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Replacing nodes

Red Hat OpenShift Data Foundation 4.10

Instructions for how to safely replace a node in an OpenShift Data Foundation cluster.

Red Hat Storage Documentation Team

Abstract

This document explains how to safely replace a node in a Red Hat OpenShift Data Foundation cluster.

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Preface

For OpenShift Data Foundation, node replacement can be performed proactively for an operational node and reactively for a failed node for the following deployments:

  • For Amazon Web Services (AWS)

    • User-provisioned infrastructure
    • Installer-provisioned infrastructure
  • For VMware

    • User-provisioned infrastructure
    • Installer-provisioned infrastructure
  • For Red Hat Virtualization

    • Installer-provisioned infrastructure
  • For Microsoft Azure

    • Installer-provisioned infrastructure
  • For local storage devices

    • Bare metal
    • VMware
    • Red Hat Virtualization
    • IBM Power
  • For replacing your storage nodes in external mode, see Red Hat Ceph Storage documentation.

Chapter 1. OpenShift Data Foundation deployed using dynamic devices

1.1. OpenShift Data Foundation deployed on AWS

1.1.1. Replacing an operational AWS node on user-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace an operational node on AWS user-provisioned infrastructure.

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure and resources to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the node that needs to be replaced.
  2. Mark the node as unschedulable using the following command:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  3. Drain the node using the following command:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  4. Delete the node using the following command:

    $ oc delete nodes <node_name>
  5. Create a new AWS machine instance with the required infrastructure. See Platform requirements.
  6. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform node using the new AWS machine instance.
  7. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  8. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  9. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  10. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node.

    From the web user interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From the command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.1.2. Replacing an operational AWS node on installer-provisioned infrastructure

Use this procedure to replace an operational node on AWS installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI).

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click ComputeNodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Mark the node as unschedulable using the following command:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  4. Drain the node using the following command:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  5. Click ComputeMachines. Search for the required machine.
  6. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮)Delete Machine.
  7. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created.
  8. Wait for new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  9. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  10. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.1.3. Replacing a failed AWS node on user-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node which is not operational on AWS user-provisioned infrastructure (UPI) for OpenShift Data Foundation.

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure and resources to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the AWS machine instance of the node that needs to be replaced.
  2. Log in to AWS and terminate the identified AWS machine instance.
  3. Create a new AWS machine instance with the required infrastructure. See platform requirements.
  4. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform node using the new AWS machine instance.
  5. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  6. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  7. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  8. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.1.4. Replacing a failed AWS node on installer-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node which is not operational on AWS installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI) for OpenShift Data Foundation.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click ComputeNodes.
  2. Identify the faulty node and click on its Machine Name.
  3. Click ActionsEdit Annotations, and click Add More.
  4. Add machine.openshift.io/exclude-node-draining and click Save.
  5. Click ActionsDelete Machine, and click Delete.
  6. A new machine is automatically created, wait for new machine to start.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  7. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  8. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  9. [Optional]: If the failed AWS instance is not removed automatically, terminate the instance from AWS console.

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.2. OpenShift Data Foundation deployed on VMware

1.2.1. Replacing an operational VMware node on user-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace an operational node on VMware user-provisioned infrastructure (UPI).

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the node and its VM that needs to be replaced.
  2. Mark the node as unschedulable using the following command:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  3. Drain the node using the following command:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  4. Delete the node using the following command:

    $ oc delete nodes <node_name>
  5. Log in to vSphere and terminate the identified VM.

    Important

    VM should be deleted only from the inventory and not from the disk.

  6. Create a new VM on vSphere with the required infrastructure. See Platform requirements.
  7. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform worker node using the new VM.
  8. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  9. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  10. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  11. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.2.2. Replacing an operational VMware node on installer-provisioned infrastructure

Use this procedure to replace an operational node on VMware installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI).

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click ComputeNodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Mark the node as unschedulable using the following command:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  4. Drain the node using the following command:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  5. Click ComputeMachines. Search for the required machine.
  6. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮)Delete Machine.
  7. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created.
  8. Wait for new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  9. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  10. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.2.3. Replacing a failed VMware node on user-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node on VMware user-provisioned infrastructure (UPI).

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the node and its VM that needs to be replaced.
  2. Delete the node using the following command:

    $ oc delete nodes <node_name>
  3. Log in to vSphere and terminate the identified VM.

    Important

    VM should be deleted only from the inventory and not from the disk.

  4. Create a new VM on vSphere with the required infrastructure. See Platform requirements.
  5. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform worker node using the new VM.
  6. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  7. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  8. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  9. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.2.4. Replacing a failed VMware node on installer-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node which is not operational on VMware installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI) for OpenShift Data Foundation.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click ComputeNodes.
  2. Identify the faulty node and click on its Machine Name.
  3. Click ActionsEdit Annotations, and click Add More.
  4. Add machine.openshift.io/exclude-node-draining and click Save.
  5. Click ActionsDelete Machine, and click Delete.
  6. A new machine is automatically created, wait for new machine to start.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  7. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  8. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  9. [Optional]: If the failed VM is not removed automatically, terminate the VM from vSphere.

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.3. OpenShift Data Foundation deployed on Red Hat Virtualization

1.3.1. Replacing an operational Red Hat Virtualization node on installer-provisioned infrastructure

Use this procedure to replace an operational node on Red Hat Virtualization installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI).

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click Compute → Nodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Mark the node as unschedulable using the following command:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  4. Drain the node using the following command:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  5. Click Compute → Machines. Search for the required machine.
  6. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮) → Delete Machine.
  7. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created. Wait for new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  8. Click Compute → Nodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  9. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:
    $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.3.2. Replacing a failed Red Hat Virtualization node on installer-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node which is not operational on Red Hat Virtualization installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI) for OpenShift Data Foundation.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click Compute → Nodes.
  2. Identify the faulty node. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Log in to Red Hat Virtualization Administration Portal and remove the virtual disks associated with mon and OSDs from the failed Virtual Machine.

    This step is required so that the disks are not deleted when the VM instance is deleted as part of the Delete machine step.

    Important

    Do not select the Remove Permanently option when removing the disk(s).

  4. In the OpenShift Web Console, click Compute → Machines. Search for the required machine.
  5. Click Actions → Edit Annotations, and click Add More.
  6. Add machine.openshift.io/exclude-node-draining and click Save.
  7. Click Actions → Delete Machine, and click Delete.

    A new machine is automatically created, wait for new machine to start.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  8. Click Compute → Nodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  9. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  10. Optional: If the failed VM is not removed automatically, remove the VM from Red Hat Virtualization Administration Portal.

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.4. OpenShift Data Foundation deployed on Microsoft Azure

1.4.1. Replacing operational nodes on Azure installer-provisioned infrastructure

Use this procedure to replace an operational node on Azure installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI).

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click ComputeNodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Mark the node as unschedulable using the following command:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  4. Drain the node using the following command:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  5. Click ComputeMachines. Search for the required machine.
  6. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮)Delete Machine.
  7. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created.
  8. Wait for new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  9. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  10. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

1.4.2. Replacing failed nodes on Azure installer-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node which is not operational on Azure installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI) for OpenShift Data Foundation.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click ComputeNodes.
  2. Identify the faulty node and click on its Machine Name.
  3. Click ActionsEdit Annotations, and click Add More.
  4. Add machine.openshift.io/exclude-node-draining and click Save.
  5. Click ActionsDelete Machine, and click Delete.
  6. A new machine is automatically created, wait for new machine to start.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  7. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  8. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  9. [Optional]: If the failed Azure instance is not removed automatically, terminate the instance from Azure console.

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

Chapter 2. OpenShift Data Foundation deployed using local storage devices

2.1. Replacing storage nodes on bare metal infrastructure

2.1.1. Replacing an operational node on bare metal user-provisioned infrastructure

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the NODE and get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  2. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  3. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  4. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  5. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  6. Delete the node.

    $ oc delete node <node_name>
  7. Get a new bare metal machine with required infrastructure. See Installing a cluster on bare metal.

    Important

    For information about how to replace a master node when you have installed OpenShift Data Foundation on a three-node OpenShift compact bare-metal cluster, see the Backup and Restore guide in the OpenShift Container Platform documentation.

  8. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform node using the new bare metal machine.
  9. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  10. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  11. Click Compute → Nodes in OpenShift Web Console, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  12. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  13. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  14. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  15. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  16. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  17. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  18. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  19. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  20. Delete the ocs-osd-removal-job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running
    0          4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.1.2. Replacing a failed node on bare metal user-provisioned infrastructure

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the NODE and get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  2. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  3. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  4. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  5. Remove the pods which are in Terminating state.

    $ oc get pods -A -o wide | grep -i <node_name> |  awk '{if ($4 == "Terminating") system ("oc -n " $1 " delete pods " $2  " --grace-period=0 " " --force ")}'
  6. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  7. Delete the node.

    $ oc delete node <node_name>
  8. Get a new bare metal machine with required infrastructure. See Installing a cluster on bare metal.

    Important

    For information about how to replace a master node when you have installed OpenShift Data Foundation on a three-node OpenShift compact bare-metal cluster, see the Backup and Restore guide in the OpenShift Container Platform documentation.

  9. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform node using the new bare metal machine.
  10. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  11. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  12. Click Compute → Nodes in OpenShift Web Console, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  13. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  14. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  15. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  16. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  17. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  18. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  19. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  20. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  21. Delete the ocs-osd-removal-job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running
    0          4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.2. Replacing storage nodes on IBM Z or LinuxONE infrastructure

You can choose one of the following procedures to replace storage nodes:

2.2.1. Replacing operational nodes on IBM Z or LinuxONE infrastructure

Use this procedure to replace an operational node on IBM Z or LinuxONE infrastructure.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console.
  2. Click ComputeNodes.
  3. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  4. Mark the node as unschedulable using the following command:

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  5. Drain the node using the following command:

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  6. Click ComputeMachines. Search for the required machine.
  7. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮)Delete Machine.
  8. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created.
  9. Wait for the new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes.

  10. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  11. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If data encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.2.2. Replacing failed nodes on IBM Z or LinuxONE infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node which is not operational on IBM Z or LinuxONE infrastructure for OpenShift Data Foundation.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click ComputeNodes.
  2. Identify the faulty node and click on its Machine Name.
  3. Click ActionsEdit Annotations, and click Add More.
  4. Add machine.openshift.io/exclude-node-draining and click Save.
  5. Click ActionsDelete Machine, and click Delete.
  6. A new machine is automatically created, wait for new machine to start.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes. Ceph errors generated during this period are temporary and are automatically resolved when the new node is labeled and functional.

  7. Click ComputeNodes, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  8. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From the web user interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From the command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  9. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= | cut -d' ' -f1
  10. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  11. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.
  12. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  13. Optional: If data encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  14. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.3. Replacing storage nodes on IBM Power infrastructure

For OpenShift Data Foundation, node replacement can be performed proactively for an operational node and reactively for a failed node for the IBM Power related deployments.

2.3.1. Replacing an operational or failed storage node on IBM Power

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure and resources to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the node and get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  2. Identify the mon (if any) and object storage device (OSD) pods that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  3. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-a --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-1 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name> --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  4. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  5. Remove the pods which are in Terminating state.

    $ oc get pods -A -o wide | grep -i <node_name> |  awk '{if ($4 == "Terminating") system ("oc -n " $1 " delete pods " $2  " --grace-period=0 " " --force ")}'
  6. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  7. Delete the node.

    $ oc delete node <node_name>
  8. Get a new IBM Power machine with required infrastructure. See Installing a cluster on IBM Power.
  9. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform node using the new IBM Power machine.
  10. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  11. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  12. Click ComputeNodes in OpenShift Web Console, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  13. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    1. Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:
    $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=''
  14. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  15. Add a newly added worker node to localVolume.

    1. Determine which localVolume to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolume
      NAME           AGE
      localblock    25h
    2. Update the localVolume definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolume localblock
      [...]
          nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  #- worker-0
                  - worker-1
                  - worker-2
                  - worker-3
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, worker-0 was removed and worker-3 is the new node.

  16. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $ oc get pv | grep localblock
    NAME              CAPACITY   ACCESSMODES RECLAIMPOLICY STATUS     CLAIM             STORAGECLASS                 AGE
    local-pv-3e8964d3    500Gi    RWO         Delete       Bound      ocs-deviceset-localblock-2-data-0-mdbg9  localblock     25h
    local-pv-414755e0    500Gi    RWO         Delete       Bound      ocs-deviceset-localblock-1-data-0-4cslf  localblock     25h
    local-pv-b481410    500Gi     RWO        Delete       Available                                            localblock     3m24s
    local-pv-5c9b8982    500Gi    RWO         Delete       Bound      ocs-deviceset-localblock-0-data-0-g2mmc  localblock     25h
  17. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  18. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required.

    1. Identify the PVC as afterwards we need to delete PV associated with that specific PVC.

      $ osd_id_to_remove=1
      $ oc get -n openshift-storage -o yaml deployment rook-ceph-osd-${osd_id_to_remove} | grep ceph.rook.io/pvc

      where, osd_id_to_remove is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix. In this example, the deployment name is rook-ceph-osd-1.

      Example output:

      ceph.rook.io/pvc: ocs-deviceset-localblock-0-data-0-g2mmc
          ceph.rook.io/pvc: ocs-deviceset-localblock-0-data-0-g2mmc

      In this example, the PVC name is ocs-deviceset-localblock-0-data-0-g2mmc.

    2. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

      $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
      -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
      <failed_osd_id>

      Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix. You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

      Warning

      This step results in the OSD being completely removed from the cluster. Ensure that the correct value of osd_id_to_remove is provided.

  19. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  20. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  21. Delete the PV associated with the failed node.

    1. Identify the PV associated with the PVC.

      The PVC name must be identical to the name that is obtained while removing the failed OSD from the cluster.

      # oc get pv -L kubernetes.io/hostname | grep localblock | grep Released
      local-pv-5c9b8982  500Gi  RWO  Delete  Released  openshift-storage/ocs-deviceset-localblock-0-data-0-g2mmc  localblock  24h  worker-0
    2. If there is a PV in Released state, delete it.

      # oc delete pv <persistent-volume>

      For example:

      # oc delete pv local-pv-5c9b8982
      persistentvolume "local-pv-5c9b8982" deleted
  22. Identify the crashcollector pod deployment.

    $ oc get deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<failed_node_name> -n openshift-storage

    If there is an existing crashcollector pod deployment, delete it.

    $ oc delete deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<failed_node_name> -n openshift-storage
  23. Delete the ocs-osd-removal-job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click WorkloadsPods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-b-74f6dc9dd6-4llzq                                   1/1     Running     0          6h14m
    rook-ceph-mon-c-74948755c-h7wtx                                    1/1     Running     0          4h24m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-598f69869b-4bv49                                   1/1     Running     0          162m

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.4. Replacing storage nodes on VMware infrastructure

2.4.1. Replacing an operational node on VMware user-provisioned infrastructure

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the NODE and get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  2. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  3. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  4. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  5. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  6. Delete the node.

    $ oc delete node <node_name>
  7. Log in to vSphere and terminate the identified VM.
  8. Create a new VM on VMware with the required infrastructure. See Supported Infrastructure and Platforms.
  9. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform worker node using the new VM.
  10. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  11. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  12. Click Compute → Nodes in OpenShift Web Console, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  13. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  14. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  15. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  16. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  17. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  18. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  19. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  20. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  21. Delete the ocs-osd-removal-job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running
    0          4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.4.2. Replacing an operational node on VMware installer-provisioned infrastructure

Prerequisites

  • Replacement nodes must be configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click Compute → Nodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  4. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  5. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  6. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  7. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  8. Click Compute → Machines. Search for the required machine.
  9. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮) → Delete Machine.
  10. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created.
  11. Wait for the new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  12. Click Compute → Nodes in OpenShift Web Console, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  13. Physically add a new device to the node.
  14. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  15. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  16. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  17. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  18. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  19. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  20. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  21. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  22. Identify the PV associated with the PVC.

    #oc get pv -L kubernetes.io/hostname | grep localblock | grep Released
    local-pv-d6bf175b  1490Gi  RWO  Delete  Released  openshift-storage/ocs-deviceset-0-data-0-6c5pw  localblock  2d22h  compute-1

    If there is a PV in Released state, delete it.

    # oc delete pv <persistent-volume>

    For example:

    #oc delete pv local-pv-d6bf175b
    persistentvolume "local-pv-d9c5cbd6" deleted
  23. Identify the crashcollector pod deployment.

    $ oc get deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage

    If there is an existing crashcollector pod deployment, delete it.

    $ oc delete deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage
  24. Delete the ocs-osd-removal-job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running
    0          4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.4.3. Replacing a failed node on VMware user-provisioned infrastructure

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Identify the NODE and get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  2. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  3. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  4. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  5. Remove the pods which are in Terminating state.

    $ oc get pods -A -o wide | grep -i <node_name> |  awk '{if ($4 == "Terminating") system ("oc -n " $1 " delete pods " $2  " --grace-period=0 " " --force ")}'
  6. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  7. Delete the node.

    $ oc delete node <node_name>
  8. Log in to vSphere and terminate the identified VM.
  9. Create a new VM on VMware with the required infrastructure. See Supported Infrastructure and Platforms.
  10. Create a new OpenShift Container Platform worker node using the new VM.
  11. Check for certificate signing requests (CSRs) related to OpenShift Container Platform that are in Pending state:

    $ oc get csr
  12. Approve all required OpenShift Container Platform CSRs for the new node:

    $ oc adm certificate approve <Certificate_Name>
  13. Click Compute → Nodes in OpenShift Web Console, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  14. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  15. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  16. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  17. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  18. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  19. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  20. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  21. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  22. Delete the ocs-osd-removal-job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running
    0          4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.4.4. Replacing a failed node on VMware installer-provisioned infrastructure

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources, and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click Compute → Nodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  4. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  5. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  6. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  7. Remove the pods which are in Terminating state.

    $ oc get pods -A -o wide | grep -i <node_name> |  awk '{if ($4 == "Terminating") system ("oc -n " $1 " delete pods " $2  " --grace-period=0 " " --force ")}'
  8. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  9. Click Compute → Machines. Search for the required machine.
  10. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮) → Delete Machine.
  11. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created.
  12. Wait for the new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  13. Click Compute → Nodes in OpenShift Web Console, confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  14. Physically add a new device to the node.
  15. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:

      $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  16. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  17. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  18. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  19. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  20. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  21. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  22. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  23. Identify the PV associated with the PVC.

    #oc get pv -L kubernetes.io/hostname | grep localblock | grep Released
    local-pv-d6bf175b  1490Gi  RWO  Delete  Released  openshift-storage/ocs-deviceset-0-data-0-6c5pw  localblock  2d22h  compute-1

    If there is a PV in Released state, delete it.

    # oc delete pv <persistent-volume>

    For example:

    #oc delete pv local-pv-d6bf175b
    persistentvolume "local-pv-d9c5cbd6" deleted
  24. Identify the crashcollector pod deployment.

    $ oc get deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage

    If there is an existing crashcollector pod deployment, delete it.

    $ oc delete deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage
  25. Delete the ocs-osd-removal-job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running
    0          38m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running
    0          4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.5. Replacing storage nodes on Red Hat Virtualization infrastructure

2.5.1. Replacing an operational node on Red Hat Virtualization installer-provisioned infrastructure

Use this procedure to replace an operational node on Red Hat Virtualization installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI).

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click Compute → Nodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Get labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  4. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  5. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  6. Mark the nodes as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  7. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  8. Click Compute → Machines. Search for the required machine.
  9. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮) → Delete Machine.
  10. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created. Wait for the new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  11. Click ComputeNodes in the OpenShift web console. Confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  12. Physically add the new device(s) to the node.
  13. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮) → Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:
    $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  14. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  15. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  16. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  17. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  18. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  19. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  20. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  21. Identify the PV associated with the PVC.

    # oc get pv -L kubernetes.io/hostname | grep localblock | grep Released
    local-pv-d6bf175b  512Gi  RWO  Delete  Released  openshift-storage/ocs-deviceset-0-data-0-6c5pw  localblock  2d22h  server3.example.com

    If there is a PV in Released state, delete it.

    # oc delete pv <persistent-volume>

    For example:

    # oc delete pv local-pv-d6bf175b
    persistentvolume "local-pv-d6bf175b" deleted
  22. Identify the crashcollector pod deployment.

    $ oc get deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage

    If there is an existing crashcollector pod, delete it.

    $ oc delete deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage
  23. Delete the ocs-osd-removal job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running  0  38m
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running  0  38m
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running  0  4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.

2.5.2. Replacing a failed node on Red Hat Virtualization installer-provisioned infrastructure

Perform this procedure to replace a failed node which is not operational on Red Hat Virtualization installer-provisioned infrastructure (IPI) for OpenShift Data Foundation.

Prerequisites

  • Red Hat recommends that replacement nodes are configured with similar infrastructure, resources and disks to the node being replaced.
  • You must be logged into the OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP) cluster.

Procedure

  1. Log in to OpenShift Web Console and click Compute → Nodes.
  2. Identify the node that needs to be replaced. Take a note of its Machine Name.
  3. Get the labels on the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep <node_name>
  4. Identify the mon (if any) and OSDs that are running in the node to be replaced.

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-storage -o wide | grep -i <node_name>
  5. Scale down the deployments of the pods identified in the previous step.

    For example:

    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-mon-c --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment rook-ceph-osd-0 --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
    $ oc scale deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=<node_name>  --replicas=0 -n openshift-storage
  6. Mark the node as unschedulable.

    $ oc adm cordon <node_name>
  7. Remove the pods which are in the Terminating state.

    $ oc get pods -A -o wide | grep -i <node_name> |  awk '{if ($4 == "Terminating") system ("oc -n " $1 " delete pods " $2  " --grace-period=0 " " --force ")}'
  8. Drain the node.

    $ oc adm drain <node_name> --force --delete-emptydir-data=true --ignore-daemonsets
  9. Click Compute → Machines. Search for the required machine.
  10. Besides the required machine, click the Action menu (⋮)Delete Machine.
  11. Click Delete to confirm the machine deletion. A new machine is automatically created. Wait for the new machine to start and transition into Running state.

    Important

    This activity may take at least 5-10 minutes or more.

  12. Click Compute → Nodes in the OpenShift web console. Confirm if the new node is in Ready state.
  13. Physically add the new device(s) to the node.
  14. Apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node using any one of the following:

    From User interface
    1. For the new node, click Action Menu (⋮)Edit Labels.
    2. Add cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage and click Save.
    From Command line interface
    • Execute the following command to apply the OpenShift Data Foundation label to the new node:
    $ oc label node <new_node_name> cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage=""
  15. Identify the namespace where OpenShift local storage operator is installed and assign it to local_storage_project variable:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)

    For example:

    $ local_storage_project=$(oc get csv --all-namespaces | awk '{print $1}' | grep local)
    echo $local_storage_project
    openshift-local-storage
  16. Add a new worker node to localVolumeDiscovery and localVolumeSet.

    1. Update the localVolumeDiscovery definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumediscovery auto-discover-devices
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

    2. Determine which localVolumeSet to edit.

      # oc get -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset
      NAME          AGE
      localblock   25h
    3. Update the localVolumeSet definition to include the new node and remove the failed node.

      # oc edit -n $local_storage_project localvolumeset localblock
      [...]
         nodeSelector:
          nodeSelectorTerms:
            - matchExpressions:
                - key: kubernetes.io/hostname
                  operator: In
                  values:
                  - server1.example.com
                  - server2.example.com
                  #- server3.example.com
                  - newnode.example.com
      [...]

      Remember to save before exiting the editor.

      In the above example, server3.example.com was removed and newnode.example.com is the new node.

  17. Verify that the new localblock PV is available.

    $oc get pv | grep localblock | grep Available
    local-pv-551d950     512Gi    RWO    Delete  Available
    localblock     26s
  18. Change to the openshift-storage project.

    $ oc project openshift-storage
  19. Remove the failed OSD from the cluster. You can specify multiple failed OSDs if required:

    $ oc process -n openshift-storage ocs-osd-removal \
    -p FAILED_OSD_IDS=<failed_osd_id> FORCE_OSD_REMOVAL=true | oc create -n openshift-storage -f -
    <failed_osd_id>

    Is the integer in the pod name immediately after the rook-ceph-osd prefix.

    You can add comma separated OSD IDs in the command to remove more than one OSD, for example, FAILED_OSD_IDS=0,1,2.

  20. Verify that the OSD was removed successfully by checking the status of the ocs-osd-removal-job pod.

    A status of Completed confirms that the OSD removal job succeeded.

    # oc get pod -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage
  21. Ensure that the OSD removal is completed.

    $ oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1 | egrep -i 'completed removal'

    Example output:

    2022-05-10 06:50:04.501511 I | cephosd: completed removal of OSD 0
    Important

    If the ocs-osd-removal-job fails and the pod is not in the expected Completed state, check the pod logs for further debugging.

    For example:

    # oc logs -l job-name=ocs-osd-removal-job -n openshift-storage --tail=-1
  22. Identify the PV associated with the PVC.

    # oc get pv -L kubernetes.io/hostname | grep localblock | grep Released
    local-pv-d6bf175b  512Gi  RWO  Delete  Released  openshift-storage/ocs-deviceset-0-data-0-6c5pw  localblock  2d22h  server3.example.com

    If there is a PV in Released state, delete it.

    # oc delete pv <persistent-volume>

    For example:

    # oc delete pv local-pv-d6bf175b
    persistentvolume "local-pv-d6bf175b" deleted
  23. Identify the crashcollector pod deployment.

    $ oc get deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage

    If there is an existing crashcollector pod deployment, delete it.

    $ oc delete deployment --selector=app=rook-ceph-crashcollector,node_name=failed-node-name -n openshift-storage
  24. Delete the ocs-osd-removal job.

    # oc delete -n openshift-storage job ocs-osd-removal-job

    Example output:

    job.batch "ocs-osd-removal-job" deleted

Verification steps

  1. Execute the following command and verify that the new node is present in the output:

    $ oc get nodes --show-labels | grep cluster.ocs.openshift.io/openshift-storage= |cut -d' ' -f1
  2. Click Workloads → Pods, confirm that at least the following pods on the new node are in Running state:

    • csi-cephfsplugin-*
    • csi-rbdplugin-*
  3. Verify that all other required OpenShift Data Foundation pods are in Running state.

    Ensure that the new incremental mon is created and is in the Running state.

    $ oc get pod -n openshift-storage | grep mon

    Example output:

    rook-ceph-mon-a-cd575c89b-b6k66         2/2     Running  0   38m
    
    rook-ceph-mon-b-6776bc469b-tzzt8        2/2     Running  0   38m
    
    rook-ceph-mon-d-5ff5d488b5-7v8xh        2/2     Running  0   4m8s

    OSD and Mon might take several minutes to get to the Running state.

  4. Verify that new OSD pods are running on the replacement node.

    $ oc get pods -o wide -n openshift-storage| egrep -i new-node-name | egrep osd
  5. Optional: If cluster-wide encryption is enabled on the cluster, verify that the new OSD devices are encrypted.

    For each of the new nodes identified in previous step, do the following:

    1. Create a debug pod and open a chroot environment for the selected host(s).

      $ oc debug node/<node name>
      $ chroot /host
    2. Run “lsblk” and check for the “crypt” keyword beside the ocs-deviceset name(s)

      $ lsblk
  6. If verification steps fail, contact Red Hat Support.