Chapter 3. Creating and editing DMN models in Business Central

You can use the DMN designer in Business Central to design DMN decision requirements diagrams (DRDs) and define decision logic for a complete and functional DMN decision model. Red Hat Process Automation Manager provides design and runtime support for DMN 1.2 models at conformance level 3, and includes enhancements and fixes to FEEL and DMN model components to optimize the experience of implementing DMN decision services with Red Hat Process Automation Manager. Red Hat Process Automation Manager also provides runtime-only support for DMN 1.1 and 1.3 models at conformance level 3, but any DMN 1.1 models that you import into Business Central, open in the DMN designer, and save are converted to DMN 1.2 models. DMN 1.3 models are not supported in the DMN designer in Business Central.

Procedure

  1. In Business Central, go to MenuDesignProjects and click the project name.
  2. Create or import a DMN file in your Business Central project.

    To create a DMN file, click Add AssetDMN, enter an informative DMN model name, select the appropriate Package, and click Ok.

    To import an existing DMN file, click Import Asset, enter the DMN model name, select the appropriate Package, select the DMN file to upload, and click Ok.

    The new DMN file is now listed in the DMN panel of the Project Explorer, and the DMN decision requirements diagram (DRD) canvas appears.

    Note

    If you imported a DMN file that does not contain layout information, the imported decision requirements diagram (DRD) is formatted automatically in the DMN designer. Click Save in the DMN designer to save the DRD layout.

    If an imported DRD is not automatically formatted, you can select the Perform automatic layout icon in the upper-right toolbar in the DMN designer to format the DRD.

  3. Begin adding components to your new or imported DMN decision requirements diagram (DRD) by clicking and dragging one of the DMN nodes from the left toolbar:

    Figure 3.1. Adding DRD components

    dmn drag decision node

    The following DRD components are available:

    • Decision: Use this node for a DMN decision, where one or more input elements determine an output based on defined decision logic.
    • Business knowledge model: Use this node for reusable functions with one or more decision elements. Decisions that have the same logic but depend on different sub-input data or sub-decisions use business knowledge models to determine which procedure to follow.
    • Knowledge source: Use this node for external authorities, documents, committees, or policies that regulate a decision or business knowledge model. Knowledge sources are references to real-world factors rather than executable business rules.
    • Input data: Use this node for information used in a decision node or a business knowledge model. Input data usually includes business-level concepts or objects relevant to the business, such as loan applicant data used in a lending strategy.
    • Text annotation: Use this node for explanatory notes associated with an input data node, decision node, business knowledge model, or knowledge source.
    • Decision service: Use this node to enclose a set of reusable decisions implemented as a decision service for invocation. A decision service can be used in other DMN models and can be invoked from an external application or a BPMN business process.
  4. In the DMN designer canvas, double-click the new DRD node to enter an informative node name.
  5. If the node is a decision or business knowledge model, select the node to display the node options and click the Edit icon to open the DMN boxed expression designer to define the decision logic for the node:

    Figure 3.2. Opening a new decision node boxed expression

    dmn decision edit

    Figure 3.3. Opening a new business knowledge model boxed expression

    dmn bkm edit

    By default, all business knowledge models are defined as boxed function expressions containing a literal FEEL expression, a nested context expression of an external JAVA or PMML function, or a nested boxed expression of any type.

    For decision nodes, you click the undefined table to select the type of boxed expression you want to use, such as a boxed literal expression, boxed context expression, decision table, or other DMN boxed expression.

    Figure 3.4. Selecting the logic type for a decision node

    dmn decision boxed expression options

    For business knowledge models, you click the top-left function cell to select the function type, or right-click the function value cell, select Clear, and select a boxed expression of another type.

    Figure 3.5. Selecting the function or other logic type for a business knowledge model

    dmn bkm define
  6. In the selected boxed expression designer for either a decision node (any expression type) or business knowledge model (function expression), click the applicable table cells to define the table name, variable data types, variable names and values, function parameters and bindings, or FEEL expressions to include in the decision logic.

    You can right-click cells for additional actions where applicable, such as inserting or removing table rows and columns or clearing table contents.

    The following is an example decision table for a decision node that determines credit score ratings based on a defined range of a loan applicant’s credit score:

    Figure 3.6. Decision node decision table for credit score rating

    dmn decision table example1a

    The following is an example boxed function expression for a business knowledge model that calculates mortgage payments based on principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI) as a literal expression:

    Figure 3.7. Business knowledge model function for PITI calculation

    dmn function expression example4
  7. After you define the decision logic for the selected node, click Back to "<MODEL_NAME>" to return to the DRD view.
  8. For the selected DRD node, use the available connection options to create and connect to the next node in the DRD, or click and drag a new node onto the DRD canvas from the left toolbar.

    The node type determines which connection options are supported. For example, an Input data node can connect to a decision node, knowledge source, or text annotation using the applicable connection type, whereas a Knowledge source node can connect to any DRD element. A Decision node can connect only to another decision or a text annotation.

    The following connection types are available, depending on the node type:

    • Information requirement: Use this connection from an input data node or decision node to another decision node that requires the information.
    • Knowledge requirement: Use this connection from a business knowledge model to a decision node or to another business knowledge model that invokes the decision logic.
    • Authority requirement: Use this connection from an input data node or a decision node to a dependent knowledge source or from a knowledge source to a decision node, business knowledge model, or another knowledge source.
    • Association: Use this connection from an input data node, decision node, business knowledge model, or knowledge source to a text annotation.

    Figure 3.8. Connecting credit score input to the credit score rating decision

    dmn input connection example
    dmn input connection example2
  9. Continue adding and defining the remaining DRD components of your decision model. Periodically click Save in the DMN designer to save your work.

    Note

    As you periodically save a DRD, the DMN designer performs a static validation of the DMN model and might produce error messages until the model is defined completely. After you finish defining the DMN model completely, if any errors remain, troubleshoot the specified problems accordingly.

  10. After you add and define all components of the DRD, click Save to save and validate the completed DRD.

    To adjust the DRD layout, you can select the Perform automatic layout icon in the upper-right toolbar of the DMN designer.

    The following is an example DRD for a loan prequalification decision model:

    Figure 3.9. Completed DRD for loan prequalification

    dmn example drd

    The following is an example DRD for a phone call handling decision model using a reusable decision service:

    Figure 3.10. Completed DRD for phone call handling with a decision service

    dmn example drd3

    In a DMN decision service node, the decision nodes in the bottom segment incorporate input data from outside of the decision service to arrive at a final decision in the top segment of the decision service node. The resulting top-level decisions from the decision service are then implemented in any subsequent decisions or business knowledge requirements of the DMN model. You can reuse DMN decision services in other DMN models to apply the same decision logic with different input data and different outgoing connections.

3.1. Defining DMN decision logic in boxed expressions in Business Central

Boxed expressions in DMN are tables that you use to define the underlying logic of decision nodes and business knowledge models in a decision requirements diagram (DRD) or decision requirements graph (DRG). Some boxed expressions can contain other boxed expressions, but the top-level boxed expression corresponds to the decision logic of a single DRD artifact. While DRDs with one or more DRGs represent the flow of a DMN decision model, boxed expressions define the actual decision logic of individual nodes. DRDs and boxed expressions together form a complete and functional DMN decision model.

You can use the DMN designer in Business Central to define decision logic for your DRD components using built-in boxed expressions.

Prerequisites

  • A DMN file is created or imported in Business Central.

Procedure

  1. In Business Central, go to MenuDesignProjects, click the project name, and select the DMN file you want to modify.
  2. In the DMN designer canvas, select a decision node or business knowledge model node that you want to define and click the Edit icon to open the DMN boxed expression designer:

    Figure 3.11. Opening a new decision node boxed expression

    dmn decision edit

    Figure 3.12. Opening a new business knowledge model boxed expression

    dmn bkm edit

    By default, all business knowledge models are defined as boxed function expressions containing a literal FEEL expression, a nested context expression of an external JAVA or PMML function, or a nested boxed expression of any type.

    For decision nodes, you click the undefined table to select the type of boxed expression you want to use, such as a boxed literal expression, boxed context expression, decision table, or other DMN boxed expression.

    Figure 3.13. Selecting the logic type for a decision node

    dmn decision boxed expression options

    For business knowledge model nodes, you click the top-left function cell to select the function type, or right-click the function value cell, select Clear, and select a boxed expression of another type.

    Figure 3.14. Selecting the function or other logic type for a business knowledge model

    dmn bkm define
  3. For this example, use a decision node and select Decision Table as the boxed expression type.

    A decision table in DMN is a visual representation of one or more rules in a tabular format. Each rule consists of a single row in the table, and includes columns that define the conditions (input) and outcome (output) for that particular row.

  4. Click the input column header to define the name and data type for the input condition. For example, name the input column Credit Score.FICO with a number data type. This column specifies numeric credit score values or ranges of loan applicants.
  5. Click the output column header to define the name and data type for the output values. For example, name the output column Credit Score Rating and next to the Data Type option, click Manage to go to the Data Types page where you can create a custom data type with score ratings as constraints.

    Figure 3.15. Managing data types for a column header value

    dmn manage data types
  6. On the Data Types page, click New Data Type to add a new data type or click Import Data Object to import an existing data object from your project that you want to use as a DMN data type.

    If you import a data object from your project as a DMN data type and then that object is updated, you must re-import the data object as a DMN data type to apply the changes in your DMN model.

    For this example, click New Data Type and create a Credit_Score_Rating data type as a string:

    Figure 3.16. Adding a new data type

    dmn custom data type add
  7. Click Add Constraints, select Enumeration from the drop-down options, and add the following constraints:

    • "Excellent"
    • "Good"
    • "Fair"
    • "Poor"
    • "Bad"

    Figure 3.17. Adding constraints to the new data type

    dmn custom data type constraints

    To change the order of data type constraints, you can click the left end of the constraint row and drag the row as needed:

    Figure 3.18. Dragging constraints to change constraint order

    dmn custom data type constraints drag

    For information about constraint types and syntax requirements for the specified data type, see the Decision Model and Notation specification.

  8. Click OK to save the constraints and click the check mark to the right of the data type to save the data type.
  9. Return to the Credit Score Rating decision table, click the Credit Score Rating column header, and set the data type to this new custom data type.
  10. Use the Credit Score.FICO input column to define credit score values or ranges of values, and use the Credit Score Rating column to specify one of the corresponding ratings you defined in the Credit_Score_Rating data type.

    Right-click any value cell to insert or delete rows (rules) or columns (clauses).

    Figure 3.19. Decision node decision table for credit score rating

    dmn decision table example1a
  11. After you define all rules, click the top-left corner of the decision table to define the rule Hit Policy and Builtin Aggregator (for COLLECT hit policy only).

    The hit policy determines how to reach an outcome when multiple rules in a decision table match the provided input values. The built-in aggregator determines how to aggregate rule values when you use the COLLECT hit policy.

    Figure 3.20. Defining the decision table hit policy

    dmn hit policies

    The following example is a more complex decision table that determines applicant qualification for a loan as the concluding decision node in the same loan prequalification decision model:

    Figure 3.21. Decision table for loan prequalification

    dmn decision table example3

For boxed expression types other than decision tables, you follow these guidelines similarly to navigate the boxed expression tables and define variables and parameters for decision logic, but according to the requirements of the boxed expression type. Some boxed expressions, such as boxed literal expressions, can be single-column tables, while other boxed expressions, such as function, context, and invocation expressions, can be multi-column tables with nested boxed expressions of other types.

For example, the following boxed context expression defines the parameters that determine whether a loan applicant can meet minimum mortgage payments based on principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI), represented as a front-end ratio calculation with a sub-context expression:

Figure 3.22. Boxed context expression for front-end client PITI ratio

dmn context expression example2

The following boxed function expression determines a monthly mortgage installment as a business knowledge model in a lending decision, with the function value defined as a nested context expression:

Figure 3.23. Boxed function expression for installment calculation in business knowledge model

dmn function expression example3

For more information and examples of each boxed expression type, see Section 1.4, “DMN decision logic in boxed expressions”.

3.2. Creating custom data types for DMN boxed expressions in Business Central

In DMN boxed expressions in Business Central, data types determine the structure of the data that you use within an associated table, column, or field in the boxed expression. You can use default DMN data types (such as String, Number, Boolean) or you can create custom data types to specify additional fields and constraints that you want to implement for the boxed expression values.

Custom data types that you create for a boxed expression can be simple or structured:

  • Simple data types have only a name and a type assignment. Example: Age (number).
  • Structured data types contain multiple fields associated with a parent data type. Example: A single type Person containing the fields Name (string), Age (number), Email (string).

Prerequisites

  • A DMN file is created or imported in Business Central.

Procedure

  1. In Business Central, go to MenuDesignProjects, click the project name, and select the DMN file you want to modify.
  2. In the DMN designer canvas, select a decision node or business knowledge model for which you want to define the data types and click the Edit icon to open the DMN boxed expression designer.
  3. If the boxed expression is for a decision node that is not yet defined, click the undefined table to select the type of boxed expression you want to use, such as a boxed literal expression, boxed context expression, decision table, or other DMN boxed expression.

    Figure 3.24. Selecting the logic type for a decision node

    dmn decision boxed expression options
  4. Click the cell for the table header, column header, or parameter field (depending on the boxed expression type) for which you want to define the data type and click Manage to go to the Data Types page where you can create a custom data type.

    Figure 3.25. Managing data types for a column header value

    dmn manage data types

    You can also set and manage custom data types for a specified decision node or business knowledge model node by selecting the Properties icon in the upper-right corner of the DMN designer:

    Figure 3.26. Managing data types in decision requirements diagram (DRD) properties

    dmn manage data types1a

    The data type that you define for a specified cell in a boxed expression determines the structure of the data that you use within that associated table, column, or field in the boxed expression.

    In this example, an output column Credit Score Rating for a DMN decision table defines a set of custom credit score ratings based on an applicant’s credit score.

  5. On the Data Types page, click New Data Type to add a new data type or click Import Data Object to import an existing data object from your project that you want to use as a DMN data type.

    If you import a data object from your project as a DMN data type and then that object is updated, you must re-import the data object as a DMN data type to apply the changes in your DMN model.

    For this example, click New Data Type and create a Credit_Score_Rating data type as a string:

    Figure 3.27. Adding a new data type

    dmn custom data type add

    If the data type requires a list of items, enable the List setting.

  6. Click Add Constraints, select Enumeration from the drop-down options, and add the following constraints:

    • "Excellent"
    • "Good"
    • "Fair"
    • "Poor"
    • "Bad"

    Figure 3.28. Adding constraints to the new data type

    dmn custom data type constraints

    To change the order of data type constraints, you can click the left end of the constraint row and drag the row as needed:

    Figure 3.29. Dragging constraints to change constraint order

    dmn custom data type constraints drag

    For information about constraint types and syntax requirements for the specified data type, see the Decision Model and Notation specification.

  7. Click OK to save the constraints and click the check mark to the right of the data type to save the data type.
  8. Return to the Credit Score Rating decision table, click the Credit Score Rating column header, set the data type to this new custom data type, and define the rule values for that column with the rating constraints that you specified.

    Figure 3.30. Decision table for credit score rating

    dmn decision table example1a

    In the DMN decision model for this scenario, the Credit Score Rating decision flows into the following Loan Prequalification decision that also requires custom data types:

    Figure 3.31. Decision table for loan prequalification

    dmn manage data types blank
  9. Continuing with this example, return to the Data Types window, click New Data Type, and create a Loan_Qualification data type as a Structure with no constraints.

    When you save the new structured data type, the first sub-field appears so that you can begin defining nested data fields in this parent data type. You can use these sub-fields in association with the parent structured data type in boxed expressions, such as nested column headers in decision tables or nested table parameters in context or function expressions.

    For additional sub-fields, select the addition icon next to the Loan_Qualification data type:

    Figure 3.32. Adding a new structured data type with nested fields

    dmn manage data types structured
  10. For this example, under the structured Loan_Qualification data type, add a Qualification field with "Qualified" and "Not Qualified" enumeration constraints, and a Reason field with no constraints. Add also a simple Back_End_Ratio and a Front_End_Ratio data type, both with "Sufficient" and "Insufficient" enumeration constraints.

    Click the check mark to the right of each data type that you create to save your changes.

    Figure 3.33. Adding nested data types with constraints

    dmn manage data types structured2

    To change the order or nesting of data types, you can click the left end of the data type row and drag the row as needed:

    Figure 3.34. Dragging data types to change data type order or nesting

    dmn manage data types structured2 drag
  11. Return to the decision table and, for each column, click the column header cell, set the data type to the new corresponding custom data type, and define the rule values as needed for the column with the constraints that you specified, if applicable.

    Figure 3.35. Decision table for loan prequalification

    dmn decision table example3

For boxed expression types other than decision tables, you follow these guidelines similarly to navigate the boxed expression tables and define custom data types as needed.

For example, the following boxed function expression uses custom tCandidate and tProfile structured data types to associate data for online dating compatibility:

Figure 3.36. Boxed function expression for online dating compatibility

dmn manage data types structured3

Figure 3.37. Custom data type definitions for online dating compatibility

dmn manage data types structured3a

Figure 3.38. Parameter definitions with custom data types for online dating compatibility

dmn manage data types structured3b

3.3. Included models in DMN files in Business Central

In the DMN designer in Business Central, you can use the Included Models tab to include other DMN models and Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML) models from your project in a specified DMN file. When you include a DMN model within another DMN file, you can use all of the nodes and logic from both models in the same decision requirements diagram (DRD). When you include a PMML model within a DMN file, you can invoke that PMML model as a boxed function expression for a DMN decision node or business knowledge model node.

You cannot include DMN or PMML models from other projects in Business Central.

3.3.1. Including other DMN models within a DMN file in Business Central

In Business Central, you can include other DMN models from your project in a specified DMN file. When you include a DMN model within another DMN file, you can use all of the nodes and logic from both models in the same decision requirements diagram (DRD), but you cannot edit the nodes from the included model. To edit nodes from included models, you must update the source file for the included model directly. If you update the source file for an included DMN model, open the DMN file where the DMN model is included (or close an re-open) to verify the changes.

You cannot include DMN models from other projects in Business Central.

Prerequisites

  • The DMN models are created or imported (as .dmn files) in the same project in Business Central as the DMN file in which you want to include the models.

Procedure

  1. In Business Central, go to MenuDesignProjects, click the project name, and select the DMN file you want to modify.
  2. In the DMN designer, click the Included Models tab.
  3. Click Include Model, select a DMN model from your project in the Models list, enter a unique name for the included model, and click Include:

    Figure 3.39. Including a DMN model

    dmn include model

    The DMN model is added to this DMN file, and all DRD nodes from the included model are listed under Decision Components in the Decision Navigator view:

    Figure 3.40. DMN file with decision components from the included DMN model

    dmn include model list

    All data types from the included model are also listed in read-only mode in the Data Types tab for the DMN file:

    Figure 3.41. DMN file with data types from the included DMN model

    dmn include model data types
  4. In the Model tab of the DMN designer, click and drag the included DRD components onto the canvas to begin implementing them in your DRD:

    Figure 3.42. Adding DRD components from the included DMN model

    dmn include model drd

    To edit DRD nodes or data types from included models, you must update the source file for the included model directly. If you update the source file for an included DMN model, open the DMN file where the DMN model is included (or close an re-open) to verify the changes.

    To edit the included model name or to remove the included model from the DMN file, use the Included Models tab in the DMN designer.

    Important

    When you remove an included model, any nodes from that included model that are currently used in the DRD are also removed.

3.3.2. Including PMML models within a DMN file in Business Central

In Business Central, you can include Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML) models from your project in a specified DMN file. When you include a PMML model within a DMN file, you can invoke that PMML model as a boxed function expression for a DMN decision node or business knowledge model node. If you update the source file for an included PMML model, you must remove and re-include the PMML model in the DMN file to apply the source changes.

You cannot include PMML models from other projects in Business Central.

Prerequisites

  • The PMML models are imported (as .pmml files) in the same project in Business Central as the DMN file in which you want to include the models.

Procedure

  1. In your DMN project, add the following dependencies to the project pom.xml file to enable PMML evaluation:

    <!-- Required for the PMML compiler -->
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.drools</groupId>
      <artifactId>kie-pmml</artifactId>
      <version>${rhpam.version}</version>
      <scope>provided</scope>
    </dependency>
    
    <!-- Alternative dependencies for JPMML Evaluator, override `kie-pmml` dependency -->
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.kie</groupId>
      <artifactId>kie-dmn-jpmml</artifactId>
      <version>${rhpam.version}</version>
      <scope>provided</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.jpmml</groupId>
      <artifactId>pmml-evaluator</artifactId>
      <version>1.4.9</version>
      <scope>provided</scope>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.jpmml</groupId>
      <artifactId>pmml-evaluator-extension</artifactId>
      <version>1.4.9</version>
      <scope>provided</scope>
    </dependency>

    To access the project pom.xml file in Business Central, you can select any existing asset in the project and then in the Project Explorer menu on the left side of the screen, click the Customize View gear icon and select Repository Viewpom.xml.

    If you want to use the full PMML specification implementation with the Java Evaluator API for PMML (JPMML), use the alternative set of JPMML dependencies in your DMN project. If the JPMML dependencies and the standard kie-pmml dependency are both present, the kie-pmml dependency is disabled. For information about JPMML licensing terms, see Openscoring.io.

    Note

    Instead of specifying a Red Hat Process Automation Manager <version> for individual dependencies, consider adding the Red Hat Business Automation bill of materials (BOM) dependency to your project pom.xml file. The Red Hat Business Automation BOM applies to both Red Hat Decision Manager and Red Hat Process Automation Manager. When you add the BOM files, the correct versions of transitive dependencies from the provided Maven repositories are included in the project.

    Example BOM dependency:

    <dependency>
      <groupId>com.redhat.ba</groupId>
      <artifactId>ba-platform-bom</artifactId>
      <version>7.8.0.redhat-00005</version>
      <scope>import</scope>
      <type>pom</type>
    </dependency>

    For more information about the Red Hat Business Automation BOM, see What is the mapping between RHPAM product and maven library version?.

  2. If you added the JPMML dependencies in your DMN project to use the JPMML Evaluator, download the following JAR files and add them to the ~/kie-server.war/WEB-INF/lib and ~/business-central.war/WEB-INF/lib directories in your Red Hat Process Automation Manager distribution:

    • kie-dmn-jpmml JAR file in the Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7.8.0 Maven Repository distribution (rhpam-7.8.0-maven-repository/maven-repository/org/kie/kie-dmn-jpmml/7.39.0.Final-redhat-00005/kie-dmn-jpmml-7.39.0.Final-redhat-00005.jar) from the Red Hat Customer Portal
    • JPMML Evaluator 1.4.9 JAR file from the online Maven repository
    • JPMML Evaluator Extensions 1.4.9 JAR file from the online Maven repository

    These artifacts are required to enable JPMML evaluation in KIE Server and Business Central.

    Important

    Red Hat supports integration with the Java Evaluator API for PMML (JPMML) for PMML execution in Red Hat Process Automation Manager. However, Red Hat does not support the JPMML libraries directly. If you include JPMML libraries in your Red Hat Process Automation Manager distribution, see the Openscoring.io licensing terms for JPMML.

  3. In Business Central, go to MenuDesignProjects, click the project name, and select the DMN file you want to modify.
  4. In the DMN designer, click the Included Models tab.
  5. Click Include Model, select a PMML model from your project in the Models list, enter a unique name for the included model, and click Include:

    Figure 3.43. Including a PMML model

    dmn include model pmml

    The PMML model is added to this DMN file:

    Figure 3.44. DMN file with included PMML model

    dmn include model list pmml
  6. In the Model tab of the DMN designer, select or create the decision node or business knowledge model node in which you want to invoke the PMML model and click the Edit icon to open the DMN boxed expression designer:

    Figure 3.45. Opening a new decision node boxed expression

    dmn decision edit

    Figure 3.46. Opening a new business knowledge model boxed expression

    dmn bkm edit
  7. Set the expression type to Function (default for business knowledge model nodes), click the top-left function cell, and select PMML.
  8. In the document and model rows in the table, double-click the undefined cells to specify the included PMML document and the relevant PMML model within that document:

    Figure 3.47. Adding a PMML model in a DMN business knowledge model

    dmn include model expression pmml

    Figure 3.48. Example PMML definition in a DMN business knowledge model

    dmn function expression example5

    If you update the source file for an included PMML model, you must remove and re-include the PMML model in the DMN file to apply the source changes.

    To edit the included model name or to remove the included model from the DMN file, use the Included Models tab in the DMN designer.

3.4. DMN model documentation in Business Central

In the DMN designer in Business Central, you can use the Documentation tab to generate a report of your DMN model that you can print or download as an HTML file for offline use. The DMN model report contains all decision requirements diagrams (DRDs), data types, and boxed expressions in your DMN model. You can use this report to share your DMN model details or as part of your internal reporting workflow.

Figure 3.49. Example DMN model report

dmn documentation

3.5. DMN designer navigation and properties in Business Central

The DMN designer in Business Central provides the following additional features to help you navigate through the components and properties of decision requirements diagrams (DRDs).

DMN file and diagram views

In the upper-left corner of the DMN designer, select the Project Explorer view to navigate between all DMN and other files or select the Decision Navigator view to navigate between the decision components, graphs, and boxed expressions of a selected DRD:

Figure 3.50. Project Explorer view

dmn designer project view

Figure 3.51. Decision Navigator view

dmn designer nav view
dmn designer nav view2
Note

The DRD components from any DMN models included in the DMN file (in the Included Models tab) are also listed in the Decision Components panel for the DMN file.

In the upper-right corner of the DMN designer, select the Explore diagram icon to view an elevated preview of the selected DRD and to navigate between the nodes of the selected DRD:

Figure 3.52. Explore diagram view

dmn designer preview
DRD properties and design

In the upper-right corner of the DMN designer, select the Properties icon to modify the identifying information, data types, and appearance of a selected DRD, DRD node, or boxed expression cell:

Figure 3.53. DRD node properties

dmn designer properties

To view the properties of the entire DRD, click the DRD canvas background instead of a specific node.

DRD search

In the upper-right corner of the DMN designer, use the search bar to search for text that appears in your DRD. The search feature is especially helpful in complex DRDs with many nodes:

Figure 3.54. DRD search

dmn designer search