Chapter 2. Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform setups

You can configure JBoss EAP with either a simple or a complex setup.

A simple setup includes a JBoss EAP instance that consists of a standalone server running one or more deployed applications.

A complex setup includes multiple JBoss EAP instances that contain numerous components that faciliate communication among the instances.

2.1. Simple JBoss EAP setup

A simple JBoss EAP setup consists of a standalone server running one or more deployed applications.

A standalone server cannot support the complex configurations that a managed domain server can, such as using a domain controller to configure each server instance according to the management policy of the domain. This standalone server use case is considered a simple JBoss EAP setup.

Figure 2.1. Image of a simple JBoss EAP setup

Image of a simple JBoss EAP setup

The JBoss EAP instance uses the datasources subsystem to connect to the following components:

  • A database
  • A Kerberos server

JBoss EAP uses the security subsystem or the elytron subsystem to connect to the Kerberos server and expose the server to the two deployed applications.

JBoss EAP uses the undertow subsystem to handle requests from the client server and send requests to an appropriate application.

The application uses the APIs exposed by JBoss EAP to connect to the database and Kerberos server. The application completes its task and then sends a response to the requester by using the undertow subsystem.

2.2. Complex JBoss EAP setup

JBoss EAP can handle complex use cases. For example, you can use a load balancer to distribute processing load across JBoss EAP instances in a managed domain.

The following image displays three JBoss EAP instances that are arranged by a load balancer in a managed domain:

Figure 2.2. Image of a complex JBoss EAP setup

Image of a complex JBoss EAP setup

In this example, the administrator has configured each instance to use mod_cluster and Infinispan session replication to provide high availability (HA) support for applications. Each instance includes the following components:

  • A web application
  • A web service
  • A deployed enterprise bean
  • A database connection that was established with the datasources subsystem
  • A connection with the LDAP server that was established with the legacy security subsystem or the elytron subsystem

The diagram displays the following configurations associated with a complex JBoss EAP setup:

  • JBoss EAP 1 has a messaging-activemq subsystem that is configured with a Jakarta Messaging queue that connects to an external message broker.
  • The connection exposes the applications, web services, enterprise beans, and Jakarta Messaging queues running on all JBoss EAP instances.
  • All inbound requests go through the load balancer.

    • Depending on the configured load-balancing algorithm and the information provided by each JBoss EAP instance, the load balancer directs the requests to the appropriate JBoss EAP instance.
  • Each JBoss EAP instance uses the undertow subsystem to direct the requests to the appropriate application.
  • Each application uses the APIs exposed by JBoss EAP to connect to the database and Kerberos server.
  • After an application performs its work, the application uses the undertow subsystem to send a response to the requester.
Note

The infinispan subsystem propagates non-persisted information, such as session information, among the JBoss EAP instances.





Revised on 2021-09-23 11:31:32 UTC