Manage Red Hat Quay

Red Hat Quay 3

Manage Red Hat Quay

Red Hat OpenShift Documentation Team

Abstract

Manage Red Hat Quay

Preface

Once you have deployed a Red Hat Quay registry, there are many ways you can further configure and manage that deployment. Topics covered here include:

  • Setting notifications to alert you of a new Red Hat Quay release
  • Securing connections with SSL and TLS certificates
  • Configuring image security scanning with Clair
  • Mirroring images with repository mirroring
  • Sharing Quay images with a BitTorrent service
  • Authenticating users with LDAP
  • Enabling Quay for Prometheus and Grafana metrics
  • Setting up geo-replication
  • Troubleshooting Quay

Chapter 1. Getting Red Hat Quay release notifications

To keep up with the latest Red Hat Quay releases and other changes related to Red Hat Quay, you can sign up for update notifications on the Red Hat Customer Portal. After signing up for notifications, you will receive notifications letting you know when there is new a Red Hat Quay version, updated documentation, or other Red Hat Quay news.

  1. Log into the Red Hat Customer Portal with your Red Hat customer account credentials.
  2. Select your user name (upper-right corner) to see Red Hat Account and Customer Portal selections: View account and portal selections
  3. Select Notifications. Your profile activity page appears.
  4. Select the Notifications tab.
  5. Select Manage Notifications.
  6. Select Follow, then choose Products from the drop-down box.
  7. From the drop-down box next to the Products, search for and select Red Hat Quay: Select Products from notifications box
  8. Select the SAVE NOTIFICATION button. Going forward, you will receive notifications when there are changes to the Red Hat Quay product, such as a new release.

Chapter 2. Using SSL to protect connections to Red Hat Quay

This document assumes you have deployed Red Hat Quay in a single-node or highly available deployment.

To configure Red Hat Quay with a self-signed certificate, you need to create a Certificate Authority (CA), then generate the required key and certificate files. You then enter those files using the Red Hat Quay superuser GUI or command line.

2.1. Create a CA and sign a certificate

  1. Create a root CA.

    $ openssl genrsa -out rootCA.key 2048
    $ openssl req -x509 -new -nodes -key rootCA.key -sha256 -days 1024 -out rootCA.pem

    The result are rootCA.key and rootCA.pem files in the current directory.

  2. Create certificate and private key: If you are having Red Hat Quay handle TLS, you need to create a certificate and private key to provide during configuration. You can get those files from a certificate signing authority. Here we show how to create those files using the self-signed certificate authority you just created.

    In this example, you create device.crt and device.key files, which will be uploaded to Red Hat Quay and renamed ssl.cert and ssl.key, respectively.

    Because OpenShift creates long fully qualified domain names, consider using a wildcard to identify the larger domain, instead of the specific route to the Red Hat Quay application. For example, use something like *.apps.openshift.example.com when prompted for the server’s hostname:

    Common Name (eg, your name or your server's hostname) []:*apps.openshift.example.com
    $ openssl genrsa -out device.key 2048
    $ openssl req -new -key device.key -out device.csr

    Then sign the certificate with the root CA created earlier:

    $ openssl x509 -req -in device.csr -CA rootCA.pem \
           -CAkey rootCA.key -CAcreateserial -out device.crt -days 500 -sha256
Note

Instead generating the *.key and *.crt files as just shown, you could create an openssl.cnf file. This lets you add more information to the resulting certificate than you can get by just responding to the prompts in the command for generating the certificate request. In this example of an openssl.cnf file, replace DNS.1 and IP.1 with the hostname and IP address of the Red Hat Quay server:

openssl.cnf

[req]
req_extensions = v3_req
distinguished_name = req_distinguished_name
[req_distinguished_name]
[ v3_req ]
basicConstraints = CA:FALSE
keyUsage = nonRepudiation, digitalSignature, keyEncipherment
subjectAltName = @alt_names
[alt_names]
DNS.1 = reg.example.com
IP.1 = 12.345.678.9

You could then generate the key as follows:

$ openssl x509 -req -in ssl.csr -CA rootCA.pem \
   -CAkey rootCA.key -CAcreateserial -out ssl.cert \
   -days 356 -extensions v3_req -extfile openssl.cnf

2.2. Configure Red Hat Quay to use the new certificate

The next step can be accomplished either in the Red Hat Quay screen or from the terminal.

2.2.1. Configure SSL from the Red Hat Quay Setup screen

Start the quay container in config mode, as described in each deployment guide. In the server Configuration section, enable SSL as follows:

  1. Set the Server Hostname to the appropriate value and check the Enable SSL box, then upload the ssl.key and ssl.cert files (in our example, named device.key and device.crt, respectively): Enable SSL
  2. Save the configuration. Red Hat Quay will automatically validate the SSL certificate: validating SSL
  3. Restart the container restart the container

2.2.2. Configure with the command line

By not using the web interface the configuration checking mechanism built into Red Hat Quay is unavailable. It is suggested to use the web interface if possible. For non-OpenShift installations, you can configure SSL from the command-line interface as follows:

  1. Copy the ssl.key and ssl.cert into the specified config directory. In this example, the config directory for Red Hat Quay is on a host named reg.example.com in a directory named /mnt/quay/config.

    Note

    The certificate/key files must be named ssl.key and ssl.cert.

    $ ls
    ssl.cert  ssl.key
    $ scp ssl.* root@reg.example.com:/mnt/quay/config/
    [root@reg.example.com ~]$ ls /mnt/quay/config/
    config.yaml  ssl.cert  ssl.key
  2. Modify the PREFERRED_URL_SCHEME: parameter in config.yaml from http to https

    PREFERRED_URL_SCHEME: https
  3. Restart the Red Hat Quay container:

    $ docker ps
    CONTAINER ID  IMAGE                     COMMAND                 CREATED       STATUS      PORTS                   NAMES
    eaf45a4aa12d  ...redhat.com/rhscl/redis  "/usr/bin/redis-serve" 22 hours ago  Up 22 hours 0.0.0.0:6379->6379/tcp  dreamy...
    cbe7b0fa39d8  quay.io/redhat/quay       "/sbin/my_init"         22 hours ago  Up one hour 80/tcp,443/tcp,443/tcp  ferv...
    705fe7311940  mysql:5.7                 "/entrypoint.sh mysql"  23 hours ago  Up 22 hours 0.0.0.0:3306->3306/tcp  mysql
    $ docker restart cbe7b0fa39d8

2.2.3. Test the secure connection

Confirm the configuration by visiting the URL from a browser https://reg.example.com/ restart the container "Your Connection is not secure" means the CA is untrusted but confirms that SSL is functioning properly. To avoid these messages, you need to get a certificate from a trusted certificate authority.

2.3. Configuring Docker to Trust a Certificate Authority

Docker requires that custom certs be installed to /etc/docker/certs.d/ under a directory with the same name as the hostname private registry. It is also required for the cert to be called ca.crt. Here is how to do that:

  1. Copy the rootCA file.

    $ cp tmp/rootCA.pem /etc/docker/certs.d/reg.example.com/ca.crt
  2. After you have copied the rootCA.pem file, docker login should authenticate successfully and pushing to the repository should succeed.

    $ sudo docker push reg.example.com/kbrwn/hello
    The push refers to a repository [reg.example.com/kbrwn/hello]
    5f70bf18a086: Layer already exists
    e493e9cb9dac: Pushed
    1770dbc4af14: Pushed
    a7bb4eb71da7: Pushed
    9fad7adcbd46: Pushed
    2cec07a74a9f: Pushed
    f342e0a3e445: Pushed
    b12f995330bb: Pushed
    2016366cdd69: Pushed
    a930437ab3a5: Pushed
    15eb0f73cd14: Pushed
    latest: digest: sha256:c24be6d92b0a4e2bb8a8cc7c9bd044278d6abdf31534729b1660a485b1cd315c size: 7864

Chapter 3. Adding TLS Certificates to the Red Hat Quay Container

To add custom TLS certificates to Red Hat Quay, create a new directory named extra_ca_certs/ beneath the Red Hat Quay config directory. Copy any required site-specific TLS certificates to this new directory.

3.1. Add TLS certificates to Red Hat Quay

  1. View certificate to be added to the container

    $ cat storage.crt
    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    MIIDTTCCAjWgAwIBAgIJAMVr9ngjJhzbMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUAMD0xCzAJBgNV
    [...]
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----
  2. Create certs directory and copy certificate there

    $ mkdir -p quay/config/extra_ca_certs
    $ cp storage.crt quay/config/extra_ca_certs/
    $ tree quay/config/
    ├── config.yaml
    ├── extra_ca_certs
    │   ├── storage.crt
  3. Obtain the quay container’s CONTAINER ID with docker ps:

    $ docker ps
    CONTAINER ID        IMAGE                                COMMAND                  CREATED             STATUS              PORTS
    5a3e82c4a75f        quay.io/redhat/quay:v3.1.0           "/sbin/my_init"          24 hours ago        Up 18 hours         0.0.0.0:80->80/tcp, 0.0.0.0:443->443/tcp, 443/tcp   grave_keller
  4. Restart the container with that ID:

    $ docker restart 5a3e82c4a75f
  5. Examine the certificate copied into the container namespace:

    $ docker exec -it 5a3e82c4a75f cat /etc/ssl/certs/storage.pem
    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    MIIDTTCCAjWgAwIBAgIJAMVr9ngjJhzbMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUAMD0xCzAJBgNV

3.2. Add certs when deployed on Kubernetes

When deployed on Kubernetes, Red Hat Quay mounts in a secret as a volume to store config assets. Unfortunately, this currently breaks the upload certificate function of the superuser panel.

To get around this error, a base64 encoded certificate can be added to the secret after Red Hat Quay has been deployed. Here’s how:

  1. Begin by base64 encoding the contents of the certificate:

    $ cat ca.crt
    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    MIIDljCCAn6gAwIBAgIBATANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQsFADA5MRcwFQYDVQQKDA5MQUIu
    TElCQ09SRS5TTzEeMBwGA1UEAwwVQ2VydGlmaWNhdGUgQXV0aG9yaXR5MB4XDTE2
    MDExMjA2NTkxMFoXDTM2MDExMjA2NTkxMFowOTEXMBUGA1UECgwOTEFCLkxJQkNP
    UkUuU08xHjAcBgNVBAMMFUNlcnRpZmljYXRlIEF1dGhvcml0eTCCASIwDQYJKoZI
    [...]
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----
    
    $ cat ca.crt | base64 -w 0
    [...]
    c1psWGpqeGlPQmNEWkJPMjJ5d0pDemVnR2QNCnRsbW9JdEF4YnFSdVd3PT0KLS0tLS1FTkQgQ0VSVElGSUNBVEUtLS0tLQo=
  2. Use the kubectl tool to edit the quay-enterprise-config-secret.

    $ kubectl --namespace quay-enterprise edit secret/quay-enterprise-config-secret
  3. Add an entry for the cert and paste the full base64 encoded string under the entry:

      custom-cert.crt:
    c1psWGpqeGlPQmNEWkJPMjJ5d0pDemVnR2QNCnRsbW9JdEF4YnFSdVd3PT0KLS0tLS1FTkQgQ0VSVElGSUNBVEUtLS0tLQo=
  4. Finally, recycle all Red Hat Quay pods. Use kubectl delete to remove all Red Hat Quay pods. The Red Hat Quay Deployment will automatically schedule replacement pods with the new certificate data.

Chapter 4. Red Hat Quay Security Scanning with Clair

Red Hat Quay supports scanning container images for known vulnerabilities with a scanning engine such as Clair. This document explains how to configure Clair with Red Hat Quay.

4.1. Set up Clair in the Red Hat Quay config tool

Enabling Clair in Red Hat Quay consists of:

  • Starting the Red Hat Quay config tool. See the Red Hat Quay deployment guide for the type of deployment you are doing (OpenShift, Basic, or HA) for how to start the config tool for that environment.
  • Enabling security scanning, then generating a private key and PEM file in the config tool
  • Including the key and PEM file in the Clair config file
  • Start the Clair container

The procedure varies, based on whether you are running Red Hat Quay on OpenShift or directly on a host.

4.1.1. Enabling Clair on a Red Hat Quay OpenShift deployment

To set up Clair on Red Hat Quay in OpenShift, see Add Clair image scanning to Red Hat Quay.

4.1.2. Enabling Clair on a Red Hat Quay Basic or HA deployment

To set up Clair on a Red Hat Quay deployment where the container is running directly on the host system, do the following:

  1. Restart the Red Hat Quay config tool: Run the quay container again in config mode, open the configuration UI in a browser, then select Modify an existing configuration. When prompted, upload the quay-config.tar.gz file that was originally created for the deployment.
  2. Enable Security Scanning: Scroll to the Security Scanner section and select the "Enable Security Scanning" checkbox. From the fields that appear you need to create an authentication key and enter the security scanner endpoint. Here’s how:

    • Generate key: Click Create Key, then from the pop-up window type a name for the Clair private key and an optional expiration date (if blank, the key never expires). Then select Generate Key.
    • Copy the Clair key and PEM file: Save the Key ID (to a notepad or similar) and download a copy of the Private Key PEM file (named security_scanner.pem) by selecting "Download Private Key" (if you lose the key, you need to generate a new one). You will need the key and PEM file when you start the Clair container later.

      Close the pop-up when you are done. Here is an example of a completed Security Scanner config:

      Create authentication key and set scan endpoint

  3. Save the configuration: Click Save Configuration Changes and then select Download Configuration to save it to your local system.
  4. Deploy the configuration: To pick up the changes enabling scanning, as well as other changes you may have made to the configuration, unpack the quay-config.tar.gz and copy the resulting files to the config directory. For example:

    $ tar xvf quay-config.tar.gz
    config.yaml  ssl.cert  ssl.key
    $ cp config.yaml ssl* /mnt/quay/config

Next, start the Clair container and associated database, as described in the following sections.

Chapter 5. Setting Up Clair Security Scanning

Once you have created the necessary key and pem files from the Red Hat Quay config UI, you are ready to start up the Clair container and associated database. Once that is done, you an restart your Red Hat Quay cluster to have those changes take effect.

Procedures for running the Clair container and associated database are different on OpenShift than they are for running those containers directly on a host.

5.1. Run Clair on a Red Hat Quay OpenShift deployment

To run the Clair image scanning container and its associated database on an OpenShift environment with your Red Hat Quay cluster, see Add Clair image scanning to Red Hat Quay.

5.2. Run Clair on a Red Hat Quay Basic or HA deployment

To run Clair and its associated database on non-OpenShift environments (directly on a host), you need to:

  • Start up a database
  • Configure and start Clair

5.2.1. Get Postgres and Clair

In order to run Clair, a database is required. For production deployments, MySQL is not supported. For production, we recommend you use PostgreSQL or other supported database:

  • Running on machines other than those running Red Hat Quay
  • Ideally with automatic replication and failover

For testing purposes, a single PostgreSQL instance can be started locally:

  1. To start Postgres locally, do the following:

    # docker run --name postgres -p 5432:5432 -d postgres
    # sleep 5
    # docker run --rm --link postgres:postgres postgres \
       sh -c 'echo "create database clairtest" | psql -h \
       "$POSTGRES_PORT_5432_TCP_ADDR" -p  \
       "$POSTGRES_PORT_5432_TCP_PORT" -U postgres'

    The configuration string for this test database is:

    postgresql://postgres@{DOCKER HOST GOES HERE}:5432/clairtest?sslmode=disable
  2. Pull the security-enabled Clair image:

    docker pull quay.io/redhat/clair-jwt:v3.1.0
  3. Make a configuration directory for Clair

    # mkdir clair-config
    # cd clair-config

5.2.2. Configure Clair

Clair can run either as a single instance or in high-availability mode. It is recommended to run more than a single instance of Clair, ideally in an auto-scaling group with automatic healing.

  1. Create a config.yaml file to be used in the Clair config directory (/clair/config) from one of the two Clair configuration files shown here.
  2. If you are doing a high-availability installation, go through the procedure in Authentication for high-availability scanners to create a Key ID and Private Key (PEM).
  3. Save the Private Key (PEM) to a file (such as, $HOME/config/security_scanner.pem).
  4. Replace the value of key_id (CLAIR_SERVICE_KEY_ID) with the Key ID you generated and the value of private_key_path with the location of the PEM file (for example, /config/security_scanner.pem).

    For example, those two value might now appear as:

    key_id: { 4fb9063a7cac00b567ee921065ed16fed7227afd806b4d67cc82de67d8c781b1 }
    private_key_path: /clair/config/security_scanner.pem
  5. Change other values in the configuration file as needed.

5.2.2.1. Clair configuration: High availability

clair:
  database:
    type: pgsql
    options:
      # A PostgreSQL Connection string pointing to the Clair Postgres database.
      # Documentation on the format can be found at: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.4/static/libpq-connect.html
      source: { POSTGRES_CONNECTION_STRING }
      cachesize: 16384
  api:
    # The port at which Clair will report its health status. For example, if Clair is running at
    # https://clair.mycompany.com, the health will be reported at
    # http://clair.mycompany.com:6061/health.
    healthport: 6061

    port: 6062
    timeout: 900s

    # paginationkey can be any random set of characters. *Must be the same across all Clair instances*.
    paginationkey: "XxoPtCUzrUv4JV5dS+yQ+MdW7yLEJnRMwigVY/bpgtQ="

  updater:
    # interval defines how often Clair will check for updates from its upstream vulnerability databases.
    interval: 6h
    notifier:
      attempts: 3
      renotifyinterval: 1h
      http:
        # QUAY_ENDPOINT defines the endpoint at which Quay is running.
        # For example: https://myregistry.mycompany.com
        endpoint: { QUAY_ENDPOINT }/secscan/notify
        proxy: http://localhost:6063

jwtproxy:
  signer_proxy:
    enabled: true
    listen_addr: :6063
    ca_key_file: /certificates/mitm.key # Generated internally, do not change.
    ca_crt_file: /certificates/mitm.crt # Generated internally, do not change.
    signer:
      issuer: security_scanner
      expiration_time: 5m
      max_skew: 1m
      nonce_length: 32
      private_key:
        type: preshared
        options:
          # The ID of the service key generated for Clair. The ID is returned when setting up
          # the key in [Quay Setup](security-scanning.md)
          key_id: { CLAIR_SERVICE_KEY_ID }
          private_key_path: /clair/config/security_scanner.pem

  verifier_proxies:
  - enabled: true
    # The port at which Clair will listen.
    listen_addr: :6060

    # If Clair is to be served via TLS, uncomment these lines. See the "Running Clair under TLS"
    # section below for more information.
    # key_file: /clair/config/clair.key
    # crt_file: /clair/config/clair.crt

    verifier:
      # CLAIR_ENDPOINT is the endpoint at which this Clair will be accessible. Note that the port
      # specified here must match the listen_addr port a few lines above this.
      # Example: https://myclair.mycompany.com:6060
      audience: { CLAIR_ENDPOINT }

      upstream: http://localhost:6062
      key_server:
        type: keyregistry
        options:
          # QUAY_ENDPOINT defines the endpoint at which Quay is running.
          # Example: https://myregistry.mycompany.com
          registry: { QUAY_ENDPOINT }/keys/

5.2.2.2. Clair configuration: Single instance

clair:
  database:
    type: pgsql
    options:
      # A PostgreSQL Connection string pointing to the Clair Postgres database.
      # Documentation on the format can be found at: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.4/static/libpq-connect.html
      source: { POSTGRES_CONNECTION_STRING }
      cachesize: 16384
  api:
    # The port at which Clair will report its health status. For example, if Clair is running at
    # https://clair.mycompany.com, the health will be reported at
    # http://clair.mycompany.com:6061/health.
    healthport: 6061

    port: 6062
    timeout: 900s

    # paginationkey can be any random set of characters. *Must be the same across all Clair instances*.
    paginationkey:

  updater:
    # interval defines how often Clair will check for updates from its upstream vulnerability databases.
    interval: 6h
    notifier:
      attempts: 3
      renotifyinterval: 1h
      http:
        # QUAY_ENDPOINT defines the endpoint at which Quay is running.
        # For example: https://myregistry.mycompany.com
        endpoint: { QUAY_ENDPOINT }/secscan/notify
        proxy: http://localhost:6063

jwtproxy:
  signer_proxy:
    enabled: true
    listen_addr: :6063
    ca_key_file: /certificates/mitm.key # Generated internally, do not change.
    ca_crt_file: /certificates/mitm.crt # Generated internally, do not change.
    signer:
      issuer: security_scanner
      expiration_time: 5m
      max_skew: 1m
      nonce_length: 32
      private_key:
        type: autogenerated
        options:
          rotate_every: 12h
          key_folder: /clair/config/
          key_server:
            type: keyregistry
            options:
              # QUAY_ENDPOINT defines the endpoint at which Quay is running.
              # For example: https://myregistry.mycompany.com
              registry: { QUAY_ENDPOINT }/keys/


  verifier_proxies:
  - enabled: true
    # The port at which Clair will listen.
    listen_addr: :6060

    # If Clair is to be served via TLS, uncomment these lines. See the "Running Clair under TLS"
    # section below for more information.
    # key_file: /clair/config/clair.key
    # crt_file: /clair/config/clair.crt

    verifier:
      # CLAIR_ENDPOINT is the endpoint at which this Clair will be accessible. Note that the port
      # specified here must match the listen_addr port a few lines above this.
      # Example: https://myclair.mycompany.com:6060
      audience: { CLAIR_ENDPOINT }

      upstream: http://localhost:6062
      key_server:
        type: keyregistry
        options:
          # QUAY_ENDPOINT defines the endpoint at which Quay is running.
          # Example: https://myregistry.mycompany.com
          registry: { QUAY_ENDPOINT }/keys/

5.2.3. Configuring Clair for TLS

To configure Clair to run with TLS, a few additional steps are required.

5.2.3.1. Using certificates from a public CA

For certificates that come from a public certificate authority, follow these steps:

  1. Generate a TLS certificate and key pair for the DNS name at which Clair will be accessed
  2. Place these files as clair.crt and clair.key in your Clair configuration directory
  3. Uncomment the key_file and crt_file lines under verifier_proxies in your Clair config.yaml

If your certificates use a public CA, you are now ready to run Clair. If you are using your own certificate authority, configure Clair to trust it below.

5.2.3.2. Configuring trust of self-signed SSL

Similar to the process for setting up Docker to trust your self-signed certificates, Clair must also be configured to trust your certificates. Using the same CA certificate bundle used to configure Docker, complete the following steps:

  1. Rename the same CA certificate bundle used to set up Quay Registry to ca.crt
  2. Make sure the ca.crt file is mounted inside the Clair container under /etc/pki/ca-trust/source/anchors/ as in the example below:

    Note

    Add --loglevel=debug to the docker run command line for the clair container to enable debug level logging.

    # docker run --restart=always -p 6060:6060 -p 6061:6061 \
       -v /path/to/clair/config/directory:/clair/config \
       -v /path/to/quay/cert/ca.crt:/etc/pki/ca-trust/source/anchors/ca.crt  \
       quay.io/redhat/clair-jwt:v3.1.0

Now Clair will be able to trust the source of your TLS certificates and use them to secure communication between Clair and Quay.

5.2.4. Using Clair data sources

Before scanning container images, Clair tries to figure out the operating system on which the container was built. It does this by looking for specific filenames inside that image (see Table 1). Once Clair knows the operating system, it uses specific security databases to check for vulnerabilities (see Table 2).

Table 5.1. Container files that identify its operating system

Operating systemFiles identifying OS type

Redhat/CentOS/Oracle

etc/oracle-release

etc/centos-release

etc/redhat-release

etc/system-release

Alpine

etc/alpine-release

Debian/Ubuntu:

etc/os-release

usr/lib/os-release

etc/apt/sources.list

Ubuntu

etc/lsb-release

The data sources that Clair uses to scan containers are shown in Table 2.

Note

You must be sure that Clair has access to all listed data sources by whitelisting access to each data source’s location. You might need to add a wild-card character (*) at the end of some URLS that may not be fully complete because they are dynamically built by code.

5.2.5. Run Clair

Execute the following command to run Clair:

# docker run --restart=always -p 6060:6060 -p 6061:6061 \
    -v /path/to/clair/config/directory:/clair/config \
    quay.io/redhat/clair-jwt:v3.1.0

Output similar to the following will be seen on success:

2016-05-04 20:01:05,658 CRIT Supervisor running as root (no user in config file)
2016-05-04 20:01:05,662 INFO supervisord started with pid 1
2016-05-04 20:01:06,664 INFO spawned: 'jwtproxy' with pid 8
2016-05-04 20:01:06,666 INFO spawned: 'clair' with pid 9
2016-05-04 20:01:06,669 INFO spawned: 'generate_mitm_ca' with pid 10
time="2016-05-04T20:01:06Z" level=info msg="No claims verifiers specified, upstream should be configured to verify authorization"
time="2016-05-04T20:01:06Z" level=info msg="Starting reverse proxy (Listening on ':6060')"
2016-05-04 20:01:06.715037 I | pgsql: running database migrations
time="2016-05-04T20:01:06Z" level=error msg="Failed to create forward proxy: open /certificates/mitm.crt: no such file or directory"
goose: no migrations to run. current version: 20151222113213
2016-05-04 20:01:06.730291 I | pgsql: database migration ran successfully
2016-05-04 20:01:06.730657 I | notifier: notifier service is disabled
2016-05-04 20:01:06.731110 I | api: starting main API on port 6062.
2016-05-04 20:01:06.736558 I | api: starting health API on port 6061.
2016-05-04 20:01:06.736649 I | updater: updater service is disabled.
2016-05-04 20:01:06,740 INFO exited: jwtproxy (exit status 0; not expected)
2016-05-04 20:01:08,004 INFO spawned: 'jwtproxy' with pid 1278
2016-05-04 20:01:08,004 INFO success: clair entered RUNNING state, process has stayed up for > than 1 seconds (startsecs)
2016-05-04 20:01:08,004 INFO success: generate_mitm_ca entered RUNNING state, process has stayed up for > than 1 seconds (startsecs)
time="2016-05-04T20:01:08Z" level=info msg="No claims verifiers specified, upstream should be configured to verify authorization"
time="2016-05-04T20:01:08Z" level=info msg="Starting reverse proxy (Listening on ':6060')"
time="2016-05-04T20:01:08Z" level=info msg="Starting forward proxy (Listening on ':6063')"
2016-05-04 20:01:08,541 INFO exited: generate_mitm_ca (exit status 0; expected)
2016-05-04 20:01:09,543 INFO success: jwtproxy entered RUNNING state, process has stayed up for > than 1 seconds (startsecs)

To verify Clair is running, execute the following command:

curl -X GET -I http://path/to/clair/here:6061/health

If a 200 OK code is returned, Clair is running:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Server: clair
Date: Wed, 04 May 2016 20:02:16 GMT
Content-Length: 0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

Once Clair and its associated database are running, you man need to restart your quay application for the changes to take effect.

Chapter 6. Repository Mirroring in Red Hat Quay

Red Hat Quay repository mirroring lets you mirror images from external container registries (or the local registry) into your local Red Hat Quay cluster. Using repository mirroring you can synchronize images to Red Hat Quay based on repository names and tags.

6.1. Overview of repository mirroring

From your Red Hat Quay cluster with repository mirroring enabled, you can:

  • Choose a repository from an external registry to mirror
  • Add credentials to access the external registry
  • Set intervals at which a repository is synced
  • Identify specific container image repository names and tags to sync
  • Check the current state of synchronization

With repository mirroring, you mirror a specific subset of content, between two or more distinct registries, to selected datacenters, clusters, or regions. By contrast, Georeplication provides a single, globally distributed Red Hat Quay to serve container images from localized storage. The two approaches to sharing content differ in the following ways:

Table 6.1. Red Hat Quay Repository Mirroring vs. Georeplication

Feature / Capability

Georeplication

Repository Mirroring

What is the feature designed to do?

A shared, global registry

Distinct, different registries

What happens if replication or mirroring hasn’t been completed yet?

The remote copy is used (slower)

No image is served

Is access to all storage backends in both regions required?

Yes (all Red Hat Quay nodes)

No (distinct storage)

Can users push images from both sites to the same repository?

Yes

No

Is all registry content and configuration identical across all regions (shared database)

Yes

No

Can users select individual namespaces or repositories to be mirrored?

No,by default

Yes

Can users apply filters to synchronization rules?

No

Yes

Here are a few tips for using Red Hat Quay repository mirroring:

  • With repository mirroring, you can mirror an entire repository or selectively limit which images are synced based on a comma-separated list of tags, a range of tags, or other means of identifying tags through regular expressions and globs.
  • Once set as a mirrored repository, you cannot manually add other images to that repository.
  • Because the mirrored repository is based on the repository and tags you set, it will hold only the content represented by the repo/tag pair. In other words, if you change the tag so that some images in the repository don’t match any more, those images will be deleted.
  • Only the designated robot can push images to a mirrored repository, superseding any role-based access control permissions set on the repository.
  • With a mirrored repository, a user can pull images (given read permission) from the repository but not push images to the repository.
  • Changing setting on your mirrored repository is done from a Mirrors tab on the Repositories page for the mirrored repository you create.
  • Images are synced at set intervals, but can also be synced on demand.

6.2. Prerequisites

Before you can use repository mirroring, you must enable repository mirroring from the Red Hat Quay configuration screen and start the repository mirroring worker. Ways of starting up this service are described in the Red Hat Quay deployment guides:

The steps shown in the following section assumes you already have the repository mirroring service running and that you have enabled repository mirroring on your Red Hat Quay cluster.

6.3. Create a mirrored repository

To mirror an external repository from an external container registry, do the following:

  1. Log into your Red Hat Quay registry.
  2. Create a robot account to pull images for the mirrored repository:

    • Select Account Settings from the drop-down in the upper right corner.
    • Select the Robot Accounts button in the left column.
    • Select Create Robot Account.
    • Add the name and description of the robot account and select Create robot account.
    • Select Close, since the mirrored repository you are adding does not exist yet.
    • Select the ROBOT ACCOUNT NAME from the listing.
    • When prompted, add the credentials needed by the robot to access the external registry of the repository you want to mirror, then close the Credentials window.
  3. Select REPOSITORIES.
  4. Select Create New Repository and give it a name.
  5. Fill in a repository name, select Public or Private, and select Create Repository.
  6. Select the Settings button and change the repository state to MIRROR.
  7. Open the new repository and select the Mirroring button in the left column.
  8. Fill in the fields to identify the repository you are mirroring in your new repository:

    • Registry URL: Location of the container registry you want to mirror from.
    • User or Organization: Typically, the account name associated with the content you are mirroring. For example, with the image registry.example.com/jsmith/myimage:latest, jsmith would be entered here.
    • Repository Name: The name identifying the name of the set of images. For example, with the image registry.example.com/jsmith/myimage:latest, myimage would be entered here.
    • Sync Interval: Defaults to syncing every 24 hours. You can change that based on hours or days.
    • Robot User: Select the robot account you created earlier to do the mirroring.
    • Username: The username for logging into the external registry holding the repository you are mirroring.
    • Password: The password associated with the Username. Note that the password cannot include characters that require an escape character (\).
    • Start Date: The date on which mirroring begins. The current date and time used by default.
    • Verify TLS: Check this box if you want to verify the authenticity of the external registry. Uncheck this box if, for example, you set up Red Hat Quay for testing with a self-signed certificate or no certificate.
    • HTTP Proxy: Identify the proxy server needed to access the remote site, if one is required.
    • Tags: This field is required. You can enter individual tags or indicate which tags to match using globbing or regular expressions. For example, you can match specific instances of an image (such as latest), enter a comma-separated list of tags, or use wildcards (such as mytag*) to match multiple images. For example, for a repository that features daily image builds named abc-2019-08-12, abc-2019-08-13, and so on, you could mirror all the August, 2019 images using abc-2019-08* as the tag.

      Note

      At least one Tag must be entered.

      Here is an example of a completed Repository Mirroring screen:

      Create a new Red Hat Quay repo mirror

  9. Select the Enable Mirror button. Here’s the resulting Repository Mirroring page:

    Viewing a new Red Hat Quay repo mirror

    You can return to this page later to change any of those settings.

6.4. Working with mirrored repositories

Once you have created a mirrored repository, there are several ways you can work with that repository. Select your mirrored repository from the Repositories page and do any of the following:

  • Enable/disable the repository: Select the Mirroring button in the left column, then toggle the Enabled check box to enable or disable the repository temporarily.
  • Check mirror logs: To make sure the mirrored repository is working properly, you can check the mirror logs. To do that, select the Usage Logs button in the left column. Here’s an example:

    View logs for your Red Hat Quay repo mirror

  • Sync mirror now: To immediately sync the images in your repository, select the Sync Now button.
  • Change credentials: To change the username and password, select DELETE from the Credentials line. Then select None and add the username and password needed to log into the external registry when prompted.
  • Cancel mirroring: To stop mirroring, which keeps the current images available but stops new ones from being synced, select the CANCEL button.
  • Set robot permissions: Red Hat Quay robot accounts are named tokens that hold credentials for accessing external repositories. By assigning credentials to a robot, that robot can be used across multiple mirrored repositories that need to access the same external registry.

    You can assign an existing robot to a repository by going to Account Settings, then selecting the Robot Accounts icon in the left column. For the robot account, choose the link under the REPOSITORIES column. From the pop-up window, you can:

    • Check which repositories are assigned to that robot.
    • Assign read, write or Admin privileges to that robot from the PERMISSION field shown in this figure: Assign a robot to mirrored repo
  • Change robot credentials: Robots can hold credentials such as Kubernetes secrets, Docker login information, and Mesos bundles. To change robot credentials, select the Options gear on the robot’s account line on the Robot Accounts window and choose View Credentials. Add the appropriate credentials for the external repository the robot needs to access.

    Assign permission to a robot

  • Check and change general setting: Select the Settings button (gear icon) from the left column on the mirrored repository page. On the resulting page, you can change settings associated with the mirrored repository. In particular, you can change User and Robot Permissions, to specify exaclty which users and robots can read from or write to the repo.

Chapter 7. Distributing Images with BitTorrent

Red Hat Quay supports BitTorrent-based distribution of its images to clients via the quayctl tool. BitTorrent-based distribution allows for machines to share image data amongst themselves, resulting in faster downloads and shorter production launch times.

7.1. Visit the management panel

Sign in to a superuser account from the Red Hat Quay login screen. For example, if the host were reg.example.com, you would go to http://reg.example.com/superuser to view the management panel: Log in as superuser to set up BitTorrent downloads

7.2. Enable BitTorrent distribution

  • Click the configuration tab and scroll down to the section entitled BitTorrent-based download. Select to enable BitTorrent downloads
  • Check the "Enable BitTorrent downloads" box

7.3. Enter an announce URL

In the "Announce URL" field, enter the HTTP endpoint of a JWT-capable BitTorrent tracker’s announce URL. This will typically be a URL ending in /announce.

7.4. Save configuration

  • Click "Save Configuration Changes"
  • Restart the container (you will be prompted)

Chapter 8. LDAP Authentication Setup for Red Hat Quay

The Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is an open, vendor-neutral, industry standard application protocol for accessing and maintaining distributed directory information services over an Internet Protocol (IP) network. Red Hat Quay supports using LDAP as an identity provider.

8.1. Prerequisites

The Red Hat Quay LDAP setup workflow requires that the user configuring the LDAP Setup already exist in the LDAP directory. Before attempting the setup, make sure that you are logged in as a superuser that matches user crendentials in LDAP. In order to do so, Navigate to the SuperUser panel (ex: http(s)://quay.enterprise/superuser) and click on the “Create User” button to create a new User. Make sure to create a user that matches the username/email syntax in LDAP.

Once the user is created, click on the Settings icon next to the user and choose “Make Superuser” option. For ease of troubleshooting, set the User password to the LDAP password.

Change the user password to match LDAP password

You will be prompted to restart the container once the new user is created. Restart the Red Hat Quay container and log in to the Superuser panel as the user that was just created.

8.2. Setup LDAP Configuration

Navigate to the Superuser panel and navigate to settings section. Locate the Authentication section and select “LDAP” from the drop-down menu.

Select LDAP from the Authentication section

Enter LDAP configuration fields as required.

Fill in LDAP information

8.3. Tips for LDAP configuration:

  • LDAP URI must be in ldap:// or ldaps:// syntax. Typing a URI with ldaps:// prefix will surface the option to provide custom SSL certificate for TLS setup
  • User Relative DN is relative to BaseDN (ex: ou=NYC not ou=NYC,dc=example,dc=org)
  • Logged in Username must exist in User Relative DN
  • You can enter multiple “Secondary User Relative DNs” if there are multiple Organizational Units where User objects are located at. (ex: ou=Users,ou=NYC and ou=Users,ou=SFO). Simply type in the Organizational Units and click on Add button to add multiple RDNs
  • sAMAccountName is the UID attribute for against Microsoft Active Directory setups
  • Red Hat Quay searches "User Relative DN" with subtree scope. For example, if your Organization has Organizational Units NYC and SFO under the Users OU (ou=SFO,ou=Users and ou=NYC,ou=Users), Red Hat Quay can authenticate users from both the NYC and SFO Organizational Units if the User Relative DN is set to Users (ou=Users)

Once the configuration is completed, click on “Save Configuration Changes” button to validate the configuration.

Fill in LDAP information

You will be prompted to login with LDAP credentials.

8.4. Common Issues

Invalid credentials

Administrator DN or Administrator DN Password values are incorrect

Verification of superuser %USERNAME% failed: Username not found The user either does not exist in the remote authentication system OR LDAP auth is misconfigured.

Red Hat Quay can connect to the LDAP server via Username/Password specified in the Administrator DN fields however cannot find the current logged in user with the UID Attribute or Mail Attribute fields in the User Relative DN Path. Either current logged in user does not exist in User Relative DN Path, or Administrator DN user do not have rights to search/read this LDAP path.

Chapter 9. Prometheus and Grafana metrics under Red Hat Quay

Red Hat Quay exports a Prometheus- and Grafana-compatible endpoint on each instance to allow for easy monitoring and alerting.

9.1. Exposing the Prometheus endpoint

The Prometheus- and Grafana-compatible endpoint on the Red Hat Quay instance can be found at port 9092. See Monitoring Quay with Prometheus and Grafana for details on configuring Prometheus and Grafana to monitor Quay repository counts.

9.1.1. Setting up Prometheus to consume metrics

Prometheus needs a way to access all Red Hat Quay instances running in a cluster. In the typical setup, this is done by listing all the Red Hat Quay instances in a single named DNS entry, which is then given to Prometheus.

9.1.2. DNS configuration under Kubernetes

A simple Kubernetes service can be configured to provide the DNS entry for Prometheus. Details on running Prometheus under Kubernetes can be found at Prometheus and Kubernetes and Monitoring Kubernetes with Prometheus.

9.1.3. DNS configuration for a manual cluster

SkyDNS is a simple solution for managing this DNS record when not using Kubernetes. SkyDNS can run on an etcd cluster. Entries for each Red Hat Quay instance in the cluster can be added and removed in the etcd store. SkyDNS will regularly read them from there and update the list of Quay instances in the DNS record accordingly.

Chapter 10. Georeplication of storage in Red Hat Quay

Georeplication allows for a single globally-distributed Red Hat Quay to serve container images from localized storage.

When georeplication is configured, container image pushes will be written to the preferred storage engine for that Red Hat Quay instance. After the initial push, image data will be replicated in the background to other storage engines. The list of replication locations is configurable. An image pull will always use the closest available storage engine, to maximize pull performance.

10.1. Prerequisites

Georeplication requires that there be a high availability storage engine (S3, GCS, RADOS, Swift) in each geographic region. Further, each region must be able to access every storage engine due to replication requirements.

Note

Local disk storage is not compatible with georeplication at this time.

10.2. Visit the Management Panel

Sign in to a superuser account from the Red Hat Quay login screen. For example, if the host were reg.example.com, you would go to http://reg.example.com/superuser to view the management panel: Log in as superuser to set up Georeplication

10.3. Enable storage replication

  1. Click the configuration tab and scroll down to the section entitled Registry Storage.
  2. Click Enable Storage Replication.
  3. Add each of the storage engines to which data will be replicated. All storage engines to be used must be listed.
  4. If complete replication of all images to all storage engines is required, under each storage engine configuration click Replicate to storage engine by default. This will ensure that all images are replicated to that storage engine. To instead enable per-namespace replication, please contact support.
  5. Click Save to validate.
  6. After adding storage and enabling “Replicate to storage engine by default” for Georeplications, you need to sync existing image data across all storage. To do this, you need to oc exec (or docker/kubectl exec) into the container and run:

    $ venv/bin/python -m util.backfillreplication

    This is a one time operation to sync content after adding new storage.

10.4. Run Red Hat Quay with storage preferences

  1. Copy the config.yaml to all machines running Red Hat Quay
  2. For each machine in each region, add a QUAY_DISTRIBUTED_STORAGE_PREFERENCE environment variable with the preferred storage engine for the region in which the machine is running.

    For example, for a machine running in Europe with the config directory on the host available from /mnt/quay/config:

    # docker login quay.io
    Username: yourquayuser
    Password: *****
    # docker run -d -p 443:8443 -p 8080:8080 -v /mnt/quay/config:/conf/stack:Z \
        -e QUAY_DISTRIBUTED_STORAGE_PREFERENCE=europestorage \
        quay.io/quay/quay:versiontag
    Note

    The value of the environment variable specified must match the name of a Location ID as defined in the config panel.

  3. Restart all Red Hat Quay containers

Chapter 11. Red Hat Quay Troubleshooting

Common failure modes and best practices for recovery.

Chapter 12. Schema for Red Hat Quay

Note

All fields are optional unless otherwise marked.

  • AUTHENTICATION_TYPE [string] required: The authentication engine to use for credential authentication.

    • enum: Database, LDAP, JWT, Keystone, OIDC.
    • Example: Database
  • BUILDLOGS_REDIS [object] required: Connection information for Redis for build logs caching.

    • HOST [string] required: The hostname at which Redis is accessible.

      • Example: my.redis.cluster
    • PASSWORD [string]: The password to connect to the Redis instance.

      • Example: mypassword
    • PORT [number]: The port at which Redis is accessible.

      • Example: 1234
  • DB_URI [string] required: The URI at which to access the database, including any credentials.

  • DEFAULT_TAG_EXPIRATION [string] required: The default, configurable tag expiration time for time machine. Defaults to 2w.

    • Pattern: ^[0-9]+(w|m|d|h|s)$
  • DISTRIBUTED_STORAGE_CONFIG [object] required: Configuration for storage engine(s) to use in Red Hat Quay. Each key is a unique ID for a storage engine, with the value being a tuple of the type and configuration for that engine.

    • Example: {"local_storage": ["LocalStorage", {"storage_path": "some/path/"}]}
  • DISTRIBUTED_STORAGE_PREFERENCE [array] required: The preferred storage engine(s) (by ID in DISTRIBUTED_STORAGE_CONFIG) to use. A preferred engine means it is first checked for pulling and images are pushed to it.

    • Min Items: None

      • Example: [u’s3_us_east', u’s3_us_west']
      • array item [string]
    • preferred_url_scheme [string] required: The URL scheme to use when hitting Red Hat Quay. If Red Hat Quay is behind SSL at all, this must be https.

      • enum: http, https
      • Example: https
  • SERVER_HOSTNAME [string] required: The URL at which Red Hat Quay is accessible, without the scheme.

    • Example: quay.io
  • TAG_EXPIRATION_OPTIONS [array] required: The options that users can select for expiration of tags in their namespace (if enabled).

    • Min Items: None
    • array item [string]
    • Pattern: ^[0-9]+(w|m|d|h|s)$
  • USER_EVENTS_REDIS [object] required: Connection information for Redis for user event handling.

    • HOST [string] required: The hostname at which Redis is accessible.

      • Example: my.redis.cluster
    • PASSWORD [string]: The password to connect to the Redis instance.

      • Example: mypassword
    • PORT [number]: The port at which Redis is accessible.

      • Example: 1234
  • ACTION_LOG_ARCHIVE_LOCATION [string]: If action log archiving is enabled, the storage engine in which to place the archived data.

    • Example: s3_us_east
  • ACTION_LOG_ARCHIVE_PATH' [string]: If action log archiving is enabled, the path in storage in which to place the archived data.

    • Example: archives/actionlogs
  • APP_SPECIFIC_TOKEN_EXPIRATION [string, null]: The expiration for external app tokens. Defaults to None.

    • Pattern: ^[0-9]+(w|m|d|h|s)$
  • ALLOW_PULLS_WITHOUT_STRICT_LOGGING [boolean]: If true, pulls in which the pull audit log entry cannot be written will still succeed. Useful if the database can fallback into a read-only state and it is desired for pulls to continue during that time. Defaults to False.

    • Example: True
  • AVATAR_KIND [string]: The types of avatars to display, either generated inline (local) or Gravatar (gravatar)

    • enum: local, gravatar
  • BITBUCKET_TRIGGER_CONFIG ['object', 'null']: Configuration for using BitBucket for build triggers.

    • consumer_key [string] required: The registered consumer key(client ID) for this Red Hat Quay instance.

      • Example: 0e8dbe15c4c7630b6780
    • CONSUMER_SECRET [string] required: The registered consumer secret(client secret) for this Red Hat Quay instance

      • Example: e4a58ddd3d7408b7aec109e85564a0d153d3e846
  • BITTORRENT_ANNOUNCE_URL [string]: The URL of the announce endpoint on the bittorrent tracker.

  • BITTORRENT_PIECE_SIZE [number]: The bittorent piece size to use. If not specified, defaults to 512 * 1024.

    • Example: 524288
  • BROWSER_API_CALLS_XHR_ONLY [boolean]: If enabled, only API calls marked as being made by an XHR will be allowed from browsers. Defaults to True.

    • Example: False
  • CONTACT_INFO [array]: If specified, contact information to display on the contact page. If only a single piece of contact information is specified, the contact footer will link directly.

    • Min Items: 1
    • Unique Items: True

      • array item 0 [string]: Adds a link to send an e-mail
      • Pattern: ^mailto:(.)+$
      • Example: mailto:support@quay.io
    • array item 1 [string]: Adds a link to visit an IRC chat room

    • array item 2 [string]: Adds a link to call a phone number

      • Pattern: ^tel:(.)+$
      • Example: tel:+1-888-930-3475
    • array item 3 [string]: Adds a link to a defined URL

  • BLACKLIST_V2_SPEC [string]: The Docker CLI versions to which Red Hat Quay will respond that V2 is unsupported. Defaults to <1.6.0.

  • DB_CONNECTION_ARGS [object]: If specified, connection arguments for the database such as timeouts and SSL.

    • threadlocals [boolean] required: Whether to use thread-local connections. Should ALWAYS be true
    • autorollback [boolean] required: Whether to use auto-rollback connections. Should ALWAYS be true
    • ssl [object]: SSL connection configuration

      • ca [string] required: Absolute container path to the CA certificate to use for SSL connections.
      • Example: conf/stack/ssl-ca-cert.pem
  • DEFAULT_NAMESPACE_MAXIMUM_BUILD_COUNT [number, null]: If not None, the default maximum number of builds that can be queued in a namespace.

    • Example: 20
  • DIRECT_OAUTH_CLIENTID_WHITELIST [array]: A list of client IDs of Red Hat Quay-managed applications that are allowed to perform direct OAuth approval without user approval.

  • DISTRIBUTED_STORAGE_DEFAULT_LOCATIONS [array]: The list of storage engine(s) (by ID in DISTRIBUTED_STORAGE_CONFIG) whose images should be fully replicated, by default, to all other storage engines.

    • Min Items: None
    • Example: s3_us_east, s3_us_west

      • array item [string]
  • EXTERNAL_TLS_TERMINATION [boolean]: If TLS is supported, but terminated at a layer before Red Hat Quay, must be true.

    • Example: True
  • ENABLE_HEALTH_DEBUG_SECRET [string, null]: If specified, a secret that can be given to health endpoints to see full debug info when not authenticated as a superuser.

    • Example: somesecrethere
  • EXPIRED_APP_SPECIFIC_TOKEN_GC [string, null]: Duration of time expired external app tokens will remain before being garbage collected. Defaults to 1d.

    • pattern: ^[0-9]+(w|m|d|h|s)$
  • FEATURE_ACI_CONVERSION [boolean]: Whether to enable conversion to ACIs. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_ACTION_LOG_ROTATION [boolean]: Whether or not to rotate old action logs to storage. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_ADVERTISE_V2 [boolean]: Whether the v2/ endpoint is visible. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_ANONYMOUS_ACCESS [boolean]: Whether to allow anonymous users to browse and pull public repositories. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_APP_REGISTRY [boolean]: Whether to enable support for App repositories. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_APP_SPECIFIC_TOKENS [boolean]: If enabled, users can create tokens for use by the Docker CLI. Defaults to True.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_BITBUCKET_BUILD [boolean]: Whether to support Bitbucket build triggers. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_BITTORRENT [boolean]: Whether to allow using Bittorrent-based pulls. Defaults to False.

  • FEATURE_BUILD_SUPPORT [boolean]: Whether to support Dockerfile build. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_CHANGE_TAG_EXPIRARTION [boolean]: Whether users and organizations are allowed to change the tag expiration for tags in their namespace. Defaults to True.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_DIRECT_LOGIN [boolean]: Whether users can directly login to the UI. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_GITHUB_BUILD [boolean]: Whether to support GitHub build triggers. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_GITHUB_LOGIN [boolean]: Whether GitHub login is supported. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_GITLAB_BUILD[boolean]: Whether to support GitLab build triggers. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_GOOGLE_LOGIN [boolean]: Whether Google login is supported. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_INVITE_ONLY_USER_CREATION [boolean]: Whether users being created must be invited by another user. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_LIBRARY_SUPPORT [boolean]: Whether to allow for "namespace-less" repositories when pulling and pushing from Docker. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_MAILING [boolean]: Whether emails are enabled. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_NONSUPERUSER_TEAM_SYNCING_SETUP [boolean]: If enabled, non-superusers can setup syncing on teams to backing LDAP or Keystone. Defaults To False.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_PARTIAL_USER_AUTOCOMPLETE [boolean]: If set to true, autocompletion will apply to partial usernames. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_PERMANENT_SESSIONS [boolean]: Whether sessions are permanent. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_PROXY_STORAGE [boolean]: Whether to proxy all direct download URLs in storage via the registry nginx. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_PUBLIC_CATALOG [boolean]: If set to true, the _catalog endpoint returns public repositories. Otherwise, only private repositories can be returned. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_READER_BUILD_LOGS [boolean]: If set to true, build logs may be read by those with read access to the repo, rather than only write access or admin access. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_RECAPTCHA [boolean]: Whether Recaptcha is necessary for user login and recovery. Defaults to False.

  • FEATURE_REQUIRE_ENCRYPTED_BASIC_AUTH [boolean]: Whether non-encrypted passwords (as opposed to encrypted tokens) can be used for basic auth. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_REQUIRE_TEAM_INVITE [boolean]: Whether to require invitations when adding a user to a team. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_SECURITY_NOTIFICATIONS [boolean]: If the security scanner is enabled, whether to turn on/off security notifications. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_SECURITY_SCANNER [boolean]: Whether to turn on/off the security scanner. Defaults to False.

  • FEATURE_STORAGE_REPLICATION [boolean]: Whether to automatically replicate between storage engines. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_SUPER_USERS [boolean]: Whether superusers are supported. Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_TEAM_SYNCING [boolean]: Whether to allow for team membership to be synced from a backing group in the authentication engine (LDAP or Keystone).

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_USER_CREATION [boolean] :Whether users can be created (by non-superusers). Defaults to True.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_USER_LOG_ACCESS [boolean]: If set to true, users will have access to audit logs for their namespace. Defaults to False.

    • Example: True
  • FEATURE_USER_METADATA [boolean]: Whether to collect and support user metadata. Defaults to False.

    • Example: False
  • FEATURE_USER_RENAME [boolean]: If set to true, users can rename their own namespace. Defaults to False.

    • Example: True
  • GITHUB_LOGIN_CONFIG [object, 'null']: Configuration for using GitHub (Enterprise) as an external login provider.

  • GITHUB_TRIGGER_CONFIG [object, null]: Configuration for using GitHub (Enterprise) for build triggers.

  • GITLAB_TRIGGER_CONFIG [object]: Configuration for using Gitlab (Enterprise) for external authentication.

    • CLIENT_ID [string] required: The registered client ID for this Red Hat Quay instance.

      • Example: 0e8dbe15c4c7630b6780
    • CLIENT_SECRET [string] required: The registered client secret for this Red Hat Quay instance.

      • Example: e4a58ddd3d7408b7aec109e85564a0d153d3e846
      • gitlab_endpoint [string] required: The endpoint at which Gitlab(Enterprise) is running.

  • GOOGLE_LOGIN_CONFIG [object, null]: Configuration for using Google for external authentication

    • CLIENT_ID [string] required: The registered client ID for this Red Hat Quay instance.

      • Example: 0e8dbe15c4c7630b6780
    • CLIENT_SECRET [string] required: The registered client secret for this Red Hat Quay instance.

      • Example: e4a58ddd3d7408b7aec109e85564a0d153d3e846
  • HEALTH_CHECKER [string]: The configured health check.

    • Example: ('RDSAwareHealthCheck', {'access_key': 'foo', 'secret_key': 'bar'})
  • LOG_ARCHIVE_LOCATION [string]:If builds are enabled, the storage engine in which to place the archived build logs.

    • Example: s3_us_east
  • LOG_ARCHIVE_PATH [string]: If builds are enabled, the path in storage in which to place the archived build logs.

    • Example: archives/buildlogs
  • MAIL_DEFAULT_SENDER [string, null]: If specified, the e-mail address used as the from when Red Hat Quay sends e-mails. If none, defaults to support@quay.io.

    • Example: support@myco.com
  • MAIL_PASSWORD [string, null]: The SMTP password to use when sending e-mails.

    • Example: mypassword
  • MAIL_PORT [number]: The SMTP port to use. If not specified, defaults to 587.

    • Example: 588
  • MAIL_SERVER [string]: The SMTP server to use for sending e-mails. Only required if FEATURE_MAILING is set to true.

    • Example: smtp.somedomain.com
  • MAIL_USERNAME [string, 'null']: The SMTP username to use when sending e-mails.

    • Example: myuser
  • MAIL_USE_TLS [boolean]: If specified, whether to use TLS for sending e-mails.

    • Example: True
  • MAXIMUM_LAYER_SIZE [string]: Maximum allowed size of an image layer. Defaults to 20G.

    • Pattern: ^[0-9]+(G|M)$
    • Example: 100G
  • PUBLIC_NAMESPACES [array]: If a namespace is defined in the public namespace list, then it will appear on all user’s repository list pages, regardless of whether that user is a member of the namespace. Typically, this is used by an enterprise customer in configuring a set of "well-known" namespaces.

    • Min Items: None
    • Unique Items: True

      • array item [string]
  • PROMETHEUS_NAMESPACE [string]: The prefix applied to all exposed Prometheus metrics. Defaults to quay.

    • Example: myregistry
  • RECAPTCHA_SITE_KEY [string]: If recaptcha is enabled, the site key for the Recaptcha service.
  • RECAPTCHA_SECRET_KEY [string]: 'If recaptcha is enabled, the secret key for the Recaptcha service.
  • REGISTRY_TITLE [string]: If specified, the long-form title for the registry. Defaults to Quay Enterprise.

    • Example: Corp Container Service
  • REGISTRY_TITLE_SHORT [string]: If specified, the short-form title for the registry. Defaults to Quay Enterprise.

    • Example: CCS
  • SECURITY_SCANNER_ENDPOINT [string]: The endpoint for the security scanner.

  • SECURITY_SCANNER_INDEXING_INTERVAL [number]: The number of seconds between indexing intervals in the security scanner. Defaults to 30.

    • Example: 30
  • SESSION_COOKIE_SECURE [boolean]: Whether the secure property should be set on session cookies. Defaults to False. Recommended to be True for all installations using SSL.

  • SUPER_USERS [array]: Red Hat Quay usernames of those users to be granted superuser privileges.

    • Min Items: None
    • Unique Items: True

      • array item [string]
  • TEAM_RESYNC_STALE_TIME [string]: If team syncing is enabled for a team, how often to check its membership and resync if necessary (Default: 30m).

    • Pattern: ^[0-9]+(w|m|d|h|s)$
    • Example: 2h
  • USERFILES_LOCATION [string]: ID of the storage engine in which to place user-uploaded files.

    • Example: s3_us_east
  • USERFILES_PATH [string]: Path under storage in which to place user-uploaded files.

    • Example: userfiles
  • USER_RECOVERY_TOKEN_LIFETIME [string]: The length of time a token for recovering a user accounts is valid. Defaults to 30m.

    • Example: 10m
    • Pattern: ^[0-9]+(w|m|d|h|s)$
  • V2_PAGINATION_SIZE [number]: The number of results returned per page in V2 registry APIs.

    • Example: 100

Additional resources

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