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A Red Hat training course is available for Red Hat OpenStack Platform

Chapter 1. Image Service

This chapter discusses the steps you can follow to manage images and storage in Red Hat OpenStack Platform.

A virtual machine image is a file that contains a virtual disk which has a bootable operating system installed on it. Virtual machine images are supported in different formats. The following are the formats available on Red Hat OpenStack Platform:

  • RAW - Unstructured disk image format.
  • QCOW2 - Disk format supported by QEMU emulator.
  • ISO - Sector-by-sector copy of the data on a disk, stored in a binary file.
  • AKI - Indicates an Amazon Kernel Image.
  • AMI - Indicates an Amazon Machine Image.
  • ARI - Indicates an Amazon RAMDisk Image.
  • VDI - Disk format supported by VirtualBox virtual machine monitor and the QEMU emulator.
  • VHD - Common disk format used by virtual machine monitors from VMware, VirtualBox, and others.
  • VMDK - Disk format supported by many common virtual machine monitors.

While ISO is not normally considered a virtual machine image format, since ISOs contain bootable filesystems with an installed operating system, you can treat them the same as you treat other virtual machine image files.

To download the official Red Hat Enterprise Linux cloud images, your account must have a valid Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscription:

You will be prompted to enter your Red Hat account credentials if you are not logged in to the Customer Portal.

1.1. Understanding the Image Service

The following notable Image service features are available.

1.1.1. Image Conversion

Image conversion converts images by calling the task API while importing an image.

As part of the import workflow, a plugin provides the image conversion. This plugin can be activated or deactivated based on the deployer configuration. Therefore, the deployer needs to specify the preferred format of images for the deployment.

Internally, the Image service receives the bits of the image in a particular format. These bits are stored in a temporary location. The plugin is then triggered to convert the image to the target format, and moved to a final destination. When the task is finished, the temporary location is deleted. As a result, the format uploaded initially is not retained by the Image service.

Note

The conversion can be triggered only when importing an image (the old copy-from). It does not run when uploading an image. For example:

$ glance --os-image-api-version 2 task-create --type import --input '{"import_from_format": "qcow2", "import_from": "http://127.0.0.1:8000/test.qcow2", "image_properties": {"disk_format": "qcow2", "container_format": "bare"}}'

1.1.2. Image Introspection

Every image format comes with a set of metadata embedded inside the image itself. For example, a stream optimized vmdk would contain the following parameters:

$ head -20 so-disk.vmdk

# Disk DescriptorFile
version=1
CID=d5a0bce5
parentCID=ffffffff
createType="streamOptimized"

# Extent description
RDONLY 209714 SPARSE "generated-stream.vmdk"

# The Disk Data Base
#DDB

ddb.adapterType = "buslogic"
ddb.geometry.cylinders = "102"
ddb.geometry.heads = "64"
ddb.geometry.sectors = "32"
ddb.virtualHWVersion = "4"

By introspecting this vmdk, you can see that the disk_type is streamOptimized and the adapter_type is buslogic. These metadata parameters are useful for the consumer of the image. In Compute, the workflow to instantiate a streamOptimized disk is different from the one to instantiate a flat disk. This new feature allows metadata extraction. You can achieve image introspection by calling the task API while importing the image. An administrator can override metadata settings.

1.1.3. Harden the Image Service

The copy_from feature in the Image Service API v1 allows an attacker to perform masked network port scans. It is possible to create images with a URL such as http://localhost:22. This could allow an attacker to enumerate internal network details, because the scan appears to originate from the Image Service. This is classified as a Server-Side Request Forgery (SSRF).

1.1.3.1. Diagnose Vulnerability

All copy_from calls are logged by the Image Service. This makes it possible to link the abuser of this vulnerability to the cloud user exploiting it. For this flaw to be exploited, image creation must be enabled and non-admin users must be able to use the copy_from function.

To diagnose this vulnerability, review the /etc/glance/policy.json file. If the file has the following settings, your deployment is vulnerable:

 "add_image": "",
 "copy_from": "",

1.1.3.2. Mitigate Vulnerability

To prevent attackers from exploiting this flaw, restrict the policy for the copy_from function to the admin role.

Add the following setting to the copy_from line of the /etc/glance/policy.json file:

"copy_from": "role:admin",
Warning

Limiting the copy_from function to admin users impacts Orchestration and dashboard usage. For example: Any Orchestration stacks for non-admin users that create images will break. Non-admin users will not be able to create images in the dashboard by providing an image-data URI.

1.1.3.2.1. Partial Mitigation

Optionally, instead of restricting the copy_from function, you can partially mitigate the vulnerability by:

  • Rate-limiting calls to the Image Service, which makes network probing extremely slow and may deter attacks.
  • Limiting connections from the control-plane node that runs the glance-api server to the ports required for the services and ports 80 and 443 towards the external network. This action would significantly limit the scope of an attack without affecting the majority of users.

1.2. Manage Images

The OpenStack Image service (glance) provides discovery, registration, and delivery services for disk and server images. It provides the ability to copy or snapshot a server image, and immediately store it away. Stored images can be used as a template to get new servers up and running quickly and more consistently, than installing a server operating system and individually configuring additional services.

1.2.1. Create an Image

This section provides you with the steps to manually create OpenStack-compatible images in the QCOW2 format using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 ISO files, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 ISO files, or Windows ISO files.

1.2.1.1. Use a KVM Guest Image With Red Hat OpenStack Platform

You can use a ready RHEL KVM guest QCOW2 image:

These images are configured with cloud-init and must take advantage of ec2-compatible metadata services for provisioning SSH keys in order to function properly.

Ready Windows KVM guest QCOW2 images are not available.

Note

For the KVM guest images:

  • The root account in the image is disabled, but sudo access is granted to a special user named cloud-user.
  • There is no root password set for this image.

The root password is locked in /etc/shadow by placing !! in the second field.

For an OpenStack instance, it is recommended that you generate an ssh keypair from the OpenStack dashboard or command line and use that key combination to perform an SSH public authentication to the instance as root.

When the instance is launched, this public key will be injected to it. You can then authenticate using the private key downloaded while creating the keypair.

If you do not want to use keypairs, you can use the admin password that has been set using the Inject an admin Password Into an Instance procedure.

If you want to create custom Red Hat Enterprise Linux or Windows images, see Create a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Image, Create a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Image, or Create a Windows Image.

1.2.1.2. Create Custom Red Hat Enterprise Linux or Windows Images

Prerequisites:

  • Linux host machine to create an image. This can be any machine on which you can install and run the Linux packages.
  • libvirt, virt-manager (run command yum groupinstall -y @virtualization). This installs all packages necessary for creating a guest operating system.
  • Libguestfs tools (run command yum install -y libguestfs-tools-c). This installs a set of tools for accessing and modifying virtual machine images.
  • A Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 or 6 ISO file (see RHEL 7.2 Binary DVD or RHEL 6.8 Binary DVD) or a Windows ISO file. If you do not have a Windows ISO file, visit the Microsoft TechNet Evaluation Center and download an evaluation image.
  • Text editor, if you want to change the kickstart files (RHEL only).
Note

In the following procedures, all commands with the [root@host]# prompt should be run on your host machine.

1.2.1.2.1. Create a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Image

This section provides you with the steps to manually create an OpenStack-compatible image in the QCOW2 format using a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 ISO file.

  1. Start the installation using virt-install as shown below:

    [root@host]# qemu-img create -f qcow2 rhel7.qcow2 8G
    [root@host]# virt-install --virt-type kvm --name rhel7 --ram 2048 \
    --cdrom /tmp/rhel-server-7.2-x86_64-dvd.iso \
    --disk rhel7.qcow2,format=qcow2 \
    --network=bridge:virbr0 --graphics vnc,listen=0.0.0.0 \
    --noautoconsole --os-type=linux --os-variant=rhel7

    This launches an instance and starts the installation process.

    Note

    If the instance does not launch automatically, run the following command to view the console:

    [root@host]# virt-viewer rhel7
  2. Set up the virtual machine as follows:

    1. At the initial Installer boot menu, choose the Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.X option. RHEL7 Install1
    2. Choose the appropriate Language and Keyboard options.
    3. When prompted about which type of devices your installation uses, choose Auto-detected installation media. RHEL7 Install5
    4. When prompted about which type of installation destination, choose Local Standard Disks. RHEL7 Install6 For other storage options, choose Automatically configure partitioning.
    5. For software selection, choose Minimal Install.
    6. For network and hostname, choose eth0 for network and choose a hostname for your device. The default hostname is localhost.localdomain.
    7. Choose the root password. RHEL7 Install9 The installation process completes and the Complete! screen appears.
  3. After the installation is complete, reboot the instance and log in as the root user.
  4. Update the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file so it only contains the following values:

    TYPE=Ethernet
    DEVICE=eth0
    ONBOOT=yes
    BOOTPROTO=dhcp
    NM_CONTROLLED=no
  5. Reboot the machine.
  6. Register the machine with the Content Delivery Network. For details, see Subscribe to the Required Channels in the Manual Installation Procedures.
  7. Update the system:

    # yum -y update
  8. Install the cloud-init packages:

    # yum install -y cloud-utils-growpart cloud-init
  9. Add the following line to /etc/sysconfig/network to avoid problems accessing the EC2 metadata service:

    NOZEROCONF=yes
  10. To ensure the console messages appear in the Log tab on the dashboard and the nova console-log output, add the following boot option to the /etc/default/grub file:

    GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8"

    Run the following command:

    # grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

    The output is as follows:

    Generating grub configuration file ...
    Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.10.0-229.7.2.el7.x86_64
    Found initrd image: /boot/initramfs-3.10.0-229.7.2.el7.x86_64.img
    Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.10.0-121.el7.x86_64
    Found initrd image: /boot/initramfs-3.10.0-121.el7.x86_64.img
    Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-0-rescue-b82a3044fb384a3f9aeacf883474428b
    Found initrd image: /boot/initramfs-0-rescue-b82a3044fb384a3f9aeacf883474428b.img
    done
  11. Un-register the virtual machine so that the resulting image does not contain the same subscription details for every instance cloned based on it:

    # subscription-manager repos --disable=*
    # subscription-manager unregister
    # yum clean all
  12. Power off the instance:

    # poweroff
  13. Reset and clean the image using the virt-sysprep command so it can be used to create instances without issues:

    [root@host]# virt-sysprep -d rhel7
  14. Reduce image size using the virt-sparsify command. This command converts any free space within the disk image back to free space within the host:

    [root@host]# virt-sparsify --compress /tmp/rhel7.qcow2 rhel7-cloud.qcow2

    This creates a new rhel7-cloud.qcow2 file in the location from where the command is run.

The rhel7-cloud.qcow2 image file is ready to be uploaded to the Image service. For more information on uploading this image to your OpenStack deployment using the dashboard, see Upload an Image.

1.2.1.2.2. Create a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Image

This section provides you with the steps to manually create an OpenStack-compatible image in the QCOW2 format using a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 ISO file.

  1. Start the installation using virt-install:

    [root@host]# qemu-img create -f qcow2 rhel6.qcow2 4G
    [root@host]# virt-install --connect=qemu:///system --network=bridge:virbr0 \
    --name=rhel6 --os-type linux --os-variant rhel6 \
    --disk path=rhel6.qcow2,format=qcow2,size=10,cache=none \
    --ram 4096 --vcpus=2 --check-cpu --accelerate \
    --hvm --cdrom=rhel-server-6.8-x86_64-dvd.iso

    This launches an instance and starts the installation process.

    Note

    If the instance does not launch automatically, run the following command to view the console:

    [root@host]# virt-viewer rhel6
  2. Set up the virtual machines as follows:

    1. At the initial Installer boot menu, choose the Install or upgrade an existing system option. RHEL6 Install1 Step through the installation prompts. Accept the defaults.

      The installer checks for the disc and lets you decide whether you want to test your installation media before installation. Select OK to run the test or Skip to proceed without testing.

    2. Choose the appropriate Language and Keyboard options.
    3. When prompted about which type of devices your installation uses, choose Basic Storage Devices. RHEL6 Install3
    4. Choose a hostname for your device. The default hostname is localhost.localdomain.
    5. Set timezone and root password.
    6. Based on the space on the disk, choose the type of installation. RHEL6 Install4
    7. Choose the Basic Server install, which installs an SSH server. RHEL6 Install5
    8. The installation process completes and Congratulations, your Red Hat Enterprise Linux installation is complete screen appears.
  3. Reboot the instance and log in as the root user.
  4. Update the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file so it only contains the following values:

    TYPE=Ethernet
    DEVICE=eth0
    ONBOOT=yes
    BOOTPROTO=dhcp
    NM_CONTROLLED=no
  5. Reboot the machine.
  6. Register the machine with the Content Delivery Network. For details, see Software Repository Configuration in Deploying OpenStack: Learning Environments (Manual Setup).
  7. Update the system:

    # yum -y update
  8. Install the cloud-init packages:

    # yum install -y cloud-utils-growpart cloud-init
  9. Edit the /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg configuration file and under cloud_init_modules add:

    - resolv-conf

    The resolv-conf option automatically configures the resolv.conf configuration file when an instance boots for the first time. This file contains information related to the instance such as nameservers, domain, and other options.

  10. To prevent network issues, create the /etc/udev/rules.d/75-persistent-net-generator.rules file as follows:

    # echo "#" > /etc/udev/rules.d/75-persistent-net-generator.rules

    This prevents /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules file from being created. If /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules is created, networking may not function properly when booting from snapshots (the network interface is created as "eth1" rather than "eth0" and IP address is not assigned).

  11. Add the following line to /etc/sysconfig/network to avoid problems accessing the EC2 metadata service:

    NOZEROCONF=yes
  12. To ensure the console messages appear in the Log tab on the dashboard and the nova console-log output, add the following boot option to the /etc/grub.conf:

    console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8
  13. Un-register the virtual machine so that the resulting image does not contain the same subscription details for every instance cloned based on it:

    # subscription-manager repos --disable=*
    # subscription-manager unregister
    # yum clean all
  14. Power off the instance:

    # poweroff
  15. Reset and clean the image using the virt-sysprep command so it can be used to create instances without issues:

    [root@host]# virt-sysprep -d rhel6
  16. Reduce image size using the virt-sparsify command. This command converts any free space within the disk image back to free space within the host:

    [root@host]# virt-sparsify --compress rhel6.qcow2 rhel6-cloud.qcow2

    This creates a new rhel6-cloud.qcow2 file in the location from where the command is run.

    Note

    You will need to manually resize the partitions of instances based on the image in accordance with the disk space in the flavor that is applied to the instance.

The rhel6-cloud.qcow2 image file is ready to be uploaded to the Image service. For more information on uploading this image to your OpenStack deployment using the dashboard, see Upload an Image

1.2.1.2.3. Create a Windows Image

This section provides you with the steps to manually create an OpenStack-compatible image in the QCOW2 format using a Windows ISO file.

  1. Start the installation using virt-install as shown below:

    [root@host]# virt-install --name=name \
    --disk size=size \
    --cdrom=path \
    --os-type=windows \
    --network=bridge:virbr0 \
    --graphics spice \
    --ram=RAM

    Replace the values of the virt-install parameters as follows:

    • name — the name that the Windows guest should have.
    • size — disk size in GB.
    • path — the path to the Windows installation ISO file.
    • RAM — the requested amount of RAM in MB.

      Note

      The --os-type=windows parameter ensures that the clock is set up correctly for the Windows guest, and enables its Hyper-V enlightenment features.

      Note that virt-install saves the guest image as /var/lib/libvirt/images/name.qcow2 by default. If you want to keep the guest image elsewhere, change the parameter of the --disk option as follows:

      --disk path=filename,size=size

      Replace filename with the name of the file which should store the guest image (and optionally its path); for example path=win8.qcow2,size=8 creates an 8 GB file named win8.qcow2 in the current working directory.

      Tip

      If the guest does not launch automatically, run the following command to view the console:

      [root@host]# virt-viewer name
  2. Installation of Windows systems is beyond the scope of this document. For instructions on how to install Windows, refer to the relevant Microsoft documentation.
  3. To allow the newly installed Windows system to use the virtualized hardware, you may need to install virtio drivers in it. To so do, first install the virtio-win package on the host system. This package contains the virtio ISO image, which is to be attached as a CD-ROM drive to the Windows guest. See Chapter 8. KVM Para-virtualized (virtio) Drivers in the Virtualization Deployment and Administration Guide for detailed instructions on how to install the virtio-win package, add the virtio ISO image to the guest, and install the virtio drivers.
  4. To complete the setup, download and execute Cloudbase-Init on the Windows system. At the end of the installation of Cloudbase-Init, select the Run Sysprep and Shutdown check boxes. The Sysprep tool makes the guest unique by generating an OS ID, which is used by certain Microsoft services.

    Important

    Red Hat does not provide technical support for Cloudbase-Init. If you encounter an issue, contact Cloudbase Solutions.

When the Windows system shuts down, the name.qcow2 image file is ready to be uploaded to the Image service. For more information on uploading this image to your OpenStack deployment using the dashboard or the command line, see Upload an Image.

1.2.1.3. Use libosinfo

Image Service (glance) can process libosinfo data for images, making it easier to configure the optimal virtual hardware for an instance. This can be done by adding the libosinfo-formatted operating system name to the glance image.

  1. This example specifies that the image with ID 654dbfd5-5c01-411f-8599-a27bd344d79b uses the libosinfo value of rhel7.2:

    $ openstack image set 654dbfd5-5c01-411f-8599-a27bd344d79b --property os_name=rhel7.2

    As a result, Compute will supply virtual hardware optimized for rhel7.2 whenever an instance is built using the 654dbfd5-5c01-411f-8599-a27bd344d79b image.

    Note

    For a complete list of libosinfo values, refer to the libosinfo project: https://gitlab.com/libosinfo/osinfo-db/tree/master/data/os

1.2.2. Upload an Image

  1. In the dashboard, select Project > Compute > Images.
  2. Click Create Image.
  3. Fill out the values, and click Create Image when finished.

Table 1.1. Image Options

FieldNotes

Name

Name for the image. The name must be unique within the project.

Description

Brief description to identify the image.

Image Source

Image source: Image Location or Image File. Based on your selection, the next field is displayed.

Image Location or Image File

  • Select Image Location option to specify the image location URL.
  • Select Image File option to upload an image from the local disk.

Format

Image format (for example, qcow2).

Architecture

Image architecture. For example, use i686 for a 32-bit architecture or x86_64 for a 64-bit architecture.

Minimum Disk (GB)

Minimum disk size required to boot the image. If this field is not specified, the default value is 0 (no minimum).

Minimum RAM (MB)

Minimum memory size required to boot the image. If this field is not specified, the default value is 0 (no minimum).

Public

If selected, makes the image public to all users with access to the project.

Protected

If selected, ensures only users with specific permissions can delete this image.

When the image has been successfully uploaded, its status is changed to active, which indicates that the image is available for use. Note that the Image service can handle even large images that take a long time to upload — longer than the lifetime of the Identity service token which was used when the upload was initiated. This is due to the fact that the Image service first creates a trust with the Identity service so that a new token can be obtained and used when the upload is complete and the status of the image is to be updated.

Note

You can also use the glance image-create command with the property option to upload an image. More values are available on the command line. For a complete listing, see Image Configuration Parameters.

1.2.3. Update an Image

  1. In the dashboard, select Project > Compute > Images.
  2. Click Edit Image from the dropdown list.

    Note

    The Edit Image option is available only when you log in as an admin user. When you log in as a demo user, you have the option to Launch an instance or Create Volume.

  3. Update the fields and click Update Image when finished. You can update the following values - name, description, kernel ID, ramdisk ID, architecture, format, minimum disk, minimum RAM, public, protected.
  4. Click the drop-down menu and select Update Metadata option.
  5. Specify metadata by adding items from the left column to the right one. In the left column, there are metadata definitions from the Image Service Metadata Catalog. Select Other to add metadata with the key of your choice and click Save when finished.
Note

You can also use the glance image-update command with the property option to update an image. More values are available on the command line; for a complete listing, see Image Configuration Parameters.

1.2.4. Delete an Image

  1. In the dashboard, select Project > Compute > Images.
  2. Select the image you want to delete and click Delete Images. == Configure OpenStack Compute Storage

This chapter describes the architecture for the back-end storage of images in OpenStack Compute (nova), and provides basic configuration options.

1.3. Architecture Overview

In Red Hat OpenStack Platform, the OpenStack Compute service uses the KVM hypervisor to execute compute workloads. The libvirt driver handles all interactions with KVM, and enables the creation of virtual machines.

Two types of libvirt storage must be considered for Compute:

  • Base image, which is a cached and formatted copy of the Image service image.
  • Instance disk, which is created using the libvirt base and is the back end for the virtual machine instance. Instance disk data can be stored either in Compute’s ephemeral storage (using the libvirt base) or in persistent storage (for example, using Block Storage).

Creation of Virtual Machines

The steps that Compute takes to create a virtual machine instance are:

  1. Cache the Image service’s backing image as the libvirt base.
  2. Convert the base image to the raw format (if configured).
  3. Resize the base image to match the VM’s flavor specifications.
  4. Use the base image to create the libvirt instance disk.

In the diagram above, the #1 instance disk uses ephemeral storage; the #2 disk uses a block-storage volume.

Ephemeral storage is an empty, unformatted, additional disk available to an instance. This storage value is defined by the instance flavor. The value provided by the user must be less than or equal to the ephemeral value defined for the flavor. The default value is 0, meaning no ephemeral storage is created.

The ephemeral disk appears in the same way as a plugged-in hard drive or thumb drive. It is available as a block device which you can check using the lsblk command. You can format it, mount it, and use it however you normally would a block device. There is no way to preserve or reference that disk beyond the instance it is attached to.

Block storage volume is persistant storage available to an instance regardless of the state of the running instance.

1.4. Configuration

Compute configuration for handling the libvirt base and instance disks can determine both performance and security aspects of your environment; parameters are configured in the /etc/nova/nova.conf file.

Table 1.2. Compute Image Parameters

SectionParameterDescriptionDefault

[DEFAULT]

force_raw_images

Whether to convert a non-raw cached base image to be raw (boolean). If a non-raw image is converted to raw, Compute:

  • Disallows backing files (which might be a security issue).
  • Removes existing compression (to avoid CPU bottlenecks).

Converting the base to raw uses more space for any image that could have been used directly by the hypervisor (for example, a qcow2 image). If you have a system with slower I/O or less available space, you might want to specify 'false', trading the higher CPU requirements of compression for that of minimized input bandwidth.

Raw base images are always used with libvirt_images_type=lvm.

true

[DEFAULT]

use_cow_images

Whether to use CoW (Copy on Write) images for libvirt instance disks (boolean):

  • false - The raw format is used. Without CoW, more space is used for common parts of the disk image
  • true - The cqow2 format is used. With CoW, depending on the backing store and host caching, there may be better concurrency achieved by having each VM operate on its own copy.

true

[DEFAULT]

preallocate_images

Preallocation mode for libvirt instance disks. Value can be:

  • none - No storage is provisioned at instance start.
  • space - Storage is fully allocated at instance start (using fallocate), which can help with both space guarantees and I/O performance.

Even when not using CoW instance disks, the copy each VM gets is sparse and so the VM may fail unexpectedly at run time with ENOSPC. By running fallocate(1) on the instance disk images, Compute immediately and efficiently allocates the space for them in the file system (if supported). Run time performance should also be improved because the file system does not have to dynamically allocate blocks at run time (reducing CPU overhead and more importantly file fragmentation).

none

[DEFAULT]

resize_fs_using_block_device

Whether to enable direct resizing of the base image by accessing the image over a block device (boolean). This is only necessary for images with older versions of cloud-init (that cannot resize themselves).

Because this parameter enables the direct mounting of images which might otherwise be disabled for security reasons, it is not enabled by default.

false

[DEFAULT]

default_ephemeral_format

The default format that is used for a new ephemeral volume. Value can be: ext2, ext3, or ext4. The ext4 format provides much faster initialization times than ext3 for new, large disks. You can also override per instance using the guest_format configuration option.

ext4

[DEFAULT]

image_cache_manager_interval

Number of seconds to wait between runs of the image cache manager, which impacts base caching on libvirt compute nodes. This period is used in the auto removal of unused cached images (see remove_unused_base_images and remove_unused_original_minimum_age_seconds).

2400

[DEFAULT]

remove_unused_base_images

Whether to enable the automatic removal of unused base images (checked every image_cache_manager_interval seconds). Images are defined as unused if they have not been accessed in remove_unused_original_minimum_age_seconds seconds.

true

[DEFAULT]

remove_unused_original_minimum_age_seconds

How old an unused base image must be before being removed from the libvirt cache (see remove_unused_base_images).

86400

[libvirt]

images_type

Image type to use for libvirt instance disks (deprecates use_cow_images). Value can be: raw, qcow2, lvm, rbd, or default. If default is specified, the value used for the use_cow_images parameter is used.

default