How to Configure Server Security

Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1

For Use with Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1

Red Hat Customer Content Services

Abstract

The purpose of this document is to provide a practical guide to securing Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform. More specifically, this guide details how to secure all of the management interfaces on JBoss EAP. Before reading this guide, users should read through the Security Architecture document for Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7.1 and have a solid understanding of how JBoss EAP handles security. This document also makes use of the JBoss EAP CLI interface for performing configuration changes. When completing this document, readers should have a solid, working understanding of how to secure JBoss EAP.

Chapter 1. Overview of Security

The basics of JBoss EAP security as well as general security concepts are covered in the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Security Architecture guide. Prior to reading this guide, you need to understand the basic information covered in that guide related to authentication, authorization, legacy security realms, Elytron, encryption, and SSL/TLS.

Chapter 2. Securing the Server and Its Interfaces

2.1. Building Blocks

2.1.1. Interfaces and Socket Bindings

JBoss EAP utilizes its host’s interfaces, for example inet-address and nic, as well as ports for communication for both its web applications as well as its management interfaces. These interfaces and ports are defined and configured through the interfaces and socket-binding-groups settings in the JBoss EAP.

For more information on how to define and configure interfaces and socket-binding-groups, see the Socket Bindings section of the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

Example: Interfaces

<interfaces>
  <interface name="management">
    <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address.management:127.0.0.1}"/>
  </interface>
  <interface name="public">
    <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address:127.0.0.1}"/>
  </interface>
</interfaces>

Example: Socket Binding Group

<socket-binding-group name="standard-sockets" default-interface="public" port-offset="${jboss.socket.binding.port-offset:0}">
    <socket-binding name="management-http" interface="management" port="${jboss.management.http.port:9990}"/>
    <socket-binding name="management-https" interface="management" port="${jboss.management.https.port:9993}"/>
    <socket-binding name="ajp" port="${jboss.ajp.port:8009}"/>
    <socket-binding name="http" port="${jboss.http.port:8080}"/>
    <socket-binding name="https" port="${jboss.https.port:8443}"/>
    <socket-binding name="txn-recovery-environment" port="4712"/>
    <socket-binding name="txn-status-manager" port="4713"/>
    <outbound-socket-binding name="mail-smtp">
        <remote-destination host="localhost" port="25"/>
    </outbound-socket-binding>
</socket-binding-group>

2.1.2. Elytron Subsystem

2.1.2.1. Enable Elytron Security Across the Server

There is a simple way to enable Elytron across the server. JBoss EAP 7.1 introduces an example configuration script that enables Elytron as the security provider. This script resides in the EAP_HOME/docs/examples directory in the server installation.

Execute the following command to enable Elytron security across the server.

$ EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.sh --file=EAP_HOME/docs/examples/enable-elytron.cli

2.1.2.2. Create an Elytron Security Domain

Security domains in the elytron subsystem, when used in conjunction with security realms, are used for both core management authentication as well as for authentication with applications.

Important

Deployments are limited to using one Elytron security domain per deployment. Scenarios that may have required multiple legacy security domains can now be accomplished using a single Elytron security domain.

Add a Security Domain Using the Management CLI
/subsystem=elytron/security-domain=domainName:add(realms=[{realm=realmName,role-decoder=roleDecoderName}],default-realm=realmName,permission-mapper=permissionMapperName,role-mapper=roleMapperName,...)
Add a Security Domain Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronOther.
  3. Click on View. Select Security Domain from the list on the SSL tab. All security domain related configurations can be done here.

2.1.2.3. Create an Elytron Security Realm

Security realms in the elytron subsystem, when used in conjunction with security domains, are used for both core management authentication as well as for authentication with applications. Security realms are also specifically typed based on their identity store, for example jdbc-realm, filesystem-realm, properties-realm, etc.

Add a Security Realm Using the Management CLI
/subsystem=elytron/type-of-realm=realmName:add(....)

Examples of adding specific realms, such as jdbc-realm, filesystem-realm, and properties-realm can be found in previous sections.

Add a Security Realm Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronSecurity Realm / Authentication.
  3. Click on View. The Security Realm, Security Realm Mapper and Authentication tabs let you configure all the security realm and authentication related attributes.

2.1.2.4. Create an Elytron Role Decoder

A role decoder converts attributes from the identity provided by the security realm into roles. Role decoders are also specifically typed based on their functionality, for example empty-role-decoder, simple-role-decoder, and custom-role-decoder.

Add a Role Decoder Using the Management CLI
/subsystem=elytron/ROLE-DECODER-TYPE=roleDeoderName:add(....)
Add a Role Decoder Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronMapper / Decoder.
  3. Click on View. The Decoder tab lets you do all the role decoder related configurations.

2.1.2.5. Create an Elytron Role Mapper

A role mapper maps roles after they have been decoded to other roles. Examples include normalizing role names or adding and removing specific roles from principals after they have been decoded. Role mappers are also specifically typed based on their functionality, for example add-prefix-role-mapper, add-suffix-role-mapper, and constant-role-mapper.

Adding a Role Mapper Takes the General Form
/subsystem=elytron/ROLE-MAPPER-TYPE=roleMapperName:add(...)
Adding a Role Mapper Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronMapper / Decoder.
  3. Click on View. The Role Mapper tab lets you do all the role mapper related configurations.

2.1.2.6. Create an Elytron Permission Mapper

In addition to roles being assigned to a identity, permissions may also be assigned. A permission mapper assigns permissions to an identity. Permission mappers are also specifically typed based on their functionality, for example logical-permission-mapper, simple-permission-mapper, and custom-permission-mapper.

Add a Permission Mapper Using the Management CLI
/subsystem=elytron/simple-permission-mapper=PermissionMapperName:add(...)
Add a Permission Mapper Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronMapper / Decoder.
  3. Click on View. The Permission Mapper tab lets you do all the permission mapper related configurations.

2.1.2.7. Creating an Authentication Configuration

An authentication configuration contains the credentials to use when making a connection. For more information on authentication configurations, see Configure Client Authentication with Elytron Client in How to Configure Identity Management for JBoss EAP.

Note

Instead of a credential store, you can configure an Elytron security domain to use the credentials of the accessing user. For instance, a security domain can be used in conjunction with Kerberos for authenticating incoming users. Follow the instructions in Configure the Elytron Subsystem in How to Set Up SSO with Kerberos for JBoss EAP, and set obtain-kerberos-ticket=true in the Kerberos security factory.

Add an Authentication Configuration Using the Management CLI
/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=AUTHENTICATION_CONFIGURATION_NAME:add(authentication-name=AUTHENTICATION_NAME, credential-reference={clear-text=PASSWORD})
Add an Authentication Configuration Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronSecurity Realm/Authentication.
  3. Click on View. Select Authentication Configuration from the list on the Authentication tab. All authentication configuration related configurations can be done here.

For the full list of authentication-configuration attributes, see Elytron Subsystem Components Reference.

2.1.2.8. Creating an Authentication Context

An authentication context contains a set of rules and either authentication configurations or SSL contexts to use for establishing a connection. For more information on authentication contexts, see Configure Client Authentication with Elytron Client in How to Configure Identity Management for JBoss EAP.

Add an Authentication Context Using the Management CLI

An authentication context can be created using the following management CLI command.

/subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=AUTHENTICATION_CONTEXT_NAME:add()

Typically, an authentication context will contain a set of rules and either an authentication configuration or a SSL context. The following CLI command provides demonstrates defining an authentication context that only functions when the hostname is localhost.

/subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=AUTHENTICATION_CONTEXT_NAME:add(match-rules=[{authentication-configuration=AUTHENTICATION_CONFIGURATION_NAME, match-host=localhost}])
Add an Authentication Context Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronSecurity Realm/Authentication.
  3. Click on View. Select Authentication Context from the list on the Authentication tab. All authentication context related configurations can be done here.

For the full list of authentication-context attributes, see Elytron Subsystem Components Reference.

2.1.2.9. Create an Elytron Authentication Factory

An authentication factory is an authentication policy used for specific authentication mechanisms. Authentication factories are specifically based on the authentication mechanism, for example http-authentication-factory, sasl-authentication-factory and kerberos-security-factory.

Add an Authentication Factory Using the Management CLI
/subsystem=elytron/AUTH-FACTORY-TYPE=authFactoryName:add(....)
Add an Authentication Factory Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronFactory.
  3. Click on View. All Elytron settings for factories can be configured here.

2.1.2.10. Create an Elytron Keystore

A key-store is the definition of a keystore or truststore including the type of keystore, its location, and the credential for accessing it.

To generate an example keystore for use with the elytron subsystem, use the following command in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

$ keytool -genkeypair -alias localhost -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore keystore.jks -dname "CN=localhost" -keypass secret -storepass secret
Add a Keystore Using the Management CLI

To define a key-store in Elytron that references the newly made keystore, execute the following management CLI command. This command species the path to the keystore, relative to the file system path provided, the credential reference used for accessing the keystore, and the type of keystore.

/subsystem=elytron/key-store=newKeyStore:add(path=keystore.jks,relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
Note

The above command uses relative-to to reference the location of the keystore file. Alternatively, you can specify the full path to the keystore in path and omit relative-to.

Add a Keystore Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronOther.
  3. Click on View. The Key Store tab lets you do all the keystore related configurations.

2.1.2.11. Create an Elytron Key Manager

A key-manager references a key-store, and is used in conjunction with an SSL context.

Add a Key Manager Using the Management CLI

The following command specifies the underlying keystore to reference, the algorithm to use when initializing the key manager, and the credential reference for accessing the entries in the underlying keystore.

/subsystem=elytron/key-manager=newKeyManager:add(key-store=KEY_STORE,algorithm="PKIX",credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
Important

If an algorithm is not specified, then it will be set to the default KeyManagerFactory algorithm name.

The available key manager algorithms are provided by the JDK in use. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms.

Add a Key Manager Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronOther.
  3. Click on View. The Key Manager tab lets you do all the key manager related configurations.

2.1.2.12. Create an Elytron Truststore

To create a truststore in Elytron execute the following CLI command.

/subsystem=elytron/key-store=default-trust-store:add(type=JKS, relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir, path=application.truststore, credential-reference={clear-text=password})

In order to successfully execute the command above you must have an application.truststore file inside your EAP_HOME/standalone/configuration directory. The truststore must contain the certificates associated with the endpoint or a certificate chain in case the end point’s certificate is signed by a CA.

Red Hat recommends you to avoid using self-signed certificates. Ideally, certificates should be signed by a CA and your truststore should contain a certificate chain representing your ROOT and intermediary CAs.

2.1.2.13. Create an Elytron Trust Manager

To define a trust manager in Elytron execute the following CLI command.

/subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=default-trust-manager:add(key-store=TRUST-STORE-NAME)

This sets the defined truststore as the source of the certificates that the application server trusts.

2.1.2.14. Using the Out of the Box Elytron Components

JBoss EAP provides a default set of Elytron components configured in the elytron subsystem. You can find more details on these pre-configured components in the Out of the Box section of the Security Architecture guide.

2.1.2.14.1. Securing Management Interfaces

You can find more details on the enabling JBoss EAP to use the out of the box Elytron components for securing the management interfaces in the User Authentication with Elytron section.

2.1.2.14.2. Securing Applications

The elytron subsystem provides application-http-authentication for http-authentication-factory by default, which can be used to secure applications. For more information on how to configure application-http-authentication, see the Out of the Box section of the Security Architecture guide.

To configure applications to use application-http-authentication, see Configure Web Applications to Use Elytron or Legacy Security for Authentication in How to Configure Identity Management Guide. You can also override the default behavior of all applications using the steps in the Override an Application’s Authentication Configuration section of the JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide.

2.1.2.14.3. Using SSL/TLS

JBoss EAP does provide a default one-way SSL/TLS configuration using the legacy core management authentication, but it does not provide one in the elytron subsystem. You can find more details on configuring SSL/TLS using the elytron subsystem for both the management interfaces as well as for applications in the following sections:

2.1.2.14.4. Using Elytron with Other Subsystems

In addition to securing applications and management interfaces, Elytron also integrates with other subsystems in JBoss EAP.

batch-jberet
You can configure the batch-jberet subsystem to run batch jobs using an Elytron security domain. For more information, see Configure Security for Batch Jobs in the Configuration Guide.
datasources
You can use a credential store or an Elytron security domain to provide authentication information in a datasource definition. For more information, see Datasource Security in the Configuration Guide.
ejb3
You can create mappings for Elytron security domains in the ejb3 subsystem to be referenced by deployments. For more information, see Elytron Integration with the EJB Subsystem in Developing EJB Applications.
iiop-openjdk
You can use the elytron subsystem to configure SSL/TLS between clients and servers using the iiop-openjdk subsystem. For more information, see Configure IIOP to use SSL/TLS with the Elytron Subsystem in the Configuration Guide.
jca
You can use the elytron-enabled attribute to enable Elytron security for a work manager. For more information, see Configuring the JCA Subsystem in the Configuration Guide.
jgroups
You can configure the SYM_ENCRYPT and ASYM_ENCRYPT protocols to reference keystores or credential references defined in the elytron subsystem. For more information, see Securing a Cluster in the Configuration Guide.
mail
You can use a credential store to provide authentication information in a server definition in the mail subsystem. For more information, see Use a Credential Store for Passwords in the Configuration Guide.
messaging-activemq
You can secure remote connections to the remote connections used by the messaging-activemq subsystem. For more information, see the Using the Elytron Subsystem section of Configuring Messaging.
modcluster
You can use an Elytron client ssl-context to communicate with a load balancer using SSL/TLS. For more information, see Elytron Integration with the ModCluster Subsystem.
remoting
You can configure inbound and outbound connections in the remoting subsystem to reference authentication contexts, SASL authentication factories, and SSL contexts defined in the elytron subsystem. For full details on configuring each type of connection, see Elytron Integration with the Remoting Subsystem.
resource-adapters
You can secure connections to the resource adapter using Elytron. You can enable security inflow to establish security credentials when submitting work to be executed by the work manager. For more information, see Configure Resource Adapters to Use the Elytron Subsystem in the Configuration Guide.
undertow
You can use the elytron subsystem to configure both SSL/TLS and application authentication. For more information on configuring application authentication, see Using SSL/TLS and Configure Web Applications to Use Elytron or Legacy Security for Authentication in How to Configure Identity Management.

2.1.2.15. Elytron Audit Logging

Audit logging for the elytron subsystem enables logging of Elytron authentication and authorization events within the application server. Audit log entries are stored in either JSON or SIMPLE, human readable format. By default, file audit logging is enabled in Elytron.

You can configure the following log handlers for Elytron audit logging:

Important

Elytron audit logging is distinct from other audit logging, such as audit logging for the JBoss EAP management interfaces. For more information on management interface audit logging options, see the Management Audit Logging section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

Note

You can disable Elytron audit logging by unsetting the security-event-listener option of the security-domain attribute.

File Audit Logging

File audit logging stores audit log messages in one specified file in the file system, without dividing them into multiple files.

An Elytron file audit logger, named local-audit, is enabled by default. It writes Elytron audit logs to EAP_HOME/standalone/log/audit.log on a standalone server, or EAP_HOME/domain/log/audit.log for a managed domain host.

The attributes of a file audit logger are:

  • path and relative-to: Defines the location of the log file.
  • synchronized: Specifies whether every event should be immediately written to disk.
  • format: Use SIMPLE for human readable text format, or JSON for storing individual events in JSON.

You can use a command similar to the following to create a file audit log:

/subsystem=elytron/file-audit-log=my_audit_log:add(path="my_audit.log",relative-to="jboss.server.log.dir",format=SIMPLE,synchronized=true)
Periodic Rotating File Audit Logging

Periodic rotating file audit logging automatically rotates audit log files based on a configured schedule. It has the same basic attributes as the default file audit logger, with the following additional attribute:

  • suffix: This must be in the java.text.SimpleDateFormat format, for example .yyyy-MM-dd-HH. The period of the rotation is automatically calculated based on this suffix, and the suffix is appended to the end of the log file names.

You can use a command similar to the following to create a periodic rotating file audit log:

/subsystem=elytron/periodic-rotating-file-audit-log=my_periodic_audit_log:add(path="my_periodic_audit.log",relative-to="jboss.server.log.dir",format=SIMPLE,synchronized=false,suffix=".yyyy-MM-dd-HH")
Size Rotating File Audit Logging

Size rotating file audit logging automatically rotates audit log files when the log file reaches a configured file size. It has the same basic attributes as the default file audit logger, with the following additional attributes:

  • rotate-size: The maximum size that the log file can reach before being rotated. The default is 2m for 2 megabytes.
  • max-backup-index: The maximum number of files to backup when rotating.
  • rotate-on-boot: By default, a new log file is not created on server restart. You can set this to true to rotate the log on server restart.
  • suffix: This optionally adds a date suffix to a rotated log. This must be in the java.text.SimpleDateFormat format, for example .yyyy-MM-dd-HH.

When the log file size exceeds the limit defined by the rotate-size attribute, the suffix .1 is appended to the end of the current file and a new log file is created. If there are any existing log files, their suffixed number is incremented by one, for example audit_log.1 is renamed to audit_log.2. This happens until the maximum number of log files defined by max-backup-index is reached. When the max-backup-index is exceeded, the file that is over limit, for example audit_log.99, is removed.

You can use a command similar to the following to create a size rotating file audit log:

/subsystem=elytron/size-rotating-file-audit-log=my_size_log:add(path="my_size_audit.log",relative-to="jboss.server.log.dir",format=SIMPLE,synchronized=false,rotate-size="2m",max-backup-index=10)
Syslog Audit Logging

A syslog handler specifies the parameters by which audit log entries are sent to a syslog server, specifically the syslog server’s host name and port on which the syslog server is listening. Sending audit logging to a syslog server provides more security options than logging to a local file or local syslog server. Multiple syslog handlers can be defined and be active at the same time.

  1. Add a syslog handler.

    /subsystem=elytron/syslog-audit-log=syslog-logger:add(host-name=HOST_NAME, port=PORT, server-address=SERVER_ADDRESS, format=JSON, transport=UDP)
  2. Enable syslog audit logging.

    /subsystem=elytron/security-domain=domain-with-syslog-logger:write-attribute(name=security-event-listener, value=syslog-logger)
Important

To send logs to syslog server over TLS, you can add the following configuration:

/subsystem=elytron/syslog-audit-log=remote-audit:add(transport=SSL_TCP,server-address=127.0.0.1,port=9898,host-name=Elytron,ssl-context=audit-ssl)
Note

To send security events to more destinations, mainly loggers, the aggregate-security-event-listener resource is used. This delivers all events to all listeners specified in the aggregate listener definition.

2.1.2.16. Enable and Disable the Elytron Subsystem

The elytron subsystem comes pre-configured with the default JBoss EAP profiles alongside the legacy security subsystem.

If you are using a profile where the elytron subsystem has not been configured, you can add it by adding the elytron extension and enabling the elytron subsystem.

To add the elytron extension required for the elytron subsystem:

/extension=org.wildfly.extension.elytron:add()

To enable the elytron subsystem in JBoss EAP:

/subsystem=elytron:add

reload

To disable the elytron subsystem in JBoss EAP:

/subsystem=elytron:remove

reload
Important

Other subsystems within JBoss EAP may have dependencies on the elytron subsystem. If these dependencies are not resolved before disabling it, you will see errors when starting JBoss EAP.

2.1.3. Legacy Security Subsystem

2.1.3.1. Enable and Disable the Security Subsystem

To disable the security subsystem in JBoss EAP:

/subsystem=security:remove
Important

Other subsystems within JBoss EAP may have dependencies on the security subsystem. If these dependencies are not resolved before disabling it, you will see errors when starting JBoss EAP.

To enable the security subsystem in JBoss EAP:

/subsystem=security:add

2.1.4. Legacy Security Realms

JBoss EAP uses security realms to define authentication and authorization mechanisms, such as local, LDAP, properties, which can then be used by the management interfaces. For more background information on security realms, see the Security Realms section of the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Security Architecture guide.

Example: Security Realms

<security-realms>
  <security-realm name="ManagementRealm">
    <authentication>
      <local default-user="$local" skip-group-loading="true"/>
      <properties path="mgmt-users.properties" relative-to="jboss.server.config.dir"/>
    </authentication>
    <authorization map-groups-to-roles="false">
      <properties path="mgmt-groups.properties" relative-to="jboss.server.config.dir"/>
    </authorization>
  </security-realm>
  <security-realm name="ApplicationRealm">
    <authentication>
      <local default-user="$local" allowed-users="*" skip-group-loading="true"/>
      <properties path="application-users.properties" relative-to="jboss.server.config.dir"/>
    </authentication>
    <authorization>
      <properties path="application-roles.properties" relative-to="jboss.server.config.dir"/>
    </authorization>
  </security-realm>
</security-realms>

Note

In addition to updating the existing security realms, JBoss EAP also allows you to create new security realms. You can create new security realms via the management console as well as invoking the following command from the management CLI:

/core-service=management/security-realm=NEW-REALM-NAME:add()

If you create a new security realm and want to use a properties file for authentication or authorization, you must create a new properties file specifically for the new security domain. JBoss EAP does not reuse existing files used by other security domains nor does it automatically create new files specified in the configuration if they do not exist.

2.1.5. Using Authentication and Socket Bindings for Securing the Management Interfaces

By default, JBoss EAP defines an http-interface to connect to the management interfaces:

[standalone@localhost:9990 /] /core-service=management:read-resource(recursive=true)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "access" => {...},
        "ldap-connection" => undefined,
        "management-interface" => {"http-interface" => {
            "allowed-origins" => undefined,
            "console-enabled" => true,
            "http-authentication-factory" => "management-http-authentication",
            "http-upgrade" => {
                "enabled" => true,
                "sasl-authentication-factory" => "management-sasl-authentication"
            },
            "http-upgrade-enabled" => true,
            "sasl-protocol" => "remote",
            "secure-socket-binding" => undefined,
            "security-realm" => undefined,
            "server-name" => undefined,
            "socket-binding" => "management-http",
            "ssl-context" => undefined
        }},
        "security-realm" => {...},
        "service" => undefined
    }
}

You can use a combination socket-binding, http-authentication-factory and http-upgrade to secure the management interfaces using the elytron subsystem. Alternatively, you can use socket-binding with security-realm to secure the management interfaces with the legacy core management authentication. You can also disable the management interfaces, and configure users of the interfaces to have various roles and access rights.

2.2. How to Secure the Management Interfaces

The following sections show how to perform various operations related to securing the JBoss EAP management interfaces and related subsystems.

Note

The management CLI commands shown assume that you are running a JBoss EAP standalone server. For more details on using the management CLI for a JBoss EAP managed domain, see the JBoss EAP Management CLI Guide.

Elytron Integration with the Management CLI

The management interfaces can be secured using resources from the elytron subsystem in the same way as it is done by the legacy security realms.

The SSL configuration for connections comes from one of these locations:

  • Any SSL configuration within the CLI specific configuration.
  • The default SSL configuration that automatically prompts users to accept the server’s certificate.
  • The java system property.

Client configuration can be modified using the wildfly-config.xml file.

Note

If you set the -Dwildfly.config.url property, any file can be used by the client for configuration.

2.2.1. Configure Networking and Ports

Depending on the configuration of the host, JBoss EAP may be configured to use various network interfaces and ports. This allows JBoss EAP to work with different host, networking, and firewall requirements.

For more information on the networking and ports used by JBoss EAP, as well as how to configure these settings, see the Network and Port Configuration section of the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

2.2.2. Disabling the Management Console

Other clients, such as JBoss Operations Network, operate using the HTTP interface for managing JBoss EAP. In order to continue using these services, just the web-based management console itself may be disabled. This is accomplished by setting the console-enabled attribute to false:

/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface/:write-attribute(name=console-enabled,value=false)

2.2.3. Disabling Remote Access to JMX

Remote access to the jmx subsystem allows for JDK and application management operations to be triggered remotely. To disable remote access to JMX in JBoss EAP, remove the remoting connector in the jmx subsystem:

Removing the Remoting Connector
/subsystem=jmx/remoting-connector=jmx/:remove

For more information on JMX, see the JMX section of the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Security Architecture guide.

2.2.4. Silent Authentication

The default installation of JBoss EAP contains a method of silent authentication for a local management CLI user. This allows the local user the ability to access the management CLI without user name or password authentication. This functionality is enabled as a convenience, and to assist local users running the management CLI scripts without requiring authentication. It is considered a useful feature given that access to the local configuration typically also gives the user the ability to add their own user details or otherwise disable security checks.

The convenience of silent authentication for local users can be disabled where greater security control is required. This can be achieved by removing the local element within the security-realm attribute of the configuration file. This is applicable to both standalone instance as well as managed domain.

Important

The removal of the local element should only be done if the impact on the JBoss EAP instance and its configuration is fully understood.

To remove silent authentication when using the elytron subsystem:

[standalone@localhost:9990 /] /subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=managenet-sasl-authentication:read-resource
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "mechanism-configurations" => [
            {
                "mechanism-name" => "JBOSS-LOCAL-USER",
                "realm-mapper" => "local"
            },
            {
                "mechanism-name" => "DIGEST-MD5",
                "mechanism-realm-configurations" => [{"realm-name" => "ManagementRealm"}]
            }
        ],
        "sasl-server-factory" => "configured",
        "security-domain" => "ManagementDomain"
    }
}

/subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=temp-sasl-authentication:list-remove(name=mechanism-configurations,index=0)

reload

To remove silent authentication when using a legacy security realm:

/core-service=management/security-realm=REALM_NAME/authentication=local:remove

2.2.5. Removing Undertow Response Headers

The default JBoss EAP undertow subsystem includes two response headers that are appended to each HTTP response by the default-host:

  • Server, which is set to JBoss-EAP/7
  • X-Powered-By, which is set to Undertow/1

Although these can be useful for development and debugging purposes, you might want to remove these headers if you do not want to disclose information about the server in use.

Use the following management CLI commands to remove these response headers from the default-host:

/subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/host=default-host/filter-ref=server-header:remove

/subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/host=default-host/filter-ref=x-powered-by-header:remove

reload

2.2.6. Enable One-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces Using the Elytron Subsystem

  1. Obtain or generate your keystore.

    Before enabling one-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must obtain or generate the keystore you plan on using. To generate an example keystore in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, use the following command.

    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias localhost -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore keystore.jks -dname "CN=localhost" -keypass secret -storepass secret
  2. Create a key-store, key-manager, and server-ssl-context.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=httpsKS:add(path=keystore.jks,relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
    
    /subsystem=elytron/key-manager=httpsKM:add(key-store=httpsKS,algorithm="SunX509",credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
    
    /subsystem=elytron/server-ssl-context=httpsSSC:add(key-manager=httpsKM,protocols=["TLSv1.2"])
    Important

    You need to know what key manager algorithms are provided by the JDK you are using. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms. You also need to determine what HTTPS protocols you want to support. The example commands above use TLSv1.2. You can use the cipher-suite-filter argument to specify which cipher suites are allowed, and the use-cipher-suites-order argument to honor server cipher suite order. The use-cipher-suites-order attribute by default is set to true. This differs from the legacy security subsystem behavior, which defaults to honoring client cipher suite order.

    Note

    The above command uses relative-to to reference the location of the keystore file. Alternatively, you can specify the full path to the keystore in path and omit relative-to.

  3. Enable HTTPS on the management interface.

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=httpsSSC)
    
    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=secure-socket-binding, value=management-https)
  4. Reload the JBoss EAP instance.

    reload

One-way SSL/TLS is now enabled for the management interfaces.

Important

In cases where you have both a security-realm and ssl-context defined, JBoss EAP will use the SSL/TLS configuration provided by ssl-context.

2.2.7. Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces Using the Elytron Subsystem

  1. Obtain or generate your keystore.

    Before enabling one-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must obtain or generate the keystores, truststores and certificates you plan on using. To generate an example set of keystores, truststores, and certificates in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, use the following commands.

    1. Generate your server and client keystores.

      $ keytool -genkeypair -alias localhost -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore server.keystore.jks -dname "CN=localhost" -keypass secret -storepass secret
      
      $ keytool -genkeypair -alias client -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore client.keystore.jks -dname "CN=client" -keypass secret -storepass secret
    2. Export your server and client certificates.

      $ keytool -exportcert  -keystore server.keystore.jks -alias localhost -keypass secret -storepass secret -file server.cer
      
      $ keytool -exportcert  -keystore client.keystore.jks -alias client -keypass secret -storepass secret -file client.cer
    3. Import the server and client certificates into the opposing truststores.

      $ keytool -importcert -keystore server.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias client -trustcacerts -file client.cer
      
      $ keytool -importcert -keystore client.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias localhost -trustcacerts -file server.cer
  2. Configure a key-store, key-manager, trust-manager, and server-ssl-context for the server keystore and truststore.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayKS:add(path=server.keystore.jks,relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
    
    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayTS:add(path=server.truststore.jks,relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
    
    /subsystem=elytron/key-manager=twoWayKM:add(key-store=twoWayKS,algorithm="SunX509",credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
    
    /subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=twoWayTM:add(key-store=twoWayTS,algorithm="SunX509")
    
    /subsystem=elytron/server-ssl-context=twoWaySSC:add(key-manager=twoWayKM,protocols=["TLSv1.2"],trust-manager=twoWayTM,want-client-auth=true,need-client-auth=true)
    Important

    You need to know what key manager algorithms are provided by the JDK you are using. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms. You also need to determine what HTTPS protocols you want to support. The example commands above use TLSv1.2. You can use the cipher-suite-filter argument to specify which cipher suites are allowed, and the use-cipher-suites-order argument to honor server cipher suite order. The use-cipher-suites-order attribute by default is set to true. This differs from the legacy security subsystem behavior, which defaults to honoring client cipher suite order.

    Note

    The above command uses relative-to to reference the location of the keystore file. Alternatively, you can specify the full path to the keystore in path and omit relative-to.

  3. Enable HTTPS on the management interface.

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=twoWaySSC)
    
    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=secure-socket-binding, value=management-https)
  4. Reload the JBoss EAP instance.

    reload
  5. Configure your client to use the client certificate.

    You need to configure your client to present the trusted client certificate to the server to complete the two-way SSL/TLS authentication. For example, if using a browser, you need to import the trusted certificate into the browser’s trust store.

    This results in a forced two-way SSL/TLS authentication, without changing the original authentication to the server management.

    If you want to change the original authentication method, see Configure Authentication with Certificates in How to Configure Identity Management for JBoss EAP.

Two-way SSL/TLS is now enabled for the management interfaces.

Important

In cases where you have both a security-realm and ssl-context defined, JBoss EAP will use the SSL/TLS configuration provided by ssl-context.

2.2.8. Configure the Management Interfaces for One-way SSL/TLS with Legacy Core Management Authentication

Configuring the JBoss EAP management interfaces for communication only using one-way SSL/TLS provides increased security. All network traffic between the client and the management interfaces is encrypted, which reduces the risk of security attacks such as a man-in-the-middle attack.

In this procedure unencrypted communication with the JBoss EAP instance is disabled. This procedure applies to both standalone server and managed domain configurations. For a managed domain, prefix the management CLI commands with the name of the host, for example: /host=master.

Important

While performing the steps for enabling one-way SSL/TLS on the management interfaces, do not reload the configuration unless explicitly instructed. Doing so may cause you to be locked out of the management interfaces.

Create a Keystore to Secure the Management Interfaces
Note

This keystore must be in JKS format as the management interfaces are not compatible with keystores in JCEKS format.

Use the following to generate a keystore, replacing the example values for the parameters, for example alias, keypass, keystore, storepass and dname, with the correct values for the environment.

$ keytool -genkeypair -alias appserver -storetype jks -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -keypass password1 -keystore EAP_HOME/standalone/configuration/identity.jks -storepass password1 -dname "CN=appserver,OU=Sales,O=Systems Inc,L=Raleigh,ST=NC,C=US" -validity 730 -v
Note

The parameter validity specifies for how many days the key is valid. A value of 730 equals two years.

Ensure the Management Interfaces Bind to HTTPS

Running a Standalone Server

To ensure the management interfaces bind to HTTPS, you must add the management-https configuration and remove the management-http configuration.

Use the following CLI commands to bind the management interfaces to HTTPS:

/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=secure-socket-binding, value=management-https)

/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:undefine-attribute(name=socket-binding)

Running a Managed Domain

Change the socket element within the management-interface attribute by adding secure-port and removing port configuration.

Use the following commands to bind the management interfaces to HTTPS:

/host=master/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=secure-port,value=9993)

/host=master/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:undefine-attribute(name=port)
Optional: Implement a Custom socket-binding-group

If you want to use a custom socket-binding-group, you must ensure the management-https binding is defined, which by default is bound to port 9993. You can verify this from the socket-binding-group attribute of the server’s configuration file or using the management CLI:

/socket-binding-group=standard-sockets/socket-binding=management-https:read-resource(recursive=true)

{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "client-mappings" => undefined,
        "fixed-port" => false,
        "interface" => "management",
        "multicast-address" => undefined,
        "multicast-port" => undefined,
        "name" => "management-https",
        "port" => expression "${jboss.management.https.port:9993}"
    }
}
Create a New Security Realm

In this example, the new security realm using HTTPS, ManagementRealmHTTPS, uses a properties file named https-mgmt-users.properties located in the EAP_HOME/standalone/configuration/ directory for storing user names and passwords.

  1. Create a properties file for storing user name and passwords.

    User names and passwords can be added to the file later, but for now, you need to create an empty file named https-mgmt-users.properties and save it to that location. The below example shows using the touch command, but you may also use other mechanisms, such as a text editor.

    Example: Using the touch Command to Create an Empty File

    $ touch EAP_HOME/standalone/configuration/https-mgmt-users.properties

  2. Next, use the following management CLI commands to create a new security realm named ManagementRealmHTTPS:

    /core-service=management/security-realm=ManagementRealmHTTPS:add
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=ManagementRealmHTTPS/authentication=properties:add(path=https-mgmt-users.properties,relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir)
  3. Add users to the properties file.

    At this point, you have created a new security realm and configured it to use a properties file for authentication. You must now add users to that properties file using the add-user script, which is available in the EAP_HOME/bin/ directory. When running the add-user script, you must specify both the properties file and the security realm using the -up and -r options respectively. From there, the add-user script will interactively prompt you for the user name and password information to store in the https-mgmt-users.properties file.

    $ EAP_HOME/bin/add-user.sh -up EAP_HOME/standalone/configuration/https-mgmt-users.properties -r ManagementRealmHTTPS
    ...
    Enter the details of the new user to add.
    Using realm 'ManagementRealmHTTPS' as specified on the command line.
    ...
    Username : httpUser
    Password requirements are listed below. To modify these restrictions edit the add-user.properties configuration file.
     - The password must not be one of the following restricted values {root, admin, administrator}
     - The password must contain at least 8 characters, 1 alphabetic character(s), 1 digit(s), 1 non-alphanumeric symbol(s)
     - The password must be different from the username
    ...
    Password :
    Re-enter Password :
    About to add user 'httpUser' for realm 'ManagementRealmHTTPS'
    ...
    Is this correct yes/no? yes
    ..
    Added user 'httpUser' to file 'EAP_HOME/configuration/https-mgmt-users.properties'
    ...
    Is this new user going to be used for one AS process to connect to another AS process?
    e.g. for a slave host controller connecting to the master or for a Remoting connection for server to server EJB calls.
    yes/no? no
    Important

    When configuring security realms that use properties files to store usernames and passwords, it is recommended that each realm use a distinct properties file that is not shared with another realm.

Configure the Management Interfaces to Use the New Security Realm

Use the following management CLI command to configure the management interfaces to use the new security realm.

/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=security-realm,value=ManagementRealmHTTPS)
Configure the Management Interfaces to Use the Keystore

Use the below management CLI command to configure the management interfaces to use the keystore. For the parameters file, password and alias their values must be copied from the Create a Keystore to Secure the Management Interfaces step.

/core-service=management/security-realm=ManagementRealmHTTPS/server-identity=ssl:add(keystore-path=identity.jks,keystore-relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir,keystore-password=password1, alias=appserver)
Note

To update the keystore password, use the following CLI command:

/core-service=management/security-realm=ManagementRealmHTTPS/server-identity=ssl:write-attribute(name=keystore-password,value=newpassword)

At this point, you need to reload the server’s configuration:

reload

After reloading the server configuration, the log should contain the following, just before the text which states the number of services that are started:

13:50:54,160 INFO  [org.jboss.as] (Controller Boot Thread) WFLYSRV0061: Http management interface listening on https://127.0.0.1:9993/management
13:50:54,162 INFO  [org.jboss.as] (Controller Boot Thread) WFLYSRV0052: Admin console listening on https://127.0.0.1:9993

The management interfaces are now listening on port 9993, which confirms that the procedure was successful.

Important

At this point, the CLI will disconnect and will be unable to reconnect since the port bindings have changed. Proceed to the next step to update the jboss-cli.xml file to allow the management CLI to reconnect.

Update the jboss-cli.xml File

If using the management CLI to perform management actions, the following changes must to be made to the EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.xml file:

  • Update the value of <default-protocol> to https-remoting.
  • In <default-controller>, update the value of <protocol> to https-remoting.
  • In <default-controller>, update the value of <port> to 9993.

Example: jboss-cli.xml

<jboss-cli xmlns="urn:jboss:cli:2.0">
    <default-protocol use-legacy-override="true">https-remoting</default-protocol>
    <!-- The default controller to connect to when 'connect' command is executed w/o arguments -->
    <default-controller>
        <protocol>https-remoting</protocol>
        <host>localhost</host>
        <port>9993</port>
    </default-controller>
...

The next time you connect to the management interface using the management CLI, you must accept the server certificate and authenticate against the ManagementRealmHTTPS security realm:

Example: Accepting Server Certificate and Authenticating

$ ./jboss-cli.sh -c
Unable to connect due to unrecognised server certificate
Subject    - CN=appserver,OU=Sales,O=Systems Inc,L=Raleigh,ST=NC,C=US
Issuer     - CN=appserver, OU=Sales, O=Systems Inc, L=Raleigh, ST=NC, C=US
Valid From - Tue Jun 28 13:38:48 CDT 2016
Valid To   - Thu Jun 28 13:38:48 CDT 2018
MD5 : 76:f4:81:8b:7e:c3:be:6d:ee:63:c1:7a:b7:b8:f0:fb
SHA1 : ea:e3:f1:eb:53:90:69:d0:c9:69:4a:5a:a3:20:8f:76:c1:e6:66:b6

Accept certificate? [N]o, [T]emporarily, [P]ermenantly : p
Authenticating against security realm: ManagementRealmHTTPS
Username: httpUser
Password:
[standalone@localhost:9993 /]

Important

In cases where you have both a security-realm and ssl-context defined, JBoss EAP will use the SSL/TLS configuration provided by ssl-context.

2.2.9. Setting up Two-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces with Legacy Core Management Authentication

Two-way SSL/TLS authentication, also known as client authentication, authenticates both the client and the server using SSL/TLS certificates. This differs from the Configure the Management Interfaces for One-way SSL/TLS section in that both the client and server each have a certificate. This provides assurance that not only is the server who it says it is, but the client is also who it says it is.

In this section the following conventions are used:

HOST1
The JBoss server hostname. For example: jboss.redhat.com.
HOST2
A suitable name for the client. For example: myclient. Note this is not necessarily an actual hostname.
CA_HOST1
The DN (distinguished name) to use for the HOST1 certificate. For example: cn=jboss,dc=redhat,dc=com.
CA_HOST2
The DN (distinguished name) to use for the HOST2 certificate. For example: cn=myclient,dc=redhat,dc=com.
Prerequisites
Note

If a password vault is used to store the keystore and truststore passwords, which is recommended, the password vault should already be created. For more information on the password vault, see the Password Vault section as well as the Password Vault System section of the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 Security Architecture guide.

Warning

Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2 in all affected packages.

  1. Generate the keystores.

    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias HOST1_alias -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore HOST1.keystore.jks -dname "CA_HOST1" -keypass secret -storepass secret
    
    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias HOST2_alias -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore HOST2.keystore.jks -dname "CA_HOST2" -keypass secret -storepass secret
  2. Export the certificates.

    $ keytool -exportcert  -keystore HOST1.keystore.jks -alias HOST1_alias -keypass secret -storepass secret -file HOST1.cer
    
    $ keytool -exportcert  -keystore HOST2.keystore.jks -alias HOST2_alias -keypass secret -storepass secret -file HOST2.cer
  3. Import the certificates into the opposing truststores.

    $ keytool -importcert -keystore HOST1.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias HOST2_alias -trustcacerts -file HOST2.cer
    
    $ keytool -importcert -keystore HOST2.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias HOST1_alias -trustcacerts -file HOST1.cer
  4. Define a CertificateRealm.

    Define a CertificateRealm in the configuration for the server (host.xml or standalone.xml) and point the interface to it. This can be done using the following commands:

    /core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm:add()
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/server-identity=ssl:add(keystore-path=/path/to/HOST1.keystore.jks, keystore-password=secret,alias=HOST1_alias)
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/authentication=truststore:add(keystore-path=/path/to/HOST1.truststore.jks,keystore-password=secret)
  5. Change the security-realm of the http-interface to the new CertificateRealm.

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=security-realm,value=CertificateRealm)
  6. Add the SSL/TLS configuration for the CLI.

    Important

    In addition to adding the two-way SSL/TLS, the management interface should also be configured to bind to HTTPS. For details, see Ensure the Management Interfaces Bind to HTTPS in the section entitled Configure the Management Interfaces for One-way SSL/TLS with Legacy Core Management Authentication.

    Add the SSL/TLS configuration for the CLI, which uses EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.xml as a settings file.

    To store the keystore and truststore passwords in plain text, edit EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.xml and add the SSL/TLS configuration using the appropriate values for the variables:

    Example: jboss-cli.xml Storing Keystore and Truststore Passwords in Plain Text

    <ssl>
      <alias>HOST2_alias</alias>
      <key-store>/path/to/HOST2.keystore.jks</key-store>
      <key-store-password>secret</key-store-password>
      <trust-store>/path/to/HOST2.truststore.jks</trust-store>
      <trust-store-password>secret</trust-store-password>
      <modify-trust-store>true</modify-trust-store>
    </ssl>

    To use the keystore and truststore passwords stored in a password vault, you need to add the vault configuration and appropriate vault values to EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.xml:

    Example: jboss-cli.xml Storing Keystore and Truststore Passwords in a Password Vault

    <ssl>
      <vault>
        <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_URL" value="path-to/vault/vault.keystore"/>
        <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="MASK-5WNXs8oEbrs"/>
        <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_ALIAS" value="vault"/>
        <vault-option name="SALT" value="12345678"/>
        <vault-option name="ITERATION_COUNT" value="50"/>
        <vault-option name="ENC_FILE_DIR" value="EAP_HOME/vault/"/>
      </vault>
      <alias>HOST2_alias</alias>
      <key-store>/path/to/HOST2.keystore.jks</key-store>
      <key-store-password>VAULT::VB::cli_pass::1</key-store-password>
      <key-password>VAULT::VB::cli_pass::1</key-password>
      <trust-store>/path/to/HOST2.truststore.jks</trust-store>
      <trust-store-password>VAULT::VB::cli_pass::1</trust-store-password>
      <modify-trust-store>true</modify-trust-store>
    </ssl>

Important

In cases where you have both a security-realm and ssl-context defined, JBoss EAP will use the SSL/TLS configuration provided by ssl-context.

2.2.10. HTTPS Listener Reference

For a full list of attributes available for the HTTPS listener, see the Undertow Subsystem Attributes section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

2.2.10.1. About Cipher Suites

You can configure a list of the encryption ciphers which are allowed. For JSSE syntax, it must be a comma-separated list. For OpenSSL syntax, it must be a colon-separated list. Ensure that only one syntax is used. The default is the JVM default.

Important

Using weak ciphers is a significant security risk. See NIST Guidelines for NIST recommendations on cipher suites.

See the OpenSSL documentation for a list of available OpenSSL ciphers. Note that the following are not supported:

  • @SECLEVEL
  • SUITEB128
  • SUITEB128ONLY
  • SUITEB192

See the Java documentation for a list of the standard JSSE ciphers.

To update the list of enabled cipher suites, use the enabled-cipher-suites attribute of the HTTPS listener in the undertow subsystem.

Example: Management CLI Command for Updating the List of Enabled Cipher Suites

/subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=enabled-cipher-suites,value="TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA")

Note

The example only lists two possible ciphers, but real-world examples will likely use more.

2.2.11. Enable FIPS 140-2 Cryptography for SSL/TLS on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

You can configure Undertow to use FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography for SSL/TLS. The scope of this configuration example is limited to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, using the Mozilla NSS library in FIPS mode.

Important

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 must already be configured to be FIPS 140-2 compliant. For more information, see the solution titled How can I make RHEL 6 or RHEL 7 FIPS 140-2 compliant?, which is located on the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Warning

Using the TLS 1.2 protocol when running JBoss EAP in FIPS mode can cause a NoSuchAlgorithmException to occur. More details on this issue can be found in the solution titled NoSuchAlgorithmException: no such algorithm: SunTls12MasterSecret, which is located on the Red Hat Customer Portal.

Therefore, it is not possible to configure HTTP/2 in FIPS mode because HTTP/2 requires the TLS 1.2 protocol. FIPS mode (PKCS11) supports the TLS 1 and the TLS 1.1 protocols so you can use:

  • TLS 1.1 in case of Oracle/OpenJDK
  • TLS 1 in case of IBM java

To configure Undertow to use FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography for SSL/TLS, you must do the following:

Note

The OpenSSL provider requires a private key, but it is not possible to retrieve a private key from the PKCS11 store. FIPS does not allow the export of unencrypted keys from FIPS compliant cryptographic module. Therefore, for both the elytron subsystem as well as legacy security, it is not possible to use the OpenSSL provider for TLS when in FIPS mode.

2.2.11.1. Configuring the NSS database

  1. Create a directory owned by the appropriate user to house the NSS database.

    Example Commands for Creating the NSS Database Directory

    $ mkdir -p /usr/share/jboss-as/nssdb
    $ chown jboss /usr/share/jboss-as/nssdb
    $ modutil -create -dbdir /usr/share/jboss-as/nssdb

    Note

    The jboss user is only an example. You need to replace it with a user on your operating system that you plan on using for running JBoss EAP.

  2. Create the NSS configuration file: /usr/share/jboss-as/nss_pkcsll_fips.cfg.

    It must specify:

    • a name
    • the directory where the NSS library is located
    • the directory where the NSS database was created in the previous step

      Example: nss_pkcsll_fips.cfg

      name = nss-fips
      nssLibraryDirectory=/usr/lib64
      nssSecmodDirectory=/usr/share/jboss-as/nssdb
      nssDbMode = readOnly
      nssModule = fips

      Note

      If you are not running a 64-bit version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 then set nssLibraryDirectory to /usr/lib instead of /usr/lib64.

  3. Edit the $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/java.security configuration file.

    Add the following line to $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/java.security:

    Example: java.security

    security.provider.1=sun.security.pkcs11.SunPKCS11 /usr/share/jboss-as/nss_pkcsll_fips.cfg

    Note

    The nss_pkcsll_fips.cfg configuration file specified in the above line is the file created in the previous step.

    You also need to update the following link in $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/java.security from:

    security.provider.5=com.sun.net.ssl.internal.ssl.Provider

    to

    security.provider.5=com.sun.net.ssl.internal.ssl.Provider SunPKCS11-nss-fips
    Important

    Any other security.provider.X lines in this file, for example security.provider.2, must have the value of their X increased by one to ensure that this provider is given priority.

  4. Run the modutil command on the NSS database directory you created in the previous step to enable FIPS mode.

    modutil -fips true -dbdir /usr/share/jboss-as/nssdb
    Note

    You may get a security library error at this point requiring you to regenerate the library signatures for some of the NSS shared objects.

  5. Set the password on the FIPS token.

    The name of the token must be NSS FIPS 140-2 Certificate DB.

    modutil -changepw "NSS FIPS 140-2 Certificate DB" -dbdir /usr/share/jboss-as/nssdb
    Important

    The password used for the FIPS token must be a FIPS compliant password. If the password is not strong enough, you may receive an error: ERROR: Unable to change password on token "NSS FIPS 140-2 Certificate DB".

  6. Create a certificate using the NSS tools.

    Example Command

    $ certutil -S -k rsa -n undertow -t "u,u,u" -x -s "CN=localhost, OU=MYOU, O=MYORG, L=MYCITY, ST=MYSTATE, C=MY" -d /usr/share/jboss-as/nssdb

  7. Verify that the JVM can read the private key from the PKCS11 keystore by running the following command:

    $ keytool -list -storetype pkcs11
Important

Once you have FIPS enabled, you may see the following error when starting JBoss EAP:

10:16:13,993 ERROR [org.jboss.msc.service.fail] (MSC service thread 1-1) MSC000001: Failed to start service jboss.server.controller.management.security_realm.ApplicationRealm.key-manager: org.jboss.msc.service.StartException in service jboss.server.controller.management.security_realm.ApplicationRealm.key-manager: WFLYDM0018: Unable to start service
	at org.jboss.as.domain.management.security.AbstractKeyManagerService.start(AbstractKeyManagerService.java:85)
	at org.jboss.msc.service.ServiceControllerImpl$StartTask.startService(ServiceControllerImpl.java:1963)
	at org.jboss.msc.service.ServiceControllerImpl$StartTask.run(ServiceControllerImpl.java:1896)
	at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.runWorker(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:1142)
	at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:617)
	at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:745)
Caused by: java.security.KeyStoreException: FIPS mode: KeyStore must be from provider SunPKCS11-nss-fips
	at sun.security.ssl.KeyManagerFactoryImpl$SunX509.engineInit(KeyManagerFactoryImpl.java:67)
	at javax.net.ssl.KeyManagerFactory.init(KeyManagerFactory.java:256)
	at org.jboss.as.domain.management.security.AbstractKeyManagerService.createKeyManagers(AbstractKeyManagerService.java:130)
	at org.jboss.as.domain.management.security.AbstractKeyManagerService.start(AbstractKeyManagerService.java:83)
	... 5 more

This message will appear if you have any existing key managers configured, such as the default key manager in legacy core management authentication, that do not use FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography.

2.2.11.2. Configure the Management CLI for FIPS 140-2 Compliant Cryptography for SSL/TLS

You must configure the JBoss EAP management CLI to work in an environment with FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography for SSL/TLS enabled. By default, if you try to use the management CLI in such an environment, the following exception is thrown: org.jboss.as.cli.CliInitializationException: java.security.KeyManagementException: FIPS mode: only SunJSSE TrustManagers may be used.

  • If you are using the legacy security subsystem:

    Update the javax.net.ssl.keyStore and javax.net.ssl.trustStore system properties in the jboss-cli.sh file, as shown below:

    JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=NONE -Djavax.net.ssl.trustStoreType=PKCS11"
    JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStore=NONE -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStoreType=PKCS11 -Djavax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword=P@ssword123"
  • If you are using the elytron subsystem:

    1. Create an XML configuration file for the management CLI with the following contents:

      Example: cli-wildfly-config.xml

      <configuration>
        <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
          <key-stores>
            <key-store name="truststore" type="PKCS11">
              <key-store-clear-password password="P@ssword123"/>
            </key-store>
          </key-stores>
          <ssl-contexts>
            <ssl-context name="client-cli-context">
              <trust-store key-store-name="truststore"/>
              <cipher-suite selector="${cipher.suite.filter}"/>
              <protocol names="TLSv1.1"/>
            </ssl-context>
          </ssl-contexts>
          <ssl-context-rules>
            <rule use-ssl-context="client-cli-context"/>
          </ssl-context-rules>
        </authentication-client>
      </configuration>

      Note

      If you are using the IBM JDK, see the IBM management CLI configuration example for the specific configuration required.

    2. When starting the management CLI, pass the configuration file to the management CLI script using the -Dwildfly.config.url property. For example:

      $ jboss-cli.sh -Dwildfly.config.url=cli-wildfly-config.xml

2.2.11.3. Configure the Elytron and Undertow Subsystems

  1. Add the FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography key-store, key-manager and ssl-context.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=fipsKS:add(type=PKCS11,provider="SunPKCS11-nss-fips",credential-reference={clear-text="P@ssword123"})
    
    /subsystem=elytron/key-manager=fipsKM:add(key-store=fipsKS,algorithm="SunX509",provider=SunPKCS11-nss-fips,credential-reference={clear-text="P@ssword123"})
    
    /subsystem=elytron/server-ssl-context=fipsSSC:add(key-manager=fipsKM,protocols=["TLSv1.1"])
  2. Update the undertow subsystem to use the new ssl-context.

    Note

    https-listener must always have either a security-realm or ssl-context configured. When changing between the two configurations, the commands must be executed as a single batch, as shown below.

    batch
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:undefine-attribute(name=security-realm)
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=ssl-context,value=fipsSSC)
    run-batch
    
    reload

In the elytron subsystem, OpenJDK and Oracle JDK in FIPS mode restrict the usage of any advanced features that are based on providing custom KeyManager or TrustManager implementations. The following configuration attributes do not work:

  • On the client:

    • ssl-context.key-store-ssl-certificate
  • On the server:

    • server-ssl-context.security-domain
    • trust-manager.certificate-revocation-list

2.2.11.4. Configure Undertow with the Legacy Core Management Authentication

Optionally, you can still use the legacy core management authentication instead of the elytron subsystem to complete the setup of FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography for SSL/TLS:

  1. Configure Undertow to use SSL/TLS.

    Note

    The following commands below must either be run in batch mode, or the server must be reloaded after adding the ssl server identity. The example below is shown using batch mode.

    batch
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=HTTPSRealm:add
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=HTTPSRealm/server-identity=ssl:add(keystore-provider=PKCS11, keystore-password="strongP@ssword1")
    
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:add(socket-binding=https, security-realm=HTTPSRealm, enabled-protocols="TLSv1.1")
    
    run-batch

    The basic details for configuring Undertow to SSL/TLS are covered in Setting up an SSL/TLS for Applications.

  2. Configure the cipher suites used by Undertow.

    Once you have SSL/TLS configured, you need to configure the https listener and security realm to have a specific set of cipher suites enabled:

    Required Cipher Suites

    SSL_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, SSL_DHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA

    The basics behind enabling cipher suites for the https listener are covered in About Cipher Suites. To enable cipher suites on the https listener:

    Example Command for Enabling Cipher Suites on the Https Listener

    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=enabled-cipher-suites,value="SSL_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA,SSL_DHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA,TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA,TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA")

  3. Enable cipher suites on the security realm.

    Example Command for Enabling Cipher Suites on the Security Realm

    /core-service=management/security-realm=HTTPSRealm/server-identity=ssl:write-attribute(name=enabled-cipher-suites, value=[SSL_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, SSL_DHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_DSS_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA, TLS_ECDH_anon_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA])

2.2.12. FIPS 140-2 Compliant Cryptography on IBM JDK

On the IBM JDK, the IBM Java Cryptographic Extension (JCE) IBMJCEFIPS provider and the IBM Java Secure Sockets Extension (JSSE) FIPS 140-2 Cryptographic Module (IBMJSSE2) for multi-platforms provide FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography.

For more information on the IBMJCEFIPS provider, see the IBM Documentation for IBM JCEFIPS and NIST IBMJCEFIPS – Security Policy. For more information on IBMJSSE2, see Running IBMJSSE2 in FIPS mode.

2.2.12.1. Key Storage

The IBM JCE does not provide a keystore. The keys are stored on the computer and do not leave its physical boundary. If the keys are moved between computers they must be encrypted.

To run keytool in FIPS-compliant mode use the -providerClass option on each command like this:

keytool -list -storetype JCEKS -keystore mystore.jck -storepass mystorepass -providerClass com.ibm.crypto.fips.provider.IBMJCEFIPS

2.2.12.2. Management CLI Configuration

To configure the management CLI for FIPS 140-2 compliant cryptography on the IBM JDK, you must use a management CLI configuration file specifically for the IBM JDK, such as the following:

Example: cli-wildfly-config-ibm.xml

<configuration>
  <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
    <key-stores>
      <key-store name="truststore" type="JKS">
        <file name="/path/to/truststore"/>
        <key-store-clear-password password="P@ssword123"/>
      </key-store>
    </key-stores>
    <ssl-contexts>
      <ssl-context name="client-cli-context">
        <trust-store key-store-name="truststore"/>
        <cipher-suite selector="${cipher.suite.filter}"/>
        <protocol names="TLSv1"/>
      </ssl-context>
    </ssl-contexts>
    <ssl-context-rules>
      <rule use-ssl-context="client-cli-context"/>
    </ssl-context-rules>
  </authentication-client>
</configuration>

2.2.12.3. Examine FIPS Provider Information

To examine information about the IBMJCEFIPS used by the server, enable debug-level logging by adding -Djavax.net.debug=true to the standalone.conf or domain.conf files. Information about the FIPS provider is logged to the server.log file, for example:

04:22:45,685 INFO  [stdout] (http-/127.0.0.1:8443-1) JsseJCE:  Using MessageDigest SHA from provider IBMJCEFIPS version 1.7
04:22:45,689 INFO  [stdout] (http-/127.0.0.1:8443-1) DHCrypt:  DH KeyPairGenerator  from provider from init IBMJCEFIPS version 1.7
04:22:45,754 INFO  [stdout] (http-/127.0.0.1:8443-1) JsseJCE:  Using KeyFactory DiffieHellman from provider IBMJCEFIPS version 1.7
04:22:45,754 INFO  [stdout] (http-/127.0.0.1:8443-1) JsseJCE:  Using KeyAgreement DiffieHellman from provider IBMJCEFIPS version 1.7
04:22:45,754 INFO  [stdout] (http-/127.0.0.1:8443-1) DHCrypt:  DH KeyAgreement  from provider IBMJCEFIPS version 1.7
04:22:45,754 INFO  [stdout] (http-/127.0.0.1:8443-1) DHCrypt:  DH KeyAgreement  from provider from initIBMJCEFIPS version 1.7

2.2.13. Starting a Managed Domain when the JVM is Running in FIPS Mode

Important

It is assumed you have a managed domain, FIPS configured, as well as all necessary certificates configured. This includes having imported the domain controller’s certificate into each controller’s truststore. For more details on configuring a managed domain, see the Domain Management section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide. For more details on configuring FIPS, see Enable FIPS 140-2 Cryptography for SSL/TLS on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

You need to update each host controller and the master domain controller to use SSL/TLS for communication.

Warning

Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 in all affected packages.

  1. Create an SSL/TLS security realm on the master domain controller.

    You need to create an SSL/TLS security realm on the master domain controller configured to use your NSS database as a PKCS11 provider.

    Example: Security Realm on the Master Domain Controller

    <security-realm name="HTTPSRealm">
        <server-identities>
            <ssl>
                <engine enabled-protocols="TLSv1.1"/>
                <keystore provider="PKCS11" keystore-password="strongP@ssword1"/>
            </ssl>
        </server-identities>
        <authentication>
            <local default-user="\$local"/>
            <properties path="https-users.properties" relative-to="jboss.domain.config.dir"/>
        </authentication>
    </security-realm>

  2. Create an SSL/TLS security realm on each host controller.

    You need to create a security realm with an SSL/TLS truststore for authentication.

    Example: Security Realm on Each Host Controller

    <security-realm name="HTTPSRealm">
      <authentication>
        <truststore provider="PKCS11" keystore-password="strongP@ssword1"/>
      </authentication>
    </security-realm>

    Note

    You need to repeat this process on each host.

  3. Secure the native interface on the master domain controller.

    You need to ensure that the native interface on the master domain controller is secured with the security realm you just created.

    Example: Native Interface

    <management-interfaces>
      ...
      <native-interface security-realm="HTTPSRealm">
        <socket interface="management" port="${jboss.management.native.port:9999}"/>
       </native-interface>
    </management-interfaces>

  4. Use the SSL/TLS realm on each host controller to connect to the master domain controller.

    You need to update the security realm used for connecting to the master domain controller. This change must be done directly in the host controller’s configuration file, for example host.xml or host-slave.xml, while the server is not running.

    Example: Host Controller Configuration File

    <domain-controller>
      <remote security-realm="HTTPSRealm">
        <discovery-options>
          <static-discovery name="primary" protocol="${jboss.domain.master.protocol:remote}" host="${jboss.domain.master.address}" port="${jboss.domain.master.port:9999}"/>
        </discovery-options>
      </remote>
    </domain-controller>

  5. Update how each server connects back to its host controller.

    You also need to update how each server connects back to its host controller.

    Example: Server Configuration

    <server name="my-server" group="my-server-group">
      <ssl ssl-protocol="TLS" trust-manager-algorithm="SunX509" truststore-type="PKCS11" truststore-password="strongP@ssword1"/>
    </server>

  6. Configure two-way SSL/TLS in a managed domain.

    To enable two-way SSL/TLS, add a truststore authentication method to the SSL/TLS security realm for the master domain controller, execute the following management CLI commands:

    /host=master/core-service=management/security-realm=HTTPSRealm/authentication=truststore:add(keystore-provider="PKCS11",keystore-password="strongP@ssword1")
    
    reload --host=master

    You also need to update each host controller’s security realm to have an SSL server identity, execute the following management CLI commands:

    /host=host1/core-service=management/security-realm=HTTPSRealm/server-identity=ssl:add(keystore-provider=PKCS11, keystore-password="strongP@ssword1",enabled-protocols=["TLSv1.1"])
    
    reload --host=host1
    Important

    You also need to ensure that each host’s certificate is imported into the domain controller’s truststore.

2.3. Security Auditing

Security auditing refers to triggering events, such as writing to a log, in response to an event that happens within the security subsystem or the management interfaces. Auditing mechanisms are configured as part of a security domain or management interface.

Auditing uses provider modules. Both included provider modules as well as custom implementations may be used.

2.3.1. Configure Security Auditing for the Legacy Security Domains

To configure security auditing settings for a security domain, the following steps must be performed from the management console:

  1. Open the security domain’s detailed view.

    1. Click Configuration at the top of the screen.
    2. In a managed domain, select a profile to modify from the Profile selection box at the top left.
    3. Click on Subsystems, then Security.
    4. Click on the security domain to edit and click View.
  2. Navigate to the auditing configuration.

    Click on Audit on the left side of the screen.

    The configuration area is divided into two areas: Provider Modules and Details. The provider module is the basic unit of configuration. A security domain can include several provider modules each of which can include attributes and options.

  3. Add a provider module.

    Click Add and fill in the Code section with the class name of the provider module. Also fill in the Name section with the desired name.

  4. Verify that the module is working.

    The goal of an audit module is to provide a way to monitor the events in the security subsystem. This monitoring can be done by means of writing to a log file, email notifications, or any other measurable auditing mechanism.

    For example, JBoss EAP includes the org.jboss.security.audit.providers.LogAuditProvider module by default. If enabled following the steps above, this audit module writes security notifications to an audit.log file in the log subfolder within the EAP_HOME directory.

    To verify if the steps above have worked in the context of the org.jboss.security.audit.providers.LogAuditProvider, perform an action that is likely to trigger a notification and then check the audit log file.

  5. Optional: Add, edit, or remove module options.

    To add options to your module, click its entry in the Modules list, and select the Module Options tab in the Details section of the page. Click Add, and provide the key and value for the option.

    To edit an option that already exists, click Remove to remove it, and click Add to add it again with the correct options.

2.4. Configure One-way and Two-way SSL/TLS for Applications

2.4.1. Automatic Self-signed Certificate Creation for Applications

When using the legacy security realms, JBoss EAP provides automatic generation of self-signed certificate for development purposes.

Example: Server Log Showing Self-signed Certificate Creation

15:26:09,031 WARN  [org.jboss.as.domain.management.security] (MSC service thread 1-7) WFLYDM0111: Keystore /path/to/jboss/standalone/configuration/application.keystore not found, it will be auto generated on first use with a self signed certificate for host localhost
...
15:26:10,076 WARN  [org.jboss.as.domain.management.security] (MSC service thread 1-2) WFLYDM0113: Generated self signed certificate at /path/to/jboss/configuration/application.keystore. Please note that self signed certificates are not secure, and should only be used for testing purposes. Do not use this self signed certificate in production.
SHA-1 fingerprint of the generated key is 00:11:22:33:44:55:66:77:88:99:aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff:00:11:22:33
SHA-256 fingerprint of the generated key is 00:11:22:33:44:55:66:77:88:99:00:aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff:00:11:22:33:44:55:66:77:88:99:aa:bb:cc:dd:ee
...

This certificate is created for testing purposes and is assigned to the HTTPS interface used by applications. The keystore containing the certificate will be generated if the file does not exist the first time the HTTPS interface is accessed.

Example: Default ApplicationRealm Using the Self-signed Certificate

<security-realm name="ApplicationRealm">
  <server-identities>
    <ssl>
      <keystore path="application.keystore" relative-to="jboss.server.config.dir" keystore-password="password" alias="server" key-password="password" generate-self-signed-certificate-host="localhost"/>
    </ssl>
  </server-identities>
  ...
</security-realm>

Example: Default HTTPS Interface Configuration

<subsystem xmlns="urn:jboss:domain:undertow:4.0">
    ...
    <server name="default-server">
        ...
        <https-listener name="https" socket-binding="https" security-realm="ApplicationRealm" enable-http2="true"/>
        <host name="default-host" alias="localhost">
        ...

Note

If you want to disable the self-signed certificate creation, you will need to remove the generate-self-signed-certificate-host="localhost" from the server keystore configuration. The generate-self-signed-certificate-host attribute holds the host name for which the self-signed certificate should be generated.

Warning

This self-signed certificate is intended for testing purposes only and is not intended for use in production environments. For more information on configuring SSL/TLS for applications with Elytron, see the Enable One-way SSL/TLS for Applications using the Elytron Subsystem and Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for Applications using the Elytron Subsystem sections. For more information on configuring SSL/TLS for applications with legacy security, see the Enable One-way SSL/TLS for Applications Using Legacy Security Realms and Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for Applications Using Legacy Security Realms sections.

2.4.2. Using Elytron

2.4.2.1. Enable One-way SSL/TLS for Applications Using the Elytron Subsystem

In JBoss EAP, you can use the elytron subsystem, along with the undertow subsystem, to enable one-way SSL/TLS for deployed applications.

  1. Obtain or generate your keystore.

    Before enabling one-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must obtain or generate the keystore you plan on using. To generate an example keystore in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias localhost -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore /path/to/keystore.jks -dname "CN=localhost" -keypass secret -storepass secret
  2. Configure a key-store in JBoss EAP.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=httpsKS:add(path=/path/to/keystore.jks, credential-reference={clear-text=secret}, type=JKS)
    Note

    The previous command uses an absolute path to the keystore. Alternatively you can use the relative-to attribute to specify the base directory variable and path attribute to specify a relative path.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=httpsKS:add(path=keystore.jks, relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir, credential-reference={clear-text=secret}, type=JKS)
  3. Configure a key-manager that references your key-store.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-manager=httpsKM:add(key-store=httpsKS, algorithm="SunX509", credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
    Important

    You need to know what key manager algorithms are provided by the JDK you are using. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms.

    The example command above uses SunX509 for the key manager algorithm.

  4. Configure a server-ssl-context that references your key-manager.

    /subsystem=elytron/server-ssl-context=httpsSSC:add(key-manager=httpsKM, protocols=["TLSv1.2"])
    Important

    You need to determine what SSL/TLS protocols you want to support. The example command above uses TLSv1.2. You can use the cipher-suite-filter argument to specify which cipher suites are allowed, and the use-cipher-suites-order argument to honor server cipher suite order. The use-cipher-suites-order attribute by default is set to true. This differs from the legacy security subsystem behavior, which defaults to honoring client cipher suite order.

    Warning

    Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2 in all affected packages.

  5. Check and see if the https-listener is configured to use a legacy security realm for its SSL configuration.

    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:read-attribute(name=security-realm)
    {
        "outcome" => "success",
        "result" => "ApplicationRealm"
    }

    The above command shows that the https-listener is configured to use the ApplicationRealm legacy security realm for its SSL configuration. Undertow cannot reference both a legacy security realm and an ssl-context in Elytron at the same time so you must remove the reference to the legacy security realm.

    Note

    If the result is undefined, you do not need to remove the reference to the security realm in the next step.

  6. Remove the reference to the legacy security realm, and update the https-listener to use the ssl-context from Elytron.

    Note

    https-listener must always have either a security-realm or ssl-context configured. When changing between the two configurations, the commands must be executed as a single batch, as shown below.

    batch
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:undefine-attribute(name=security-realm)
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=httpsSSC)
    run-batch
  7. Reload the server.

    reload

One-way SSL/TLS is now enabled for applications.

2.4.2.2. Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for Applications Using the Elytron Subsystem

In JBoss EAP, you can use the elytron subsystem, along with the undertow subsystem, to enable two-way SSL/TLS for deployed applications.

  1. Obtain or generate your keystore.

    Before enabling two-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must obtain or generate the keystores, truststores and certificates you plan on using. To generate an example set of keystores, truststores, and certificates in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7:

    Example: Server and Client Keystores:

    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias localhost -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore server.keystore.jks -dname "CN=localhost" -keypass secret -storepass secret
    
    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias client -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore client.keystore.jks -dname "CN=client" -keypass secret -storepass secret

    Example: Export the Server and Client Certificates:

    $ keytool -exportcert -keystore server.keystore.jks -alias localhost -keypass secret -storepass secret -file server.cer
    
    $ keytool -exportcert -keystore client.keystore.jks -alias client -keypass secret -storepass secret -file client.cer

    Example: Import the Server and Client Certificates Into the Opposing Truststores:

    $ keytool -importcert -keystore server.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias client -trustcacerts -file client.cer
    
    $ keytool -importcert -keystore client.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias localhost -trustcacerts -file server.cer

  2. Configure a key-store for server keystore and truststore in JBoss EAP.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayKS:add(path=/path/to/server.keystore.jks, credential-reference={clear-text=secret}, type=JKS)
    
    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayTS:add(path=/path/to/server.truststore.jks, credential-reference={clear-text=secret}, type=JKS)
    Note

    The previous command uses an absolute path to the keystore. Alternatively you can use the relative-to attribute to specify the base directory variable and path attribute to specify a relative path.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=myKS:add(path=keystore.jks, relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir, credential-reference={clear-text=secret}, type=JKS)
  3. Configure a key-manager that references your keystore key-store.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-manager=twoWayKM:add(key-store=twoWayKS, algorithm="SunX509", credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
    Important

    You need to know what key manager algorithms are provided by the JDK you are using. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms.

    The example command below uses SunX509 for the key manager algorithm.

  4. Configure a trust-manager that references your truststore key-store.

    /subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=twoWayTM:add(key-store=twoWayTS, algorithm="SunX509")
    Important

    You need to know what key manager algorithms are provided by the JDK you are using. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms.

    The example command above uses SunX509 for the key manager algorithm.

  5. Configure a server-ssl-context that references your key-manager, trust-manager, and enables client authentication:

    /subsystem=elytron/server-ssl-context=twoWaySSC:add(key-manager=twoWayKM, protocols=["TLSv1.2"], trust-manager=twoWayTM, need-client-auth=true)
    Important

    You need to determine what SSL/TLS protocols you want to support. The example command above uses TLSv1.2. You can use the cipher-suite-filter argument to specify which cipher suites are allowed, and the use-cipher-suites-order argument to honor server cipher suite order. The use-cipher-suites-order attribute by default is set to true. This differs from the legacy security subsystem behavior, which defaults to honoring client cipher suite order.

    Warning

    Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2 in all affected packages.

  6. Check and see if the https-listener is configured to use a legacy security realm for its SSL configuration.

    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:read-attribute(name=security-realm)
    {
        "outcome" => "success",
        "result" => "ApplicationRealm"
    }

    The above command shows that the https-listener is configured to use the ApplicationRealm legacy security realm for its SSL configuration. Undertow cannot reference both a legacy security realm and an ssl-context in the elytron subsystem at the same time. So you must remove the reference to the legacy security realm.

    Note

    If the result is undefined, you do not need to remove the reference to the security realm in the next step.

  7. Remove the reference to the legacy security realm, and update the https-listener to use the ssl-context from Elytron.

    Note

    https-listener must always have either a security-realm or ssl-context configured. When changing between the two configurations, the commands must be executed as a single batch, as shown below.

    batch
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:undefine-attribute(name=security-realm)
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=twoWaySSC)
    run-batch
  8. Reload the server.

    reload
  9. Configure your client to use the client certificate.

    You need to configure your client to present the trusted client certificate to the server to complete the two-way SSL/TLS authentication. For example, if using a browser, you need to import the trusted certificate into the browser’s trust store.

    This procedure forces a two-way SSL/TLS but it does not change the original authentication method of the application.

    If you want to change the original authentication method, see Configure Authentication with Certificates in How to Configure Identity Management for JBoss EAP.

Two-way SSL/TLS is now enabled for applications.

2.4.3. Using Legacy Security Realms

Important

As a prerequisite, an SSL/TLS encryption key and certificate should be created and placed in an accessible directory. Additionally, relevant information, such as keystore aliases and passwords, desired cipher suites, should also be accessible. For examples on generating SSL/TLS Keys and Certificates, see the first two steps in the Setting up Two-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces section. For more information about the HTTPS listener, including cipher suites, see the HTTPS Listener Reference section.

2.4.3.1. Enable One-way SSL/TLS for Applications Using Legacy Security Realms

This example assumes that the keystore, identity.jks, has been copied to the server configuration directory and configured with the given properties. Administrators should substitute their own values for the example ones.

Note

The management CLI commands shown assume that you are running a JBoss EAP standalone server. For more details on using the management CLI for a JBoss EAP managed domain, see the JBoss EAP Management CLI Guide.

  1. Add and configure an HTTPS security realm first. Once the HTTPS security realm has been configured, configure an https-listener in the undertow subsystem that references the security realm:

    batch
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=HTTPSRealm:add
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=HTTPSRealm/server-identity=ssl:add(keystore-path=identity.jks, keystore-relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir, keystore-password=password1, alias=appserver)
    
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=security-realm, value=HTTPSRealm)
    
    run-batch
    Warning

    Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2 in all affected packages.

  2. Restart the JBoss EAP instance for the changes to take effect.

2.4.3.2. Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for Applications Using Legacy Security Realms

Setting up two-way SSL/TLS for applications follows many of the same procedures outlined in Setting up Two-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces. To set up two-way SSL/TLS for applications, you need to do the following:

  1. Generate the stores for both the client and server
  2. Export the certificates for both the client and server
  3. Import the certificates into the opposing truststores
  4. Define a security realm, for example CertificateRealm, on the server that uses the server’s keystore and truststore
  5. Update the undertow subsystem to use the security realm and require client verification

The first four steps are covered in Setting up Two-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces.

Important

If the server has not been reloaded since the new security realm has been added, you must reload the server before performing the next step.

Update the Undertow Subsystem

Once the keystores, certificates, truststores, and security realms have been created and configured, you need to add an HTTPS listener to the undertow subsystem, use the security realm you created, and require client verification:

/subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=security-realm, value=CertificateRealm)

/subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=verify-client, value=REQUIRED)
Important

You must reload the server for these changes to take effect.

Important

Any client connecting to a JBoss EAP instance with two-way SSL/TLS enabled for applications must have access to a client certificate or keystore, in other words a client keystore whose certificate is included in the server’s truststore. If the client is using a browser to connect to the JBoss EAP instance, you need to import that certificate or keystore into the browser’s certificate manager.

Note

More details on using certificate-based authentication in applications, in addition to two-way SSL/TLS with applications, can be found in the Configuring a Security Domain to Use Certificate-based Authentication section of the JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide.

2.5. SASL Authentication Mechanisms

Simple Authentication and Security Layer (SASL) authentication mechanisms are used for defining the mechanisms for authenticating connections to a JBoss EAP server using the elytron subsystem, and for clients connecting to servers. Clients can be other JBoss EAP instances, or Elytron Client. SASL authentication mechanisms in JBoss EAP are also significantly used in Elytron integration with the remoting subsystem.

2.5.1. Choosing SASL Authentication Mechanisms

Note

Although JBoss EAP and Elytron Client work with a variety of SASL authentication mechanisms, you must ensure that the mechanisms you use are supported. See this list for the support levels for SASL authentication mechanisms.

The authentication mechanisms you use depends on your environment and desired authentication method. The following list summarizes the use of some of the supported SASL authentication mechanisms:

ANONYMOUS
Unauthenticated guest access.
DIGEST-MD5
Uses HTTP digest authentication as a SASL mechanism.
EXTERNAL
Uses authentication credentials that are implied in the context of the request. For example, IPsec or TLS authentication.
Mechanisms beginning with GS
Authentication using Kerberos.
JBOSS-LOCAL-USER
Provides authentication by testing that the client has the same file access as the local user that is running the JBoss EAP server. This is useful for other JBoss EAP instances running on the same machine.
OAUTHBEARER
Uses authentication provided by OAuth as a SASL mechanism.
PLAIN
Plain text username and password authentication.
Mechanisms beginning with SCRAM
Salted Challenge Response Authentication Mechanism (SCRAM) that uses a specified hashing function.
Mechanisms ending with -PLUS
Indicates a channel binding variant of a particular authentication mechanism. You should use these variants when the underlying connection uses SSL/TLS.

For more information on individual SASL authentication mechanisms, see the IANA SASL mechanism list and individual mechanism memos.

2.5.2. Configuring SASL Authentication Mechanisms on the Server Side

Configuring SASL authentication mechanisms on the server side is done using SASL authentication factories.

There are two levels of configuration required:

  • A sasl-authentication-factory, where you specify authentication mechanisms.
  • A configurable-sasl-server-factory that aggregates one or more of sasl-authentication-factory, and configures mechanism properties as well as optionally applying filters to enable or disable certain authentication mechanisms.

The following example demonstrates creating a new configurable-sasl-server-factory, and a sasl-authentication-factory that uses DIGEST-MD5 as a SASL authentication mechanism for application clients.

/subsystem=elytron/configurable-sasl-server-factory=mySASLServerFactory:add(sasl-server-factory=elytron)

/subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=mySASLAuthFactory:add(sasl-server-factory=mySASLServerFactory,security-domain=ApplicationDomain,mechanism-configurations=[{mechanism-name=DIGEST-MD5,mechanism-realm-configurations=[{realm-name=ApplicationRealm}]}])

2.5.3. Specifying SASL Authentication Mechanisms on the Client Side

SASL authentication mechanisms used by a client are specified using a sasl-mechanism-selector. You can specify any supported SASL authentication mechanisms that are exposed by the server that the client is connecting to.

A sasl-mechanism-selector is defined in Elytron configurations where authentication is configured:

  • In the elytron subsystem, this is an attribute of an authentication-configuration. For example:

    /subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=myAuthConfig:write-attribute(name=sasl-mechanism-selector,value="DIGEST-MD5")

    An example of using an authentication-configuration with a sasl-mechanism-selector can be seen in Configuring SSL/TLS Between Domain and Host Controllers Using Elytron.

  • For Elytron Client, it is specified under the configuration element of authentication-configurations in the client configuration file, usually named wildfly-config.xml. For example:

    <configuration>
      <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
        <authentication-rules>
          <rule use-configuration="default" />
        </authentication-rules>
        <authentication-configurations>
          <configuration name="default">
            <sasl-mechanism-selector selector="#ALL" />
          ...
          </configuration>
        </authentication-configurations>
      </authentication-client>
    </configuration>

See How to Configure Identity Management for more information on configuring client authentication with Elytron Client.

sasl-mechanism-selector Grammar

The selector string for sasl-mechanism-selector has a specific grammar.

In a simple form, individual mechanisms are specified by listing their names in order, separated by a spaces. For example, to specify DIGEST-MD5, SCRAM-SHA-1, and SCRAM-SHA-256 as allowed authentication mechanisms, use the following string: DIGEST-MD5 SCRAM-SHA-1 SCRAM-SHA-256.

More advanced usage of the grammar can use the following special tokens:

  • #ALL: All mechanisms.
  • #FAMILY(NAME): Mechanisms belonging to the specified mechanism family. For example, the family could be DIGEST, EAP, GS2, SCRAM, or IEC-ISO-9798.
  • #PLUS: Mechanisms that use channel binding. For example, SCRAM-SHA-XXX-PLUS or GS2-XXX-PLUS.
  • #MUTUAL: Mechanisms that authenticate the server in some way, for example making the server prove that the server knows the password. #MUTUAL includes families such as #FAMILY(SCRAM) and #FAMILY(GS2).
  • #HASH(ALGORITHM): Mechanisms that use the specified hash algorithm. For example, the algorithm could be MD5, SHA-1, SHA-256, SHA-384, or SHA-512.

The above tokens and names can also be used with the following operations and predicates:

  • -: Forbids
  • !: Inverts
  • &&: And
  • ||: Or
  • ==: Equals
  • ?: If
  • #TLS: Is true when TLS is active, otherwise false.

Below are some examples of sasl-mechanism-selector strings and their meaning:

  • #TLS && !#MUTUAL: When TLS is active, all mechanisms without mutual authentication.
  • #ALL -ANONYMOUS: All mechanisms, except for ANONYMOUS.
  • SCRAM-SHA-1 SCRAM-SHA-256: Adds those two mechanisms in that order.
  • (SCRAM-SHA-1 || SCRAM-SHA-256): Adds the two mechanisms in the order that the provider or server presents them.
  • !#HASH(MD5): Any mechanism that does not use the MD5 hashing algorithm.
  • #FAMILY(DIGEST): Any digest mechanism.

2.5.4. Configuring SASL Authentication Mechanism Properties

You can configure authentication mechanism properties on both the server side and on the client side.

  • On the server side, you define authentication mechanism properties in the configurable-sasl-server-factory. The following example defines the com.sun.security.sasl.digest.utf8 property with a value of false.

    /subsystem=elytron/configurable-sasl-server-factory=mySASLServerFactory:map-put(name=properties,key=com.sun.security.sasl.digest.utf8,value=false)
  • On the client side, you define authentication mechanisms properties in the client’s authentication configuration:

    • In the elytron subsystem, define the authentication mechanism properties in your authentication-configuration. The following example defines the wildfly.sasl.local-user.quiet-auth property with a value of true.

      /subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=myAuthConfig:map-put(name=mechanism-properties,key=wildfly.sasl.local-user.quiet-auth,value=true)
    • For Elytron Client, authentication mechanism properties are specified under the configuration element of authentication-configurations in the client configuration file, usually named wildfly-config.xml. For example:

      ...
      <authentication-configurations>
        <configuration name="default">
          <sasl-mechanism-selector selector="#ALL" />
          <set-mechanism-properties>
            <property key="wildfly.sasl.local-user.quiet-auth" value="true" />
          </set-mechanism-properties>
          ...
        </configuration>
      </authentication-configurations>
      ...

You can see a list of standard Java SASL authentication mechanism properties in the Java documentation. Other JBoss EAP-specific SASL authentication mechanism properties are listed in the Authentication Mechanisms Reference.

2.6. Elytron Integration with the ModCluster Subsystem

One of the security capabilities exposed by elytron subsystem is a client ssl-context that can be used to configure the modcluster subsystem to communicate with a load balancer using SSL/TLS.

When protecting the communication between the application server and the load balancer, you need to define a client ssl-context in order to:

  • Define a truststore holding the certificate chain that will be used to validate load balancer’s certificate.
  • Define a trust manager to perform validations against the load balancer’s certificate.

2.6.1. Defining a Client SSL Context and Configuring ModCluster Subsystem

The following procedure requires that a truststore and trust manager be configured. For information on creating these see Create an Elytron Truststore and Create an Elytron Trust Manager.

  1. Create the client SSL context.

    This SSL context is going to be used by the modcluster subsystem when connecting to the load balancer using SSL/TLS:

    /subsystem=elytron/client-ssl-context=modcluster-client-ssl-context:add(trust-manager=default-trust-manager)
  2. Reference the newly created client SSL context using one of the following options.

    • Configure the modcluster subsystem by setting the ssl-context.

      /subsystem=modcluster/mod-cluster-config=configuration:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=modcluster-client-ssl-context)
    • Configure the undertow subsystem by defining the ssl-context attribute of the mod-cluster filter.

      /subsystem=undertow/configuration=filter/mod-cluster=modcluster:write-attribute(name=ssl-context,value=modcluster-client-ssl-context)
  3. Reload the server.

    reload

For configuring the modcluster subsystem and using two-way authentication, along with the trust manager, the key manager also needs to be configured.

  1. Create the keystore.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayKS:add(path=/path/to/client.keystore.jks, credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
  2. Configure the key manager.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-manager=twoWayKM:add(key-store=twoWayKS, algorithm="SunX509", credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
  3. Create the client SSL context.

    /subsystem=elytron/client-ssl-context=modcluster-client-ssl-context:add(trust-manager=default-trust-manager, key-manager=twoWayKM)
    Note

    If you already have an existing client SSL context, you can add the key-manager to it as follows:

    /subsystem=elytron/client-ssl-context=modcluster-client-ssl-context:write-attribute(name=key-manager, value=twoWayKM)
  4. Reload the server.

    reload

2.7. Elytron Integration with the JGroups Subsystem

Components in the elytron subsystem may be referenced when defining authorization or encryption protocols in the jgroups subsystem. Full instructions on configuring these protocols are found in the Securing a Cluster section of the Configuration Guide.

2.8. Elytron Integration with the Remoting Subsystem

2.8.1. Elytron Integration with Remoting Connectors

A remoting connector is specified by a SASL authentication factory, a socket binding, and an optional SSL context. In particular, the attributes for a connector are as follows:

sasl-authentication-factory
A reference to the SASL authentication factory to use for authenticating requests to this connector. For more information on creating this factory, see Create an Elytron Authentication Factory.
socket-binding
A reference to the socket binding, detailing the interface and port where the connector should listen for incoming requests.
ssl-context
An optional reference to the server-side SSL Context to use for this connector. The SSL Context contains the server key manager and trust manager to be used, and should be defined in instances where SSL is desired.

For example, a connector can be added as follows, where SASL_FACTORY_NAME is an already defined authentication factory and SOCKET_BINDING_NAME is an existing socket binding.

/subsystem=remoting/connector=CONNECTOR_NAME:add(sasl-authentication-factory=SASL_FACTORY_NAME,socket-binding=SOCKET_BINDING_NAME)

If SSL is desired, a preconfigured server-ssl-context may be referenced using the ssl-context attribute, as seen below.

/subsystem=remoting/connector=CONNECTOR_NAME:add(sasl-authentication-factory=SASL_FACTORY_NAME,socket-binding=SOCKET_BINDING_NAME,ssl-context=SSL_CONTEXT_NAME)
Enable One-way SSL/TLS for Remoting Connectors Using the Elytron Subsystem

Before enabling one-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must configure a key-store, key-manager, and a server-ssl-context that references the defined key-manager.

The following SASL mechanisms support channel binding to external secure channels, such as SSL/TLS:

  • GS2-KRB5-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-1-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-256-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-384-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-512-PLUS

To use any of the above mechanisms, a custom SASL factory can be configured, or one of the predefined SASL authentication factories can be modified to offer any of these mechanisms. A SASL mechanism selector can be used on the client to specify the appropriate SASL mechanism.

  1. Create a socket-binding for the connector. The following command defines the oneWayBinding binding that listens on port 11199.

    /socket-binding-group=standard-sockets/socket-binding=oneWayBinding:add(port=11199)
  2. Create a connector that references the SASL authentication factory, the previously created socket binding, and the SSL context.

    /subsystem=remoting/connector=oneWayConnector:add(sasl-authentication-factory=SASL_FACTORY,socket-binding=oneWayBinding,ssl-context=SSL_CONTEXT)
    Important

    In cases where you have both a security-realm and ssl-context defined, JBoss EAP will use the SSL/TLS configuration provided by ssl-context.

  3. Configure the client to trust the server certificate. A generic example client is found at Elytron Client Side One Way Example. This example configures an ssl-context using the client trust-store.
Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for Remoting Connectors Using the Elytron Subsystem

Before enabling two-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must configure a separate key-store components for the client and server certificates, a key-manager for the server key-store, a trust-manager for the server trust-store, and a server-ssl-context that references the defined key-manager and trust-manager.

The following SASL mechanisms support channel binding to external secure channels, such as SSL/TLS:

  • GS2-KRB5-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-1-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-256-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-384-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-512-PLUS

To use any of the above mechanisms, a custom SASL factory can be configured, or one of the predefined SASL authentication factories can be modified to offer any of these mechanisms. A SASL mechanism selector can be used on the client to specify the appropriate SASL mechanism.

  1. Create a socket-binding for the connector. The following command defines the twoWayBinding binding that listens on port 11199.

    /socket-binding-group=standard-sockets/socket-binding=twoWayBinding:add(port=11199)
  2. Create a connector that references the SASL authentication factory, the previously created socket binding, and the SSL context.

    /subsystem=remoting/connector=twoWayConnector:add(sasl-authentication-factory=SASL_FACTORY,socket-binding=twoWayBinding,ssl-context=SSL_CONTEXT)
    Important

    In cases where you have both a security-realm and ssl-context defined, JBoss EAP will use the SSL/TLS configuration provided by ssl-context.

  3. Configure your client to trust the server certificate, and to present its certificate to the server.

    You need to configure your client to present the trusted client certificate to the server to complete the two-way SSL/TLS authentication. For example, if using a browser, you need to import the trusted certificate into the browser’s truststore. A generic example client is found at Elytron Client Side Two Way Example. This example configures an ssl-context using the client trust-store and key-store.

Two-way SSL/TLS is now enabled on the remoting connector.

2.8.2. Elytron Integration with Remoting HTTP Connectors

A remote HTTP connection is specified by referencing a connector in the undertow system and a SASL authentication factory defined in the elytron subsystem. The HTTP connector provides the configuration for the HTTP upgrade-based remoting connector, and connects to an HTTP listener specified by the connector-ref attribute.

The attributes for a connector are as follows:

connector-ref
A reference to a predefined undertow listener.
sasl-authentication-factory
A reference to the SASL authentication factory to use for authenticating requests to this connector. For more information on creating this factory, see Create an Elytron Authentication Factory.

For example, a http-connector can be added as follows, where CONNECTOR_NAME references the undertow listener, and SASL_FACTORY_NAME is an already defined authentication factory in the elytron subsystem.

/subsystem=remoting/http-connector=HTTP_CONNECTOR_NAME:add(connector-ref=CONNECTOR_NAME,sasl-authentication-factory=SASL_FACTORY_NAME)
Enable One-Way SSL on the Remoting HTTP Connector

Before enabling one-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must configure a key-store, key-manager, and a server-ssl-context that references the defined key-manager.

The following SASL mechanisms support channel binding to external secure channels, such as SSL/TLS:

  • GS2-KRB5-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-1-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-256-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-384-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-512-PLUS

To use any of the above mechanisms, a custom SASL factory can be configured, or one of the predefined SASL authentication factories can be modified to offer any of these mechanisms. A SASL mechanism selector can be used on the client to specify the appropriate SASL mechanism.

  1. Check whether the https-listener is configured to use a legacy security realm for its SSL configuration.

    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:read-attribute(name=security-realm)
    {
        "outcome" => "success",
        "result" => "ApplicationRealm"
    }

    The above command shows that the https-listener is configured to use the ApplicationRealm legacy security realm for its SSL configuration. Undertow cannot reference both a legacy security realm and an ssl-context in Elytron at the same time so you must remove the reference to the legacy security realm.

    Note

    If the result is undefined, you do not need to remove the reference to the security realm in the next step.

  2. Remove the reference to the legacy security realm, and update the https-listener to use the ssl-context from Elytron.

    Note

    https-listener must always have either a security-realm or ssl-context configured. When changing between the two configurations, the commands must be executed as a single batch, as shown below.

    batch
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:undefine-attribute(name=security-realm)
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=SERVER_SSL_CONTEXT)
    run-batch
  3. Create an HTTP connector that references the HTTPS listener and the SASL authentication factory.

    /subsystem=remoting/http-connector=ssl-http-connector:add(connector-ref=https,sasl-authentication-factory=SASL_FACTORY)
  4. Reload the server.

    reload
  5. Configure the client to trust the server certificate. For example, if using a browser, you need to import the trusted certificate into the browser’s truststore.
Enable Two-way SSL/TLS on the Remoting HTTP Connectors

Before enabling two-way SSL/TLS in JBoss EAP, you must configure separate key-store components for the client and server certificates, a key-manager for the server key-store, a trust-manager for the server trust-store, and a server-ssl-context that references the defined key-manager and trust-manager.

The following SASL mechanisms support channel binding to external secure channels, such as SSL/TLS:

  • GS2-KRB5-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-1-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-256-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-384-PLUS
  • SCRAM-SHA-512-PLUS

To use any of the above mechanisms, a custom SASL factory can be configured, or one of the predefined SASL authentication factories can be modified to offer any of these mechanisms. A SASL mechanism selector can be used on the client to specify the appropriate SASL mechanism.

  1. Check whether the https-listener is configured to use a legacy security realm for its SSL configuration.

    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:read-attribute(name=security-realm)
    {
        "outcome" => "success",
        "result" => "ApplicationRealm"
    }

    The above command shows that the https-listener is configured to use the ApplicationRealm legacy security realm for its SSL configuration. Undertow cannot reference both a legacy security realm and an ssl-context in Elytron at the same time so you must remove the reference to the legacy security realm.

    Note

    If the result is undefined, you do not need to remove the reference to the security realm in the next step.

  2. Remove the reference to the legacy security realm, and update the https-listener to use the ssl-context from Elytron.

    Note

    https-listener must always have either a security-realm or ssl-context configured. When changing between the two configurations, the commands must be executed as a single batch, as shown below.

    batch
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:undefine-attribute(name=security-realm)
    /subsystem=undertow/server=default-server/https-listener=https:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=SERVER_SSL_CONTEXT)
    run-batch
  3. Create an HTTP connector that references the HTTPS listener and the SASL authentication factory.

    /subsystem=remoting/http-connector=ssl-http-connector:add(connector-ref=https,sasl-authentication-factory=SASL_FACTORY)
  4. Reload the server.

    reload
  5. Configure your client to trust the server certificate, and to present its certificate to the server.

    You need to configure your client to present the trusted client certificate to the server to complete the two-way SSL/TLS authentication. For example, if using a browser, you need to import the trusted certificate into the browser’s truststore.

Two-way SSL/TLS is now enabled on the remoting HTTP connector.

Important

In cases where you have both a security-realm and ssl-context defined, JBoss EAP will use the SSL/TLS configuration provided by ssl-context.

2.8.3. Elytron Integration with Remoting Outbound Connectors

A remote outbound connection is specified by an outbound socket binding and an authentication context. The authentication context provides all of the security information that is needed for the connection. In particular, the attributes for a remote-outbound-connection are as follows:

  • outbound-socket-binding-ref - The name of the outbound socket binding, which is used to determine the destination address and port for the connection.
  • authentication-context - A reference to the authentication context, which contains the authentication configuration and the defined SSL context, if one exists, required for the connection. For information on defining an authentication context, see Creating an Authentication Context.

For example, a remote-outbound-connection can be added as follows, where OUTBOUND_SOCKET_BINDING_NAME is an already defined outbound-socket-binding and AUTHENTICATION_CONTEXT_NAME is an authentication-context that has already been defined in the elytron subsystem configuration.

/subsystem=remoting/remote-outbound-connection=OUTBOUND_CONNECTION_NAME:add(authentication-context=AUTHENTICATION_CONTEXT_NAME, outbound-socket-binding-ref=OUTBOUND_SOCKET_BINDING_NAME)

2.9. Securing a Managed Domain

In addition to securing the management interfaces, you can also secure communication between JBoss EAP instances in a managed domain.

For information on concepts and general configuration for the managed domain operating mode, see the Domain Management section of the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

2.9.1. Configure Password Authentication Between Slaves and the Domain Controller Using Elytron

  1. Add a user on the master domain controller.

    A user needs to be added on the master domain controller for the slave controller to use for authentication. If you are using the default file based user and group authentication mechanism, this can be done by running EAP_HOME/bin/adduser.sh. Add the username, password and other configurations when prompted.

    The add-user utility can be used to manage both the users in the ManagementRealm and the users in the ApplicationRealm.

    Note

    The server caches the contents of the properties files in memory. However, the server does check the modified time of the properties files on each authentication request and reloads if the time has been updated. This means that all changes made by the add-user utility are immediately applied to any running server.

    The slave controller attemps to authenticate using the native interface. If the native interface has been secured with the ManagementRealm Elytron security realm, then you would need to add a user to ManagementRealm for the slave controller to use.

    Note

    The default name of the realm for management users is ManagementRealm. When the add-user utility prompts for the realm name, just accept the default unless you have switched to a different realm.

    The following example assumes the user slave with the password password1! has been added to ManagementRealm.

  2. Add an authentication-configuration to the slave controller.

    /host=slave/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=slave:add(authentication-name=slave, credential-reference={clear-text=password1!})
  3. Add an authentication-context to the slave controller.

    /host=slave/subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=slave-context:add(match-rules=[{authentication-configuration=slave}])
  4. Specify the domain controller location and authentication-context in the slave controller.

    <domain-controller>
      <remote protocol="remote" host="localhost" port="9999" authentication-context="slave-context"/>
    </domain-controller>

2.9.2. Configure Password Authentication Between Slaves and the Domain Controller Using Legacy Core Management Authentication

When configuring a managed domain, by default, the master domain controller is configured to require authentication for each slave controller that connects to it. To configure slave controllers with the proper credentials, you must do the following:

  1. Add a user to the master domain controller

    You need to add a user to the master domain controller using the add-user script. Specifically, you will need to ensure that the user is added to the same realm the master uses to secure its management interface, which by default is ManagementRealm. You also need to ensure you answer yes to the Is this new user going to be used for one AS process to connect to another AS process? question.

    Important

    After adding the user, the script will output a <secret> element, which will be used in the next step. You must keep this value for use in the next step.

    Example: Adding a Slave User

    $ EAP_HOME/bin/add-user.sh
    
    What type of user do you wish to add?
     a) Management User (mgmt-users.properties)
     b) Application User (application-users.properties)
    (a): a
    
    Enter the details of the new user to add.
    Using realm 'ManagementRealm' as discovered from the existing property files.
    Username : slave-user
    Password recommendations are listed below. To modify these restrictions edit the add-user.properties configuration file.
     - The password should be different from the username
     - The password should not be one of the following restricted values {root, admin, administrator}
     - The password should contain at least 8 characters, 1 alphabetic character(s), 1 digit(s), 1 non-alphanumeric symbol(s)
    Password :
    Re-enter Password :
    What groups do you want this user to belong to? (Please enter a comma separated list, or leave blank for none)[  ]:
    About to add user 'slave-user' for realm 'ManagementRealm'
    Is this correct yes/no? yes
    Added user 'slave-user' to file '/home/user/EAP-7.1.0/standalone/configuration/mgmt-users.properties'
    Added user 'slave-user' to file '/home/user/EAP-7.1.0/domain/configuration/mgmt-users.properties'
    Added user 'slave-user' with groups  to file '/home/user/EAP-7.1.0/standalone/configuration/mgmt-groups.properties'
    Added user 'slave-user' with groups  to file '/home/user/EAP-7.1.0/domain/configuration/mgmt-groups.properties'
    Is this new user going to be used for one AS process to connect to another AS process?
    e.g. for a slave host controller connecting to the master or for a Remoting connection for server to server EJB calls.
    yes/no? yes
    To represent the user add the following to the server-identities definition <secret value="ABCzc3dv11Qx" />

  2. Configure the slave controllers to use the credential.

    Once you have created the user on the master domain controller, you will need to update each slave controller to use that credential in the host configuration file, for example host.xml or host-slave.xml. To do so, you need to add the user name to the <remote> element in the domain controller configuration. You will also need to add the <secret> to the server identities of the realm used to secure the <remote> element. Both the user name and <secret> were obtained when adding the user to the master domain controller in the previous step.

    Example: Configuring Slave Controllers

    ...
    <security-realm name="ManagementRealm">
        <server-identities>
            <!-- Replace this with either a base64 password of your own, or use a vault with a vault expression -->
            <secret value="ABCzc3dv11Qx"/>
        </server-identities>
    ...
    <domain-controller>
      <remote security-realm="ManagementRealm" username="slave-user">
          <discovery-options>
              <static-discovery name="primary" protocol="${jboss.domain.master.protocol:remote}" host="${jboss.domain.master.address}" port="${jboss.domain.master.port:9999}"/>
          </discovery-options>
      </remote>
    </domain-controller>

2.9.3. Configuring SSL/TLS Between Domain and Host Controllers Using Elytron

Important

When you configure SSL/TLS to be used between JBoss EAP instances in a managed domain, each instance can have a client or server role depending on the interaction. This includes all host controllers as well as domain controllers. As a result, it is recommended that you set up two-way SSL/TLS between endpoints.

You can configure JBoss EAP instances in a managed domain to use SSL/TLS when communicating with each other, in other words, between the master domain controller and host controllers. To do so using Elytron, use the following procedure.

  1. Generate and configure all necessary certificates and keystores.

    In order to set up two-way SSL/TLS between endpoints, you need to generate and configure certificates and keystores for the master domain controller as well as each host controller. You also need to import the certificate of the master domain controller into each host controller’s keystore as well as import each host controller’s certificate into the master domain controller’s keystore. The specifics of this process is covered in Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces Using the Elytron Subsystem.

  2. Add a user on the master domain controller.

    A user needs to be added on the master domain controller for the slave controller to use for authentication. If you are using the default file based user and group authentication mechanism, this can be done by running EAP_HOME/bin/adduser.sh. Add the username, password and other configurations when prompted.

    The add-user utility can be used to manage both the users in the ManagementRealm and the users in the ApplicationRealm.

    Note

    The server caches the contents of the properties files in memory. However, the server does check the modified time of the properties files on each authentication request and reloads if the time has been updated. This means that all changes made by the add-user utility are immediately applied to any running server.

    The slave controller attemps to authenticate using the native interface. If the native interface has been secured with the ManagementRealm Elytron security realm, then you would need to add a user to ManagementRealm for the slave controller to use.

    Note

    The default name of the realm for management users is ManagementRealm. When the add-user utility prompts for the realm name, just accept the default unless you have switched to a different realm.

    The following example assumes the user slave with the password password1! has been added to ManagementRealm.

  3. Configure the master domain controller to use SSL/TLS.

    The commands below configure the domain controller’s key-store, key-manager, trust-manager, and server-ssl-context for the server keystore and truststore.

    /host=master/subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayKS:add(path=/path/to/server.keystore.jks,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
    
    /host=master/subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayTS:add(path=/path/to/server.truststore.jks,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
    
    /host=master/subsystem=elytron/key-manager=twoWayKM:add(key-store=twoWayKS,algorithm="SunX509",credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
    
    /host=master/subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=twoWayTM:add(key-store=twoWayTS,algorithm="SunX509")
    
    /host=master/subsystem=elytron/server-ssl-context=twoWaySSC:add(key-manager=twoWayKM,protocols=["TLSv1.2"],trust-manager=twoWayTM,want-client-auth=true,need-client-auth=true)
    
    /host=master/core-service=management/management-interface=native-interface:write-attribute(name=ssl-context, value=twoWaySSC)
    Important

    You need to know what key manager algorithms are provided by the JDK you are using. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms. You also need to determine what HTTPS protocols you want to support. The example commands above use TLSv1.2. You can use the cipher-suite-filter argument to specify which cipher suites are allowed, and the use-cipher-suites-order argument to honor server cipher suite order. The use-cipher-suites-order attribute by default is set to true. This differs from the legacy security subsystem behavior, which defaults to honoring client cipher suite order.

  4. Configure an authentication context and domain controller location on each slave host controller.

    The following example configuration assumes the domain controller exists on localhost. Ensure you specify the correct management user, password, and domain controller location for your environment.

    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=slaveHostSSLContext:add()
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=slaveHostSSLConfiguration:add()
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=slaveHostSSLConfiguration:write-attribute(name=sasl-mechanism-selector,value=DIGEST-MD5)
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=slaveHostSSLConfiguration:write-attribute(name=authentication-name,value=slave)
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=slaveHostSSLConfiguration:write-attribute(name=realm,value=ManagementRealm)
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=slaveHostSSLConfiguration:write-attribute(name=credential-reference,value={clear-text=password1!})
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=slaveHostSSLContext:write-attribute(name=match-rules,value=[{match-host=localhost,authentication-configuration=slaveHostSSLConfiguration}]
    
    /host=slave1:write-remote-domain-controller(host=localhost,port=9999,protocol=remote,authentication-context=slaveHostSSLContext)
  5. Configure each slave host controller to use SSL/TLS.

    The commands below configure a slave host controller’s key-store, key-manager, trust-manager, client-ssl-context for the server keystore and truststore, as well as the authentication-context.

    The following example configuration assumes the domain controller exists on localhost. Ensure you specify the correct domain controller location for your environment.

    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayKS:add(path=/path/to/client.keystore.jks,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/key-store=twoWayTS:add(path=/path/to/client.truststore.jks,credential-reference={clear-text=secret},type=JKS)
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/key-manager=twoWayKM:add(key-store=twoWayKS,algorithm="SunX509",credential-reference={clear-text=secret})
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=twoWayTM:add(key-store=twoWayTS,algorithm="SunX509")
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/client-ssl-context=twoWayCSC:add(key-manager=twoWayKM,protocols=["TLSv1.2"],trust-manager=twoWayTM)
    
    /host=slave1/subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=slaveHostSSLContext:write-attribute(name=match-rules,value=[{match-host=localhost,authentication-configuration=slaveHostSSLConfiguration,ssl-context=twoWayCSC}])
  6. Reload all the JBoss EAP hosts in your managed domain.

2.9.4. Configuring SSL/TLS Between Domain and Host Controllers Using Legacy Core Management Authentication

Important

When you configure SSL/TLS to be used between JBoss EAP instances in a managed domain, each instance can have a client or server role depending on the interaction. This includes all host controllers as well as domain controllers. As a result, it is recommended that you set up two-way SSL/TLS between endpoints.

You can configure JBoss EAP instances in a managed domain to use SSL/TLS when communicating with each other, in other words, between the master domain controller and host controllers. To do so using legacy core management authentication, use the following procedure.

  1. Generate and configure all necessary certificates and keystores.

    In order to set up two-way SSL/TLS between endpoints, you need to generate and configure certificates and keystores for the master domain controller as well as each host controller. You also need to import the certificate of the master domain controller into each host controller’s keystore as well as import each host controller’s certificate into the master domain controller’s keystore. The specifics of this process is covered in Setting up Two-way SSL/TLS for the Management Interfaces with Legacy Core Management Authentication.

  2. Configure the master domain controller to use SSL/TLS.

    Once you have configured all certificates and keystores, you need to configure a security realm to use two-way SSL/TLS. This is done by configuring a security realm to use SSL/TLS and to require it for authentication. That security realm is then used to secure the management interface used for connecting between host controllers and the master domain controller.

    Note

    The following commands below must either be run in batch mode, or the server must be reloaded after adding the ssl server identity. The example below is shown using batch mode.

    batch
    
    /host=master/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm:add()
    
    /host=master/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/server-identity=ssl:add(alias=domaincontroller,keystore-relative-to=jboss.domain.config.dir,keystore-path=domaincontroller.jks,keystore-password=secret)
    
    /host=master/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/authentication=truststore:add(keystore-relative-to=jboss.domain.config.dir,keystore-path=domaincontroller.jks,keystore-password=secret)
    
    /host=master/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/authentication=local:add(default-user=\$local)
    
    /host=master/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/authentication=properties:add(relative-to=jboss.domain.config.dir,path=mgmt-users.properties)
    
    /host=master/core-service=management/management-interface=native-interface:write-attribute(name=security-realm,value=CertificateRealm)
    
    run-batch
  3. Configure all host controllers to use SSL/TLS.

    Once you have the master domain controller configured to use two-way SSL/TLS, you need to configure each host controller to use it as well. The process is very much the same as the master domain controller configuration, except you will need to use the keystore specific to each host.

    Note

    The following commands below must either be run in batch mode, or the server must be reloaded after adding the ssl server identity. The example below is shown using batch mode.

    batch
    
    /host=instance1/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm:add()
    
    /host=instance1/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/server-identity=ssl:add(alias=instance1,keystore-relative-to=jboss.domain.config.dir,keystore-path=instance1.jks,keystore-password=secret)
    
    /host=instance1/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/authentication=truststore:add(keystore-relative-to=jboss.domain.config.dir,keystore-path=instance1.jks,keystore-password=secret)
    
    /host=instance1/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/authentication=local:add(default-user="\$local")
    
    /host=instance1/core-service=management/security-realm=CertificateRealm/authentication=properties:add(relative-to=jboss.domain.config.dir,path=mgmt-users.properties)
    
    /host=instance1/core-service=management/management-interface=native-interface:write-attribute(name=security-realm,value=CertificateRealm)
    
    run-batch

    Additionally, you will need to update the security realm used when connecting the master domain controller. This change must be done directly in the host controller’s configuration file, for example host.xml or host-slave.xml, while the server is not running.

    Example: Host Controller Configuration File

    <domain-controller>
      <remote security-realm="CertificateRealm" username="slave-user">
        <discovery-options>
          <static-discovery name="primary" protocol="${jboss.domain.master.protocol:remote}" host="${jboss.domain.master.address}" port="${jboss.domain.master.port:9999}"/>
        </discovery-options>
      </remote>
    </domain-controller>

    Warning

    Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2 in all affected packages.

2.10. Additional Elytron Components for SSL/TLS

The basic concepts behind configuring one-way SSL/TLS and two-way SSL/TLS are covered in the following:

Elytron also offers some additional components for configuring SSL/TLS.

2.10.1. Using an ldap-key-store

An ldap-key-store allows you to use a keystore stored in an LDAP server. You can use an ldap-key-store in the same way as you use a key-store.

Note

It is not possible to use a JMX ObjectName to decrypt the LDAP credentials. Instead, credentials can be secured by using a credential store.

To create and use an ldap-key-store:

  1. Configure a dir-context.

    To connect to the LDAP server from JBoss EAP, you need to configure a dir-context that provides the URL as well as the principal used to connect to the server.

    Example: dir-context

    /subsystem=elytron/dir-context=exampleDC:add(url="ldap://127.0.0.1:10389", principal="uid=admin,ou=system", credential-reference={clear-text="secret"})

  2. Configure an ldap-key-store.

    When you configure an ldap-key-store, you need to specify both the dir-context used to connect to the LDAP server as well as how to locate the keystore stored in the LDAP server. At a minimum, this requires you to specify a search-path.

    Example: ldap-key-store

    /subsystem=elytron/ldap-key-store=ldapKS:add(dir-context=exampleDC, search-path="ou=Keystores,dc=wildfly,dc=org")

  3. Use the ldap-key-store.

    Once you have defined your ldap-key-store, you can use it in the same places where a key-store could be used. For example, you could use an ldap-key-store when configuring One-way SSL/TLS and Two-way SSL/TLS for applications.

For the full list of attributes for ldap-key-store as well as other Elytron components, see Elytron Subsystem Components Reference.

2.10.2. Using a filtering-key-store

A filtering-key-store allows you to expose a subset of aliases from an existing key-store, and use it in the same places you could use a key-store. For example, if a keystore contained alias1, alias2, and alias3, but you only wanted to expose alias1 and alias3, a filtering-key-store provides you several ways to do that.

To create a filtering-key-store:

  1. Configure a key-store.

    /subsystem=elytron/key-store=myKS:add(path=keystore.jks, relative-to=jboss.server.config.dir, credential-reference={clear-text=secret}, type=JKS)
  2. Configure a filtering-key-store.

    When you configure a filtering-key-store, you specify which key-store you want to filter and the alias-filter for filtering aliases from the key-store. The filter can be specified in one of the following formats:

    • alias1,alias3, which is a comma-delimited list of aliases to expose.
    • ALL:-alias2, which exposes all aliases in the keystore except the ones listed.
    • NONE:+alias1:+alias3, which exposes no aliases in the keystore except the ones listed.

      This example uses a comma-delimted list to expose alias1 and alias3.

      /subsystem=elytron/filtering-key-store=filterKS:add(key-store=myKS, alias-filter="alias1,alias3")
      Note

      The alias-filter attribute is case sensitive. Because the use of mixed-case or uppercase aliases, such as elytronAppServer, might not be recognized by some keystore providers, it is recommended to use lowercase aliases, such as elytronappserver.

  3. Use the filtering-key-store.

    Once you have defined your filtering-key-store, you can use it in the same places where a key-store could be used. For example, you could use a filtering-key-store when configuring One-way SSL/TLS and Two-way SSL/TLS for applications.

For the full list of attributes for filtering-key-store as well as other Elytron components, see Elytron Subsystem Components Reference.

2.10.3. Reload a Keystore

You can reload a keystore configured in JBoss EAP from the management CLI. This is useful in cases where you have made changes to certificates referenced by a keystore.

To reload a keystore:

/subsystem=elytron/key-store=httpsKS:load

2.10.4. Keystore Alias

The alias denotes the stored secret or credential in the store. If you add a keystore to the elytron subsystem using the key-store component, you can check the keystore’s contents using the alias related key-store operations.

The different operations for alias manipulation are:

  • read-alias - Read an alias from a keystore.
  • read-aliases - Read aliases from a keystore.
  • remove-alias - Remove an alias from a keystore.

For example, to read an alias:

/subsystem=elytron/key-store=httpsKS/:read-alias(alias=localhost)

2.10.5. Using a client-ssl-context

A client-ssl-context is used for providing an SSL context when the JBoss EAP instance creates an SSL connection as a client, such as using SSL in remoting.

To create a client-ssl-context:

  1. Create key-store, key-manager, and trust-manager components as needed.

    If establishing a two-way SSL/TLS connection, you need to create separate key-store components for the client and server certificates, a key-manager for the client key-store, and a trust-manager for the server key-store. Alternatively, if you are doing a one-way SSL/TLS connection, you need to create a key-store for the server certificate and a trust-manager that references it. Examples on creating keystores and truststores are available in the Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for Applications using the Elytron Subsystem section.

  2. Create a client-ssl-context.

    Create a client-ssl-context referencing keystores, truststores, as well as any other necessary configuration options.

    Example: client-ssl-context

    /subsystem=elytron/client-ssl-context=exampleCSC:add(key-manager=clientKM, trust-manager=clientTM, protocols=["TLSv1.2"])

  3. Reference the client-ssl-context.

For the full list of attributes for client-ssl-context as well as other Elytron components, see Elytron Subsystem Components Reference.

2.10.6. Using a server-ssl-context

A server-ssl-context is used for providing a server-side SSL context. In addition to the usual configuration for an SSL context, it is possible to configure additional items such as cipher suites and protocols. The SSL context will wrap any additional items that are configured.

  1. Create key-store, key-manager, and trust-manager components as needed.

    If establishing a two-way SSL/TLS connection, you need to create separate key-store components for the client and server certificates, a key-manager for the server key-store, and a trust-manager for the server trust-store. Alternatively, if you are doing a one-way SSL/TLS connection, you need to create a key-store for the server certificate and a key-manager that references it. Examples on creating keystores and truststores are available in the Enable Two-way SSL/TLS for Applications Using the Elytron Subsystem section.

  2. Create a server-ssl-context.

    Create a server-ssl-context that references the key manager, trust manager, or any other desired configuration options using one of the options outlined below.

Add a Server SSL Context Using the Management CLI
/subsystem=elytron/server-ssl-context=newServerSSLContext:add(key-manager=KEY_MANAGER,protocols=["TLSv1.2"])
Important

You need to determine what HTTPS protocols will be supported. The example commands above use TLSv1.2. You can use the cipher-suite-filter argument to specify which cipher suites are allowed, and the use-cipher-suites-order argument to honor server cipher suite order. The use-cipher-suites-order attribute by default is set to true. This differs from the legacy security subsystem behavior, which defaults to honoring client cipher suite order.

Add a Server SSL Context Using the Management Console
  1. Access the management console. For more information, see the Management Console section in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.
  2. Navigate to ConfigurationSubsystemsSecurity - ElytronOther.
  3. Click on View. The Server SSL Context tab lets you do all the server SSL context related configurations.

For the full list of attributes for server-ssl-context as well as other Elytron components, see Elytron Subsystem Components Reference.

2.10.7. Custom Components

When configuring SSL/TLS in the elytron subsystem, you can provide and use custom implementations of the following components:

  • key-store
  • key-manager
  • trust-manager
  • client-ssl-context
  • server-ssl-context
Warning

It is not recommended to provide custom implementations of any component outside of the trust-manager without an intimate knowledge of the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE).

Important

When using FIPS it is not possible to utilize a custom trust manager or key manager, as FIPS requires these managers be embedded in the JDK for security reasons. Similar behavior can be accomplished by implementing a SecurityRealm that validates X509 evidences.

When creating custom implementations of Elytron components, they must present the appropriate capabilities and requirements. For more details on capabilities and requirements, see the Capabilities and Requirements section of the JBoss EAP Security Architecture guide. Implementation details for each component are provided by the JDK vendor.

2.10.7.1. Add a Custom Component to Elytron

The following steps describe adding a custom component within Elytron.

  1. Add the JAR containing the provider for the custom component as a module into JBoss EAP, declaring any required dependencies, such as javax.api:

    module add --name=MODULE_NAME --resources=FACTORY_JAR --dependencies=javax.api,DEPENDENCY_LIST
    Important

    Using the module management CLI command to add and remove modules is provided as Technology Preview only. This command is not appropriate for use in a managed domain or when connecting to the management CLI remotely. Modules should be added and removed manually in a production environment. For more information, see the Create a Custom Module Manually and Remove a Custom Module Manually sections of the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

    Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs), might not be functionally complete, and Red Hat does not recommend to use them for production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

    See Technology Preview Features Support Scope on the Red Hat Customer Portal for information about the support scope for Technology Preview features.

  2. When the component is added to the elytron subsystem the java.util.ServiceLoader will be used to discover the provider. Alternatively, a reference to the provider can be provided by defining a provider-loader. There are two methods of creating the loader, and only one should be implemented for each component.

    • Reference the provider directly when defining the provider-loader:

      /subsystem=elytron/provider-loader=LOADER_NAME:add(class-names=[CLASS_NAME],module=MODULE_NAME)
    • Include a reference to the provider in META-INF/services/java.security.Provider. This reference is automatically created when using the @MetaInfServices annotation in org.kohsuke.metainf-services. When using this method only the module needs to be referenced by the provider-loader, as seen below:

      /subsystem=elytron/provider-loader=LOADER_NAME:add(module=MODULE_NAME)
  3. Add the custom component into Elytron’s configuration, using the appropriate element for the type to be added and referencing any defined providers.

    /subsystem=elytron/COMPONENT_NAME=NEW_COMPONENT:add(providers=LOADER_NAME,...)

    For instance, to define a trust manager, the trust-manager element would be used, as seen in the following command:

    Example: Adding a Custom Trust Manager

    /subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=newTrustManager:add(algorithm=MyX509,providers=customProvider,key-store=sampleKeystore)

  4. Once defined, the component can be referenced from other elements.

2.10.7.2. Using Custom Trust Managers with Elytron

By implementing a custom trust manager, it is possible to extend the validation of certificates when using HTTPS in Undertow, LDAPS in a dir-context, or any place where Elytron is used for SSL connections. This component is responsible for making trust decisions for the server, and it is strongly recommended that these be implemented if a custom trust manager is used.

Important

When using FIPS it is not possible to utilize a custom trust manager, as FIPS requires this manager be embedded in the JDK for security reasons. Similar behavior can be accomplished by implementing a SecurityRealm that validates X509 evidences.

Requirements for Implementing a Custom Trust Manager

When using a custom trust manager, the following must be implemented:

  • A trust manager that implements the X509ExtendedTrustManager interface.
  • A trust manager factory that extends TrustManagerFactorySpi.
  • The provider of the trust manager factory.

The provider must be included in the JAR file to be added into JBoss EAP. Any implemented classes must be included in JBoss EAP as a module. Classes are not required to be in one module, and can be loaded from module dependencies.

Example Implementations

The following example demonstrates a provider that registers the custom trust manager factory as a service.

Example: Provider

import org.kohsuke.MetaInfServices;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManagerFactory;
import java.security.Provider;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

@MetaInfServices(Provider.class)
public class CustomProvider extends Provider {

    public CustomProvider() {
        super("CustomProvider", 1.0, "Demo provider");

        System.out.println("CustomProvider initialization.");

        final List<String> emptyList = Collections.emptyList();
        final Map<String, String> emptyMap = Collections.emptyMap();

        putService(new Service(this, TrustManagerFactory.class.getSimpleName(),"CustomAlgorithm", CustomTrustManagerFactorySpi.class.getName(), emptyList, emptyMap));
    }

}

The following example demonstrates a custom trust manager. This trust manager contains overloaded methods on checking if a client or server is trusted.

Example: TrustManager

import javax.net.ssl.SSLEngine;
import javax.net.ssl.X509ExtendedTrustManager;
import java.net.Socket;
import java.security.cert.CertificateException;
import java.security.cert.X509Certificate;

public class CustomTrustManager extends X509ExtendedTrustManager {

    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, Socket socket) throws CertificateException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, Socket socket) throws CertificateException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, SSLEngine sslEngine) throws CertificateException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s, SSLEngine sslEngine) throws CertificateException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    public void checkClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s) throws CertificateException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] x509Certificates, String s) throws CertificateException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
        // Insert your code here
    }

}

The following example is a factory used to return instances of the trust manager.

Example: TrustManagerFactorySpi

import javax.net.ssl.ManagerFactoryParameters;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManager;
import javax.net.ssl.TrustManagerFactorySpi;
import java.security.InvalidAlgorithmParameterException;
import java.security.KeyStore;
import java.security.KeyStoreException;

public class CustomTrustManagerFactorySpi extends TrustManagerFactorySpi {

    protected void engineInit(KeyStore keyStore) throws KeyStoreException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    protected void engineInit(ManagerFactoryParameters managerFactoryParameters) throws InvalidAlgorithmParameterException {
        // Insert your code here
    }

    protected CustomTrustManager[] engineGetTrustManagers() {
        // Insert your code here
    }

}

Adding the Custom Trust Manager

Once the provider and trust manager have been created, add them to the elytron subsystem by using the steps outlined in Add a Custom Component to Elytron.

2.10.8. Using a Certificate Revocation List

If you want to validate a certificate against a certificate revocation list (CRL), you can configure this using the certificate-revocation-list attribute for a trust manager in the elytron subsystem. For example:

/subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=TRUST_MANAGER:write-attribute(name=certificate-revocation-list,value={path=/path/to/CRL_FILE.crl.pem}

For more information on the available attributes for a trust manager, see the trust-manager Attributes table.

Note

Your truststore must contain the certificate chain in order to check the validity of both the certification revocation list and the certificate. The truststore should not contain end-entity certificates, just certificate authority and intermediate certificates.

You can instruct the trust manager to reload the certificate revocation list by using the reload-certificate-revocation-list operation.

/subsystem=elytron/trust-manager=TRUST_MANAGER:reload-certificate-revocation-list

Chapter 3. Securing Users of the Server and Its Management Interfaces

3.1. User Authentication with Elytron

3.1.1. Default Configuration

By default, the JBoss EAP management interfaces are secured by the legacy core management authentication.

Example: Default Configuration

/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "allowed-origins" => undefined,
        "console-enabled" => true,
        "http-authentication-factory" => undefined,
        "http-upgrade" => {"enabled" => true},
        "http-upgrade-enabled" => true,
        "sasl-protocol" => "remote",
        "secure-socket-binding" => undefined,
        "security-realm" => "ManagementRealm",
        "server-name" => undefined,
        "socket-binding" => "management-http",
        "ssl-context" => undefined
    }

JBoss EAP does provide management-http-authentication and management-sasl-authentication in the elytron subsystem for securing the management interfaces as well.

To update JBoss EAP to use the default Elytron components:

  1. Set http-authentication-factory to use management-http-authentication:

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=http-authentication-factory, value=management-http-authentication)
  2. Set sasl-authentication-factory to use management-sasl-authentication:

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=http-upgrade.sasl-authentication-factory, value=management-sasl-authentication)
  3. Undefine security-realm:

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:undefine-attribute(name=security-realm)
  4. Reload JBoss EAP for the changes to take affect:
reload

The management interfaces are now secured using the default components provided by the elytron subsystem.

3.1.1.1. Default Elytron HTTP Authentication Configuration

When you access the management interface over http, for example when using the web-based management console, JBoss EAP will use the management-http-authentication http-authentication-factory.

/subsystem=elytron/http-authentication-factory=management-http-authentication:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "http-server-mechanism-factory" => "global",
        "mechanism-configurations" => [{
            "mechanism-name" => "DIGEST",
            "mechanism-realm-configurations" => [{"realm-name" => "ManagementRealm"}]
        }],
        "security-domain" => "ManagementDomain"
    }
}

The management-http-authentication http-authentication-factory, is configured to use the ManagementDomain security domain.

/subsystem=elytron/security-domain=ManagementDomain:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "default-realm" => "ManagementRealm",
        "permission-mapper" => "default-permission-mapper",
        "post-realm-principal-transformer" => undefined,
        "pre-realm-principal-transformer" => undefined,
        "principal-decoder" => undefined,
        "realm-mapper" => undefined,
        "realms" => [
            {
                "realm" => "ManagementRealm",
                "role-decoder" => "groups-to-roles"
            },
            {
                "realm" => "local",
                "role-mapper" => "super-user-mapper"
            }
        ],
        "role-mapper" => undefined,
        "trusted-security-domains" => undefined
    }
}

The ManagementDomain security domain is backed by the ManagementRealm Elytron security realm, which is a properties-based realm.

Important

A properties-based realm is only read when the server starts. Any users added after server start, either manually or by using an add-user script, will require a server reload. This reload is accomplished by running the reload command from the management CLI.

reload
/subsystem=elytron/properties-realm=ManagementRealm:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "groups-attribute" => "groups",
        "groups-properties" => {
            "path" => "mgmt-groups.properties",
            "relative-to" => "jboss.server.config.dir"
        },
        "plain-text" => false,
        "users-properties" => {
            "path" => "mgmt-users.properties",
            "relative-to" => "jboss.server.config.dir"
        }
    }
}

3.1.1.2. Default Elytron Management CLI Authentication

By default, the management CLI (jboss-cli.sh) is configured to connect over remote+http.

Example: Default jboss-cli.xml

<jboss-cli xmlns="urn:jboss:cli:3.1">

    <default-protocol use-legacy-override="true">remote+http</default-protocol>

    <!-- The default controller to connect to when 'connect' command is executed w/o arguments -->
    <default-controller>
        <protocol>remote+http</protocol>
        <host>localhost</host>
        <port>9990</port>
    </default-controller>

This will establish a connection over HTTP and use HTTP upgrade to change the communication protocol to Remoting. The HTTP upgrade connection is secured in the http-upgrade section of the http-interface using a sasl-authentication-factory.

Example: Configuration with Default Components

/core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "allowed-origins" => undefined,
        "console-enabled" => true,
        "http-authentication-factory" => "management-http-authentication",
        "http-upgrade" => {
            "enabled" => true,
            "sasl-authentication-factory" => "management-sasl-authentication"
        },
        "http-upgrade-enabled" => true,
        "sasl-protocol" => "remote",
        "secure-socket-binding" => undefined,
        "security-realm" => undefined,
        "server-name" => undefined,
        "socket-binding" => "management-http",
        "ssl-context" => undefined
    }
}

The default sasl-authentication-factory is management-sasl-authentication.

/subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=management-sasl-authentication:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "mechanism-configurations" => [
            {
                "mechanism-name" => "JBOSS-LOCAL-USER",
                "realm-mapper" => "local"
            },
            {
                "mechanism-name" => "DIGEST-MD5",
                "mechanism-realm-configurations" => [{"realm-name" => "ManagementRealm"}]
            }
        ],
        "sasl-server-factory" => "configured",
        "security-domain" => "ManagementDomain"
    }
}

The management-sasl-authentication sasl-authentication-factory specifies JBOSS-LOCAL-USER and DIGEST-MD5 mechanisms.

The ManagementRealm Elytron security realm, used in DIGEST-MD5, is the same realm used in the management-http-authentication http-authentication-factory.

Example: JBOSS-LOCAL-USER Realm

/subsystem=elytron/identity-realm=local:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "attribute-name" => undefined,
        "attribute-values" => undefined,
        "identity" => "$local"
    }
}

The local Elytron security realm is for handling silent authentication for local users.

3.1.2. Secure the Management Interfaces with a New Identity Store

  1. Create a security domain and any supporting security realms, decoders, or mappers for your identity store.

    This process is covered in the Elytron Subsystem section of JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide. For example, if you wanted to secure the management interfaces using a filesystem-based identity store, you would follow the steps in Configure Authentication with a Filesystem-based Identity Store.

  2. Create an http-authentication-factory or sasl-authentication-factory.

    Example: http-authentication-factory

    /subsystem=elytron/http-authentication-factory=example-http-auth:add(http-server-mechanism-factory=global, security-domain=exampleSD, mechanism-configurations=[{mechanism-name=DIGEST, mechanism-realm-configurations=[{realm-name=exampleManagementRealm}]}])

    Example: sasl-authentication-factory

    /subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=example-sasl-auth:add(sasl-server-factory=configured, security-domain=exampleSD, mechanism-configurations=[{mechanism-name=DIGEST-MD5, mechanism-realm-configurations=[{realm-name=exampleManagementRealm}]}])

  3. Add pattern-filter to the configured configurable-sasl-server-factory.

    Example: Add GSSAPI to the Configured configurable-sasl-server-factory

    /subsystem=elytron/configurable-sasl-server-factory=configured:list-add(name=filters, value={pattern-filter=GSSAPI})

    This is an optional step. When a client attempts to connect to the HTTP management interfaces, JBoss EAP sends back an HTTP response with a status code of 401 Unauthorized, and a set of headers that list the supported authentication mechanisms, for example, Digest, GSSAPI, and so on. For more information, see the Local and Remote Client Authentication with the HTTP Interface section in the JBoss EAP Security Architecture guide.

  4. Update the management interfaces to use your http-authentication-factory or sasl-authentication-factory.

    Example: Update http-authentication-factory

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=http-authentication-factory, value=example-http-auth)
    
    reload

    Example: Update sasl-authentication-factory

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface:write-attribute(name=http-upgrade.sasl-authentication-factory, value=example-sasl-auth)
    
    reload

    You can also update the native interface to use a sasl-authentication-factory.

    Note

    The native interface is not enabled by default.

    Example: Add Native Interface and Use sasl-authentication-factory

    /socket-binding-group=standard-sockets/socket-binding=native:add(interface=management, port=9999)
    
    /core-service=management/management-interface=native-interface:add(socket-binding=native)
    
    /core-service=management/management-interface=native-interface:write-attribute(name=sasl-authentication-factory, value=example-sasl-auth)
    
    reload

Note

When using legacy core management authentication, you can only secure the http management interface with a single legacy security realm. This forces the HTTP and SASL configuration to appear in a single legacy security realm. When using the elytron subsystem, you can configure the http-authentication-factory and sasl-authentication-factory separately, allowing you to use distinct security domains for securing the HTTP and SASL mechanisms of the http management interface.

Note

If two different attributes with similar implementation in legacy security and Elytron, respectively, are configured in the management interface, only the Elytron related configurations are used. For example, if security-realm for legacy security and http-authentication-factory for Elytron are configured, then authentication is handled by http-authentication-factory configuration.

Note

When the management interface includes both http-authentication-factory, or sasl-authentication-factory for the native interface, as well as the security-realm, and the ssl-context attribute is not used, the authentication is handled by Elytron and the SSL is handled by the legacy security realm.

When the management interface includes both the security-realm and the ssl-context, and the http-authentication-factory or sasl-authentication-factory for the native interface is not used, then authentication is handled by the legacy security realm and SSL is handled by Elytron.

3.1.3. Adding Silent Authentication

By default, JBoss EAP provides an authentication mechanism for local users, also know as silent authentication, through the local security realm. You can find more details on silent authentication in the Silent Authentication section.

Silent authentication must be added to a sasl-authentication-factory.

To add silent authentication to an existing sasl-authentication-factory:

/subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=example-sasl-auth:list-add(name=mechanism-configurations, value={mechanism-name=JBOSS-LOCAL-USER, realm-mapper=local})

reload

To create a new sasl-server-factory with silent authentication:

/subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=example-sasl-auth:add(sasl-server-factory=configured,security-domain=ManagementDomain,mechanism-configurations=[{mechanism-name=DIGEST-MD5,mechanism-realm-configurations=[{realm-name=exampleManagementRealm}]},{mechanism-name=JBOSS-LOCAL-USER, realm-mapper=local}])

reload
Note

The above example uses the existing ManagementDomain security domain, but you can also create and use other security domains. You can find more examples of creating security domains in the Elytron Subsystem section of the JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide.

Important

If the Elytron security is used and an authentication attempt comes in using the JBOSS-LOCAL-USER SASL mechanism with an authentication name that does not correspond to a real identity, authentication fails.

Choosing a custom user name for JBOSS-LOCAL-USER is possible with legacy security subsystem. There the authentication proceeds by mapping the user name to a special identity.

3.1.4. Mapping Identity for Authenticated Management Users

When using the elytron subsystem to secure the management interfaces, you can provide a security domain to the management interfaces for identity mapping of authenticated users. This allows authenticated users to appear with the appropriate identity when logged into the management interfaces.

The application server exposes more than one kind of management interface. Each type of interface can be associated with an independent authentication-factory to handle the authentication requirements of that interface.

To make the authorization decision, the current security identity is obtained from the security domain. The returned security identity has the role mapping and permission assignment, based on the rules defined within that security domain.

Note

In most cases, a common security domain is used for all management; for authentication of the management interfaces as well as for obtaining the security identity used for the authorization decisions. In these cases, the security domain is associated with the authentication factory of the management interface and no special access=identity needs to be defined.

In some cases, a different security domain is used to obtain the identity for the authorization decisions. Here, the access=identity resource is defined. It contains a reference to a security domain to obtain the identity for authorization.

The below example assumes you have secured the management interfaces with the exampleSD Elytron security domain and have it exposed as exampleManagementRealm.

To define the identity mapping, add the identity resource to the management interfaces.

Example: Add the identity Resource

/core-service=management/access=identity:add(security-domain=exampleSD)

Once you have added the identity resource, the identity of an authenticated user will appear when accessing the management interfaces. When the identity resource is not added, then the identity of the security domain used for authentication is used.

For example, if you logged into the management CLI as user1, your identity will properly appear.

Example: Display the Identity of an Authenticated User from the Management CLI

:whoami
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {"identity" => {"username" => "user1"}}
}

Important

If the identity resource is added and legacy security realms are used to secure the management interfaces, authenticated users will always have the anonymous identity. Once the identity resource is removed, users authenticated from the legacy security realms will appear with the appropriate identity.

Authorization for management operation always uses the security domain, which is the domain specified on access=identity. If not specified, it is the domain used for authentication. Any role mapping is always in the context of the security domain.

The identity resource for the current request will return a set of roles as mapped using the Elytron configuration. When an RBAC based role mapping definition is in use, the roles from the identity resource will be taken as groups and fed into the management RoleMapping to obtain the management roles for the current request.

Table 3.1. Identity to be Used for Different Scenarios

ScenarioNo access=identity definitionaccess=identity referencing an Elytron security-domain

HTTP management interface using legacy security-realm

Identity from connection.

Unsupported or anonymous identity.

HTTP management interface using elytron HTTP authentication factory backed by security-domain

Identity from connection.

Identity from referenced security-domain if it was successfully inflowed.

Native management, including over HTTP Upgrade, interface using legacy security-realm

Identity from connection.

Unsupported or anonymous identity.

Native management, including over HTTP Upgrade, interface using elytron SASL authentication factory backed by security-domain

Identity from connection.

Identity from referenced security-domain if it was successfully inflowed.

Note

If security domain used in the identity resource does not trust the security domain from authentication, anonymous identity is used.

The security domain used in the identity resource does not need to trust the security domain from authentication, when both are using an identical security realm.

The trusted security domains is not transitive.

Where no access=identity resource is defined, then the identity established during authentication against the management interface will be used. Identities established using connections, through the remoting subsystem or using applications, will not be usable in this case.

Where an access=identity resource is defined but the security domain used by the management interfaces is different and not listed in the list of domains to inflow from, no identity will be established. An inflow will be attempted using the identity established during authentication. Identities established using connections through the remoting subsystem or using applications will not be inflowed in this way.

Important

Where the management interfaces are secured using the legacy security realms, the identity will not be sharable across different security domains. In that case no access=identity resource should be defined. So the identity established during authentication can be used directly. Thus, applications secured using PicketBox are not supported for the identity resource.

3.1.5. Using Elytron Client with the Management CLI

You can configure the management CLI to use Elytron Client for providing security information when connecting to JBoss EAP.

  1. Secure the management interfaces with Elytron.

    In order to use Elytron Client with the management CLI, you must secure the management interfaces with Elytron. You can find more details on securing the management interfaces with Elytron in User Authentication with Elytron.

  2. Create an Elytron Client configuration file.

    You need to create an Elytron Client configuration file that houses your authentication configuration as well as rules for using that configuration. You can find more details on creating an authentication configuration in the The Configuration File Approach section of the JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide.

    Example: custom-config.xml

    <configuration>
        <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
            <authentication-rules>
                <rule use-configuration="configuration1">
                    <match-host name="localhost" />
                </rule>
            </authentication-rules>
            <authentication-configurations>
                <configuration name="configuration1">
                    <sasl-mechanism-selector selector="DIGEST-MD5" />
                    <providers>
                      <use-service-loader />
                    </providers>
                    <set-user-name name="user1" />
                    <credentials>
                        <clear-password password="password123" />
                    </credentials>
                    <set-mechanism-realm name="exampleManagementRealm" />
                 </configuration>
            </authentication-configurations>
        </authentication-client>
    </configuration>

  3. Use the Elytron Client configuration file with management CLI script.

    $ ./jboss-cli.sh -c  -Dwildfly.config.url=/path/to/custom-config.xml

3.2. Identity Propagation and Forwarding with Elytron

3.2.1. Propagating Security Identities for Remote Calls

JBoss EAP 7.1 introduces the ability to easily configure the server and your applications to propagate a security identity from a client to the server for remoting calls. You can also configure server components to run within the security identity of a given user.

The example in this section demonstrates how to forward security identity credentials. It propagates the security identity of a client and an EJB to a remote EJB. It returns a string containing the name of the Principal that called the remote EJB along with the user’s authorized role information. The example consists of the following components.

  • A secured EJB that contains a single method, accessible by all users, that returns authorization information about the caller.
  • An intermediate EJB that contains a single method. It makes use of a remote connection and invokes the method on the secured EJB.
  • A remote standalone client application that invokes the intermediate EJB.
  • A META-INF/wildfly-config.xml file that contains the identity information used for authentication.

You must first enable security identity propagation by configuring the server. Next review the example application code that uses the WildFlyInitialContextFactory to look up and invoke the remote EJB.

Configure the Server for Security Propagation
  1. Configure the ejb3 subsystem to use the Elytron ApplicationDomain.

    /subsystem=ejb3/application-security-domain=quickstart-domain:add(security-domain=ApplicationDomain)

    This adds the following application-security-domain configuration to the ejb3 subsystem.

    <subsystem xmlns="urn:jboss:domain:ejb3:5.0">
        ....
        <application-security-domains>
            <application-security-domain name="quickstart-domain" security-domain="ApplicationDomain"/>
        </application-security-domains>
    </subsystem>
  2. Add the PLAIN authentication configuration to send plain text user names and passwords, and the authentication context that is to be used for outbound connections. See Mechanisms That Support Security Identity Propagation for the list of mechanisms that support identity propagation.

    /subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=ejb-outbound-configuration:add(security-domain=ApplicationDomain,sasl-mechanism-selector="PLAIN")
    /subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=ejb-outbound-context:add(match-rules=[{authentication-configuration=ejb-outbound-configuration}])

    This adds the following authentication-client configuration to the elytron subsystem.

    <subsystem xmlns="urn:wildfly:elytron:1.2" final-providers="combined-providers" disallowed-providers="OracleUcrypto">
        <authentication-client>
            <authentication-configuration name="ejb-outbound-configuration" security-domain="ApplicationDomain" sasl-mechanism-selector="PLAIN"/>
            <authentication-context name="ejb-outbound-context">
                <match-rule authentication-configuration="ejb-outbound-configuration"/>
            </authentication-context>
        </authentication-client>
        ....
    </subsystem>
  3. Add the remote destination outbound socket binding to the standard-sockets socket binding group.

    /socket-binding-group=standard-sockets/remote-destination-outbound-socket-binding=ejb-outbound:add(host=localhost,port=8080)

    This adds the following ejb-outbound outbound socket binding to the standard-sockets socket binding group.

    <socket-binding-group name="standard-sockets" default-interface="public" port-offset="${jboss.socket.binding.port-offset:0}">
        ....
        <outbound-socket-binding name="ejb-outbound">
            <remote-destination host="localhost" port="8080"/>
        </outbound-socket-binding>
    </socket-binding-group>
  4. Add the remote outbound connection and set the SASL authentication factory in the HTTP connector.

    /subsystem=remoting/remote-outbound-connection=ejb-outbound-connection:add(outbound-socket-binding-ref=ejb-outbound, authentication-context=ejb-outbound-context)
    /subsystem=remoting/http-connector=http-remoting-connector:write-attribute(name=sasl-authentication-factory,value=application-sasl-authentication)

    This adds the following http-remoting-connector and ejb-outbound-connection configuration to the remoting subsystem.

    <subsystem xmlns="urn:jboss:domain:remoting:4.0">
        ....
        <http-connector name="http-remoting-connector" connector-ref="default" security-realm="ApplicationRealm" sasl-authentication-factory="application-sasl-authentication"/>
        <outbound-connections>
            <remote-outbound-connection name="ejb-outbound-connection" outbound-socket-binding-ref="ejb-outbound" authentication-context="ejb-outbound-context"/>
        </outbound-connections>
    </subsystem>
  5. Configure the Elytron SASL authentication to use the PLAIN mechanism.

    /subsystem=elytron/sasl-authentication-factory=application-sasl-authentication:write-attribute(name=mechanism-configurations,value=[{mechanism-name=PLAIN},{mechanism-name=JBOSS-LOCAL-USER,realm-mapper=local},{mechanism-name=DIGEST-MD5,mechanism-realm-configurations=[{realm-name=ApplicationRealm}]}])

    This adds the following application-sasl-authentication configuration to the elytron subsystem.

    <subsystem xmlns="urn:wildfly:elytron:1.2" final-providers="combined-providers" disallowed-providers="OracleUcrypto">
        ....
        <sasl>
          ....
          <sasl-authentication-factory name="application-sasl-authentication" sasl-server-factory="configured" security-domain="ApplicationDomain">
              <mechanism-configuration>
                  <mechanism mechanism-name="PLAIN"/>
                  <mechanism mechanism-name="JBOSS-LOCAL-USER" realm-mapper="local"/>
                  <mechanism mechanism-name="DIGEST-MD5">
                      <mechanism-realm realm-name="ApplicationRealm"/>
                  </mechanism>
              </mechanism-configuration>
          </sasl-authentication-factory>
      </sasl>
      ....
    </subsystem>

The server is now configured to enable security propagation for the following example application.

Review the Example Application Code That Propagates a Security Identity

Once security identity propagation is enabled in the server configuration, the EJB client application can use the WildFlyInitialContextFactory to look up and invoke the EJB proxy. The EJB is invoked as the user that authenticated in the client example shown below. The following abbreviated code examples are taken from the ejb-security-context-propagation quickstart that ships with JBoss EAP 7.1. See that quickstart for a complete working example of security identity propagation.

To invoke the EJB as a different user, you can set the Context.SECURITY_PRINCIPAL and Context.SECURITY_CREDENTIALS in the context properties.

Example: Remote Client

public class RemoteClient {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        // invoke the intermediate bean using the identity configured in wildfly-config.xml
        invokeIntermediateBean();

        // now lets programmatically setup an authentication context to switch users before invoking the intermediate bean
        AuthenticationConfiguration superUser = AuthenticationConfiguration.empty().setSaslMechanismSelector(SaslMechanismSelector.NONE.addMechanism("PLAIN")).
                useName("superUser").usePassword("superPwd1!");
        final AuthenticationContext authCtx = AuthenticationContext.empty().
                with(MatchRule.ALL, superUser);

        AuthenticationContext.getContextManager().setThreadDefault(authCtx);
        invokeIntermediateBean();
    }

    private static void invokeIntermediateBean() throws Exception {
        final Hashtable<String, String> jndiProperties = new Hashtable<>();
        jndiProperties.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, "org.wildfly.naming.client.WildFlyInitialContextFactory");
        jndiProperties.put(Context.PROVIDER_URL, "remote+http://localhost:8080");
        final Context context = new InitialContext(jndiProperties);
        IntermediateEJBRemote intermediate = (IntermediateEJBRemote) context.lookup("ejb:/ejb-security-context-propagation/IntermediateEJB!"
                + IntermediateEJBRemote.class.getName());
        // Call the intermediate EJB
        System.out.println(intermediate.makeRemoteCalls());
    }
}

Example: Intermediate EJB

@Stateless
@Remote(IntermediateEJBRemote.class)
@SecurityDomain("quickstart-domain")
@PermitAll
public class IntermediateEJB implements IntermediateEJBRemote {

    @EJB(lookup="ejb:/ejb-security-context-propagation/SecuredEJB!org.jboss.as.quickstarts.ejb_security_context_propagation.SecuredEJBRemote")
    private SecuredEJBRemote remote;

    @Resource
    private EJBContext context;

    public String makeRemoteCalls() {
        try {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("** ").
                    append(context.getCallerPrincipal()).
                    append(" * * \n\n");
            sb.append("Remote Security Information: ").
                    append(remote.getSecurityInformation()).
                    append("\n");

            return sb.toString();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            if (e instanceof RuntimeException) {
                throw (RuntimeException) e;
            }
            throw new RuntimeException("Teasting failed.", e);
        }
    }
}

Example: Secured EJB

@Stateless
@Remote(SecuredEJBRemote.class)
@SecurityDomain("quickstart-domain")
public class SecuredEJB implements SecuredEJBRemote {

    @Resource
    private SessionContext context;

    @PermitAll
    public String getSecurityInformation() {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder("[");
        sb.append("Principal=[").
                append(context.getCallerPrincipal().getName()).
                append("], ");
        userInRole("guest", sb).append(", ");
        userInRole("user", sb).append(", ");
        userInRole("admin", sb).append("]");
        return sb.toString();
    }
}

Example: wildfly-config.xml File

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
    <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
        <authentication-rules>
            <rule use-configuration="default"/>
        </authentication-rules>
        <authentication-configurations>
            <configuration name="default">
                <set-user-name name="quickstartUser"/>
                <credentials>
                    <clear-password password="quickstartPwd1!"/>
                </credentials>
                <sasl-mechanism-selector selector="PLAIN"/>
                <providers>
                    <use-service-loader />
                </providers>
            </configuration>
        </authentication-configurations>
    </authentication-client>
</configuration>

3.2.2. Utilizing Authorization Forwarding Mode

In addition to credential forwarding, Elytron supports the trusted use of identities between peers. This can be useful in the following cases.

  • Requirements are such that you cannot send passwords over the wire.
  • The authentication type is one that does not support credential forwarding.
  • The environment requires a need to limit which systems are allowed to receive the propagated requests.

To utilize authorization forwarding, you first configure an authentication client on the forwarding server and then configure the receiving server to accept and handle the authorization.

Configure the Authentication Client on the Forwarding Server

To enable authorization forwarding, you must configure an authentication client configuration in the forwarding server configuration.

The following management CLI commands create a default authentication client configuration to enable authentication forwarding. You can configure a more advanced rule based selection if you need one.

Example: Management CLI Command to Create the Authentication Client Configuration

/subsystem=elytron/authentication-configuration=forwardit:add(authentication-name=theserver1,security-domain=ApplicationDomain,realm=ApplicationRealm,forwarding-mode=authorization,credential-reference={clear-text=thereallysecretpassword})
/subsystem=elytron/authentication-context=forwardctx:add(match-rules=[{authentication-configuration=forwardit,match-no-user=true}])

These commands add the following authentication-configuration and authentication-context configuration to the elytron subsystem.

Example: Authentication Client Configuration

<authentication-client>
    <authentication-configuration name="forwardit" authentication-name="theserver1" security-domain="ApplicationDomain" forwarding-mode="authorization" realm="ApplicationRealm">
        <credential-reference clear-text="thereallysecretpassword"/>
    </authentication-configuration>
    <authentication-context name="forwardctx">
        <match-rule match-no-user="true" authentication-configuration="forwardit"/>
    </authentication-context>
</authentication-client>

When the forwarding server contacts the receiving server, instead of using the default authentication-based user name and credentials, it uses the predefined server login name theserver1 to establish the trust relationship.

Configure the Authorization Forwarding on the Receiving Server

For the forwarding to complete successfully, the receiving server configuration needs to be configured with the identity matching the one passed by the forwarding server. In this case, you must configure a user named theserver1 on the receiving server with the correct credentials.

You must also configure a "RunAs" permission mapping in the elytron subsystem to allow the identity switch for the theserver1 identity that is passed from the forwarding server. For more information about permission mapping, see Create an Elytron Permission Mapper in How to Configure Server Security for JBoss EAP.

The command below adds a simple-permission-mapper named auth-forwarding-permission-mapper that includes the following configurations.

  • A permission mapping for the user anonymous. This user has no permissions, which prevents an anonymous user from being able to log in.
  • A permission mapping for the user theserver1. This user is assigned the RunAsPrincipalPermission permission of *, which gives this user global permissions to run as any identity. You can restrict the permission to a specific identity if you prefer.
  • A permission mapping for all other users.

Example: Management CLI Command to the Create Simple Permission Mapper

/subsystem=elytron/simple-permission-mapper=auth-forwarding-permission-mapper:add(permission-mappings=[{principals=["anonymous"]},{principals=["theserver1"],permissions=[{class-name="org.wildfly.security.auth.permission.RunAsPrincipalPermission",target-name="*"},{class-name="org.wildfly.security.auth.permission.LoginPermission"},{class-name="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet.deployment.BatchPermission",module="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet",target-name="*"},{class-name="org.wildfly.transaction.client.RemoteTransactionPermission",module="org.wildfly.transaction.client"},{class-name="org.jboss.ejb.client.RemoteEJBPermission",module="org.jboss.ejb-client"}]},{match-all=true,permissions=[{class-name="org.wildfly.security.auth.permission.LoginPermission"},{class-name="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet.deployment.BatchPermission",module="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet",target-name="*"},{class-name="org.wildfly.transaction.client.RemoteTransactionPermission",module="org.wildfly.transaction.client"},{class-name="org.jboss.ejb.client.RemoteEJBPermission",module="org.jboss.ejb-client"}]}])

This command adds the following simple-permission-mapper configuration to the elytron subsystem.

Example: Simple Permission Mapper Configuration

<simple-permission-mapper name="auth-forwarding-permission-mapper">
    <permission-mapping>
        <principal name="anonymous"/>
        <!-- No permissions: Deny any permission to anonymous! -->
    </permission-mapping>
    <permission-mapping>
        <principal name="theserver1"/>
        <permission class-name="org.wildfly.security.auth.permission.RunAsPrincipalPermission" target-name="*"/>
        <permission class-name="org.wildfly.security.auth.permission.LoginPermission"/>
        <permission class-name="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet.deployment.BatchPermission" module="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet" target-name="*"/>
        <permission class-name="org.wildfly.transaction.client.RemoteTransactionPermission" module="org.wildfly.transaction.client"/>
        <permission class-name="org.jboss.ejb.client.RemoteEJBPermission" module="org.jboss.ejb-client"/>
    </permission-mapping>
    <permission-mapping match-all="true">
        <permission class-name="org.wildfly.security.auth.permission.LoginPermission"/>
        <permission class-name="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet.deployment.BatchPermission" module="org.wildfly.extension.batch.jberet" target-name="*"/>
        <permission class-name="org.wildfly.transaction.client.RemoteTransactionPermission" module="org.wildfly.transaction.client"/>
        <permission class-name="org.jboss.ejb.client.RemoteEJBPermission" module="org.jboss.ejb-client"/>
    </permission-mapping>
</simple-permission-mapper>

In cases where principal transformers are used after forwarding authorization, then those transformers are applied on both the authentication and the authorization principals.

3.2.3. Retrieving Security Identity Credentials

There might be situations where you need to retrieve identity credentials for use in outgoing calls, for example, by an HTTP client. The following example demonstrates how to retrieve security credentials programmatically.

import org.wildfly.security.auth.server.IdentityCredentials;
import org.wildfly.security.auth.server.SecurityDomain;
import org.wildfly.security.auth.server.SecurityIdentity;
import org.wildfly.security.credential.PasswordCredential;
import org.wildfly.security.password.interfaces.ClearPassword;

SecurityIdentity securityIdentity = null;
ClearPassword password = null;

// Obtain the SecurityDomain for the current deployment.
// The calling code requires the
//     org.wildfly.security.permission.ElytronPermission("getSecurityDomain") permission
//     if running with a security manager.
SecurityDomain securityDomain = SecurityDomain.getCurrent();
if (securityDomain != null) {
    // Obtain the current security identity from the security domain.
    // This always returns an identity, but it could be the representation
    //     of the anonymous identity if no authenticated identity is available.
    securityIdentity = securityDomain.getCurrentSecurityIdentity();
    // The private credentials can be accessed to obtain any credentials delegated to the identity.
    // The calling code requires the
    //     org.wildfly.security.permission.ElytronPermission("getPrivateCredentials")
    //     permission if running with a security manager.
    IdentityCredentials credentials = securityIdentity.getPrivateCredentials();
    if (credentials.contains(PasswordCredential.class)) {
        password = credentials.getCredential(PasswordCredential.class).getPassword(ClearPassword.class);
    }
}

3.2.4. Mechanisms That Support Security Identity Propagation

The following SASL mechanisms support propagation of security identities:

  • PLAIN
  • OAUTHBEARER
  • GSSAPI
  • GS2-KRB5

The following HTTP mechanisms support propagation of security identities:

  • FORM 1
  • BASIC
  • BEARER_TOKEN
  • SPNEGO

1 FORM authentication is not automatically handled by the web browser. For this reason, you cannot use identity propagation with web applications that use FORM authentication when running in an HA cluster. Other mechanisms, such as BASIC and SPNEGO, support identity propagation in an HA cluster environment.

3.3. Identity Switching with Elytron

3.3.1. Switching Identities in Server-to-server EJB Calls

By default, when you make a remote call to an EJB deployed to an application server, the identity used for authentication on the remote server is the same one that was used on the source server. In some cases, you might want to run the remote secured EJB within the security context of a different identity.

You can use the Elytron API to switch identities in server-to-server EJB calls. When you do that, the request received over the connection is executed as a new request, using the identity specified programmatically in the API call.

The following code example demonstrates how to switch the identity that is used for authentication on a remote EJB. The remoteUsername and remotePassword arguments passed in the securityDomain.authenticate() method are the identity credentials that are to be used for authentication on the target server.

Example: Switching Identities in Server-to-server EJB Calls

SecurityDomain securityDomain = SecurityDomain.getCurrent();
Callable<T> forwardIdentityCallable = () -> {
    return AuthenticationContext.empty()
            .with(MatchRule.ALL,
                    AuthenticationConfiguration.empty()
                    .setSaslMechanismSelector(SaslMechanismSelector.ALL)
                    .useForwardedIdentity(securityDomain))
            .runCallable(callable);
};

securityDomain.authenticate(remoteUsername, new PasswordGuessEvidence(remotePassword.toCharArray())).runAs(forwardIdentityCallable);

3.4. User Authentication with Legacy Core Management Authentication

3.4.1. Default User Configuration

All management interfaces in JBoss EAP are secured by default and users can access them in two different ways: local interfaces and remote interfaces. The basics of both of these authentication mechanisms are covered in the Default Security and JBoss EAP Out of the Box sections of the JBoss EAP Security Architecture guide. By default, access to these interfaces is configured in the Management Realm security realm. Initially, the local interface is enabled and requires access to the host machine running the JBoss EAP instance. Remote access is also enabled and is configured to use a file-based identity store. By default it uses mgmt-users.properties file to store user names and passwords, and mgmt-groups.properties to store user group information.

User information is added to these files by using the included adduser script located in the EAP_HOME/bin/ directory.

To add a user via the adduser script:

  1. Run the add-user.sh or add-user.bat command.
  2. Choose whether to add a management user or application user.
  3. Choose the realm the user will be added to. By default, the only available realms are ManagementRealm and ApplicationRealm. If a custom realm has been added, its name can be manually entered instead.
  4. Type the desired user name, password, and optional roles when prompted. The changes are written to each of the properties files for the security realm.

3.4.2. Adding Authentication via LDAP

JBoss EAP also supports using LDAP authentication for securing the management interfaces. The basics of LDAP and how it works with JBoss EAP are covered in the LDAP, Using LDAP with the Management Interfaces, and Using LDAP with the ManagementRealm sections of the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 Security Architecture guide. For more specifics on how to secure the management interfaces using LDAP authentication, see the Securing the Management Interfaces with LDAP section of the JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide.

3.4.3. Using JAAS for Securing the Management Interfaces

JAAS is a declarative security API used by JBoss EAP to manage security. For more details and background regarding JAAS and declarative security, see the Declarative Security and JAAS section of the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Security Architecture guide.

Note

When JBoss EAP instances are configured to run in ADMIN_ONLY mode, using JAAS to secure the management interfaces is not supported. For more information on ADMIN_ONLY mode, see the Running JBoss EAP in ADMIN_ONLY Mode section of the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

To use JAAS to authenticate to the management interfaces, the following steps must be performed:

  1. Create a security domain.

    In this example, a security domain is created with the UserRoles login module, but other login modules may be used as well:

    /subsystem=security/security-domain=UsersLMDomain:add(cache-type=default)
    
    /subsystem=security/security-domain=UsersLMDomain/authentication=classic:add
    
    /subsystem=security/security-domain=UsersLMDomain/authentication=classic/login-module=UsersRoles:add(code=UsersRoles, flag=required,module-options=[("usersProperties"=>"users.properties"),("rolesProperties"=>"roles.properties")])
  2. Create a security realm with JAAS authentication.

    /core-service=management/security-realm=SecurityDomainAuthnRealm:add
    
    /core-service=management/security-realm=SecurityDomainAuthnRealm/authentication=jaas:add(name=UsersLMDomain)
  3. Update the http-interface management interface to use new security realm.

    /core-service=management/management-interface=http-interface/:write-attribute(name=security-realm,value=SecurityDomainAuthnRealm)
  4. Optional: Assign group membership.

    The attribute assign-groups determines whether loaded user membership information from the security domain is used for group assignment in the security realm. When set to true, this group assignment is used for Role-Based Access Control (RBAC).

    /core-service=management/security-realm=SecurityDomainAuthnRealm/authentication=jaas:write-attribute(name=assign-groups,value=true)

3.5. Role-Based Access Control

The basics of Role-Based Access Control are covered in the Role-Based Access Control and Adding RBAC to the Management Interfaces sections of the JBoss EAP Security Architecture guide.

3.5.1. Enabling Role-Based Access Control

By default the Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) system is disabled. It is enabled by changing the provider attribute from simple to rbac. provider is an attribute of the access-control element of the management element. This can be done using the management CLI or by editing the server configuration XML file if the server is offline. When RBAC is disabled or enabled on a running server, the server configuration must be reloaded before it takes effect.

Warning

Before changing the provider to rbac, be sure your configuration has a user who will be mapped to one of the RBAC roles, preferably with at least one in the Administrator or SuperUser role. Otherwise your installation will not be manageable except by shutting it down and editing the XML configuration. If you have started with one of the standard XML configurations shipped with JBoss EAP, the $local user will be mapped to the SuperUser role and the local authentication scheme will be enabled. This will allow a user, running the CLI on the same system as the JBoss EAP process, to have full administrative permissions. Remote CLI users and web-based management console users will have no permissions.

It is recommended to map at least one user, besides $local, before switching the provider to rbac. You can do all of the configuration associated with the rbac provider even when the provider is set to simple.

Once enabled it can only be disabled by a user of the Administrator or SuperUser roles. By default the management CLI runs as the SuperUser role if it is run on the same machine as the server.

CLI to Enable RBAC

To enable RBAC with the management CLI, use the write-attribute operation of the access authorization resource to set the provider attribute to rbac.

/core-service=management/access=authorization:write-attribute(name=provider, value=rbac)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "response-headers" => {
        "operation-requires-reload" => true,
        "process-state" => "reload-required"
    }
}

reload

In a managed domain, the access control configuration is part of the domain wide configuration, so the resource address is the same as above, but the management CLI is connected to the master domain controller.

/core-service=management/access=authorization:write-attribute(name=provider,value=rbac)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "response-headers" => {
        "operation-requires-reload" => true,
        "process-state" => "reload-required"
    },
    "result" => undefined,
    "server-groups" => {"main-server-group" => {"host" => {"master" => {
        "server-one" => {"response" => {
            "outcome" => "success",
            "response-headers" => {
                "operation-requires-reload" => true,
                "process-state" => "reload-required"
            }
        }},
        "server-two" => {"response" => {
            "outcome" => "success",
            "response-headers" => {
                "operation-requires-reload" => true,
                "process-state" => "reload-required"
            }
        }}
    }}}}
}

reload --host=master
Note

As with a standalone server, a reload or restart is required for the change to take effect. In a managed domain, all hosts and servers in the domain will need to be reloaded or restarted, starting with the master domain controller.

Management CLI Command to Disable RBAC

To disable RBAC with the management CLI, use the write-attribute operation of the access authorization resource to set the provider attribute to simple.

/core-service=management/access=authorization:write-attribute(name=provider, value=simple)
XML Configuration to Enable or Disable RBAC

If the server is offline the XML configuration can be edited to enable or disable RBAC. To do this, edit the provider attribute of the access-control element of the management element. Set the value to rbac to enable, and simple to disable.

Example: XML Configuration to Enable or Disable RBAC

<management>
  <access-control provider="rbac">
    <role-mapping>
      <role name="SuperUser">
        <include>
          <user name="$local"/>
        </include>
      </role>
    </role-mapping>
  </access-control>
</management>

3.5.2. Changing the Permission Combination Policy

The Permission Combination Policy determines how permissions are determined if a user is assigned more than one role. This can be set to permissive or rejecting. The default is permissive.

When set to permissive, if any role is assigned to the user that permits an action, then the action is allowed.

When set to rejecting, if multiple roles are assigned to a user, then no action is allowed. This means that when the policy is set to rejecting each user should only be assigned one role. Users with multiple roles will not be able to use the management console or the management CLI when the policy is set to rejecting.

The Permission Combination Policy is configured by setting the permission-combination-policy attribute to either permissive or rejecting. This can be done using the management CLI or by editing the server configuration XML file if the server is offline. The permission-combination-policy attribute is part of the access-control element and the access-control element can be found in the management element.

Setting the Permission Combination Policy

Use the write-attribute operation of the access authorization resource to set the permission-combination-policy attribute to the required policy name.

/core-service=management/access=authorization:write-attribute(name=permission-combination-policy, value=POLICYNAME)

The valid policy names are rejecting and permissive.

Example: Management CLI Command for Rejecting Permission Combination Policy

/core-service=management/access=authorization:write-attribute(name=permission-combination-policy, value=rejecting)

If the server is offline the XML configuration can be edited to change the permission combination policy value. To do this, edit the permission-combination-policy attribute of the access-control element.

Example: XML Configuration for Rejecting Permission Combination Policy

<access-control provider="rbac" permission-combination-policy="rejecting">
  <role-mapping>
    <role name="SuperUser">
      <include>
        <user name="$local"/>
      </include>
    </role>
  </role-mapping>
</access-control>

3.5.3. Managing Roles

When Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) is enabled, what a management user is permitted to do is determined by the roles to which the user is assigned. JBoss EAP 7 uses a system of includes and excludes based on both the user and group membership to determine to which role a user belongs.

A user is considered to be assigned to a role if the user is:

  • listed as a user to be included in the role, or
  • a member of a group that is listed to be included in the role.

A user is also considered to be assigned to a role if the user is not:

  • listed as a user to exclude from the role, or
  • a member of a group that is listed to be excluded from the role.

Exclusions take priority over inclusions.

Role include and exclude settings for users and groups can be configured using both the management console and the management CLI.

Only users of the SuperUser or Administrator roles can perform this configuration.

3.5.3.1. Configure User Role Assignment Using the Management CLI

The configuration of mapping users and groups to roles is located at: /core-service=management/access=authorization as role-mapping elements.

Only users of the SuperUser or Administrator roles can perform this configuration.

Viewing Role Assignment Configuration

Use the :read-children-names operation to get a complete list of the configured roles:

/core-service=management/access=authorization:read-children-names(child-type=role-mapping)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => [
        "Administrator",
        "Deployer",
        "Maintainer",
        "Monitor",
        "Operator",
        "SuperUser"
    ]
}

Use the read-resource operation of a specified role-mapping to get the full details of a specific role:

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME:read-resource(recursive=true)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "include-all" => false,
        "exclude" => undefined,
        "include" => {
            "user-theboss" => {
                "name" => "theboss",
                "realm" => undefined,
                "type" => "USER"
            },
            "user-harold" => {
                "name" => "harold",
                "realm" => undefined,
                "type" => "USER"
            },
            "group-SysOps" => {
                "name" => "SysOps",
                "realm" => undefined,
                "type" => "GROUP"
            }
        }
    }
}
Add a New Role

This procedure shows how to add a role-mapping entry for a role. This must be done before the role can be configured.

Use the add operation to add a new role configuration.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME:add

ROLENAME is the name of the role that the new mapping is for, such as Auditor.

Example: Management CLI Command for New Role Configuration

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor:add

Add a User as Included in a Role

This procedure shows how to add a user to the included list of a role.

If no configuration for a role has been done, then a role-mapping entry for it must be done first.

Use the add operation to add a user entry to the includes list of the role.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/include=ALIAS:add(name=USERNAME, type=USER)
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, such as Auditor.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends the use of a naming convention for aliases, such as user-USERNAME (for example, user-max).
  • USERNAME is the name of the user being added to the include list, such as max.

Example: Management CLI Command for User Included in a Role

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/include=user-max:add(name=max, type=USER)

Add a User as Excluded in a Role

This procedure shows how to add a user to the excluded list of a role.

If no configuration for a role has been done, then a role-mapping entry for it must be done first.

Use the add operation to add a user entry to the excludes list of the role.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/exclude=ALIAS:add(name=USERNAME, type=USER)
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, for example Auditor.
  • USERNAME is the name of the user being added to the exclude list, for example max.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends that the use of a naming convention for aliases, such as user-USERNAME (for example, user-max).

Example: Management CLI Command User Excluded in a Role

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/exclude=user-max:add(name=max, type=USER)

Remove User Role Include Configuration

This procedure shows how to remove a user include entry from a role mapping.

Use the remove operation to remove the entry.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/include=ALIAS:remove
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, such as Auditor.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends that the use of a naming convention for aliases, such as user-USERNAME (for example, user-max).

Example: Management CLI Command for Removing User Role Include Configuration

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/include=user-max:remove

Note

Removing the user from the list of includes does not remove the user from the system, nor does it guarantee that the role will not be assigned to the user. The role might still be assigned based on group membership.

Remove User Role Exclude Configuration

This procedure shows how to remove an user exclude entry from a role mapping.

Use the remove operation to remove the entry.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/exclude=ALIAS:remove
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, such as Auditor.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends that the use of a naming convention for aliases, such as user-USERNAME (for example, user-max).
/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/exclude=user-max:remove
Note

Removing the user from the list of excludes does not remove the user from the system, nor does it guarantee the role will be assigned to the user. Roles might still be excluded based on group membership.

3.5.4. Configure User Role Assignment with the Elytron Subsystem

In addition to adding role mappings for users directly, as covered in Managing Roles section, you can also configure RBAC roles to be directly taken from the identity provided by the elytron subsystem.

To configure the RBAC system to use roles provided by the elytron subsystem:

/core-service=management/access=authorization:write-attribute(name=use-identity-roles,value=true)
Important

RBAC must be enabled to use this functionality, and the principal must have RBAC roles.

3.5.5. Roles and User Groups

A user group is an arbitrary label that can be assigned to one or more users. When authenticating using the management interfaces, users are assigned groups from either the elytron subsystem or core management authentication, depending on how the management interfaces are secured. The RBAC system can be configured to automatically assign roles to users depending on what user groups they are members of. It can also exclude users from roles based on group membership.

3.5.6. Configure Group Role Assignment Using the Management CLI

Groups to be included or excluded from a role can be configured in the management console and the management CLI. This topic only shows using the management CLI.

The configuration of mapping users and groups to roles is located in the management API at: /core-service=management/access=authorization as role-mapping elements.

Only users in the SuperUser or Administrator roles can perform this configuration.

Viewing Group Role Assignment Configuration

Use the read-children-names operation to get a complete list of the configured roles:

/core-service=management/access=authorization:read-children-names(child-type=role-mapping)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => [
        "Administrator",
        "Deployer",
        "Maintainer",
        "Monitor",
        "Operator",
        "SuperUser"
    ]
}

Use the read-resource operation of a specified role-mapping to get the full details of a specific role:

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME:read-resource(recursive=true)
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "include-all" => false,
        "exclude" => undefined,
        "include" => {
            "user-theboss" => {
                "name" => "theboss",
                "realm" => undefined,
                "type" => "USER"
            },
            "user-harold" => {
                "name" => "harold",
                "realm" => undefined,
                "type" => "USER"
            },
            "group-SysOps" => {
                "name" => "SysOps",
                "realm" => undefined,
                "type" => "GROUP"
            }
        }
    }
}
Add a New Role

This procedure shows how to add a role-mapping entry for a role. This must be done before the role can be configured.

Use the add operation to add a new role configuration.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME:add
Add a Group as Included in a Role

This procedure shows how to add a group to the included list of a role.

If no configuration for a role has been done, then a role-mapping entry for it must be done first.

Use the add operation to add a group entry to the includes list of the role.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/include=ALIAS:add(name=GROUPNAME, type=GROUP)
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, such as Auditor.
  • GROUPNAME is the name of the group being added to the include list, such as investigators.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends that you use a naming convention for your aliases, such as group-GROUPNAME (for example, group-investigators).

Example: Management CLI Command for Adding a Group as Included in a Role

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/include=group-investigators:add(name=investigators, type=GROUP)

Add a Group as Excluded in a Role

This procedure shows how to add a group to the excluded list of a role.

If no configuration for a role has been done, then a role-mapping entry for it must be created first.

Use the add operation to add a group entry to the excludes list of the role.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/exclude=ALIAS:add(name=GROUPNAME, type=GROUP)
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, such as Auditor.
  • GROUPNAME is the name of the group being added to the include list, such as supervisors.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends that you use a naming convention for your aliases, such as group-GROUPNAME (for example, group-supervisors).

Example: Management CLI Command for Adding a Group as Excluded in a Role

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/exclude=group-supervisors:add(name=supervisors, type=GROUP)

Remove Group Role Include Configuration

This procedure shows how to remove a group include entry from a role mapping.

Use the remove operation to remove the entry.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/include=ALIAS:remove
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, such as Auditor.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends that you use a naming convention for your aliases, such as group-GROUPNAME (for example, group-investigators).

Example: Management CLI Command for Removing Group Role Include Configuration

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/include=group-investigators:remove

Note

Removing the group from the list of includes does not remove the group from the system, nor does it guarantee that the role will not be assigned to users in this group. The role might still be assigned to users in the group individually.

Remove a User Group Exclude Entry

This procedure shows how to remove a group exclude entry from a role mapping.

Use the remove operation to remove the entry.

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=ROLENAME/exclude=ALIAS:remove
  • ROLENAME is the name of the role being configured, such as Auditor.
  • ALIAS is a unique name for this mapping. Red Hat recommends that you use a naming convention for your aliases, such as group-GROUPNAME (for example, group-supervisors).
/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=Auditor/exclude=group-supervisors:remove
Note

Removing the group from the list of excludes does not remove the group from the system. It also does not guarantee the role will be assigned to members of the group. Roles might still be excluded based on group membership.

3.5.7. Using RBAC with LDAP

The basics of using RBAC with LDAP as well as how to configure JBoss EAP to use RBAC with LDAP are covered in the LDAP and RBAC section of the JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide.

3.5.8. Scoped Roles

Scoped roles are user-defined roles that grant the permissions of one of the standard roles but only for one or more specified server groups or hosts in an JBoss EAP managed domain. Scoped roles allow for management users to be granted permissions that are limited to only those server groups or hosts that are required.

Important

Scoped roles can be created by users assigned the Administrator or SuperUser roles.

They are defined by five characteristics:

  • A unique name.
  • The standard roles which it is based on.
  • If it applies to server groups or hosts.
  • The list of server groups or hosts that it is restricted to.
  • If all users are automatically included. This defaults to false.

Once created a scoped role can be assigned to users and groups the same way that the standard roles are.

Creating a scoped role does not allow for defining new permissions. Scoped roles can only be used to apply the permissions of an existing role in a limited scope. For example, a scoped role could be created based on the Deployer role which is restricted to a single server group.

There are only two scopes that roles can be limited to:

Host-scoped roles
A role that is host-scoped restricts the permissions of that role to one or more hosts. This means access is provided to the relevant /host=*/ resource trees but resources that are specific to other hosts are hidden.
Server-group-scoped roles
A role that is server-group-scoped restricts the permissions of that role to one or more server groups. Additionally the role permissions will also apply to the profile, socket binding group, server configuration, and server resources that are associated with the specified server-groups. Any sub-resources within any of those that are not logically related to the server-group will not be visible to the user.
Important

Some resources are non-addressable to server-group and host scoped roles in order to provide a simplified view of the management model to improve usability. This is distinct from resources that are non-addressable to protect sensitive data.

For host scoped roles this means that resources in the /host=* portion of the management model will not be visible if they are not related to the server groups specified for the role.

For server-group scoped roles, this means that resources in the profile, socket-binding-group, deployment, deployment-overlay, server-group, server-config and server portions of the management model will not be visible if they are not related to the server groups specified for the role.

3.5.8.1. Configuring Scoped Roles from the Management CLI

Important

Only users in the SuperUser or Administrator roles can perform this configuration.

Add a New Scoped Role

To add a new scoped role, the following operations must be done:

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=NEW-SCOPED-ROLE:add
/core-service=management/access=authorization/server-group-scoped-role=NEW-SCOPED-ROLE:add(base-role=BASE-ROLE, server-groups=[SERVER-GROUP-NAME])

Replace NEW-SCOPED-ROLE, BASE-ROLE, and SERVER-GROUP-NAME with the proper information.

Viewing and Editing a Scoped Role Mapping

A scoped role’s details, including members, can be viewed by using the following command:

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=NEW-SCOPED-ROLE:read-resource(recursive=true)

Replace NEW-SCOPED-ROLE with the proper information.

To edit a scoped role’s details, the write-attribute command may be used. For example:

/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=NEW-SCOPED-ROLE:write-attribute(name=include-all, value=true)

Replace NEW-SCOPED-ROLE with the proper information.

Delete a Scoped Role
/core-service=management/access=authorization/role-mapping=NEW-SCOPED-ROLE:remove
/core-service=management/access=authorization/server-group-scoped-role=NEW-SCOPED-ROLE:remove

Replace NEW-SCOPED-ROLE with the proper information.

Important

A scoped role cannot be deleted if users or groups are assigned to it. Remove the role assignments first, and then delete it.

Adding and Removing Users

Adding and removing users to and from scoped roles follows the same process as adding and removing standard roles.

3.5.8.2. Configuring Scoped Roles from the Management Console

Important

Only users in the SuperUser or Administrator roles can perform this configuration.

Scoped role configuration in the management console can be found by following these steps:

  1. Log in to the management console
  2. Click on the Access Control tab
  3. Click on the Roles menu on the left and all roles, including scoped roles, are displayed.

The following procedures show how to perform configuration tasks for scoped roles.

Add a New Scoped Role
  1. Log in to the management console.
  2. Click on the Access Control tab.
  3. Click on the Roles menu on the left.
  4. Click Add.
  5. Specify the following details:

    • Name, the unique name for the new scoped role.
    • Base Role, the role which this role will base its permissions on.
    • Type, whether this role will be restricted to hosts or server groups.
    • Scope, the list of hosts or server groups that the role is restricted to. Multiple entries can be selected.
    • Include All, should this role automatically include all users. Defaults to no.
  6. Click Save and the dialog will close and the newly created role will appear in the table.
Edit a Scoped Role
  1. Log in to the management console.
  2. Click on the Access Control tab.
  3. Click on the Roles menu on the left.
  4. Click on the desired scoped role to edit and click Edit.
  5. Update the desired details to change and click the Save button.
View Scoped Role Members
  1. Log in to the management console.
  2. Click on the Access Control tab.
  3. Click on the Roles menu on the left.
  4. Click on the desired scoped role and choose Include or Exclude to view the included or excluded members.
Delete a Scoped Role
  1. Log in to the management console.
  2. Click on the Access Control tab.
  3. Click on the Roles menu on the left.
  4. Click on the desired scoped role, click the drop-down arrow next to the Edit button and click Remove.
  5. Click Confirm. The dialog closes and the role is removed.
Important

A scoped role cannot be deleted if users or groups are assigned to it. Remove the role assignments first, and then delete it.

Adding and Removing Users

Adding and removing users to and from scoped roles follows the same process as adding and removing standard roles. To update a user’s scoped roles:

  1. Log in to the management console.
  2. Click on the Access Control tab.
  3. Click on the Roles menu on the left.
  4. Click on the desired scoped role and choose Include or Exclude to view the included or excluded members.
  5. To add a member, click Add, choose the member to include or exclude, and click Save.
  6. To remove a member, select the desired member to remove and click Remove.

3.5.9. Configuring Constraints

3.5.9.1. Configure Sensitivity Constraints

Each sensitivity constraint defines a set of resources that are considered sensitive. A sensitive resource is generally one that either should be secret, like passwords, or one that will have serious impact on the server, like networking, JVM configuration, or system properties. The access control system itself is also considered sensitive. Resource sensitivity limits which roles are able to read, write or address a specific resource.

Sensitivity constraint configuration is at /core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=sensitivity-classification.

Within the management model each sensitivity constraint is identified as a classification. The classifications are then grouped into types. Each classification has an applies-to element which is a list of path patterns to which the classifications configuration applies.

To configure a sensitivity constraint, use the write-attribute operation to set the configured-requires-read, configured-requires-write, or configured-requires-addressable attribute. To make that type of operation sensitive set the value of the attribute to true, otherwise to make it nonsensitive set it to false. By default these attributes are not set and the values of default-requires-read, default-requires-write, and default-requires-addressable are used. Once the configured attribute is set it is that value that is used instead of the default. The default values cannot be changed.

Example: Make Reading System Properties a Sensitive Operation

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=sensitivity-classification/type=core/classification=system-property:write-attribute(name=configured-requires-read,value=true)

Example: Result

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=sensitivity-classification/type=core/classification=system-property:read-resource

{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "configured-requires-addressable" => undefined,
        "configured-requires-read" => true,
        "configured-requires-write" => undefined,
        "default-requires-addressable" => false,
        "default-requires-read" => false,
        "default-requires-write" => true,
        "applies-to" => {
            "/core-service=platform-mbean/type=runtime" => undefined,
            "/system-property=*" => undefined,
            "/" => undefined
        }
    }
}

The roles, and the respective operations that they are able to perform, depend on the configuration of the attributes. This is summarized in the following table:

Table 3.2. Sensitivity Constraint Configuration Outcomes

Valuerequires-readrequires-writerequires-addressable

true

Read is sensitive. Only Auditor, Administrator, SuperUser can read.

Write is sensitive. Only Administrator and SuperUser can write.

Addressing is sensitive. Only Auditor, Administrator, SuperUser can address.

false

Read is not sensitive. Any management user can read.

Write is not sensitive. Only Maintainer, Administrator and SuperUser can write. Deployer can also write the resource is an application resource.

Addressing is not sensitive. Any management user can address.

3.5.9.2. List Sensitivity Constraints

You can see a list of the available sensitivity constraints directly from the JBoss EAP management model using the following management CLI command:

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=sensitivity-classification:read-resource(include-runtime=true,recursive=true)

3.5.9.3. Configure Application Resource Constraints

Each application resource constraint defines a set of resources, attributes and operations that are usually associated with the deployment of applications and services. When an application resource constraint is enabled management users of the Deployer role are granted access to the resources that it applies to.

Application constraint configuration is at /core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=application-classification/.

Each application resource constraint is identified as a classification. The classifications are then grouped into types. Each classification has an applies-to element which is a list of path patterns to which the classifications configuration applies.

By default the only application resource classification that is enabled is core. Core includes deployments, deployment overlays, and the deployment operations.

To enable an application resource, use the write-attribute operation to set the configured-application attribute of the classification to true. To disable an application resource, set this attribute to false. By default these attributes are not set and the value of default-application attribute is used. The default value cannot be changed.

Example: Enabling the logger-profile Application Resource Classification

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=application-classification/type=logging/classification=logging-profile:write-attribute(name=configured-application,value=true)

Example: Result

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=application-classification/type=logging/classification=logging-profile:read-resource

{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "configured-application" => true,
        "default-application" => false,
        "applies-to" => {"/subsystem=logging/logging-profile=*" => undefined}
    }
}
Important

Application resource constraints apply to all resources that match its configuration. For example, it is not possible to grant a Deployer user access to one datasource resource but not another. If this level of separation is required then it is recommended to configure the resources in different server groups and create different scoped Deployer roles for each group.

3.5.9.4. List Application Resource Constraints

You can see a list of the available application resource constraints directly from the JBoss EAP management model using the following management CLI command:

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=application-classification:read-resource(include-runtime=true,recursive=true)

3.5.9.5. Configure the Vault Expression Constraint

By default, reading and writing vault expressions are sensitive operations. Configuring the vault expression constraint allows either or both of those operations to be set to nonsensitive. Changing this constraint allows a greater number of roles to read and write vault expressions.

The vault expression constraint is found at /core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=vault-expression.

To configure the vault expression constraint, use the write-attribute operation to set the attributes of configured-requires-write and configured-requires-read to true or false. By default these are not set and the values of default-requires-read and default-requires-write are used. The default values cannot be changed.

Example: Making Writing to Vault Expressions a Nonsensitive Operation

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=vault-expression:write-attribute(name=configured-requires-write,value=false)

Example: Result

/core-service=management/access=authorization/constraint=vault-expression:read-resource

{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        "configured-requires-read" => undefined,
        "configured-requires-write" => false,
        "default-requires-read" => true,
        "default-requires-write" => true
    }
}

The roles, and the respective vault expressions that they will be able to read and write, depend on the configuration of the attributes. This is summarized in the following table:

Table 3.3. Vault Expression Constraint Configuration Outcomes

Valuerequires-readrequires-write

true

Read operation is sensitive. Only Auditor, Administrator, and SuperUser can read.

Write operation is sensitive. Only Administrator and SuperUser can write.

false

Read operation is not sensitive. All management users can read.

Write operation is not sensitive. Monitor, Administrator, and SuperUser can write. Deployer can also write if the vault expression is in an application resource.

Chapter 4. Securely Storing Credentials

JBoss EAP allows the encryption of sensitive strings outside of configuration files. These strings can be stored in a keystore, and subsequently decrypted for applications and verifications systems. Sensitive strings can be stored in either of the following:

  • Credential Store - Introduced in JBoss EAP 7.1, a credential store can safely secure sensitive and plain text strings by encrypting them in a storage file. Each JBoss EAP server can contain multiple credential stores.
  • Password Vault - Primarily used in legacy configurations, a password vault uses a Java Keystore to store sensitive strings outside of the configuration files. Each JBoss EAP server can only contain a single password vault.

All of the configuration files in EAP_HOME/standalone/configuration/ and EAP_HOME/domain/configuration/ are world readable by default. It is strongly recommended to not store plaintext passwords in the configuration files, and instead place these credentials in either a credential store or password vault.

If you decide to place plaintext passwords in the configuration files, then these files should only be accessible by limited users. At a minimum, the user account under which JBoss EAP 7 is running requires read-write access.

4.1. Credential Store

Introduced with the elytron subsystem, credential stores allow for secure storage and usage of credentials. You can find more background information on credential stores as well as other Elytron components in the Core Concepts and Components section of the Security Architecture guide.

Using a credential store is preferred to using a password vault to store passwords and other sensitive strings. Credential stores allow for easier credential management within the JBoss EAP management CLI, without having to use an external tool. You can also use multiple credential stores within a JBoss EAP server, compared to the limitation of only one password vault per JBoss EAP server.

The default credential store implementation uses a JCEKS keystore file to store credentials. When creating a new credential store, the default implementation also allows you to reference an existing keystore file or have JBoss EAP automatically create one for you. Currently, the default implementation only allows you to store clear text passwords.

Important

The elytron subsystem does not provide any checks for using the same file as storage to multiple credential stores. It is strongly advised not to use the same file for multiple credential stores or even to share the storage file using remote file systems.

If you need to use shared storage file, be sure to set the read-only flag on the credential stores accessing it. This will prevent the file from being modified. After the file is updated from outside, each credential store has to be reloaded to reflect the changed values. A similar process needs to be followed when using credential stores in a managed domain.

Since a credential store contains sensitive information, the directory containing the store should be accessible to only limited users. At a minimum the user account under which JBoss EAP is running requires read-write access.

Important

JBoss EAP reads the credential store file into memory and writes changes to it at varying times. You must ensure that the user running the JBoss EAP process has permissions to the store file, and that you do not externally modify the store file while JBoss EAP is running.

If the file is modified externally, you can use the reload() operation on the credential store to make JBoss EAP reload the content of the store file.

4.1.1. Create a Credential Store

To create a credential store, you must define a path to the new credential store file, and provide a master password that is used to encrypt the credential store. The directory containing the store should be accessible to only limited users. At a minimum the user account under which JBoss EAP is running requires read-write access.

Important

JCEKS keystore implementations differ between Java vendors, so the JBoss EAP instance must run a JDK from the same vendor that generated the JCEKS keystore.

Like providing paths in other JBoss EAP configuration, you can also use the relative-to attribute to provide a path relative to another.

Create a Credential Store for a Standalone Server

Use the following management CLI command to create a new credential store:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:add(location="path/to/store_file", credential-reference={clear-text=STORE_PASSWORD},create=true)

For example, the following command creates a new store named my_store, and creates the file jboss.server.data.dir/cred_stores/my_store.jceks:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:add(location="cred_stores/my_store.jceks", relative-to=jboss.server.data.dir,  credential-reference={clear-text=supersecretstorepassword},create=true)
Note

If you want to use an implementation other than default, you can explicitly define the type of a credential store. For more information, see the section on using a custom credential store implementation.

Create a Credential Store in a Managed Domain

Use the following management CLI command to create a new credential store in a managed domain:

/profile=PROFILE_NAME/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:add(location=path/to/store_file,credential-reference={clear-text="STORE_PASSWORD"},create=true)

For example, the following command creates a new store named my_store, and creates the file jboss.server.data.dir/cred_stores/my_store.jceks:

/profile=full/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:add(relative-to=jboss.server.data.dir,location="cred_stores/my_store.jceks",credential-reference={clear-text=supersecretstorepassword},create=true)
Note

There is no need to define a credential store resource at each server. Every server running the same profile, for which the credential store is created, contains our credential store. Therefore, it is good idea to locate the storage file at the server data directory, relative-to=jboss.server.data.dir.

For another way of creating a credential store in a managed domain, see Using Credential Stores in a Managed Domain.

4.1.2. Add a Credential to the Credential Store

To add a new credential to a credential store, you associate an alias to the sensitive string that you are wanting to store.

Note

Credential store aliases are case insensitive by default. Any stored alias is displayed in lowercase, and may be referenced using any combination of uppercase and lowercase letters.

If a custom credential store is used, then case sensitivity will be determined by the custom implementation.

The following management CLI command adds a credential to a credential store:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:add-alias(alias=ALIAS, secret-value="SENSITIVE_STRING")

For example, to add a password with the alias database-pw to the store created in the previous section:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:add-alias(alias=database-pw, secret-value="speci@l_db_pa$$_01")
Editing Credential Store Aliases Using the Management Console
  1. Log in to the management console and click on the Runtime tab.
  2. Select the server and click on Subsystems.
  3. Select Security - Elytron and click on View. You can edit your credential store aliases here.

4.1.3. Use a Stored Credential in a Configuration

To refer to a password or sensitive string stored in a credential store, use the credential-reference attribute in your JBoss EAP configuration. You can use credential-reference as an alternative to providing a password or other sensitive string in most places throughout the JBoss EAP configuration.

credential-reference={store=STORE_NAME, alias=ALIAS}

For example, to create a new datasource using the password that was added to the credential store in the previous example, you can use credential-reference like the following:

data-source add --name=my_DS --jndi-name=java:/my_DS --driver-name=h2 --connection-url=jdbc:h2:mem:test;DB_CLOSE_DELAY=-1;DB_CLOSE_ON_EXIT=FALSE --user-name=db_user --credential-reference={store=my_store, alias=database-pw}

In the above example, instead of providing a password using --password, a credential-reference including a store name and alias is provided. If you check the resulting datasource configuration, note that password is undefined and the credential-reference attribute is defined instead.

/subsystem=datasources/data-source=my_DS:read-resource()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => {
        ...
        "credential-reference" => {
            "store" => "my_store",
            "alias" => "database-pw"
        },
        ...
        "password" => undefined,
        ...
    }
}

4.1.4. List the Credentials in the Credential Store

You can list the aliases of all the credentials contained in a credential store using the following management CLI command:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:read-aliases()

For example:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:read-aliases()
{
    "outcome" => "success",
    "result" => [
        "database-pw"
    ]
}

4.1.5. Remove a Credential from the Credential Store

You can remove a credential from a credential store using the following command:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:remove-alias(alias=ALIAS)

For example:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:remove-alias(alias=database-pw)

4.1.6. Obtain the Master Password for the Credential Store from an External Source

Instead of providing your credential store’s master password in the clear, you can choose to provide that password using a pseudo credential store. You have the following options:

EXT

External command using java.lang.Runtime#exec(java.lang.String). If parameters are needed, they are supplied using a space-separated list of strings. An external command refers to any executable from the operation system, for example a shell script or an executable binary. The password is read from the standard output of the executed command.

Example

{EXT}/usr/bin/getTheMasterPassswordScript.sh par1 par2

CMD

External command using java.lang.ProcessBuilder. If parameters are needed, they are supplied using a comma-separated list of strings. An external command refers to any executable from the operation system, for example a shell script or an executable binary. The password is read from the standard output of the executed command.

Example

{CMD}/usr/bin/getTheMasterPassswordScript.sh par1,par2

MASK

Masked password using PBE, or Password Based Encryption. It must be in the following format, which includes the SALT and ITERATION values:

MASK-MASKED_VALUE;SALT;ITERATION

Example

MASK-NqMznhSbL3lwRpDmyuqLBW==;12345678;123

Important

EXT, CMD, and MASK provide backward compatibility with the legacy security vault style of supplying an external password. For MASK you must use the above format that includes the SALT and ITERATION values.

You can also use a password located in another credential store as the master password for a new credential store.

Example Credential Store Created with a Password from Another Credential Store

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=exampleCS:add(location="cred_stores/exampleCS.jceks", relative-to=jboss.server.data.dir, create=true, credential-reference={store=master-cred-store, alias=master-pw})

4.1.7. Define a FIPS 140-2 Compliant Credential Store

To obtain a FIPS compliant keystore, use a Sun PKCS#11 provider accessing an NSS database. Instructions on defining the database are found at Configuring the NSS Database.

  1. Create a secret key to be used in the credential store.

    $ keytool -keystore NONE -storetype PKCS11 -storepass STORE_PASSWORD -genseckey -alias ALIAS -keyalg AES -keysize 256
  2. Create an external credential store. An external credential store holds a secret key in a PKCS#11 keystore, and accesses this keystore using the alias defined in the previous step. This keystore is then used to decrypt the credentials in a JCEKS keystore. In addition to the credential-store attributes, the credential-store KeyStoreCredentialStore implementation properties are used to configure external credential stores.

    /subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:add(modifiable=true, location="/path/to/EXTERNAL_STORAGE", implementation-properties={"keyStoreType"=>"PKCS11","external"=>"true","keyAlias"=>"ALIAS"},credential-reference={clear-text="STORE_PASSWORD"}, create=true)
    Note

    Due to a known issue with using externalPath for PKCS#11 keystores, location is used in the above command to specify the path to external storage.

  3. Once created, the credential store can be used to store aliases as normal.

    /subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:add-alias(alias="ALIAS", secret-value="SENSITIVE_STRING")
  4. Confirm that the alias has been added successfully by reading from the credential store.

    /subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:read-aliases()

4.1.8. Use a Custom Implementation of the Credential Store

To use a custom implementation of the credential store:

  1. Create a class that extends the Service Provider Interface (SPI) CredentialStoreSpi abstract class.
  2. Create a class that implements the Java Security Provider. The provider must add the custom credential store class as a service.
  3. Create a module containing your credential store and provider classes, and add it to JBoss EAP with a dependency on org.wildfly.security.elytron. For example:

    module add --name=org.jboss.customcredstore --resources=/path/to/customcredstoreprovider.jar --dependencies=org.wildfly.security.elytron --slot=main
  4. Create a provider loader for your provider. For example:

    /subsystem=elytron/provider-loader=myCustomLoader:add(class-names=[org.wildfly.security.mycustomcredstore.CustomElytronProvider],module=org.jboss.customcredstore)
  5. Create a credential store using the custom implementation.

    Note

    Ensure that you specify the correct providers and type values. The value of type is what is used in your provider class where it adds your custom credential store class as a service.

    For example:

    /subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:add(providers=myCustomLoader,type=CustomKeyStorePasswordStore,location="cred_stores/my_store.jceks",relative-to=jboss.server.data.dir,credential-reference={clear-text=supersecretstorepassword},create=true)

    Alternatively, if you have created multiple providers, you can specify the additional providers using another provider loader with other-providers. This allows you to have other additional implementations for new types of credentials. These specified other providers are automatically accessible in the custom credential store’s initialize method as the Provider[] argument. For example:

    /subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:add(providers=myCustomLoader,other-providers=myCustomLoader2,type=CustomKeyStorePasswordStore,location="cred_stores/my_store.jceks",relative-to=jboss.server.data.dir,credential-reference={clear-text=supersecretstorepassword},create=true)

4.1.9. Create and Modify Credential Stores Offline with the WildFly Elytron Tool

You can use the WildFly Elytron tool, which you access using the elytron-tool script located in EAP_HOME/bin/, to create and modify a credential store for an offline, or stopped, JBoss EAP server.

Important

JCEKS keystore implementations differ between Java vendors, so the JBoss EAP instance must run a JDK from the same vendor that generated the JCEKS keystore.

Important

Using the WildFly Elytron tool to modify a credential store that is in use by a running JBoss EAP server can result in changes to the store being lost. Instead, you should create and modify credential stores for a running server by using the management CLI, as described in the previous sections.

The following commands are shown using elytron-tool.sh for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Solaris systems. For Windows Server systems, use the elytron-tool.bat script instead.

Create a Credential Store Using the WildFly Elytron Tool

Create a credential store using the WildFly Elytron tool with the following command:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --create --location "path/to/store_file" --password STORE_PASSWORD

For example:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --create --location "../cred_stores/my_store.jceks" --password supersecretstorepassword

If you do not want to provide your store password in the command, you can omit that argument and you will be prompted to enter the password manually using standard input. You can also use a masked password generated by the WildFly Elytron tool for the store password.

Add a Credential to a Credential Store Using the WildFly Elytron Tool

Add a credential to a credential store using the WildFly Elytron tool with the following command:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "path/to/store_file" --password STORE_PASSWORD --add ALIAS --secret SENSITIVE_STRING

For example:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "../cred_stores/my_store.jceks" --password supersecretstorepassword --add database-pw --secret speci@l_db_pa$$_01

Similar to providing the credential store password, if you do not want to provide your secret in the command, you can omit that argument and you will be prompted to enter the secret manually using standard input.

List All the Credentials in the Credential Store Using the WildFly Elytron Tool

List the credentials in a credential store using the WildFly Elytron tool with the following command:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "path/to/store_file" --password STORE_PASSWORD --aliases

For example:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "../cred_stores/my_store.jceks" --password supersecretstorepassword --aliases

Check If an Alias Exists in the Credential Store Using the Wildfly Elytron Tool

Check if an alias exists in a credential store using the WildFly Elytron tool with the following command:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "path/to/store_file" --password STORE_PASSWORD --exists ALIAS

For example:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "../cred_stores/my_store.jceks" --password supersecretstorepassword --exists database-pw

Remove a Credential from the Credential Store Using the WildFly Elytron Tool

Remove a credential from a credential store using the WildFly Elytron tool with the following command:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "path/to/store_file" --password STORE_PASSWORD --remove ALIAS

For example:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --location "../cred_stores/my_store.jceks" --password supersecretstorepassword --remove database-pw

Add a Credential Store Created with the WildFly Elytron Tool to a JBoss EAP Server

After you have created a credential store with the WildFly Elytron tool, add it to your running JBoss EAP server with the following management CLI command:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=STORE_NAME:add(location="path/to/store_file",credential-reference={clear-text=STORE_PASSWORD})

For example:

/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=my_store:add(location="../cred_stores/my_store.jceks",credential-reference={clear-text=supersecretstorepassword})

After adding the credential store to the JBoss EAP configuration, you can then refer to a password or sensitive string stored in the credential store using the credential-reference attribute.

For more information, use the EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh credential-store --help command for a detailed listing of available options.

4.1.9.1. Generate Masked Encrypted Strings Using the WildFly Elytron Tool

You can use the WildFly Elytron tool to generate PicketBox-compatible MASK- encrypted strings to use instead of a plain text password for a credential store.

To generate a masked string, use the following command and provide values for the salt and the iteration count:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh mask --salt SALT --iteration ITERATION_COUNT --secret PASSWORD

For example:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh mask --salt 12345678 --iteration 123 --secret supersecretstorepassword

MASK-8VzWsSNwBaR676g8ujiIDdFKwSjOBHCHgnKf17nun3v;12345678;123

If you do not want to provide the secret in the command, you can omit that argument and you will be prompted to enter the secret manually using standard input.

For more information, use the EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh mask --help command for a detailed listing of available options.

4.1.9.2. Convert a Password Vault to a Credential Store Using the WildFly Elytron Tool

You can use the WildFly Elytron tool to convert a password vault to a credential store. To convert a password vault to a credential store, you need the vault’s values used when initializing the vault.

Note

When converting a password vault, aliases in the new credential store are named in the following format based on their equivalent password vault block and attribute name: VAULT_BLOCK::ATTRIBUTE_NAME.

Convert a Single Password Vault

Convert a single password vault to a credential store using the following command:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh vault --keystore "path/to/vault_file" --keystore-password VAULT_PASSWORD --enc-dir "path/to/vault_directory" --salt SALT --iteration ITERATION_COUNT --alias VAULT_ALIAS

For example, you can also specify the new credential store’s file name and location with the --location argument:

$ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh vault --keystore ../vaults/vault.keystore --keystore-password vault22 --enc-dir ../vaults/ --salt 1234abcd --iteration 120 --alias my_vault --location ../cred_stores/my_vault_converted.cred_store
Note

You can also use the --summary argument to print a summary of the management CLI commands used to convert it. Note that even if a plain text password is used, it is masked in the summary output. The default SALT and ITERATION values are used unless they are specified in the command.

Bulk Convert Multiple Password Vaults

To bulk convert multiple password vaults:

  1. Put the details of the vaults you want to convert into a description file in the following format:

    keystore:path/to/vault_file
    keystore-password:VAULT_PASSWORD
    enc-dir:path/to/vault_directory
    salt:SALT 1
    iteration:ITERATION_COUNT
    location:path/to/converted_cred_store 2
    alias:VAULT_ALIAS
    properties:PARAMETER1=VALUE1;PARAMETER2=VALUE2; 3
    1
    salt and iteration can be omitted if you are providing a plain text password for the vault.
    2
    Specifies the location and file name for the converted credential store.
    3
    Optional: Specifies a list of optional parameters separated by semicolons (;). See EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh vault --help for a list of available parameters.

    For example:

    keystore:/vaults/vault1/vault1.keystore
    keystore-password:vault11
    enc-dir:/vaults/vault1/
    salt:1234abcd
    iteration:120
    location:/cred_stores/vault1_converted.cred_store
    alias:my_vault
    
    keystore:/vaults/vault2/vault2.keystore
    keystore-password:vault22
    enc-dir:/vaults/vault2/
    salt:abcd1234
    iteration:130
    location:/cred_stores/vault2_converted.cred_store
    alias:my_vault2
  2. Run the bulk convert command with your description file from the previous step:

    $ EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh vault --bulk-convert vaultdescriptions.txt

For more information, use the EAP_HOME/bin/elytron-tool.sh vault --help command for a detailed listing of available options.

4.1.10. Using Credential Stores with Elytron Client

Clients connecting to JBoss EAP, such as EJBs, can authenticate using Elytron Client. Users without access to a running JBoss EAP server can create and modify credential stores using the WildFly Elytron tool, and then clients can use Elytron Client to access sensitive strings inside a credential store.

The following example shows you how to use a credential store in an Elytron Client configuration file.

Example custom-config.xml with a Credential Store

<configuration>
  <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
    ...
    <credential-stores>
      <credential-store name="my_store"> 1
        <protection-parameter-credentials>
          <credential-store-reference clear-text="pass123"/> 2
        </protection-parameter-credentials>
        <attributes>
          <attribute name="location" value="/path/to/my_store.jceks"/> 3
        </attributes>
      </credential-store>
    </credential-stores>
    ...
    <authentication-configurations>
      <configuration name="my_user">
        <set-host name="localhost"/>
        <set-user-name name="my_user"/>
        <set-mechanism-realm name="ManagementRealm"/>
        <use-provider-sasl-factory/>
        <credentials>
          <credential-store-reference store="my_store" alias="my_user"/> 4
        </credentials>
      </configuration>
    </authentication-configurations>
    ...
  </authentication-client>
</configuration>

1
A name for the credential store for use within the Elytron Client configuration file.
2
The master password for the credential store.
3
The path to the credential store file.
4
A credential reference for a sensitive string stored in the credential store.

See the JBoss EAP How to Configure Identity Management Guide for more information on configuring client authentication using Elytron Client.

4.1.11. Using Credential Stores in a Managed Domain

There are a few different ways of creating and setting up a credential store in a managed domain. One of the ways is:

  1. Use the WildFly Elytron Tool to prepare the credential store. For more information on this, see Create and Modify Credential Stores Offline with the WildFly Elytron Tool.
  2. Distribute the created credential store storage file. For example, distribute it to each server, for example by using scp, or store it in NFS and use it for all the created credential stores.
  3. You can then create a credential store with the create property set to false, using the already created file.

    /profile=full/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=test:add(relative-to=jboss.server.data.dir,location="store.keystore",credential-reference={clear-text="secret2"},create=false)
    Note

    When using one credential store to store all credential stores, when storing it on NFS, you must use the credential store in read-only mode. The read-only mode is used to maintain consistency. It is also prefered to use an absolute path in this case.

    /profile=full/subsystem=elytron/credential-store=test:add(location=/absolute/path/to/store.keystore,credential-reference={clear-text="secret2"},create=false,modifiable=false)

For other ways of creating a credential store in a managed domain, see Create a Credential Store in a Managed Domain.

4.2. Password Vault

Configuration of JBoss EAP and associated applications requires potentially sensitive information, such as user names and passwords. Instead of storing the password as plain text in configuration files, the password vault feature can be used to mask the password information and store it in an encrypted keystore. Once the password is stored, references can be included in management CLI commands or applications deployed to JBoss EAP.

The password vault uses the Java keystore as its storage mechanism. Password vault consists of two parts: storage and key storage. Java keystore is used to store the key, which is used to encrypt or decrypt sensitive strings in Vault storage.

Important

The keytool utility, provided by the Java Runtime Environment (JRE), is utilized for this steps. Locate the path for the file, which on Red Hat Enterprise Linux is /usr/bin/keytool.

JCEKS keystore implementations differ between Java vendors so the keystore must be generated using the keytool utility from the same vendor as the JDK used. Using a keystore generated by the keytool from one vendor’s JDK in a JBoss EAP 7 instance running on a JDK from a different vendor results in the following exception: java.io.IOException: com.sun.crypto.provider.SealedObjectForKeyProtector

4.2.1. Set Up a Password Vault

Follow the steps below to set up and use a Password Vault.

  1. Create a directory to store the keystore and other encrypted information.

    Create a directory to store the keystore and other important information. The rest of this procedure assumes that the directory is EAP_HOME/vault/. Since this directory will contain sensitive information it should be accessible to only limited users. At a minimum the user account under which JBoss EAP is running requires read-write access.

  2. Determine the parameters to use with keytool utility.

    Decide on values for the following parameters:

    alias
    The alias is a unique identifier for the vault or other data stored in the keystore. Aliases are case-insensitive.
    storetype
    The storetype specifies the keystore type. The value jceks is recommended.
    keyalg
    The algorithm to use for encryption. Use the documentation for the JRE and operating system to see which other choices are available.
    keysize
    The size of an encryption key impacts how difficult it is to decrypt through brute force. For information on appropriate values, see the documentation distributed with the keytool utility.
    storepass
    The value of storepass is the password that is used to authenticate to the keystore so that the key can be read. The password must be at least 6 characters long and must be provided when the keystore is accessed. If this parameter is omitted, the keytool utility will prompt for it to be entered after the command has been executed
    keypass
    The value of keypass is the password used to access the specific key and must match the value of the storepass parameter.
    validity
    The value of validity is the period (in days) for which the key will be valid.
    keystore

    The value of keystore is the file path and file name in which the keystore’s values are to be stored. The keystore file is created when data is first added to it. Ensure the correct file path separator is used: / (forward slash) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and similar operating systems, \ (backslash) for Windows Server.

    The keytool utility has many other options. See the documentation for the JRE or the operating system for more details.

  3. Run the keytool command, ensuring keypass and storepass contain the same value.

    $ keytool -genseckey -alias vault -storetype jceks -keyalg AES -keysize 128 -storepass vault22 -keypass vault22 -validity 730 -keystore EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore

    This results in a keystore that has been created in the file EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore. It stores a single key, with the alias vault, which will be used to store encrypted strings, such as passwords, for JBoss EAP.

4.2.2. Initialize the Password Vault

The password vault can be initialized either interactively, where you are prompted for each parameter’s value, or non-interactively, where all parameter values are provided on the command line. Each method gives the same result, so either may be used.

The following parameters will be needed:

keystore URL (KEYSTORE_URL)
The file system path or URI of the keystore file. The examples use EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore.
keystore password (KEYSTORE_PASSWORD)
The password used to access the keystore.
Salt (SALT)
The salt value is a random string of eight characters used, together with the iteration count, to encrypt the content of the keystore.
keystore Alias (KEYSTORE_ALIAS)
The alias by which the keystore is known.
Iteration Count (ITERATION_COUNT)
The number of times the encryption algorithm is run.
Directory to store encrypted files (ENC_FILE_DIR)
The path in which the encrypted files are to be stored. This is typically the directory containing the password vault. It is convenient but not mandatory to store all of your encrypted information in the same place as the keystore. This directory should be only accessible to limited users. At a minimum the user account under which JBoss EAP 7 is running requires read-write access. The keystore should be located in the directory you created when you set up the password vault. Note that the trailing backslash or forward slash on the directory name is required. Ensure the correct file path separator is used: / (forward slash) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and similar operating systems, \ (backslash) for Windows Server.
Vault Block (VAULT_BLOCK)
The name to be given to this block in the password vault.
Attribute (ATTRIBUTE)
The name to be given to the attribute being stored.
Security Attribute (SEC-ATTR)
The password which is being stored in the password vault.

To run the password vault command non-interactively, the vault script located in EAP_HOME/bin/ can be invoked with parameters for the relevant information:

$ vault.sh --keystore KEYSTORE_URL --keystore-password KEYSTORE_PASSWORD --alias KEYSTORE_ALIAS --vault-block VAULT_BLOCK --attribute ATTRIBUTE --sec-attr SEC-ATTR --enc-dir ENC_FILE_DIR --iteration ITERATION_COUNT --salt SALT

Example: Initializing Password Vault

$ vault.sh --keystore EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore --keystore-password vault22 --alias vault --vault-block vb --attribute password --sec-attr 0penS3sam3 --enc-dir EAP_HOME/vault/ --iteration 120 --salt 1234abcd

Example: Output

=========================================================================

  JBoss Vault

  JBOSS_HOME: EAP_HOME

  JAVA: java

=========================================================================

Nov 09, 2015 9:02:47 PM org.picketbox.plugins.vault.PicketBoxSecurityVault init
INFO: PBOX00361: Default Security Vault Implementation Initialized and Ready
WFLYSEC0047: Secured attribute value has been stored in Vault.
Please make note of the following:
********************************************
Vault Block:vb
Attribute Name:password
Configuration should be done as follows:
VAULT::vb::password::1
********************************************
WFLYSEC0048: Vault Configuration in WildFly configuration file:
********************************************

</extensions>
<vault>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_URL" value="EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="MASK-5dOaAVafCSd"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_ALIAS" value="vault"/>
  <vault-option name="SALT" value="1234abcd"/>
  <vault-option name="ITERATION_COUNT" value="120"/>
  <vault-option name="ENC_FILE_DIR" value="EAP_HOME/vault/"/>
</vault><management> ...
********************************************

To run the password vault command interactively, the following steps are required:

  1. Launch the password vault command interactively.

    Run EAP_HOME/bin/vault.sh on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and similar operating systems or EAP_HOME\bin\vault.bat on Windows Server. Start a new interactive session by typing 0 (zero).

  2. Complete the prompted parameters.

    Follow the prompts to input the required parameters.

  3. Make a note of the masked password information.

    The masked password, salt, and iteration count are printed to standard output. Make a note of them in a secure location. They are required to add entries to the Password Vault. Access to the keystore file and these values could allow an attacker access to obtain access to sensitive information in the Password Vault.

  4. Exit the interactive console

    Type 2 (two) to exit the interactive console.

Example: Input and Output

Please enter a Digit::   0: Start Interactive Session  1: Remove Interactive Session  2: Exit
0
Starting an interactive session
Enter directory to store encrypted files:EAP_HOME/vault/
Enter Keystore URL:EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore
Enter Keystore password: vault22
Enter Keystore password again: vault22
Values match
Enter 8 character salt:1234abcd
Enter iteration count as a number (Eg: 44):120
Enter Keystore Alias:vault
Initializing Vault
Nov 09, 2015 9:24:36 PM org.picketbox.plugins.vault.PicketBoxSecurityVault init
INFO: PBOX000361: Default Security Vault Implementation Initialized and Ready
Vault Configuration in AS7 config file:
********************************************
...
</extensions>
<vault>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_URL" value="EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="MASK-5dOaAVafCSd"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_ALIAS" value="vault"/>
  <vault-option name="SALT" value="1234abcd"/>
  <vault-option name="ITERATION_COUNT" value="120"/>
  <vault-option name="ENC_FILE_DIR" value="EAP_HOME/vault/"/>
</vault><management> ...
********************************************
Vault is initialized and ready for use
Handshake with Vault complete

+ The keystore password has been masked for use in configuration files and deployments. In addition, the vault is initialized and ready to use.

4.2.3. Use a Password Vault

Before passwords and other sensitive attributes can be masked and used in configuration files, JBoss EAP 7 must be made aware of the password vault which stores and decrypts them.

The following command can be used to configure JBoss EAP 7 to use the password vault:

/core-service=vault:add(vault-options=[("KEYSTORE_URL" => PATH_TO_KEYSTORE),("KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" => MASKED_PASSWORD),("KEYSTORE_ALIAS" => ALIAS),("SALT" => SALT),("ITERATION_COUNT" => ITERATION_COUNT),("ENC_FILE_DIR" => ENC_FILE_DIR)])

/core-service=vault:add(vault-options=[("KEYSTORE_URL" => "EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore"),("KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" => "MASK-5dOaAVafCSd"),("KEYSTORE_ALIAS" => "vault"),("SALT" => "1234abcd"),("ITERATION_COUNT" => "120"),("ENC_FILE_DIR" => "EAP_HOME/vault/")])
Note

If Microsoft Windows Server is being used, use two backslashes (\\) in the file path instead using one. For example, C:\\data\\vault\\vault.keystore. This is because a single backslash character (\) is used for character escaping.

4.2.4. Store a Sensitive String in the Password Vault

Including passwords and other sensitive strings in plaintext configuration files is a security risk. Store these strings instead in the Password Vault for improved security, where they can then be referenced in configuration files, management CLI commands and applications in their masked form.

Sensitive strings can be stored in the Password Vault either interactively, where the tool prompts for each parameter’s value, or non-interactively, where all the parameters' values are provided on the command line. Each method gives the same result, so either may be used. Both of these methods are invoked using the vault script.

To run the password vault command non-interactively, the vault script (located in EAP_HOME/bin/) can be invoked with parameters for the relevant information:

$ vault.sh --keystore KEYSTORE_URL --keystore-password KEYSTORE_PASSWORD --alias KEYSTORE_ALIAS --vault-block VAULT_BLOCK --attribute ATTRIBUTE --sec-attr SEC-ATTR --enc-dir ENC_FILE_DIR --iteration ITERATION_COUNT --salt SALT
Note

The keystore password must be given in plaintext form, not masked form.

$ vault.sh --keystore EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore --keystore-password vault22 --alias vault --vault-block vb --attribute password --sec-attr 0penS3sam3 --enc-dir EAP_HOME/vault/ --iteration 120 --salt 1234abcd

Example: Output

=========================================================================

  JBoss Vault

  JBOSS_HOME: EAP_HOME

  JAVA: java

=========================================================================

Nov 09, 2015 9:24:36 PM org.picketbox.plugins.vault.PicketBoxSecurityVault init
INFO: PBOX00361: Default Security Vault Implementation Initialized and Ready
WFLYSEC0047: Secured attribute value has been stored in Vault.
Please make note of the following:
********************************************
Vault Block:vb
Attribute Name:password
Configuration should be done as follows:
VAULT::vb::password::1
********************************************
WFLYSEC0048: Vault Configuration in WildFly configuration file:
********************************************
...
</extensions>
<vault>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_URL" value="../vault/vault.keystore"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="MASK-5dOaAVafCSd"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_ALIAS" value="vault"/>
  <vault-option name="SALT" value="1234abcd"/>
  <vault-option name="ITERATION_COUNT" value="120"/>
  <vault-option name="ENC_FILE_DIR" value="../vault/"/>
</vault><management> ...
********************************************

After invoking the vault script, a message prints to standard output, showing the vault block, attribute name, masked string, and advice about using the string in your configuration. Make note of this information in a secure location. An extract of sample output is as follows:

Vault Block:vb
Attribute Name:password
Configuration should be done as follows:
VAULT::vb::password::1

To run the password vault command interactively, the following steps are required:

  1. Launch the Password Vault command interactively.

    Launch the operating system’s command line interface and run EAP_HOME/bin/vault.sh (on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and similar operating systems) or EAP_HOME\bin\vault.bat (on Microsoft Windows Server). Start a new interactive session by typing 0 (zero).

  2. Complete the prompted parameters.

    Follow the prompts to input the required parameters. These values must match those provided when the Password Vault was created.

    Note

    The keystore password must be given in plaintext form, not masked form.

  3. Complete the prompted parameters about the sensitive string.

    Enter 0 (zero) to start storing the sensitive string. Follow the prompts to input the required parameters.

  4. Make note of the information about the masked string.

    A message prints to standard output, showing the vault block, attribute name, masked string, and advice about using the string in the configuration. Make note of this information in a secure location. An extract of sample output is as follows:

    Vault Block:ds_Example1
    Attribute Name:password
    Configuration should be done as follows:
    VAULT::ds_Example1::password::1
  5. Exit the interactive console.

    Type 2 (two) to exit the interactive console.

Example: Input and Output

 =========================================================================
  JBoss Vault
  JBOSS_HOME: EAP_HOME
  JAVA: java
 =========================================================================
 **********************************
 ****  JBoss Vault  ***************
 **********************************
Please enter a Digit::   0: Start Interactive Session  1: Remove Interactive Session  2: Exit
0
Starting an interactive session
Enter directory to store encrypted files:EAP_HOME/vault/
Enter Keystore URL:EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore
Enter Keystore password:
Enter Keystore password again:
Values match
Enter 8 character salt:1234abcd
Enter iteration count as a number (Eg: 44):120
Enter Keystore Alias:vault
Initializing Vault
Nov 09, 2015 9:24:36 PM org.picketbox.plugins.vault.PicketBoxSecurityVault init
INFO: PBOX000361: Default Security Vault Implementation Initialized and Ready
Vault Configuration in AS7 config file:
 ********************************************
...
</extensions>
<vault>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_URL" value="EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="MASK-5dOaAVafCSd"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_ALIAS" value="vault"/>
  <vault-option name="SALT" value="1234abcd"/>
  <vault-option name="ITERATION_COUNT" value="120"/>
  <vault-option name="ENC_FILE_DIR" value="EAP_HOME/vault/"/>
</vault><management> ...
 ********************************************
Vault is initialized and ready for use
Handshake with Vault complete
Please enter a Digit::  0: Store a secured attribute  1: Check whether a secured attribute exists  2: Remove secured attribute  3: Exit
0
Task: Store a secured attribute
Please enter secured attribute value (such as password):
Please enter secured attribute value (such as password) again:
Values match
Enter Vault Block:ds_Example1
Enter Attribute Name:password
Secured attribute value has been stored in vault.
Please make note of the following:
 ********************************************
Vault Block:ds_Example1
Attribute Name:password
Configuration should be done as follows:
VAULT::ds_Example1::password::1
 ********************************************
Please enter a Digit::  0: Store a secured attribute  1: Check whether a secured attribute exists  2: Remove secured attribute  3: Exit

4.2.5. Use an Encrypted Sensitive String in Configuration

Any sensitive string which has been encrypted can be used in a configuration file or management CLI command in its masked form, providing expressions are allowed.

To confirm if expressions are allowed within a particular subsystem, run the following management CLI command against that subsystem:

/subsystem=SUBSYSTEM:read-resource-description(recursive=true)

From the output of running this command, look for the value of the expressions-allowed parameter. If this is true, then expressions can be used within the configuration of this subsystem.

Use the following syntax to replace any plaintext string with the masked form.

${VAULT::VAULT_BLOCK::ATTRIBUTE_NAME::MASKED_STRING}

Example: Datasource Definition Using a Password in Masked Form

...
  <subsystem xmlns="urn:jboss:domain:datasources:1.0">
    <datasources>
      <datasource jndi-name="java:jboss/datasources/ExampleDS" enabled="true" use-java-context="true" pool-name="H2DS">
        <connection-url>jdbc:h2:mem:test;DB_CLOSE_DELAY=-1</connection-url>
        <driver>h2</driver>
        <pool></pool>
        <security>
          <user-name>sa</user-name>
          <password>${VAULT::ds_ExampleDS::password::1}</password>
        </security>
      </datasource>
      <drivers>
         <driver name="h2" module="com.h2database.h2">
            <xa-datasource-class>org.h2.jdbcx.JdbcDataSource</xa-datasource-class>
         </driver>
      </drivers>
    </datasources>
  </subsystem>
...

4.2.6. Use an Encrypted Sensitive String in an Application

Encrypted strings stored in the password vault can be used in an application’s source code. The below example is an extract of a servlet’s source code, illustrating the use of a masked password in a datasource definition, instead of the plaintext password. The plaintext version is commented out so that you can see the difference.

Example: Servlet Using a Vaulted Password

@DataSourceDefinition(
        name = "java:jboss/datasources/LoginDS",
        user = "sa",
        password = "VAULT::DS::thePass::1",
        className = "org.h2.jdbcx.JdbcDataSource",
        url = "jdbc:h2:tcp://localhost/mem:test"
)
/*old (plaintext) definition
@DataSourceDefinition(
        name = "java:jboss/datasources/LoginDS",
        user = "sa",
        password = "sa",
        className = "org.h2.jdbcx.JdbcDataSource",
        url = "jdbc:h2:tcp://localhost/mem:test"
)*/

4.2.7. Check if a Sensitive String is in the Password Vault

Before attempting to store or use a sensitive string in the Password Vault it can be useful to first confirm if it is already stored.

This check can be done either interactively, where the user is prompted for each parameter’s value, or non-interactively, where all parameters' values are provided on the command line. Each method gives the same result, so either may be used. Both of these methods are invoked using the vault script.

Use the non-interative method to provide all parameters' values at once. For a description of all parameters, see Initialize the Password Vault. To run the password vault command non-interactively, the vault script located in EAP_HOME/bin/ can be invoked with parameters for the relevant information:

$ vault.sh --keystore KEYSTORE_URL --keystore-password KEYSTORE_PASSWORD --alias KEYSTORE_ALIAS --check-sec-attr --vault-block VAULT_BLOCK --attribute ATTRIBUTE --enc-dir ENC_FILE_DIR --iteration ITERATION_COUNT --salt SALT

Substitute the placeholder values with the actual values. The values for parameters KEYSTORE_URL, KEYSTORE_PASSWORD and KEYSTORE_ALIAS must match those provided when the password vault was created.

Note

The keystore password must be given in plaintext form, not masked form.

If the sensitive string is stored in the vault block specified, the following message will be displayed:

Password already exists.

If the value is not stored in the specified block, the following message will be displayed:

Password doesn't exist.

To run the password vault command interactively, the following steps are required:

  1. Launch the password vault command interactively.

    Run EAP_HOME/bin/vault.sh (on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and similar operating systems) or EAP_HOME\bin\vault.bat (on Windows Server). Start a new interactive session by typing 0 (zero).

  2. Complete the prompted parameters. Follow the prompts to input the required authentication parameters. These values must match those provided when the password vault was created.

    Note

    When prompted for authentication, the keystore password must be given in plaintext form, not masked form.

    • Enter 1 (one) to select Check whether a secured attribute exists.
    • Enter the name of the vault block in which the sensitive string is stored.
    • Enter the name of the sensitive string to be checked.

If the sensitive string is stored in the vault block specified, a confirmation message like the following will be output:

A value exists for (VAULT_BLOCK, ATTRIBUTE)

If the sensitive string is not stored in the specified block, a message like the following will be output:

No value has been store for (VAULT_BLOCK, ATTRIBUTE)

Example: Check For a Sensitive String Interactively

 =========================================================================
  JBoss Vault
  JBOSS_HOME: EAP_HOME
  JAVA: java
 =========================================================================
 **********************************
 ****  JBoss Vault  ***************
 **********************************
Please enter a Digit::   0: Start Interactive Session  1: Remove Interactive Session  2: Exit
0
Starting an interactive session
Enter directory to store encrypted files:EAP_HOME/vault
Enter Keystore URL:EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore
Enter Keystore password:
Enter Keystore password again:
Values match
Enter 8 character salt:1234abcd
Enter iteration count as a number (Eg: 44):120
Enter Keystore Alias:vault
Initializing Vault
Nov 09, 2015 9:24:36 PM org.picketbox.plugins.vault.PicketBoxSecurityVault init
INFO: PBOX000361: Default Security Vault Implementation Initialized and Ready
Vault Configuration in AS7 config file:
 ********************************************
...
</extensions>
<vault>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_URL" value="EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="MASK-5dOaAVafCSd"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_ALIAS" value="vault"/>
  <vault-option name="SALT" value="1234abcd"/>
  <vault-option name="ITERATION_COUNT" value="120"/>
  <vault-option name="ENC_FILE_DIR" value="EAP_HOME/vault/"/>
</vault><management> ...
 ********************************************
Vault is initialized and ready for use
Handshake with Vault complete
Please enter a Digit::  0: Store a secured attribute  1: Check whether a secured attribute exists  2: Remove secured attribute  3: Exit
1
Task: Verify whether a secured attribute exists
Enter Vault Block:vb
Enter Attribute Name:password
A value exists for (vb, password)
Please enter a Digit::  0: Store a secured attribute  1: Check whether a secured attribute exists  2: Remove secured attribute  3: Exit

4.2.8. Remove a Sensitive String from the Password Vault

For security reasons it is best to remove sensitive strings from the Password Vault when they are no longer required. For example, if an application is being decommissioned, any sensitive strings used in datasource definitions should be removed at the same time.

Important

As a prerequisite, before removing a sensitive string from the Password Vault, confirm if it is used in the configuration of JBoss EAP.

This operation can be done either interactively, where the user is prompted for each parameter’s value, or non-interactively, where all parameters' values are provided on the command line. Each method gives the same result, so either may be used. Both of these methods are invoked using the vault script.

Use the non-interative method to provide all parameters' values at once. For a description of all parameters, see Initialize the Password Vault. To run the password vault command non-interactively, the vault script (located in EAP_HOME/bin/) can be invoked with parameters for the relevant information:

$ vault.sh --keystore KEYSTORE_URL --keystore-password KEYSTORE_PASSWORD --alias KEYSTORE_ALIAS --remove-sec-attr --vault-block VAULT_BLOCK --attribute ATTRIBUTE --enc-dir ENC_FILE_DIR --iteration ITERATION_COUNT --salt SALT

Substitute the placeholder values with the actual values. The values for parameters KEYSTORE_URL, KEYSTORE_PASSWORD and KEYSTORE_ALIAS must match those provided when the password Vault was created.

Note

The keystore password must be given in plaintext form, not masked form.

If the sensitive string is successfully removed, a confirmation message like the following will be displayed:

Secured attribute [VAULT_BLOCK::ATTRIBUTE] has been successfully removed from vault

If the sensitive string is not removed, a message like the following will be displayed:

Secured attribute [VAULT_BLOCK::ATTRIBUTE] was not removed from vault, check whether it exist

Example: Output

$ ./vault.sh --keystore EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore --keystore-password vault22 --alias vault --remove-sec-attr --vault-block vb --attribute password --enc-dir EAP_HOME/vault/ --iteration 120 --salt 1234abcd
 =========================================================================
  JBoss Vault
  JBOSS_HOME: EAP_HOME
  JAVA: java
 =========================================================================
Dec 23, 2015 1:54:24 PM org.picketbox.plugins.vault.PicketBoxSecurityVault init
INFO: PBOX000361: Default Security Vault Implementation Initialized and Ready
Secured attribute [vb::password] has been successfully removed from vault

Remove a Sensitive String Interactively

To run the password vault command interactively, the following steps are required:

  1. Launch the password vault command interactively.

    Run EAP_HOME/bin/vault.sh (on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and similar operating systems) or EAP_HOME\bin\vault.bat (on Microsoft Windows Server). Start a new interactive session by typing 0 (zero).

  2. Complete the prompted parameters.

    Follow the prompts to input the required authentication parameters. These values must match those provided when the password vault was created.

    Note

    When prompted for authentication, the keystore password must be given in plaintext form, not masked form.

    • Enter 2 (two) to choose option Remove secured attribute.
    • Enter the name of the vault block in which the sensitive string is stored.
    • Enter the name of the sensitive string to be removed.

If the sensitive string is successfully removed, a confirmation message like the following will be displayed:

Secured attribute [VAULT_BLOCK::ATTRIBUTE] has been successfully removed from vault

If the sensitive string is not removed, a message like the following will be displayed:

Secured attribute [VAULT_BLOCK::ATTRIBUTE] was not removed from vault, check whether it exist

Example: Output

 **********************************
 ****  JBoss Vault  ***************
 **********************************
Please enter a Digit::   0: Start Interactive Session  1: Remove Interactive Session  2: Exit
0
Starting an interactive session
Enter directory to store encrypted files:EAP_HOME/vault/
Enter Keystore URL:EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore
Enter Keystore password:
Enter Keystore password again:
Values match
Enter 8 character salt:1234abcd
Enter iteration count as a number (Eg: 44):120
Enter Keystore Alias:vault
Initializing Vault
Dec 23, 2014 1:40:56 PM org.picketbox.plugins.vault.PicketBoxSecurityVault init
INFO: PBOX000361: Default Security Vault Implementation Initialized and Ready
Vault Configuration in configuration file:
 ********************************************
...
</extensions>
<vault>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_URL" value="EAP_HOME/vault/vault.keystore"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="MASK-5dOaAVafCSd"/>
  <vault-option name="KEYSTORE_ALIAS" value="vault"/>
  <vault-option name="SALT" value="1234abcd"/>
  <vault-option name="ITERATION_COUNT" value="120"/>
  <vault-option name="ENC_FILE_DIR" value="EAP_HOME/vault/"/>
</vault><management> ...
 ********************************************
Vault is initialized and ready for use
Handshake with Vault complete
Please enter a Digit::  0: Store a secured attribute  1: Check whether a secured attribute exists  2: Remove secured attribute  3: Exit
2
Task: Remove secured attribute
Enter Vault Block:vb
Enter Attribute Name:password
Secured attribute [vb::password] has been successfully removed from vault

4.2.9. Configure Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform to Use a Custom Implementation of the Password Vault

In addition to using the provided password vault implementation, a custom implementation of SecurityVault can also be used.

Important

As a prerequisite, ensure that the password vault has been initialized. For more information, see Initialize the Password Vault.

To use a custom implementation for the password vault:

  1. Create a class that implements the interface SecurityVault.
  2. Create a module containing the class from the previous step, and specify a dependency on org.picketbox where the interface is SecurityVault.
  3. Enable the custom password vault in the JBoss EAP configuration by adding the vault element with the following attributes:

    • code - The fully qualified name of class that implements SecurityVault.
    • module - The name of the module that contains the custom class.

Optionally, the vault-options parameters can be used to initialize the custom class for a password vault.

Example: Use vault-options Parameters to Initialize the Custom Class

/core-service=vault:add(code="custom.vault.implementation.CustomSecurityVault", module="custom.vault.module", vault-options=[("KEYSTORE_URL" => PATH_TO_KEYSTORE),("KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" => MASKED_PASSWORD), ("KEYSTORE_ALIAS" => ALIAS),("SALT" => SALT),("ITERATION_COUNT" => ITERATION_COUNT),("ENC_FILE_DIR" => ENC_FILE_DIR)])

4.2.10. Obtain Keystore Password From External Source

The EXT, EXTC, CMD, CMDC or CLASS methods can be used in vault configuration for obtaining the Java keystore password.

<vault-option name="KEYSTORE_PASSWORD" value="METHOD_TO_OBTAIN_PASSWORD"/>

The description for the methods are listed as:

{EXT}…​
Refers to the exact command, where the …​ is the exact command. For example: {EXT}/usr/bin/getmypassword --section 1 --query company, run the /usr/bin/getmypassword command, which displays the password on standard output and use it as password for Security Vault’s keystore. In this example, the command is using two options: --section 1 and --query company.
{EXTC[:expiration_in_millis]}…​
Refers to the exact command, where the …​ is the exact command line that is passed to the Runtime.exec(String) method to execute a platform command. The first line of the command output is used as the password. EXTC variant caches the passwords for expiration_in_millis milliseconds. Default cache expiration is 0 = infinity. For example: {EXTC:120000}/usr/bin/getmypassword --section 1 --query company verifies if the cache contains /usr/bin/getmypassword output, if it contains the output then use it. If it does not contain the output, run the command to output it to cache and use it. In this example, the cache expires in 2 minutes, that is 120000 milliseconds.
{CMD}…​ or {CMDC[:expiration_in_millis]}…​
The general command is a string delimited by , (comma) where the first part is the actual command and further parts represents the parameters. The comma can be backslashed to keep it as a part of the parameter. For example, {CMD}/usr/bin/getmypassword,--section,1,--query,company.
{CLASS[@jboss_module_spec]}classname[:ctorargs]
Where the [:ctorargs] is an optional string delimited by the : (colon) from the classname is passed to the classname ctor. The ctorargs is a comma delimited list of strings. For example, {CLASS@org.test.passwd}org.test.passwd.ExternamPassworProvider. In this example, the org.test.passwd.ExternamPassworProvider class is loaded from org.test.passwd module and uses the toCharArray() method to get the password. If toCharArray() is not available the toString() method is used. The org.test.passwd.ExternamPassworProvider class must have the default constructor.

Chapter 5. Java Security Manager

5.1. About the Java Security Manager

The Java Security Manager is a class that manages the external boundary of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) sandbox, controlling how code executing within the JVM can interact with resources outside the JVM. When the Java Security Manager is activated, the Java API checks with the security manager for approval before executing a wide range of potentially unsafe operations. The Java Security Manager uses a security policy to determine whether a given action will be allowed or denied.

5.2. Define a Java Security Policy

A Java security policy is a set of defined permissions for different classes of code. The Java Security Manager compares actions requested by applications against the security policy. If an action is allowed by the policy, the Security Manager will permit that action to take place. If the action is not allowed by the policy, the Security Manager will deny that action.

Important

Previous versions of JBoss EAP defined policies using an external file, e.g. EAP_HOME/bin/server.policy. JBoss EAP 7 defines Java Security Policies in two ways: the security-manager subsystem and through XML files in the individual deployments. The security-manager subsystem defines minimum and maximum permission for ALL deployments, while the XML files specify the permissions requested by the individual deployment.

5.2.1. Defining Policies in the Security Manager Subsystem

The security-manager subsystem allows you do define shared or common permissions for all deployments. This is accomplished by defining minimum and maximum permission sets. All deployments will be granted at the least all permissions defined in the minimum permission. The deployment process fails for a deployment if it requests a permission that exceeds the ones defined in the maximum permission set.

Example: Management CLI Command for Updating Minimum Permission Set

/subsystem=security-manager/deployment-permissions=default:write-attribute(name=minimum-permissions, value=[{class="java.util.PropertyPermission", actions="read", name="*"}])

Example: Management CLI Command for Updating Maximum Permission Set

/subsystem=security-manager/deployment-permissions=default:write-attribute(name=maximum-permissions, value=[{class="java.util.PropertyPermission", actions="read,write", name="*"}, {class="java.io.FilePermission", actions="read,write", name="/-"}])

Note

If the maximum permission set is not defined, its value defaults to java.security.AllPermission.

You can find a full reference of the security-manager subsystem in the JBoss EAP Configuration Guide.

5.2.2. Defining Policies in the Deployment

In JBoss EAP 7, you can add a META-INF/permissions.xml to your deployment, which is part of JSR 342 and is a part of the Java EE 7 specification. This file allows you to specify the permissions needed by the deployment. If a minimum permissions set is defined in the security-manager subsystem and a META-INF/permissions.xml is added to your deployment, then the union of those permissions is granted. If the permissions requested in the permissions.xml exceed the maximum policies defined in the security-manager subsystem, its deployment will not succeed. If both META-INF/permissions.xml and META-INF/jboss-permissions.xml are present in the deployment, then only the permissions requested in the META-INF/jboss-permissions.xml are granted.

The Java EE 7 specification dictates that permissions.xml cover the entire application or top-level deployment module. In cases where you wish to define specific permissions for a subdeployment, you can use the JBoss EAP-specific META-INF/jboss-permissions.xml. It follows the same exact format as permissions.xml and will apply only to the deployment module in which it is declared.

Example: Sample permissions.xml

<permissions version="7">
  <permission>
  <class-name>java.util.PropertyPermission</class-name>
  <name>*</name>
  <actions>read</actions>
  </permission>
</permissions>

5.2.3. Defining Policies in Modules

You can restrict the permissions of a module by adding a <permissions> element to the module.xml file. The <permissions> element contains zero or more <grant> elements, which define the permission to grant to the module. Each <grant> element contains the following attributes:

permission
The qualified class name of the permission to grant.
name
The permission name to provide to the permission class constructor.
actions
The (optional) list of actions, required by some permission types.

Example: module.xml with Defined Policies

<module xmlns="urn:jboss:module:1.5" name="org.jboss.test.example">
  <permissions>
    <grant permission="java.util.PropertyPermission" name="*" actions="read,write" />
    <grant permission="java.io.FilePermission" name="/etc/-" actions="read" />
  </permissions>
  ...
</module>

If the <permissions> element is present, the module will be restricted to only the permissions you have listed. If the <permissions> element is not present, there will be no restrictions on the module.

5.3. Run JBoss EAP With the Java Security Manager

Important

Previous version of JBoss EAP allowed for the use of the -Djava.security.manager Java system property as well as custom security managers. Neither of these are supported in JBoss EAP 7. In addition, the Java Security Manager policies are now defined within the security-manager subsystem, meaning external policy files and the -Djava.security.policy Java system property are not supported JBoss EAP 7.

Important

Before starting JBoss EAP with the Java Security Manager enabled, you need make sure all security policies are defined in the security-manager subsystem.

To run JBoss EAP with the Java Security Manager, you need to use the secmgr option during startup. There are two ways to do this:

  • Use the flag with the startup script To use the -secmgr flag with the startup script, include it when starting up your JBoss EAP instance:

    Example: Startup Script

    ./standalone.sh -secmgr

  • Using the Startup Configuration File

    Important

    The domain or standalone server must be completely stopped before you edit any configuration files.

    Note

    If you are using JBoss EAP in a managed domain, you must perform the following procedure on each physical host or instance in your domain.

    To enable the Java Security Manager using the startup configuration file, you need to edit either the standalone.conf or domain.conf file, depending if you are running a standalone instance or managed domain. If running in Windows, the standalone.conf.bat or domain.conf.bat files are used instead.

    Uncomment the SECMGR="true" line in the configuration file:

    Example: standalone.conf or domain.conf

    # Uncomment this to run with a security manager enabled
    SECMGR="true"

    Example: standalone.conf.bat or domain.conf.bat

    rem # Uncomment this to run with a security manager enabled
    set "SECMGR=true"

5.4. Considerations Moving from Previous Versions

When moving applications from a previous version of JBoss EAP to JBoss EAP 7 running with the Java Security Manager enabled, you need to be aware of the changes in how policies are defined as well as the necessary configuration needed with both the JBoss EAP configuration and the deployment.

5.4.1. Defining Policies

In previous versions of JBoss EAP, policies were defined in an external configuration file. In JBoss EAP 7, policies are defined using the security-manager subsystem and with permissions.xml or jboss-permissions.xml contained in the deployment. More details on how to use both to define your policies are covered in a previous section.

5.4.2. JBoss EAP Configuration Changes

In previous versions of JBoss EAP, you could use -Djava.security.manager and -Djava.security.policy Java system properties during JBoss EAP startup. These are no longer supported and the secmgr flag should be used instead to enable JBoss EAP to run with the Java Security Manager. More details on the secmgr flag are covered in a previous section.

5.4.3. Custom Security Managers

Custom security managers are not supported in JBoss EAP 7.

Appendix A. Reference Material

A.1. Elytron Subsystem Components Reference

Table A.1. add-prefix-role-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

prefix

The prefix to add to each role.

Table A.2. add-suffix-role-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

suffix

The suffix to add to each role.

Table A.3. aggregate-http-server-mechanism-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

http-server-mechanism-factories

The list of HTTP server factories to aggregate.

Table A.4. aggregate-principal-decoder Attributes

AttributeDescription

principal-decoders

The list of principal decoders to aggregate.

Table A.5. aggregate-principal-transformer Attributes

AttributeDescription

principal-transformers

The list of principal transformers to aggregate.

Table A.6. aggregate-providers Attributes

AttributeDescription

providers

The list of referenced Provider[] resources to aggregate.

Table A.7. aggregate-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

authentication-realm

Reference to the security realm to use for authentication steps. This is used for obtaining or validating credentials.

authorization-realm

Reference to the security realm to use for loading the identity for authorization steps.

Table A.8. aggregate-role-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

role-mappers

The list of role mappers to aggregate.

Table A.9. aggregate-sasl-server-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

sasl-server-factories

The list of SASL server factories to aggregate.

Table A.10. authentication-configuration Attributes

AttributeDescription

anonymous

If true anonymous authentication is allowed. The default is false.

authentication-name

The authentication name to use.

authorization-name

The authorization name to use.

credential-reference

The credential to use for authentication. This can be in clear text or as a reference to a credential stored in a credential-store.

extends

An existing authentication configuration to extend.

host

The host to use.

kerberos-security-factory

Reference to a kerberos security factory used to obtain a GSS kerberos credential.

mechanism-properties

Configuration properties for the SASL authentication mechanism.

port

The port to use.

protocol

The protocol to use.

realm

The realm to use.

sasl-mechanism-selector

The SASL mechanism selector string. See sasl-mechanism-selector Grammar for usage information.

security-domain

Reference to a security domain to obtain a forwarded identity.

Table A.11. authentication-context Attributes

AttributeDescription

extends

An existing authentication context to extend.

match-rules

The rules to match against for this authentication context.

Table A.12. authentication-context match-rules Attributes

AttributeDescription

match-abstract-type

The abstract type to match against.

match-abstract-type-authority

The abstract type authority to match against.

match-host

The host to match against.

match-local-security-domain

The local security domain to match against.

match-no-user

If true, rule will match against no user.

match-path

The patch to match against.

match-port

The port to match against.

match-protocol

The protocol to match against.

match-urn

The URN to match against.

match-user

The user to match against.

authentication-configuration

Reference to the authentication configuration to use for a successful match.

ssl-context

Reference to the ssl-context to use for a successful match.

Table A.13. caching-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

maximum-age

The time in milliseconds that an item can stay in the cache. A value of -1 keeps items indefinitely. This defaults to -1.

maximum-entries

The maximum number of entries to keep in the cache. This defaults to 16.

realm

A reference to a cacheable security realm such as jdbc-realm, ldap-realm, filesystem-realm or a custom security realm.

Table A.14. chained-principal-transformer Attributes

AttributeDescription

principal-transformers

List of principal transformers to chain.

Table A.15. client-ssl-context Attributes

AttributeDescription

cipher-suite-filter

The filter to apply to specify the enabled cipher suites. This filter takes a list of items delimited by colons, commas, or spaces. Each item may be a OpenSSL-style cipher suite name, a standard SSL/TLS cipher suite name, or a keyword such as TLSv1.2 or DES. A full list of keywords as well as additional details on creating a filter can be found in the JavaDocs. The default value is DEFAULT, which corresponds to all known cipher suites that do not have NULL encryption and excludes any cipher suites that have no authentication.

key-manager

Reference to the key-manager to use within the SSLContext.

protocols

The enabled protocols. Allowed options: SSLv2, SSLv3, TLSv1, TLSv1.1, TLSv1.2, TLSv1.3. This defaults to enabling TLSv1, TLSv1.1, TLSv1.2, and TLSv1.3.

Warning

Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2 in all affected packages.

provider-name

The name of the provider to use. If not specified, all providers from providers will be passed to the SSLContext.

providers

The name of the providers to obtain the Provider[] to use to load the SSLContext.

session-timeout

The timeout for SSL sessions.

trust-manager

Reference to the trust-manager to use within the SSLContext.

Table A.16. concatenating-principal-decoder Attributes

AttributeDescription

joiner

The string that will be used to join the values in the principal-decoders attribute.

principal-decoders

The list of principal decoders to concatenate.

Table A.17. configurable-http-server-mechanism-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

filters

The list of filters to be applied in order to enable or disable mechanisms based on the name.

http-server-mechanism-factory

Reference to the http server factory to be wrapped.

properties

Custom properties to be passed in to the HTTP server factory calls.

Table A.18. configurable-http-server-mechanism-factory filters Attributes

AttributeDescription

pattern-filter

Filter based on a regular expression pattern.

enabling

If true the filter will be enabled if the mechanism matches. This defaults to true.

Table A.19. configurable-sasl-server-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

filters

List of filters to be evaluated sequentially and combined using or.

properties

Custom properties to be passed in to the SASL server factory calls.

protocol

The protocol passed into the factory when creating the mechanism.

sasl-server-factory

Reference to the SASL server factory to be wrapped.

server-name

The server name passed into the factory when creating the mechanism.

Table A.20. configurable-sasl-server-factory filters Attributes

AttributeDescription

predefined-filter

A predefined filter to use to filter the mechanism name. Allowed values are HASH_MD5, HASH_SHA, HASH_SHA_256, HASH_SHA_384, HASH_SHA_512, GS2, SCRAM, DIGEST, IEC_ISO_9798, EAP, MUTUAL, BINDING, and RECOMMENDED.

pattern-filter

A filter for the mechanism name based on a regular expression.

enabling

If true the filter will be enabled if the factory matches. This defaults to true.

Table A.21. constant-permission-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

permissions

The permissions to assign.

Table A.22. constant-permission-mapper permissions Attributes

AttributeDescription

class-name

The fully qualified class name of the permission.

module

The module to use to load the permission.

target-name

The target name to pass to the permission as it is constructed.

action

The action to pass to the permission as it is constructed.

Table A.23. constant-principal-decoder Attributes

AttributeDescription

constant

The constant value the principal decoder will always return.

Table A.24. constant-principal-transformer Attributes

AttributeDescription

constant

The constant value this principal transformer will always return.

Table A.25. constant-realm-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

realm-name

Reference to the realm that will be returned.

Table A.26. constant-role-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

roles

The list of roles that will be returned.

Table A.27. credential-store Attributes

AttributeDescription

create

Specifies whether the credential store should create storage when it does not exist.

credential-reference

The reference to the credential used to create protection parameter. This can be in clear text or as a reference to a credential stored in a credential-store.

implementation-properties

Map of credentials store implementation-specific properties.

location

The file name of the credential store storage.

modifiable

Whether the credential store is modifiable.

other-providers

The name of the providers to obtain the providers to search for the one that can create the required JCA objects within the credential store. This is valid only for keystore-based credential store. If this is not specified, then the global list of providers is used instead.

provider-name

The name of the provider to use to instantiate the CredentialStoreSpi. If the provider is not specified, then the first provider found that can create an instance of the specified type will be used.

providers

The name of the providers to obtain the providers to search for the one that can create the required credential store type. If this is not specified, then the global list of providers is used instead.

relative-to

The base path this credential store path is relative to.

type

Type of the credential store, for example, KeyStoreCredentialStore.

Table A.28. credential-store alias

AttributeDescription

entry-type

Type of credential entry stored in the credential store.

secret-value

Secret value such as password.

Table A.29. credential-store KeyStoreCredentialStore implementation properties

AttributeDescription

cryptoAlg

Cryptographic algorithm name to be used to encrypt decrypt entries at external storage. This attribute is only valid if external is enabled. Defaults to AES.

external

Whether data is stored to external storage and encrypted by the keyAlias. Defaults to false.

externalPath

Specifies path to external storage. This attribute is only valid if external is enabled. For PKCS11 keystores use the location attribute instead of externalPath.

keyAlias

The secret key alias within the credential store that is used to encrypt or decrypt data to the external storage.

keyStoreType

The keystore type, such as PKCS11. Defaults to KeyStore.getDefaultType().

Table A.30. custom-credential-security-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the custom security factory.

class-name

The class name of the implementation of the custom security factory.

module

The module to use to load the custom security factory.

Table A.31. custom-modifiable-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the custom realm.

class-name

The class name of the implementation of the custom realm.

module

The module to use to load the custom realm.

Table A.32. custom-permission-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the permission mapper.

class-name

Fully qualified class name of the permission mapper.

module

Name of the module to use to load the permission mapper.

Table A.33. custom-principal-decoder Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the principal decoder.

class-name

Fully qualified class name of the principal decoder.

module

Name of the module to use to load the principal decoder.

Table A.34. custom-principal-transformer Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the principal transformer.

class-name

Fully qualified class name of the principal transformer.

module

Name of the module to use to load the principal transformer.

Table A.35. custom-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the custom realm.

class-name

Fully qualified class name of the custom realm.

module

Name of the module to use to load the custom realm.

Table A.36. custom-realm-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the realm mapper.

class-name

Fully qualified class name of the realm mapper.

module

Name of the module to use to load the realm mapper.

Table A.37. custom-role-decoder Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the role decoder.

class-name

Fully qualified class name of the role decoder.

module

Name of the module to use to load the role decoder.

Table A.38. custom-role-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

configuration

The optional key and value configuration for the role mapper.

class-name

Fully qualified class name of the role mapper.

module

Name of the module to use to load the role mapper.

Table A.39. dir-context Attributes

AttributeDescription

authentication-context

The authentication context to obtain login credentials to connect to the LDAP server. Can be omitted if authentication-level is none, which is equivalent to anonymous authentication.

authentication-level

The authentication level, meaning security level or authentication mechanism, to use. Corresponds to SECURITY_AUTHENTICATION or java.naming.security.authentication environment property. Allowed values are none, simple and sasl_mech format. The sasl_mech format is a space-separated list of SASL mechanism names.

connection-timeout

The timeout for connecting to the LDAP server in milliseconds.

credential-reference

The credential reference to authenticate and connect to the LDAP server. This can be omitted if authentication-level is none, which is equivalent to anonymous authentication.

enable-connection-pooling

If true connection pooling is enabled. This defaults to false.

module

Name of module that will be used as the class loading base.

principal

The principal to authenticate and connect to the LDAP server. This can be omitted if authentication-level is none which is equivalent to anonymous authentication.

properties

The additional connection properties for the DirContext.

read-timeout

The read timeout for an LDAP operation in milliseconds.

referral-mode

The mode used to determine if referrals should be followed. Allowed values are FOLLOW, IGNORE, and THROW. This defaults to IGNORE.

ssl-context

The name of the SSL context used to secure connection to the LDAP server.

url

The connection URL.

Table A.40. filesystem-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

encoded

Whether the identity names should be stored encoded (Base32) in file names.

levels

The number of levels of directory hashing to apply. The default value is 2.

path

The path to the file containing the realm.

relative-to

The predefined relative path to use with path. For example jboss.server.config.dir.

Table A.41. filtering-key-store Attributes

AttributeDescription

alias-filter

A filter to apply to the aliases returned from the key-store. It can either be a comma-separated list of aliases to return or one of the following formats:

  • ALL:-alias1:-alias2
  • NONE:+alias1:+alias2
Note

The alias-filter attribute is case sensitive. Because the use of mixed-case or uppercase aliases, such as elytronAppServer, might not be recognized by some keystore providers, it is recommended to use lowercase aliases, such as elytronappserver.

key-store

Reference to the key-store to filter.

Table A.42. http-authentication-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

http-server-mechanism-factory

The HttpServerAuthenticationMechanismFactory to associate with this resource.

mechanism-configurations

The list of mechanism-specific configurations.

security-domain

The security domain to associate with this resource.

Table A.43. http-authentication-factory mechanism-configurations Attributes

AttributeDescription

credential-security-factory

The security factory to use to obtain a credential as required by the mechanism.

final-principal-transformer

A final principal transformer to apply for this mechanism realm.

host-name

The host name this configuration applies to.

mechanism-name

This configuration will only apply where a mechanism with the name specified is used. If this attribute is omitted then this will match any mechanism name.

mechanism-realm-configurations

The list of definitions of the realm names as understood by the mechanism.

pre-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply before the realm is selected.

post-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply after the realm is selected.

protocol

The protocol this configuration applies to.

realm-mapper

The realm mapper to be used by the mechanism.

Table A.44. http-authentication-factory mechanism-configurations mechanism-realm-configurations Attributes

AttributeDescription

final-principal-transformer

A final principal transformer to apply for this mechanism realm.

post-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply after the realm is selected.

pre-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply before the realm is selected.

realm-mapper

The realm mapper to be used by the mechanism.

realm-name

The name of the realm to be presented by the mechanism.

Table A.45. identity-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

attribute-name

The name of the attribute associated with this identity.

attribute-values

The list of values associated with the identities attribute.

identity

The identity available from the security realm.

Table A.46. jdbc-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

principal-query

The list of authentication queries used to authenticate users based on specific key types.

Table A.47. jdbc-realm principal-query Attributes

AttributeDescription

attribute-mapping

The list of attribute mappings defined for this resource.

bcrypt-mapper

A key mapper that maps a column returned from a SQL query to a Bcrypt key type.

clear-password-mapper

A key mapper that maps a column returned from a SQL query to a clear password key type. This has a password-index child element that is the column index from an authentication query that represents the user’s password.

data-source

The name of the datasource used to connect to the database.

salted-simple-digest-mapper

A key mapper that maps a column returned from a SQL query to a Salted Simple Digest key type.

scram-mapper

A key mapper that maps a column returned from a SQL query to a SCRAM key type.

simple-digest-mapper

A key mapper that maps a column returned from a SQL query to a Simple Digest key type.

sql

The SQL statement used to obtain the keys as table columns for a specific user and map them accordingly with their type.

Table A.48. jdbc-realm principal-query attribute-mapping Attributes

AttributeDescription

index

The column index from a query that representing the mapped attribute.

to

The name of the identity attribute mapped from a column returned from a SQL query.

Table A.49. jdbc-realm principal-query bcrypt-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

iteration-count-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the password’s iteration count, if supported.

password-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the user’s password.

salt-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the password’s salt, if supported.

Table A.50. jdbc-realm principal-query salted-simple-digest-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

algorithm

The algorithm for a specific password key mapper. Allowed values are password-salt-digest-md5, password-salt-digest-sha-1, password-salt-digest-sha-256, password-salt-digest-sha-384, password-salt-digest-sha-512, salt-password-digest-md5, salt-password-digest-sha-1, salt-password-digest-sha-256, salt-password-digest-sha-384, and salt-password-digest-sha-512. The default is password-salt-digest-md5.

password-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the user’s password.

salt-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the password’s salt, if supported.

Table A.51. jdbc-realm principal-query simple-digest-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

algorithm

The algorithm for a specific password key mapper. Allowed values are simple-digest-md2, simple-digest-md5, simple-digest-sha-1, simple-digest-sha-256, simple-digest-sha-384, and simple-digest-sha-512. The default is simple-digest-md5.

password-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the user’s password.

Table A.52. jdbc-realm principal-query scram-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

algorithm

The algorithm for a specific password key mapper. The allowed values are scram-sha-1 and scram-sha-256. The default value is scram-sha-256.

iteration-count-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the password’s iteration count, if supported.

password-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the user’s password.

salt-index

The column index from an authentication query that represents the password’s salt, if supported.

Table A.53. kerberos-security-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

debug

If true the JAAS step of obtaining the credential will have debug logging enabled. Defaults to false.

mechanism-names

The mechanism names the credential should be usable with. Names will be converted to OIDs and used together with OIDs from mechanism-oids attribute.

mechanism-oids

The list of mechanism OIDs the credential should be usable with.

minimum-remaining-lifetime

The amount of time in seconds a cached credential can have before it is recreated.

obtain-kerberos-ticket

Should the KerberosTicket also be obtained and associated with the credential. This is required to be true where credentials are delegated to the server.

options

The Krb5LoginModule additional options.

path

The path of the keytab to load to obtain the credential.

principal

The principal represented by the keytab.

relative-to

The relative path to the keytab.

request-lifetime

How much lifetime should be requested for newly created credentials.

required

Whether the keytab file with an adequate principal is required to exist at the time the service starts.

server

If true this factory is used for the server-side portion of Kerberos authentication. If false it is used for the client-side. Defaults to true

wrap-gss-credential

Whether generated GSS credentials should be wrapped to prevent improper disposal.

Table A.54. key-manager Attributes

AttributeDescription

algorithm

The name of the algorithm to use to create the underlying KeyManagerFactory. This is provided by the JDK. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms. More details on SunJSSE can be found in the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) Reference Guide.

alias-filter

A filter to apply to the aliases returned from the keystore. This can either be a comma-separated list of aliases to return or one of the following formats:

  • ALL:-alias1:-alias2
  • NONE:+alias1:+alias2

credential-reference

The credential reference to decrypt keystore item. This can be specified in clear text or as a reference to a credential stored in a credential-store. This is not a password of the keystore.

key-store

Reference to the key-store to use to initialize the underlying KeyManagerFactory.

provider-name

The name of the provider to use to create the underlying KeyManagerFactory.

providers

Reference to obtain the Provider[] to use when creating the underlying KeyManagerFactory.

Table A.55. key-store Attributes

AttributeDescription

alias-filter

A filter to apply to the aliases returned from the keystore, can either be a comma separated list of aliases to return or one of the following formats:

  • ALL:-alias1:-alias2
  • NONE:+alias1:+alias2
Note

The alias-filter attribute is case sensitive. Because the use of mixed-case or uppercase aliases, such as elytronAppServer, might not be recognized by some keystore providers, it is recommended to use lowercase aliases, such as elytronappserver.

credential-reference

The password to use to access the keystore. This can be specified in clear text or as a reference to a credential stored in a credential-store.

path

The path to the keystore file.

provider-name

The name of the provider to use to load the keystore. Setting this attribute disables searching for the first provider that can create a keystore of the specified type.

providers

A reference to the providers that should be used to obtain the list of provider instances to search. If not specified, the global list of providers will be used instead.

relative-to

The base path this store is relative to. This can be a full path or predefined path such as jboss.server.config.dir.

required

If true the keystore file referenced is required to exist at the time the keystore service starts. The default value is false.

type

The type of the keystore, for example, JKS. A full list of keystore types can be found in the Java Cryptography Architecture Standard Algorithm Name Documentation for JDK 8.

Table A.56. key-store-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

key-store

Reference to the keystore used to back this security realm.

Table A.57. ldap-key-store Attributes

AttributeDescription

alias-attribute

The name of LDAP attribute where the item alias will be stored.

certificate-attribute

The name of LDAP attribute where the certificate will be stored.

certificate-chain-attribute

The name of LDAP attribute where the certificate chain will be stored.

certificate-chain-encoding

The encoding of the certificate chain.

certificate-type

The type of the certificate.

dir-context

The name of the dir-context which will be used to communication with LDAP server.

filter-alias

The LDAP filter for obtaining an item in the keystore by alias.

filter-certificate

The LDAP filter for obtaining an item in the keystore by certificate.

filter-iterate

The LDAP filter for iterating over all items of the keystore.

key-attribute

The name of LDAP attribute where the key will be stored.

key-type

The type of keystore that is stored in a serialized manner in the LDAP attribute. For example, JKS. A full list of keystore types can be found in the Java Cryptography Architecture Standard Algorithm Name Documentation for JDK 8.

new-item-template

Configuration for item creation. This defines how the LDAP entry of newly created keystore item will look.

search-path

The path in LDAP where the keystore items will be searched.

search-recursive

If the LDAP search should be recursive.

search-time-limit

The time limit in milliseconds for obtaining keystore items from LDAP. Defaults to 10000.

Table A.58. ldap-key-store new-item-template Attributes

AttributeDescription

new-item-attributes

The LDAP attributes which will be set for newly created items. This takes a list of items with name and value pairs.

new-item-path

The path in LDAP where the newly created keystore items will be stored.

new-item-rdn

The name of LDAP RDN for the newly created items.

Table A.59. ldap-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

allow-blank-password

Whether this realm supports blank password direct verification. A blank password attempt will be rejected otherwise.

dir-context

The name of the dir-context which will be used to connect to the LDAP server.

direct-verification

If true this realm supports verification of credentials by directly connecting to LDAP as the account being authenticated; otherwise, the password is retrieved from the LDAP server and verified in JBoss EAP. If enabled, the JBoss EAP server must be able to obtain the plain user password from the client, which requires either the PLAIN SASL or BASIC HTTP mechanism be used for authentication. Defaults to false.

identity-mapping

The configuration options that define how principals are mapped to their corresponding entries in the underlying LDAP server.

Table A.60. ldap-realm identity-mapping Attributes

AttributeDescription

rdn-identifier

The RDN part of the principal’s DN to be used to obtain the principal’s name from an LDAP entry. This is also used when creating new identities.

use-recursive-search

If true identity search queries are recursive. Defaults to false.

search-base-dn

The base DN to search for identities.

attribute-mapping

List of attribute mappings defined for this resource.

filter-name

The LDAP filter for getting identity by name.

iterator-filter

The LDAP filter for iterating over identities of the realm.

new-identity-parent-dn

The DN of parent of newly created identities. Required for modifiability of the realm.

new-identity-attributes

The list of attributes of newly created identities and is required for modifiability of the realm. This is a list of name and value pair objects.

user-password-mapper

The credential mapping for a credential similar to userPassword.

otp-credential-mapper

The credential mapping for OTP credential.

x509-credential-mapper

The configuration allowing to use LDAP as storage of X509 credentials. If none of the -from child attributes are defined, then this configuration will be ignored. If more than one -from child attribute is defined, then the user certificate must match all the defined criteria.

Table A.61. ldap-realm identity-mapping attribute-mapping Attributes

AttributeDescription

extract-rdn

The RDN key to use as the value for an attribute, in case the value in its raw form is in X.500 format.

filter

The filter to use to obtain the values for a specific attribute.

filter-base-dn

The name of the context where the filter should be performed.

from

The name of the LDAP attribute to map to an identity attribute. If not defined, DN of entry is used.

reference

The name of LDAP attribute containing DN of entry to obtain value from.

role-recursion

Maximum depth for recursive role assignment. Use 0 to specify no recursion. Defaults to 0.

role-recursion-name

Determine the LDAP attribute of role entry which will be a substitute for "{0}" in filter-name when searching roles of role.

search-recursive

If true attribute LDAP search queries are recursive. Defaults to true.

to

The name of the identity attribute mapped from a specific LDAP attribute. If not provided, the name of the attribute is the same as define in from. If the from is not defined too, value dn is used.

Table A.62. ldap-realm identity-mapping user-password-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

from

The name of the LDAP attribute to map to an identity attribute. If not defined, DN of entry is used.

verifiable

If true password can be used to verify the user. Defaults to true.

writable

If true password can be changed. Defaults to false.

Table A.63. ldap-realm identity-mapping otp-credential-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

algorithm-from

The name of the LDAP attribute of OTP algorithm.

hash-from

The name of the LDAP attribute of OTP hash function.

seed-from

The name of the LDAP attribute of OTP seed.

sequence-from

The name of the LDAP attribute of OTP sequence number.

Table A.64. ldap-realm identity-mapping x509-credential-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

certificate-from

The name of the LDAP attribute to map to an encoded user certificate. If not defined, encoded certificate will not be checked.

digest-algorithm

The digest algorithm, which is the hash function, used to compute digest of the user certificate. Will be used only if digest-from has been defined.

digest-from

The name of the LDAP attribute to map to a user certificate digest. If not defined, certificate digest will not be checked.

serial-number-from

The name of the LDAP attribute to map to a serial number of user certificate. If not defined, serial number will not be checked.

subject-dn-from

The name of the LDAP attribute to map to a subject DN of user certificate. If not defined, subject DN will not be checked.

Table A.65. logical-permission-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

left

Reference to the permission mapper to use to the left of the operation.

logical-operation

The logical operation to use to combine the permission mappers. Allowed values are and, or, xor, and unless.

right

Reference to the permission mapper to use to the right of the operation.

Table A.66. logical-role-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

left

Reference to a role mapper to be used on the left side of the operation.

logical-operation

The logical operation to be performed on the role mapper mappings. Allowed values are: and, minus, or, and xor.

right

Reference to a role mapper to be used on the right side of the operation.

Table A.67. mapped-regex-realm-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

delegate-realm-mapper

The realm mapper to delegate to if there is no match using the pattern.

pattern

The regular expression which must contain at least one capture group to extract the realm from the name.

realm-map

Mapping of realm name extracted using the regular expression to a defined realm name.

Table A.68. mechanism-provider-filtering-sasl-server-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

enabling

If true no provider loaded mechanisms are enabled unless matched by one of the filters. This defaults to true.

filters

The list of filters to apply when comparing the mechanisms from the providers. A filter matches when all of the specified values match the mechanism and provider pair.

sasl-server-factory

Reference to a SASL server factory to be wrapped by this definition.

Table A.69. mechanism-provider-filtering-sasl-server-factory filters Attributes

AttributeDescription

mechanism-name

The name of the SASL mechanism this filter matches with.

provider-name

The name of the provider this filter matches.

provider-version

The version to use when comparing the provider’s version.

version-comparison

The equality to use when evaluating the Provider’s version. The allowed values are less-than and greater-than. The default value is less-than.

Table A.70. properties-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

groups-attribute

The name of the attribute in the returned AuthorizationIdentity that should contain the group membership information for the identity.

groups-properties

The properties file containing the users and their groups.

users-properties

The properties file containing the users and their passwords.

Table A.71. properties-realm users-properties Attributes

AttributeDescription

digest-realm-name

The default realm name to use for digested passwords if one is not discovered in the properties file.

path

The path to the file containing the users and their passwords. The file should contain realm name declaration.

plain-text

If true the passwords in properties file stored in plain text. If false they are pre-hashed, taking the form of HEX( MD5( username \":\" realm \":\" password))). Defaults to false.

relative-to

The predefined path the path is relative to.

Table A.72. properties-realm groups-properties Attributes

AttributeDescription

path

The path to the file containing the users and their groups.

relative-to

The predefined path the path is relative to.

Table A.73. provider-http-server-mechanism-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

providers

The providers to use to locate the factories. If not specified, the globally registered list of providers will be used.

Table A.74. provider-loader Attributes

AttributeDescription

argument

An argument to be passed into the constructor as the Provider is instantiated.

class-names

The list of the fully qualified class names of providers to load. These are loaded after the service-loader discovered providers, and any duplicates will be skipped.

configuration

The key and value configuration to be passed to the provider to initialize it.

module

The name of the module to load the provider from.

path

The path of the file to use to initialize the providers.

relative-to

The base path of the configuration file.

Table A.75. provider-sasl-server-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

providers

The providers to use to locate the factories. If not specified, the globally registered list of providers will be used.

Table A.76. regex-principal-transformer Attributes

AttributeDescription

pattern

The regular expression to use to locate the portion of the name to be replaced.

replace-all

If true all occurrences of the pattern matched are replaced. If false only the first occurrence. is replaced. Defaults to false.

replacement

The value to be used as the replacement.

Table A.77. regex-validating-principal-transformer Attributes

AttributeDescription

match

If true the name must match the given pattern to make validation successful. If false the name must not match the given pattern to make validation successful. This defaults to true.

pattern

The regular expression to use for the principal transformer.

Table A.78. sasl-authentication-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

mechanism-configurations

The list of mechanism specific configurations.

sasl-server-factory

The SASL server factory to associate with this resource.

security-domain

The security domain to associate with this resource.

Table A.79. sasl-authentication-factory mechanism-configurations Attributes

AttributeDescription

credential-security-factory

The security factory to use to obtain a credential as required by the mechanism.

final-principal-transformer

A final principal transformer to apply for this mechanism realm.

host-name

The host name this configuration applies to.

mechanism-name

This configuration will only apply where a mechanism with the name specified is used. If this attribute is omitted then this will match any mechanism name.

mechanism-realm-configurations

The list of definitions of the realm names as understood by the mechanism.

protocol

The protocol this configuration applies to.

post-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply after the realm is selected.

pre-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply before the realm is selected.

realm-mapper

The realm mapper to be used by the mechanism.

Table A.80. sasl-authentication-factory mechanism-configurations mechanism-realm-configurations Attributes

AttributeDescription

final-principal-transformer

A final principal transformer to apply for this mechanism realm.

post-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply after the realm is selected.

pre-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply before the realm is selected.

realm-mapper

The realm mapper to be used by the mechanism.

realm-name

The name of the realm to be presented by the mechanism.

Table A.81. server-ssl-context Attributes

AttributeDescription

authentication-optional

If true rejecting of the client certificate by the security domain will not prevent the connection. This allows a fall through to use other authentication mechanisms, such as form login, when the client certificate is rejected by security domain. This has an effect only when the security domain is set. This defaults to false.

cipher-suite-filter

The filter to apply to specify the enabled cipher suites. This filter takes a list of items delimited by colons, commas, or spaces. Each item may be an OpenSSL-style cipher suite name, a standard SSL/TLS cipher suite name, or a keyword such as TLSv1.2 or DES. A full list of keywords as well as additional details on creating a filter can be found in the JavaDocs. The default value is DEFAULT, which corresponds to all known cipher suites that do not have NULL encryption and excludes any cipher suites that have no authentication.

final-principal-transformer

A final principal transformer to apply for this mechanism realm.

key-manager

Reference to the key managers to use within the SSLContext.

maximum-session-cache-size

The maximum number of SSL/TLS sessions to be cached.

need-client-auth

If true a client certificate is required on SSL handshake. Connection without trusted client certificate will be rejected. This defaults to false.

post-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply after the realm is selected.

pre-realm-principal-transformer

A principal transformer to apply before the realm is selected.

protocols

The enabled protocols. Allowed options are SSLv2, SSLv3, TLSv1, TLSv1.1, TLSv1.2, TLSv1.3. This defaults to enabling TLSv1, TLSv1.1, TLSv1.2, and TLSv1.3.

Warning

Red Hat recommends that SSLv2, SSLv3, and TLSv1.0 be explicitly disabled in favor of TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2 in all affected packages.

provider-name

The name of the provider to use. If not specified, all providers from providers will be passed to the SSLContext.

providers

The name of the providers to obtain the Provider[] to use to load the SSLContext.

realm-mapper

The realm mapper to be used for SSL authentication.

security-domain

The security domain to use for authentication during SSL/TLS session establishment.

session-timeout

The timeout for SSL/TLS sessions.

trust-manager

Reference to the trust-manager to use within the SSLContext.

use-cipher-suites-order

If true the cipher suites order defined on the server will be used. If false the cipher suites order presented by the client will be used. Defaults to true.

want-client-auth

If true a client certificate will be requested, but not required, on SSL handshake. If a security domain is referenced and supports X509 evidence, this will be set to true automatically. This is ignored when need-client-auth is set. This defaults to false.

wrap

If true, the returned SSLEngine, SSLSocket, and SSLServerSocket instances will be wrapped to protect against further modification. This defaults to false.

Note

The realm mapper and principal transformer attributes for a server-ssl-context apply only for the SASL EXTERNAL mechanism, where the certificate is verified by the trust manager. HTTP CLIENT-CERT authentication settings are configured in an http-authentication-factory.

Table A.82. service-loader-http-server-mechanism-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

module

The module to use to obtain the class loader to load the factories. If not specified the class loader to load the resource will be used instead.

Table A.83. service-loader-sasl-server-factory Attributes

AttributeDescription

module

The module to use to obtain the class loader to load the factories. If not specified the class loader to load the resource will be used instead.

Table A.84. simple-permission-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

mapping-mode

The mapping mode that should be used in the event of multiple matches. Allowed values are, and, or, xor, unless, and first. The default is first.

permission-mappings

The list of defined permission mappings.

Table A.85. simple-permission-mapper permission-mappings Attributes

AttributeDescription

permissions

The list of permissions to assign in the event of a match.

principals

The list of principals to compare when mapping permissions, if the identities principal matches any one in the list it is a match.

roles

The list of roles to compare when mapping permissions, if the identity is a member of any one in the list it is a match.

Table A.86. simple-permission-mapper permission-mappings permissions Attributes

AttributeDescription

action

The action to pass to the permission as it is constructed.

class-name

The fully qualified class name of the permission.

module

The module to use to load the permission.

target-name

The target name to pass to the permission as it is constructed.

Table A.87. simple-regex-realm-mapper Attributes

AttributeDescription

delegate-realm-mapper

The realm mapper to delegate to if there is no match using the pattern.

pattern

The regular expression which must contain at least one capture group to extract the realm from the name.

Table A.88. simple-role-decoder Attributes

AttributeDescription

attribute

The name of the attribute from the identity to map directly to roles.

Table A.89. token-realm Attributes

AttributeDescription

jwt

A token validator to be used in conjunction with a token-based realm that handles security tokens based on the JWT/JWS standard.

oauth2-introspection

A token validator to be used in conjunction with a token-based realm that handles OAuth2 Access Tokens and validates them using an endpoint compliant with the RFC-7662 OAuth2 Token Introspection specification.

principal-claim

The name of the claim that should be used to obtain the principal’s name. The default is username.

Table A.90. token-realm jwt Attributes

AttributeDescription

audience

A list of strings representing the audiences supported by this configuration. During validation JWT tokens must have an aud claim that contains one of the values defined here.

certificate

The name of the certificate with a public key to load from the keystore.

issuer

A list of strings representing the issuers supported by this configuration. During validation JWT tokens must have an iss claim that contains one of the values defined here.

key-store

A keystore from where the certificate with a public key should be loaded from.

public-key

A public key in PEM Format. During validation, if a public key is provided, the signature will be verified based on the key you provided here.

Table A.91. token-realm oauth2-introspection Attributes

AttributeDescription

client-id

The identifier of the client on the OAuth2 Authorization Server.

client-secret

The secret of the client.

client-ssl-context

The SSL context to be used if the introspection endpoint is using HTTPS.

host-name-verification-policy

A policy that defines how host names should be verified when using HTTPS. The only allowed value is ANY.

introspection-url

The URL of token introspection endpoint.

Table A.92. trust-manager Attributes

AttributeDescription

algorithm

The name of the algorithm to use to create the underlying TrustManagerFactory. This is provided by the JDK. For example, a JDK that uses SunJSSE provides the PKIX and SunX509 algorithms. More details on SunJSSE can be found in the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) Reference Guide.

alias-filter

A filter to apply to the aliases returned from the keystore. This can either be a comma-separated list of aliases to return or one of the following formats:

  • ALL:-alias1:-alias2
  • NONE:+alias1:+alias2

certificate-revocation-list

Enables the certificate revocation list that can be checked by a trust manager. The attributes of certificate-revocation-list are:

  • path - The path to the configuration file that is used to initialize the provider.
  • relative-to - The base path of the certificate revocation list file.
  • maximum-cert-path - The maximum number of non-self-issued intermediate certificates that can exist in a certification path. The default value is 5.

See Using a Certificate Revocation List for more information.

key-store

Reference to the key-store to use to initialize the underlying TrustManagerFactory.

provider-name

The name of the provider to use to create the underlying TrustManagerFactory.

providers

Reference to obtain the Provider[] to use when creating the underlying TrustManagerFactory.

Table A.93. x500-attribute-principal-decoder Attributes

AttributeDescription

attribute-name

The name of the X.500 attribute to map. This can also be defined using the oid attribute.

convert

When set to true, the principal decoder will attempt to convert a principal to a X500Principal, if it is not already of that type. If the conversion fails, the original value is used as the principal.

joiner

The joining string. The default value is a period (.).

maximum-segments

The maximum number of occurrences of the attribute to map. The default value is 2147483647.

oid

The OID of the X.500 attribute to map. This can also be defined using the attribute-name attribute.

required-attributes

The list of attribute names of the attributes that must be present in the principal

required-oids

The list of OIDs of the attributes that must be present in the principal.

reverse

If true the attribute values will be processed and returned in reverse order. The default value is false.

start-segment

The starting occurrence of the attribute you want to map. This uses a zero-based index and the default value is 0.

A.2. SASL Authentication Mechanisms Reference

A.2.1. Support Level for SASL Authentication Mechanisms

NameSupport LevelComments

ANONYMOUS

Supported

 

DIGEST-SHA-512

Technology Preview

Supported but name not currently IANA registered.

DIGEST-SHA-256

Technology Preview

Supported but name not currently IANA registered.

DIGEST-SHA

Technology Preview

Supported but name not currently IANA registered.

DIGEST-MD5

Supported

 

EXTERNAL

Supported

 

GS2-KRB5

Supported

 

GS2-KRB5-PLUS

Supported

 

GSSAPI

Supported

 

JBOSS-LOCAL-USER

Supported

Supported but name not currently IANA registered.

OAUTHBEARER

Supported

 

OTP

Not supported

 

PLAIN

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-1

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-1-PLUS

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-256

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-256-PLUS

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-384

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-384-PLUS

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-512

Supported

 

SCRAM-SHA-512-PLUS

Supported

 

9798-U-RSA-SHA1-ENC

Not supported

 

9798-M-RSA-SHA1-ENC

Not supported

 

9798-U-DSA-SHA1

Not supported

 

9798-M-DSA-SHA1

Not supported

 

9798-U-ECDSA-SHA1

Not supported

 

9798-M-ECDSA-SHA1

Not supported

 

A.2.2. SASL Authentication Mechanism Properties

You can see a list of standard Java SASL authentication mechanism properties in the Java documentation. Other JBoss EAP-specific SASL authentication mechanism properties are listed in the following tables.

Table A.94. SASL Properties Used During SASL Mechanism Negotiation or Authentication Exchange

PropertyClient / ServerDescription

com.sun.security.sasl.digest.realm

Server

Used by some SASL mechanisms, including the DIGEST-MD5 algorithm supplied with most Oracle JDKs, to provide the list of possible server realms to the mechanism. Each realm name must be separated by a space character (U+0020).

com.sun.security.sasl.digest.utf8

Client, server

Used by some SASL mechanisms, including the DIGEST-MD5 algorithm supplied with most Oracle JDKs, to indicate that information exchange should take place using UTF-8 character encoding instead of the default Latin-1/ISO-8859-1 encoding. The default value is true.

wildfly.sasl.authentication-timeout

Server

The amount of time, in seconds, after which a server should terminate an authentication attempt. The default value is 150 seconds.

wildfly.sasl.channel-binding-required

Client, server

Indicates that a mechanism which supports channel binding is required. A value of true indicates that channel binding is required. Any other value, or lack of this property, indicates that channel binding is not required.

wildfly.sasl.digest.alternative_protocols

Server

Supplies a separated list of alternative protocols that are acceptable in responses received from the client. The list can be space, comma, tab, or new line separated.

wildfly.sasl.gssapi.client.delegate-credential

Client

Specifies if the GSSAPI mechanism supports credential delegation. If set to true, the credential is delegated from the client to the server.

This property defaults to true if a GSSCredential is provided using the javax.security.sasl.credentials property. Otherwise, the default value is false.

wildfly.sasl.gs2.client.delegate-credential

Client

Specifies if the GS2 mechanism supports credential delegation. If set to true, the credential is delegated from the client to the server.

This property defaults to true if a GSSCredential is provided using a CredentialCallback. Otherwise, the default value is false.

wildfly.sasl.local-user.challenge-path

Server

Specifies the directory in which the server generates the challenge file. The default value is the java.io.tmpdir system property.

wildfly.sasl.local-user.default-user

Server

The user name to use for silent authentication.

wildfly.sasl.local-user.quiet-auth

Client

Enables silent authentication for a local user. The default value is true.

Note that the EJB client and naming client disables silent local authentication if this property is not explicitly defined and a callback handler or user name was specified in the client configuration.

wildfly.sasl.local-user.use-secure-random

Server

Specifies whether the server uses a secure random number generator when creating the challenge. The default value is true.

wildfly.sasl.mechanism-query-all

Client, server

Indicates that all possible supported mechanism names should be returned, regardless of the presence or absence of any other properties.

This property is only effective on calls to SaslServerFactory#getMechanismNames(Map) or SaslClientFactory#getMechanismNames(Map) for Elytron-provided SASL factories.

wildfly.sasl.otp.alternate-dictionary

Client

Provides an alternate dictionary to the OTP SASL mechanism. Each dictionary word must be separated by a space character (U+0020).

wildfly.sasl.relax-compliance

Server

The specifications for the SASL mechanisms mandate certain behavior and verification of that behavior at the opposite side of the connection. When interacting with other SASL mechanism implementations, some of these requirements are interpreted loosely. If this property is set to true, checking is relaxed where differences in specification interpretation has been identified. The default value is false.

wildfly.sasl.scram.min-iteration-count

Client, server

The minimum iteration count to use for SCRAM. The default value is 4096.

wildfly.sasl.scram.max-iteration-count

Client, server

The maximum iteration count to use for SCRAM. The default value is 32786.

wildfly.sasl.secure-rng

Client, server

The algorithm name of a SecureRandom implementation to use. Using this property can improve security, at the cost of performance.

wildfly.security.sasl.digest.ciphers

Client, server

Comma-separated list of supported ciphers that directly limits the set of supported ciphers for SASL mechanisms.

Table A.95. SASL Properties Used After Authentication

PropertyClient / ServerDescription

wildfly.sasl.principal

Client

Contains the negotiated client principal after a successful SASL client-side authentication.

wildfly.sasl.security-identity

Server

Contains the negotiated security identity after a successful SASL server-side authentication.

A.3. Elytron Client Side One Way Example

After configuring a server SSL context, it is important to test the configuration if possible. An Elytron client SSL context can be placed in a configuration file and then executed from the management CLI, allowing functional testing of the server configuration. These steps assume that the server-side configuration is completed, and the server has been reloaded if necessary.

  1. If the server keystore already exists, then proceed to the next step; otherwise, create the server keystore.

    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias localhost -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore server.keystore.jks -dname "CN=localhost" -keypass secret -storepass secret
  2. If the server certificate has already been exported, then proceed to the next step; otherwise, export the server certificate.

    $ keytool -exportcert  -keystore server.keystore.jks -alias localhost -keypass secret -storepass secret -file server.cer
  3. Import the server certificate into the client’s truststore.

    $ keytool -importcert -keystore client.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias localhost -trustcacerts -file server.cer
  4. Define the client-side SSL context inside of example-security.xml. This configuration file contains an Elytron authentication-client that defines the authentication and SSL configuration for outbound connections. The following file demonstrates defining a client SSL context and keystore.

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    
    <configuration>
        <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
            <key-stores>
                <key-store name="clientStore" type="jks" >
                    <file name="/path/to/client.truststore.jks"/>
                    <key-store-clear-password password="secret" />
                </key-store>
            </key-stores>
            <ssl-contexts>
                <ssl-context name="client-SSL-context">
                    <trust-store key-store-name="clientStore" />
                </ssl-context>
            </ssl-contexts>
            <ssl-context-rules>
                <rule use-ssl-context="client-SSL-context" />
            </ssl-context-rules>
        </authentication-client>
    </configuration>
  5. Using the management CLI, reference the newly created file and attempt to access the server. The following command accesses the management interface and executes the whoami command.

    $ EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.sh -c --controller=remote+https://127.0.0.1:9993 -Dwildfly.config.url=/path/to/example-security.xml :whoami

A.4. Elytron Client Side Two Way Example

After configuring a server SSL context, it is important to test the configuration if possible. An Elytron client SSL context can be placed in a configuration file and then executed from the management CLI, allowing functional testing of the server configuration. These steps assume that the server-side configuration is completed, and the server has been reloaded if necessary.

  1. If the server and client keystores already exist, then proceed to the next step; otherwise, create the server and client keystores.

    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias localhost -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore server.keystore.jks -dname "CN=localhost" -keypass secret -storepass secret
    $ keytool -genkeypair -alias client -keyalg RSA -keysize 1024 -validity 365 -keystore client.keystore.jks -dname "CN=client" -keypass secret -storepass secret
  2. If the server and client certificates have already been exported, then proceed to the next step; otherwise, export the server and client certificates.

    $ keytool -exportcert  -keystore server.keystore.jks -alias localhost -keypass secret -storepass secret -file server.cer
    $ keytool -exportcert  -keystore client.keystore.jks -alias client -keypass secret -storepass secret -file client.cer
  3. Import the server certificate into the client’s truststore.

    $ keytool -importcert -keystore client.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias localhost -trustcacerts -file server.cer
  4. Import the client certificate into the server’s truststore.

    $ keytool -importcert -keystore server.truststore.jks -storepass secret -alias client -trustcacerts -file client.cer
  5. Define the client-side SSL context inside of example-security.xml. This configuration file contains an Elytron authentication-client that defines the authentication and SSL configuration for outbound connections. The following file demonstrates defining a client SSL context and keystore.

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    
    <configuration>
        <authentication-client xmlns="urn:elytron:1.0.1">
            <key-stores>
                <key-store name="clientStore" type="jks" >
                    <file name="/path/to/client.truststore.jks"/>
                    <key-store-clear-password password="secret" />
                </key-store>
            </key-stores>
            <key-store name="clientKeyStore" type="jks" >
                <file name="/path/to/client.keystore.jks"/>
                <key-store-clear-password password="secret" />
            </key-store>
            <ssl-contexts>
                <ssl-context name="client-SSL-context">
                    <trust-store key-store-name="clientStore" />
                    <key-store-ssl-certificate key-store-name="clientKeyStore" alias="client">
                        <key-store-clear-password password="secret" />
                    </key-store-ssl-certificate>
                </ssl-context>
            </ssl-contexts>
            <ssl-context-rules>
                <rule use-ssl-context="client-SSL-context" />
            </ssl-context-rules>
        </authentication-client>
    </configuration>
  6. Using the management CLI, reference the newly created file and attempt to access the server. The following command accesses the management interface and executes the whoami command.

    $ EAP_HOME/bin/jboss-cli.sh -c --controller=remote+https://127.0.0.1:9993 -Dwildfly.config.url=/path/to/example-security.xml :whoami





Revised on 2018-07-11 14:29:53 EDT

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