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Red Hat OpenStack Platform Operational Tools

Red Hat OpenStack Platform 9

Centralized Logging and Monitoring of an OpenStack Environment

OpenStack Documentation Team

Abstract

This document describes the installation and configuration of the operational tools that provide centralized logging, availability monitoring, and performance monitoring.

Preface

Red Hat OpenStack Platform comes with an optional suite of tools designed to help operators maintain an OpenStack environment. The tools perform the following functions:

  • Centralized logging
  • Availability monitoring
  • Performance monitoring

This document describes the preparation and installation of these tools.

Warning

The Red Hat OpenStack Platform Operational Tool Suite is currently a Technology Preview. For more information on Red Hat Technology Previews, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

Chapter 1. Architecture

1.1. Centralized Logging

The centralized logging toolchain consists of a number of components, including:

  • A Log Collection Agent (Fluentd)
  • A Log Relay/Transformer (Fluentd)
  • A Data Store (Elasticsearch)
  • An API/Presentation Layer (Kibana)

These components and their interactions are laid out in the following diagrams:

Figure 1.1. Centralized logging architecture at a high level

centralised logging arch

Figure 1.2. Single-node deployment for Red Hat OpenStack Platform

centralised logging single node fluentd

Figure 1.3. HA deployment for Red Hat OpenStack Platform

centralised logging ha fluentd

1.2. Availability Monitoring

The availability monitoring toolchain consists of a number of components, including:

  • A Monitoring Agent (Sensu)
  • A Monitoring Relay/Proxy (RabbitMQ)
  • A Monitoring Controller/Server (Sensu)
  • An API/Presentation Layer (Uchiwa)

These components and their interactions are laid out in the following diagrams:

Figure 1.4. Availability monitoring architecture at a high level

availability monitoring arch

Figure 1.5. Single-node deployment for Red Hat OpenStack Platform

availability monitoring single node sensu

Figure 1.6. HA deployment for Red Hat OpenStack Platform

availability monitoring ha sensu

1.3. Performance Monitoring

The performance monitoring toolchain consists of a number of components, including:

  • A Collection Agent (collectd)
  • A Collection Aggregator/Relay (Graphite)
  • A Data Store (whisperdb)
  • An API/Presentation Layer (Grafana)

These components and their interactions are laid out in the following diagrams:

Figure 1.7. Performance monitoring architecture at a high level

performance monitoring arch

Figure 1.8. Single-node deployment for Red Hat OpenStack Platform

performance monitoring single node whisperdb

Figure 1.9. HA deployment for Red Hat OpenStack Platform

performance monitoring ha whisperdb

Chapter 2. Installing the Centralized Logging Suite

2.1. Installing the Centralized Log Relay/Transformer

  1. Locate a bare metal system that meets the following minimum specifications:

    • 8 GB of memory
    • Single-socket Xeon class CPU
    • 500 GB of disk space
  2. Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.
  3. Allow the system to access the Operational Tools packages:

    1. Register the system and list the subscriptions attached to the system:

      # subscription-manager register
      # subscription-manager list --consumed

      If an OpenStack subscription is not attached automatically, see the documentation for manually attaching subscriptions.

    2. Disable initially enabled repositories and enable only the ones appropriate for the Operational Tools:

      # subscription-manager repos --disable=*
      # subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-optional-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-9-optools-rpms
      Note

      The base OpenStack repository (rhel-7-server-openstack-9-rpms) must not be enabled on this node. This repository may contain newer versions of certain Operational Tools dependencies which may be incompatible with the Operational Tools packages.

  4. Install the Elasticsearch, Fluentd, and Kibana software by running the following command:

    # yum install elasticsearch fluentd rubygem-fluent-plugin-elasticsearch kibana httpd
  5. Enable Cross-origin resource sharing (CORS) in Elasticsearch. To do so, edit /etc/elasticsearch/elasticsearch.yml and add the following lines to the end of the file:

    http.cors.enabled: true
    http.cors.allow-origin: "/.*/"
    Note

    This will allow the Elasticsearch JavaScript applications to be called from any web page on any web server. To allow CORS from your Kibana server only, use:

    http.cors.allow-origin: "http://LOGGING_SERVER"

    Replace LOGGING_SERVER with the IP address or the host name of your Kibana server, depending on whether you are going to access Kibana using the IP address or the host name. However, if the Elasticsearch service is only accessible from trusted hosts, it is safe to use "/.*/".

  6. Start the Elasticsearch instance and enable it at boot:

    # systemctl start elasticsearch
    # systemctl enable elasticsearch

    To confirm the Elasticsearch instance is working, run the following command:

    # curl http://localhost:9200/

    This should give a response similar to the following:

    {
      "status" : 200,
      "name" : "elasticsearch.example.com",
      "cluster_name" : "elasticsearch",
      "version" : {
        "number" : "1.5.2",
        "build_hash" : "c88f77ffc81301dfa9dfd81ca2232f09588bd512",
        "build_timestamp" : "2015-02-19T13:05:36Z",
        "build_snapshot" : false,
        "lucene_version" : "4.10.3"
      },
      "tagline" : "You Know, for Search"
    }
  7. Configure Fluentd to accept log data and write it to Elasticsearch. Edit /etc/fluentd/fluent.conf and replace its content with the following:

    # In v1 configuration, type and id are @ prefix parameters.
    # @type and @id are recommended. type and id are still available for backward compatibility
    
    <source>
      @type forward
      port 4000
      bind 0.0.0.0
    </source>
    
    <match **>
      @type elasticsearch
      host localhost
      port 9200
      logstash_format true
      flush_interval 5
    </match>
  8. Start Fluentd and enable it at boot:

    # systemctl start fluentd
    # systemctl enable fluentd
    Tip

    Check the journal for Fluentd and ensure it has no errors at start:

    # journalctl -u fluentd -l -f
  9. Configure Kibana to point to the Elasticsearch instance. Create /etc/httpd/conf.d/kibana3.conf and place the following content inside:

    <VirtualHost *:80>
    
      DocumentRoot /usr/share/kibana
      <Directory /usr/share/kibana>
        Require all granted
        Options -Multiviews
      </Directory>
    
    </VirtualHost>
  10. If you want to restrict access to Kibana and Elasticsearch to authorized users only, for example, because these services are running on a system in an open network, secure the virtual host using HTTP Basic authentication and move Elasticseach behind a proxy. To do so, follow these steps:

    1. Create (or rewrite) the /etc/httpd/conf.d/kibana3.conf file with the following content:

      <VirtualHost *:80>
      
        DocumentRoot /usr/share/kibana
        <Directory /usr/share/kibana>
          Options -Multiviews
          AuthUserFile /etc/httpd/conf/htpasswd-kibana
          AuthName "Restricted Kibana Server"
          AuthType Basic
          Require valid-user
        </Directory>
      
        # Proxy for Elasticsearch
        <LocationMatch "^/(_nodes|_aliases|.*/_aliases|_search|.*/_search|_mapping|.*/_mapping)$">
          ProxyPassMatch http://127.0.0.1:9200/$1
          ProxyPassReverse http://127.0.0.1:9200/$1
        </LocationMatch>
      
        # Proxy for kibana-int/{dashboard,temp}
        <LocationMatch "^/(kibana-int/dashboard/|kibana-int/temp)(.*)$">
          ProxyPassMatch http://127.0.0.1:9200/$1$2
          ProxyPassReverse http://127.0.0.1:9200/$1$2
        </LocationMatch>
      
      </Virtualhost>
      Note

      You can use a different path for the AuthUserFile option as well as any other description for the AuthName option.

    2. Create a pair of user name and password which will be allowed to access Kibana. To do so, run the following command:

      # htpasswd -c /etc/httpd/conf/htpasswd-kibana user_name
      Note

      If you are using a different path for the AuthUserFile option, change the command accordingly.

      Replace user_name with a user name of your choice. When prompted, enter the password that will be used with this user name. You will be prompted to re-type the password.

    3. Optionally, create more users with their own passwords by running the following command:

      # htpasswd /etc/httpd/conf/htpasswd-kibana another_user_name
    4. Configure Elasticsearch to listen on the localhost interface only. To do so, open the /etc/elasticsearch/elasticsearch.yml file in an editor and append the following option:

      network.host: 127.0.0.1
    5. You must also configure Elasticsearch to allow using HTTP Basic authentication data with CORS by appending the following option to /etc/elasticsearch/elasticsearch.yml:

      http.cors.allow-credentials: true
    6. Restart Elasticsearch for these changes to take effect:

      # systemctl restart elasticsearch
    7. Finally, ensure that the Elasticsearch files are downloaded using the proxy, and that the HTTP Basic authentication data is sent by the browser. To do so, edit the /usr/share/kibana/config.js file. Find the following line in this file:

      elasticsearch: "http://"+window.location.hostname+":9200",

      and change it as follows:

      elasticsearch: {server: "http://"+window.location.hostname, withCredentials: true},
  11. Enable Kibana (inside Apache) to connect to Elasticsearch, and then start Apache and enable it at boot:

    # setsebool -P httpd_can_network_connect 1
    # systemctl start httpd
    # systemctl enable httpd
  12. Open the firewall on the system to allow connections to Fluentd and httpd:

    # firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=4000/tcp --permanent
    # firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-service=http --permanent
    # firewall-cmd --reload
  13. Moreover, if you have not configured HTTP authentication and Elasticsearch proxy, open the firewall to allow direct connections to Elasticsearch:

    # firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=9200/tcp --permanent
    # firewall-cmd --reload
    Important

    If you do not restrict access to Kibana and Elasticseach using HTTP authentication, the information provided by Kibana and Elasticsearch is available to anyone without any authentication. To secure the data, ensure that the system or the open TCP ports (80, 4000, and 9200) are only accessible from trusted hosts.

2.2. Installing the Log Collection Agent on All Nodes

To collect the logs from all the systems in the OpenStack environment and send them to your centralized logging server, run the following commands on all the OpenStack systems.

  1. Enable the Operational Tools repository:

    # subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-9-optools-rpms
  2. Install fluentd and rubygem-fluent-plugin-add:

    # yum install fluentd rubygem-fluent-plugin-add
  3. Configure the Fluentd user so it has permissions to read all the OpenStack log files. Do this by running the following command:

    # for user in {keystone,nova,neutron,cinder,glance}; do usermod -a -G $user fluentd; done

    Note that you may get an error on some nodes about missing groups. This can be disregarded as not all the nodes run all the services.

  4. Configure Fluentd. Make sure /etc/fluentd/fluent.conf looks like the following; be sure to replace LOGGING_SERVER with the host name or IP address of your centralized logging server configured above:

    # In v1 configuration, type and id are @ prefix parameters.
    # @type and @id are recommended. type and id are still available for backward compatibility
    
    # Nova compute
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/nova/nova-compute.log
      tag nova.compute
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match nova.compute>
      type add
      <pair>
        service nova.compute
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Nova API
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/nova/nova-api.log
      tag nova.api
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match nova.api>
      type add
      <pair>
        service nova.api
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Nova Cert
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/nova/nova-cert.log
      tag nova.cert
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match nova.cert>
      type add
      <pair>
        service nova.cert
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Nova Conductor
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/nova/nova-conductor.log
      tag nova.conductor
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match nova.conductor>
      type add
      <pair>
        service nova.conductor
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Nova Consoleauth
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/nova/nova-consoleauth.log
      tag nova.consoleauth
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match nova.consoleauth>
      type add
      <pair>
        service nova.consoleauth
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Nova Scheduler
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/nova/nova-scheduler.log
      tag nova.scheduler
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match nova.scheduler>
      type add
      <pair>
        service nova.scheduler
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Neutron Openvswitch Agent
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/neutron/openvswitch-agent.log
      tag neutron.openvswitch
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match neutron.openvswitch>
      type add
      <pair>
        service neutron.openvswitch
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Neutron Server
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/neutron/server.log
      tag neutron.server
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match neutron.server>
      type add
      <pair>
        service neutron.server
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Neutron DHCP Agent
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/neutron/dhcp-agent.log
      tag neutron.dhcp
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match neutron.dhcp>
      type add
      <pair>
        service neutron.dhcp
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Neutron L3 Agent
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/neutron/l3-agent.log
      tag neutron.l3
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match neutron.l3>
      type add
      <pair>
        service neutron.l3
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Neutron Metadata Agent
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/neutron/metadata-agent.log
      tag neutron.metadata
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match neutron.metadata>
      type add
      <pair>
        service neutron.metadata
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Keystone
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/keystone/keystone.log
      tag keystone
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match keystone>
      type add
      <pair>
        service keystone
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Glance API
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/glance/api.log
      tag glance.api
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match glance.api>
      type add
      <pair>
        service glance.api
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Glance Registry
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/glance/registry.log
      tag glance.registry
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match glance.registry>
      type add
      <pair>
        service glance.registry
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Cinder API
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/cinder/api.log
      tag cinder.api
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match cinder.api>
      type add
      <pair>
        service cinder.api
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Cinder Scheduler
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/cinder/scheduler.log
      tag cinder.scheduler
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match cinder.scheduler>
      type add
      <pair>
        service cinder.scheduler
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    # Cinder Volume
    <source>
      @type tail
      path /var/log/cinder/volume.log
      tag cinder.volume
      format multiline
      format_firstline /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      format /(?<time>[^ ]* [^ ]*) (?<pid>[^ ]*) (?<loglevel>[^ ]*) (?<class>[^ ]*) \[(?<context>.*)\] (?<message>.*)/
      time_format %F %T.%L
    </source>
    
    <match cinder.volume>
      type add
      <pair>
        service cinder.volume
        hostname "#{Socket.gethostname}"
      </pair>
    </match>
    
    <match greped.**>
      @type forward
      heartbeat_type tcp
      <server>
        name LOGGING_SERVER
        host LOGGING_SERVER
        port 4000
      </server>
    </match>
  5. Now that Fluentd has been configured, start the Fluentd service and enable it at boot:

    # systemctl start fluentd
    # systemctl enable fluentd

You should now be able to access Kibana running at http://LOGGING_SERVER/index.html#/dashboard/file/logstash.json and see logs start to populate. If you have enabled HTTP Basic authentication in the Kibana configuration, you must enter a valid user name and password to access this page.

Note

By default, the front page of the logging server, http://LOGGING_SERVER/, is a Kibana welcome screen providing technical requirements and additional configuration information. If you want the logs to be available here, replace the default.json file in the Kibana application directory with logstash.json, but first create a backup copy of default.json in case you need this file again in the future:

# mv /usr/share/kibana/app/dashboards/default.json /usr/share/kibana/app/dashboards/default.json.orig
# cp /usr/share/kibana/app/dashboards/logstash.json /usr/share/kibana/app/dashboards/default.json

Chapter 3. Installing the Availability Monitoring Suite

3.1. Installing the Monitoring Relay/Controller

  1. Locate a bare metal system that meets the following minimum specifications:

    • 4 GB of memory
    • Single-socket Xeon class CPU
    • 100 GB of disk space
  2. Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.
  3. Allow the system to access the Operational Tools packages:

    1. Register the system and list the subscriptions attached to the system:

      # subscription-manager register
      # subscription-manager list --consumed

      If an OpenStack subscription is not attached automatically, see the documentation for manually attaching subscriptions.

    2. Disable initially enabled repositories and enable only the ones appropriate for the Operational Tools:

      # subscription-manager repos --disable=*
      # subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-optional-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-9-optools-rpms
      Note

      The base OpenStack repository (rhel-7-server-openstack-9-rpms) must not be enabled on this node. This repository may contain newer versions of certain Operational Tools dependencies which may be incompatible with the Operational Tools packages.

  4. Open the firewall on the system to allow connections to RabbitMQ and Uchiwa:

    # firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=5672/tcp --permanent
    # firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=3000/tcp --permanent
    # firewall-cmd --reload
  5. Install the components needed for the monitoring server:

    # yum install sensu uchiwa redis rabbitmq-server
  6. Configure RabbitMQ and Redis, which are the backbone services. Start both Redis and RabbitMQ and enable them at boot:

    # systemctl start redis
    # systemctl enable redis
    # systemctl start rabbitmq-server
    # systemctl enable rabbitmq-server
  7. Configure a new RabbitMQ virtual host for sensu, with a user name and password combination that can access the host:

    # rabbitmqctl add_vhost /sensu
    # rabbitmqctl add_user sensu sensu
    # rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p /sensu sensu ".*" ".*" ".*"
  8. Now that the base services are running and configured, configure the Sensu monitoring server. Create /etc/sensu/conf.d/rabbitmq.json with the following contents:

    {
      "rabbitmq": {
        "port": 5672,
        "host": "localhost",
        "user": "sensu",
        "password": "sensu",
        "vhost": "/sensu"
      }
    }
  9. Next, create /etc/sensu/conf.d/redis.json with the following contents:

    {
      "redis": {
        "port": 6379,
        "host": "localhost"
      }
    }
  10. Finally, create /etc/sensu/conf.d/api.json with the following contents:

    {
      "api": {
        "bind": "0.0.0.0",
        "port": 4567,
        "host": "localhost"
      }
    }
  11. Start and enable all Sensu services:

    # systemctl start sensu-server
    # systemctl enable sensu-server
    # systemctl start sensu-api
    # systemctl enable sensu-api
  12. Configure Uchiwa, which is the web interface for Sensu. To do this, edit /etc/uchiwa/uchiwa.json and replace its default contents with the following:

    {
      "sensu": [
        {
          "name": "Openstack",
          "host": "localhost",
          "port": 4567
        }
      ],
      "uchiwa": {
        "host": "0.0.0.0",
        "port": 3000,
        "refresh": 5
      }
    }
  13. Start and enable the Uchiwa web interface:

    # systemctl start uchiwa
    # systemctl enable uchiwa

3.2. Installing the Availability Monitoring Agent on All Nodes

To monitor all the systems in the OpenStack environment, run the following commands on all of them.

  1. Enable the Operational Tools repository:

    # subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-9-optools-rpms
  2. Install Sensu:

    # yum install sensu
  3. Configure the Sensu agent. Edit /etc/sensu/conf.d/rabbitmq.json to have the following content; remember to replace MONITORING_SERVER with the host name or IP address of your monitoring server configured in the previous section:

    {
      "rabbitmq": {
        "port": 5672,
        "host": "MONITORING_SERVER",
        "user": "sensu",
        "password": "sensu",
        "vhost": "/sensu"
      }
    }
  4. Edit /etc/sensu/conf.d/client.json to include the following content; remember to replace FQDN with the host name of the machine, and ADDRESS with the public IP address of the machine:

    {
      "client": {
        "name": "FQDN",
        "address": "ADDRESS",
        "subscriptions": [ "all" ]
      }
    }
  5. Finally, start and enable the Sensu client:

    # systemctl start sensu-client
    # systemctl enable sensu-client

You should now be able to access Uchiwa running at http://MONITORING_SERVER:3000.

Chapter 4. Installing the Performance Monitoring Suite

4.1. Installing the Collection Aggregator/Relay

  1. Locate a bare metal system that meets the following minimum specifications:

    • 4 GB of memory
    • Single-socket Xeon class CPU
    • 500 GB of disk space
  2. Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.
  3. Allow the system to access the Operational Tools packages:

    1. Register the system and list the subscriptions attached to the system:

      # subscription-manager register
      # subscription-manager list --consumed

      If an OpenStack subscription is not attached automatically, see the documentation for manually attaching subscriptions.

    2. Disable initially enabled repositories and enable only the ones appropriate for the Operational Tools:

      # subscription-manager repos --disable=*
      # subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-optional-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-9-optools-rpms
      Note

      The base OpenStack repository (rhel-7-server-openstack-9-rpms) must not be enabled on this node. This repository may contain newer versions of certain Operational Tools dependencies which may be incompatible with the Operational Tools packages.

  4. Open the firewall on the system to allow connections to Graphite and Grafana:

    # firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=2003/tcp --permanent
    # firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=3030/tcp --permanent
    # firewall-cmd --reload
  5. Once that is done, install the Graphite and Grafana software by running the following command:

    # yum install python-carbon graphite-web grafana httpd
  6. Configure the Grafana web interface to allow access. Edit /etc/httpd/conf.d/graphite-web.conf and modify the Require line as follows:

    ...
    <Directory "/usr/share/graphite/">
        <IfModule mod_authz_core.c>
            # Apache 2.4
            Require all granted
        </IfModule>
    ...
  7. Edit /etc/grafana/grafana.ini, and change http_port to 3030.
  8. Synchronize the database behind Graphite web. Run the following command; when prompted if you want to create a super user, choose no:

    # sudo -u apache /usr/bin/graphite-manage syncdb --noinput
  9. Start and enable all the Graphite and Grafana services:

    # systemctl start httpd
    # systemctl enable httpd
    # systemctl start carbon-cache
    # systemctl enable carbon-cache
    # systemctl start grafana-server
    # systemctl enable grafana-server
  10. Configure Grafana to talk to your Graphite instance:

    1. Go to http://PERFORMANCE_MONITORING_HOST:3030/. You should be presented with the Grafana login page.
    2. Enter the default credentials of admin/admin to log in to the system.
    3. After you are logged in, click on the Grafana logo in the top left corner of the screen, then choose Data Sources.
    4. At the top of the page, click Add new, and enter the following details:

      Name

      graphite

      Default

      yes (select)

      Type

      Graphite

      Url

      http://localhost/

      Access

      proxy

      Basic Auth

      no (unselected)

    5. Finally, click the Add button at the bottom.

4.2. Installing the Performance Monitoring Collection Agent on All Nodes

To monitor the performance of all the systems in the OpenStack environment, run the following commands on all of them.

  1. Enable the Operational Tools repository:

    # subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-9-optools-rpms
  2. Install collectd:

    # yum install collectd
  3. Configure collectd to send the data to the performance monitoring aggregator/relay. To do so, create /etc/collectd.d/10-write_graphite.conf with the following contents, where PERFORMANCE_MONITORING_HOST is the host name or IP address of the host that was configured previously to be the performance monitoring aggregator/relay:

    <LoadPlugin write_graphite>
      Globals false
    </LoadPlugin>
    
    <Plugin write_graphite>
      <Carbon>
        Host "PERFORMANCE_MONITORING_HOST"
        Port "2003"
        Prefix "collectd."
        EscapeCharacter "_"
        StoreRates true
        LogSendErrors true
        Protocol "tcp"
      </Carbon>
    </Plugin>
  4. If you are using SELinux, allow collectd to tcp network connect:

    # setsebool -P collectd_tcp_network_connect=1
  5. Start and enable collectd:

    # systemctl start collectd
    # systemctl enable collectd

After a while, you should see metrics in the Graphite web user interface running at http://PERFORMANCE_MONITORING_HOST:3030/.

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