Chapter 4. Network and Port Configuration

4.1. Interfaces

JBoss EAP references named interfaces throughout the configuration. This allows the configuration to reference individual interface declarations with logical names, rather than requiring the full details of the interface at each use.

This also allows for easier configuration in a managed domain, where network interface details can vary across multiple machines. Each server instance can correspond to a logical name group.

The standalone.xml, domain.xml, and host.xml files all include interface declarations. There are several preconfigured interface names, depending on which default configuration is used. The management interface can be used for all components and services that require the management layer, including the HTTP management endpoint. The public interface can be used for all application-related network communications. The unsecure interface is used for IIOP sockets in the standard configuration. The private interface is used for JGroups sockets in the standard configuration.

4.1.1. Default Interface Configurations

<interfaces>
  <interface name="management">
    <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address.management:127.0.0.1}"/>
  </interface>
  <interface name="public">
    <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address:127.0.0.1}"/>
  </interface>
  <interface name="private">
    <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address.private:127.0.0.1}"/>
  </interface>
  <interface name="unsecure">
    <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address.unsecure:127.0.0.1}"/>
  </interface>
</interfaces>

By default, JBoss EAP binds these interfaces to 127.0.0.1, but these values can be overridden at runtime by setting the appropriate property. For example, the inet-address of the public interface can be set when starting JBoss EAP as a standalone server with the following command.

$ EAP_HOME/bin/standalone.sh -Djboss.bind.address=IP_ADDRESS

Alternatively, you can use the -b switch on the server start command line. For more information about server start options, see Server Runtime Arguments.

Important

If you modify the default network interfaces or ports that JBoss EAP uses, you must also remember to change any scripts that use the modified interfaces or ports. These include JBoss EAP service scripts, as well as remembering to specify the correct interface and port when accessing the management console or management CLI.

4.1.2. Configuring Interfaces

Network interfaces are declared by specifying a logical name and selection criteria for the physical interface. The selection criteria can reference a wildcard address or specify a set of one or more characteristics that an interface or address must have in order to be a valid match. For a listing of all available interface selection criteria, see the Interface Attributes section.

Interfaces can be configured using the management console or the management CLI. Below are several examples of adding and updating interfaces. The management CLI command is shown first, followed by the corresponding configuration XML.

Add an Interface with a NIC Value

Add a new interface with a NIC value of eth0.

/interface=external:add(nic=eth0)
<interface name="external">
   <nic name="eth0"/>
</interface>
Add an Interface with Several Conditional Values

Add a new interface that matches any interface/address on the correct subnet if it is up, supports multicast, and is not point-to-point.

/interface=default:add(subnet-match=192.168.0.0/16,up=true,multicast=true,not={point-to-point=true})
<interface name="default">
   <subnet-match value="192.168.0.0/16"/>
   <up/>
   <multicast/>
   <not>
      <point-to-point/>
   </not>
</interface>
Update an Interface Attribute

Update the public interface’s default inet-address value, keeping the jboss.bind.address property to allow for this value to be set at runtime.

/interface=public:write-attribute(name=inet-address,value="${jboss.bind.address:192.168.0.0}")
<interface name="public">
    <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address:192.168.0.0}"/>
</interface>
Add an Interface to a Server in a Managed Domain
/host=master/server-config=SERVER_NAME/interface=INTERFACE_NAME:add(inet-address=127.0.0.1)
<servers>
   <server name="SERVER_NAME" group="main-server-group">
      <interfaces>
         <interface name="INTERFACE_NAME">
            <inet-address value="127.0.0.1"/>
         </interface>
      </interfaces>
   </server>
</servers>

4.2. Socket Bindings

Socket bindings and socket binding groups allow you to define network ports and their relationship to the networking interfaces required for your JBoss EAP configuration. A socket binding is a named configuration for a socket. A socket binding group is a collection of socket binding declarations that are grouped under a logical name.

This allows other sections of the configuration to reference socket bindings by their logical name, rather than requiring the full details of the socket configuration at each use.

The declarations for these named configurations can be found in the standalone.xml and domain.xml configuration files. A standalone server contains only one socket binding group, while a managed domain can contain multiple groups. You can create a socket binding group for each server group in the managed domain, or share a socket binding group between multiple server groups.

The ports used by JBoss EAP by default depend on which socket binding groups are used and the requirements of your individual deployments.

4.2.1. Management Ports

Management ports were consolidated in JBoss EAP 7. By default, JBoss EAP 7 uses port 9990 for both native management, used by the management CLI, and HTTP management, used by the web-based management console. Port 9999, which was used as the native management port in JBoss EAP 6, is no longer used but can still be enabled if desired.

If HTTPS is enabled for the management console, then port 9993 is used by default.

4.2.2. Default Socket Bindings

JBoss EAP ships with a socket binding group for each of the four predefined profiles (default, ha, full, full-ha).

For detailed information about the default socket bindings, such as default ports and descriptions, see the Default Socket Bindings section.

Important

If you modify the default network interfaces or ports that JBoss EAP uses, you must also remember to change any scripts that use the modified interfaces or ports. These include JBoss EAP service scripts, as well as remembering to specify the correct interface and port when accessing the management console or management CLI.

Standalone Server

When running as a standalone server, only one socket binding group is defined per configuration file. Each standalone configuration file (standalone.xml, standalone-ha.xml, standalone-full.xml, standalone-full-ha.xml) defines socket bindings for the technologies used by its corresponding profile.

For example, the default standalone configuration file (standalone.xml) specifies the below socket bindings.

<socket-binding-group name="standard-sockets" default-interface="public" port-offset="${jboss.socket.binding.port-offset:0}">
    <socket-binding name="management-http" interface="management" port="${jboss.management.http.port:9990}"/>
    <socket-binding name="management-https" interface="management" port="${jboss.management.https.port:9993}"/>
    <socket-binding name="ajp" port="${jboss.ajp.port:8009}"/>
    <socket-binding name="http" port="${jboss.http.port:8080}"/>
    <socket-binding name="https" port="${jboss.https.port:8443}"/>
    <socket-binding name="txn-recovery-environment" port="4712"/>
    <socket-binding name="txn-status-manager" port="4713"/>
    <outbound-socket-binding name="mail-smtp">
        <remote-destination host="localhost" port="25"/>
    </outbound-socket-binding>
</socket-binding-group>
Managed Domain

When running in a managed domain, all socket binding groups are defined in the domain.xml file. There are four predefined socket binding groups:

  • standard-sockets
  • ha-sockets
  • full-sockets
  • full-ha-sockets

Each socket binding group specifies socket bindings for the technologies used by its corresponding profile. For example, the full-ha-sockets socket binding group defines several jgroups socket bindings, which are used by the full-ha profile for high availability.

<socket-binding-groups>
    <socket-binding-group name="standard-sockets" default-interface="public">
        <!-- Needed for server groups using the 'default' profile  -->
        <socket-binding name="ajp" port="${jboss.ajp.port:8009}"/>
        <socket-binding name="http" port="${jboss.http.port:8080}"/>
        <socket-binding name="https" port="${jboss.https.port:8443}"/>
        <socket-binding name="txn-recovery-environment" port="4712"/>
        <socket-binding name="txn-status-manager" port="4713"/>
        <outbound-socket-binding name="mail-smtp">
            <remote-destination host="localhost" port="25"/>
        </outbound-socket-binding>
    </socket-binding-group>
    <socket-binding-group name="ha-sockets" default-interface="public">
        <!-- Needed for server groups using the 'ha' profile  -->
    ...
    </socket-binding-group>
    <socket-binding-group name="full-sockets" default-interface="public">
        <!-- Needed for server groups using the 'full' profile  -->
    ...
    </socket-binding-group>
    <socket-binding-group name="full-ha-sockets" default-interface="public">
        <!-- Needed for server groups using the 'full-ha' profile  -->
        <socket-binding name="ajp" port="${jboss.ajp.port:8009}"/>
        <socket-binding name="http" port="${jboss.http.port:8080}"/>
        <socket-binding name="https" port="${jboss.https.port:8443}"/>
        <socket-binding name="iiop" interface="unsecure" port="3528"/>
        <socket-binding name="iiop-ssl" interface="unsecure" port="3529"/>
        <socket-binding name="jgroups-mping" interface="private" port="0" multicast-address="${jboss.default.multicast.address:230.0.0.4}" multicast-port="45700"/>
        <socket-binding name="jgroups-tcp" interface="private" port="7600"/>
        <socket-binding name="jgroups-tcp-fd" interface="private" port="57600"/>
        <socket-binding name="jgroups-udp" interface="private" port="55200" multicast-address="${jboss.default.multicast.address:230.0.0.4}" multicast-port="45688"/>
        <socket-binding name="jgroups-udp-fd" interface="private" port="54200"/>
        <socket-binding name="modcluster" port="0" multicast-address="224.0.1.105" multicast-port="23364"/>
        <socket-binding name="txn-recovery-environment" port="4712"/>
        <socket-binding name="txn-status-manager" port="4713"/>
        <outbound-socket-binding name="mail-smtp">
            <remote-destination host="localhost" port="25"/>
        </outbound-socket-binding>
    </socket-binding-group>
</socket-binding-groups>
Note

The socket configuration for the management interfaces is defined in the domain controller’s host.xml file.

4.2.3. Configuring Socket Bindings

When defining a socket binding, you can configure the port and interface attributes, as well as multicast settings such as multicast-address and multicast-port. For details on all available socket bindings attributes, see the Socket Binding Attributes section.

Socket bindings can be configured using the management console or the management CLI. The following steps go through adding a socket binding group, adding a socket binding, and configuring socket binding settings using the management CLI.

  1. Add a new socket binding group. Note that this step cannot be performed when running as a standalone server.

    /socket-binding-group=new-sockets:add(default-interface=public)
  2. Add a socket binding.

    /socket-binding-group=new-sockets/socket-binding=new-socket-binding:add(port=1234)
  3. Change the socket binding to use an interface other than the default, which is set by the socket binding group.

    /socket-binding-group=new-sockets/socket-binding=new-socket-binding:write-attribute(name=interface,value=unsecure)

The following example shows how the XML configuration may look after the above steps have been completed.

<socket-binding-groups>
    ...
    <socket-binding-group name="new-sockets" default-interface="public">
        <socket-binding name="new-socket-binding" interface="unsecure" port="1234"/>
    </socket-binding-group>
</socket-binding-groups>

4.2.4. Port Offsets

A port offset is a numeric offset value added to all port values specified in the socket binding group for that server. This allows the server to inherit the port values defined in its socket binding group, with an offset to ensure that it does not conflict with any other servers on the same host. For instance, if the HTTP port of the socket binding group is 8080, and a server uses a port offset of 100, then its HTTP port is 8180.

Below is an example of setting a port offset of 250 for a server in a managed domain using the management CLI.

/host=master/server-config=server-two/:write-attribute(name=socket-binding-port-offset,value=250)

Port offsets can be used for servers in a managed domain and for running multiple standalone servers on the same host.

You can pass in a port offset when starting a standalone server using the jboss.socket.binding.port-offset property.

$ EAP_HOME/bin/standalone.sh -Djboss.socket.binding.port-offset=100

4.3. IPv6 Addresses

By default, JBoss EAP is configured to run using IPv4 addresses. The steps below show how to configure JBoss EAP to run using IPv6 addresses.

Configure the JVM Stack for IPv6 Addresses

Update the startup configuration to prefer IPv6 addresses.

  1. Open the startup configuration file.

    • When running as a standalone server, edit the EAP_HOME/bin/standalone.conf file (or standalone.conf.bat for Windows Server).
    • When running in a managed domain, edit the EAP_HOME/bin/domain.conf file (or domain.conf.bat for Windows Server).
  2. Set the java.net.preferIPv4Stack property to false.

    -Djava.net.preferIPv4Stack=false
  3. Append the java.net.preferIPv6Addresses property and set it to true.

    -Djava.net.preferIPv6Addresses=true

The following example shows how the JVM options in the startup configuration file may look after making the above changes.

# Specify options to pass to the Java VM.
#
if [ "x$JAVA_OPTS" = "x" ]; then
   JAVA_OPTS="-Xms1303m -Xmx1303m -Djava.net.preferIPv4Stack=false"
   JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -Djboss.modules.system.pkgs=$JBOSS_MODULES_SYSTEM_PKGS -Djava.awt.headless=true"
   JAVA_OPTS="$JAVA_OPTS -Djava.net.preferIPv6Addresses=true"
else

Update Interface Declarations for IPv6 Addresses

The default interface values in the configuration can be changed to IPv6 addresses. For example, the below management CLI command sets the management interface to the IPv6 loopback address (::1).

/interface=management:write-attribute(name=inet-address,value="${jboss.bind.address.management:[::1]}")

The following example shows how the XML configuration may look after running the above command.

<interfaces>
    <interface name="management">
        <inet-address value="${jboss.bind.address.management:[::1]}"/>
    </interface>
    ....
</interfaces>