --foreman-proxy-content-certs-tar to match the location of the certificates archive file.
  3. If you want to enable additional features on the Capsule Server, append their parameters to the satellite-installer command. For a description of all the installer’s parameters, enter the command satellite-installer --scenario capsule --help.
  4. Copy the modified satellite-installer command from the text editor to the terminal.
  5. Run the modified satellite-installer command.

    Example custom satellite-installer command

    # satellite-installer --scenario capsule \
    --foreman-proxy-content-parent-fqdn "satellite.example.com" \
    --foreman-proxy-register-in-foreman "true" \
    --foreman-proxy-foreman-base-url "https://satellite.example.com" \
    --foreman-proxy-trusted-hosts "satellite.example.com" \
    --foreman-proxy-trusted-hosts "capsule.example.com" \
    --foreman-proxy-oauth-consumer-key "FeQsbASvCjvvaqE6duKH6SoYZWg4jwjg" \
    --foreman-proxy-oauth-consumer-secret "7UhPXFPDBongvdTbNixbsWR5WFZsKEgF" \
    --foreman-proxy-content-certs-tar "/root/capsule_certs.tar" \
    --puppet-server-foreman-url "https://satellite.example.com"

Note

The satellite-installer command, as output by the capsule-certs-generate command, is unique to each Capsule Server. Do not use the same command on more than one Capsule Server.

Do NOT delete the certificates archive file (the .tar file) even after the certificates have been deployed to all relevant hosts. It is required, for example, when upgrading the Capsule Server. If the certificates archive file is not found by the installer, it fails with a message similar to the following:

[ERROR YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss main]  tar -xzf /var/tmp/srvcapsule01.tar returned 2 instead of one of [0]

Proceed to Section 3.7.5, “Install the Capsule Server’s New Certificate on All Hosts”.

3.7.5. Install the Capsule Server’s New Certificate on All Hosts

Hosts which connect to an external Capsule Server require that server’s custom certificate.

Until BZ#1683835 is resolved, you cannot upgrade the katello-ca-consumer package; you must remove the old package and install the new one. Upgrading the katello-ca-consumer package fails because the upgrade reverts the baseurl setting in rhsm.conf to subscription.rhsm.redhat.com.

Procedure

Enter the following commands on all applicable hosts. Use the Capsule Server’s host name, not that of the Satellite Server.

  1. Delete the current katello-ca-consumer package on the host.

    # yum remove 'katello-ca-consumer*'
  2. Install the custom SSL certificate on the host.

    # yum localinstall \
    http://capsule.example.com/pub/katello-ca-consumer-latest.noarch.rpm

3.8. Restricting Access to mongod

Only the apache and root users should be allowed access to the MongoDB database daemon, mongod, to reduce the risk of data loss.

Restrict access to mongod on Satellite and Capsule Servers using the following commands.

  1. Configure the Firewall.

    # firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv4 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 27017 -m owner --uid-owner apache -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv6 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 27017 -m owner --uid-owner apache -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv4 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 27017 -m owner --uid-owner root -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv6 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 27017 -m owner --uid-owner root -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv4 filter OUTPUT 1 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 27017 -j DROP \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv6 filter OUTPUT 1 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 27017 -j DROP \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv4 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 28017 -m owner --uid-owner apache -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv6 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 28017 -m owner --uid-owner apache -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv4 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 28017 -m owner --uid-owner root -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv6 filter OUTPUT 0 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 28017 -m owner --uid-owner root -j ACCEPT \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv4 filter OUTPUT 1 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 28017 -j DROP \
    && firewall-cmd  --direct --add-rule ipv6 filter OUTPUT 1 -o lo -p \
    tcp -m tcp --dport 28017 -j DROP
  2. Make the changes persistent:

    # firewall-cmd --runtime-to-permanent