Chapter 36. Customizing How Types are Generated

Abstract

The default JAXB mappings address most of the cases encountered when using XML Schema to define the objects for a Java application. For instances where the default mappings are insufficient, JAXB provides an extensive customization mechanism.

36.1. Basics of Customizing Type Mappings

Overview

The JAXB specification defines a number of XML elements that customize how Java types are mapped to XML Schema constructs. These elements can be specified in-line with XML Schema constructs. If you cannot, or do not want to, modify the XML Schema definitions, you can specify the customizations in external binding document.

Namespace

The elements used to customize the JAXB data bindings are defined in the namespace http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb. You must add a namespace declaration similar to the one shown in Example 36.1, “JAXB Customization Namespace”. This is added to the root element of all XML documents defining JAXB customizations.

Example 36.1. JAXB Customization Namespace

xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb"

Version declaration

When using the JAXB customizations, you must indicate the JAXB version being used. This is done by adding a jaxb:version attribute to the root element of the external binding declaration. If you are using in-line customization, you must include the jaxb:version attribute in the schema element containing the customizations. The value of the attribute is always 2.0.
Example 36.2, “Specifying the JAXB Customization Version” shows an example of the jaxb:version attribute used in a schema element.

Example 36.2. Specifying the JAXB Customization Version

< schema ...
        jaxb:version="2.0">

Using in-line customization

The most direct way to customize how the code generators map XML Schema constructs to Java constructs is to add the customization elements directly to the XML Schema definitions. The JAXB customization elements are placed inside the xsd:appinfo element of the XML schema construct that is being modified.
Example 36.3, “Customized XML Schema” shows an example of a schema containing an in-line JAXB customization.

Example 36.3. Customized XML Schema

<schema targetNamespace="http://widget.com/types/widgetTypes" 
        xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
        xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb"
        jaxb:version="2.0">
  <complexType name="size">
    <annotation>
      <appinfo>
        <jaxb:class name="widgetSize" />
      </appinfo>
    </annotation>
    <sequence>
      <element name="longSize" type="xsd:string" />
      <element name="numberSize" type="xsd:int" />
    </sequence>
  </complexType>
<schema>

Using an external binding declaration

When you cannot, or do not want to, make changes to the XML Schema document that defines your type, you can specify the customizations using an external binding declaration. An external binding declaration consists of a number of nested jaxb:bindings elements. Example 36.4, “JAXB External Binding Declaration Syntax” shows the syntax of an external binding declaration.

Example 36.4. JAXB External Binding Declaration Syntax

<jaxb:bindings xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb"
               xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
               jaxb:version="2.0">
  <jaxb:bindings [schemaLocation="schemaUri" | wsdlLocation="wsdlUri">
    <jaxb:bindings node="nodeXPath">
      binding declaration
    </jaxb:bindings>
    ...
  </jaxb:bindings>
<jaxb:bindings>
The schemaLocation attribute and the wsdlLocation attribute are used to identify the schema document to which the modifications are applied. Use the schemaLocation attribute if you are generating code from a schema document. Use the wsdlLocation attribute if you are generating code from a WSDL document.
The node attribute is used to identify the specific XML schema construct that is to be modified. It is an XPath statement that resolves to an XML Schema element.
Given the schema document widgetSchema.xsd, shown in Example 36.5, “XML Schema File”, the external binding declaration shown in Example 36.6, “External Binding Declaration” modifies the generation of the complex type size.

Example 36.5. XML Schema File

<schema targetNamespace="http://widget.com/types/widgetTypes" 
        xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
        xmlns:wsdl="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/"
        version="1.0">
  <complexType name="size">
    <sequence>
      <element name="longSize" type="xsd:string" />
      <element name="numberSize" type="xsd:int" />
    </sequence>
  </complexType>
<schema>

Example 36.6. External Binding Declaration

<jaxb:bindings xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb"
               xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
               jaxb:version="2.0">
  <jaxb:bindings schemaLocation="wsdlSchema.xsd">
    <jaxb:bindings node="xsd:complexType[@name='size']">
        <jaxb:class name="widgetSize" />
    </jaxb:bindings>
  </jaxb:bindings>
<jaxb:bindings>
To instruct the code generators to use the external binging declaration use the wsdl2java tool's -b binding-file option, as shown below:
wsdl2java -b widgetBinding.xml widget.wsdl