Deployment Guide

Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud 13

Deploying a Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud Solution

Red Hat Ceph Storage Documentation Team

Abstract

This document provides instructions for deploying the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution, using Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 and Red Hat Ceph Storage 3, all running on AMD64 and Intel 64 architectures.

Chapter 1. Introducing the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution

The Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure (RHHI) for Cloud solution is part of the broader software-defined RHHI solutions. The RHHI Cloud solution unifies Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOSP) 13 and Red Hat Ceph Storage (RHCS) 3 technologies into a single product to accomplish three goals:

  • Simplify the deployment of RHOSP and RHCS.
  • Provide a more predictable performance experience.
  • Achieve a lower cost of entry for RHOSP and RHCS by colocating their respective services on the same node.

The RHHI Cloud colocating scenarios are:

  • The RHOSP Controller and the RHCS Monitor services on the same node.
  • The RHOSP Nova Compute and the RHCS Object Storage Daemon (OSD) services on the same node.

Choosing a Deployment Workflow

You can choose to deploy the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud by using either, the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director web interface, or the command-line interface. This is the basic deployment workflow:

RHHI Cloud Deployment Guide Workflow 459706 1017 JCS

Chapter 2. Verifying the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud requirements

As a technician, you need to verify three core requirements before deploying the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution.

2.1. Prerequisites

2.2. Verifying the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud hardware requirements

Implementors of hyper-converged infrastructures will reflect a wide variety of hardware configurations. Red Hat recommends the following minimums when considering hardware:

CPU
For Controller/Monitor nodes, use dual-socket, 8-core CPUs. For Compute/OSD nodes, use dual-socket, 14-core CPUs for nodes with NVMe storage media, or dual-socket, 10-core CPUs for nodes with SAS/SATA SSDs.
RAM
Configure twice the RAM needed by the resident Nova virtual machine workloads.
OSD Disks
Use 7,200 RPM enterprise HDDs for general-purpose workloads or NVMe SSDs for IOPS-intensive workloads.
Journal Disks
Use SAS/SATA SSDs for general-purpose workloads or NVMe SSDs for IOPS-intensive workloads.
Network
Use two 10GbE NICs for Red Hat Ceph Storage (RHCS) nodes. Additionally, use dedicated NICs to meet the Nova virtual machine workload requirements. See Section 2.4, “Verifying the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud network requirements” for more details.

Table 2.1. Minimum Node Quantity

Qty.RolePhysical / Virtual

1

Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d)

Either*

3

RHOSP Controller & RHCS Monitor

Physical

3

RHOSP Compute & RHCS OSD

Physical

Note

The RHOSP-d node can be virtualized for small deployments, that is less than 20TB in total capacity. If the solution deployment is larger than 20TB in capacity, then Red Hat recommends the RHOSP-d node be a physical node. Additional hyper-converged compute/storage nodes can be initially deployed or added at a later time.

Important

Red Hat recommends using standalone compute and storage nodes for deployments spanning more than one datacenter rack, which is 42 nodes.

2.3. Verifying the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud software requirements

Verify that the nodes have access to the necessary software repositories. The Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure (RHHI) for Cloud solution requires specific software packages to be installed to function properly.

Prerequisites

  • Have a valid Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud subscription.

Procedure

Do the following step on any node, as the root user.

  1. Verify the available subscriptions:

    # subscription-manager list --available --all --matches="*OpenStack*"

Additional Resources

2.4. Verifying the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud network requirements

Red Hat recommends using a minimum of five networks to serve various traffic roles:

Red Hat Ceph Storage
Ceph Monitor nodes use the public network. Ceph OSDs use the public network, if no private storage cluster network exists. Optionally, OSDs may use a private storage cluster network to handle traffic associated with replication, heartbeating and backfilling, leaving the public network exclusively for I/O. Red Hat recommends using a cluster network for larger deployments. The compute role needs access to this network.
External
Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) uses the External network to download software updates for the overcloud, and the overcloud operator uses it to access RHOSP-d to manage the overcloud. When tenant services establish connections via reserved floating IP addresses, the Controllers use the External network to route their traffic to the Internet. Overcloud users use the external network to access the overcloud.
OpenStack Internal API
OpenStack provides both public facing and private API endpoints. This is an isolated network for the private endpoints.
OpenStack Tenant Network
OpenStack tenants create private networks implemented by VLAN or VXLAN on this network.
Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director Provisioning
Red Hat OpenStack Platform director serves DHCP and PXE services from this network to install the operating system and other software on the overcloud nodes from bare metal. Red Hat OpenStack Platform director uses this network to manage the overcloud nodes, and the cloud operator uses it to access the overcloud nodes directly by ssh if necessary. The overcloud nodes must be configured to PXE boot from this network provisioning.

Figure 2.1. Network Separation Diagram

rhhi cloud network layout
Note

The NICs can be a logical bond of two physical NICs. It is not required to trunk each network to the same interface.

2.5. Additional Resources

Chapter 3. Deploying the Undercloud

As a technician, you can deploy an undercloud, which provides users with the ability to deploy and manage overclouds with the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director interface.

3.1. Prerequisites

  • Have a valid Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud subscription.
  • Have access to Red Hat’s software repositories through Red Hat’s Content Delivery Network (CDN).

3.2. Understanding Ironic’s disk cleaning between deployments

Enabling Ironic’s disk cleaning feature will permanently delete all data from all the disks on a node before that node becomes available again for deployment.

There are two facts that you should consider before enabling Ironic’s disk cleaning feature:

  • When director deploys Ceph it uses the ceph-disk command to prepare each OSD. Before ceph-disk prepares an OSD, it checks if the disk which will host the new OSD has data from an older OSD and if it does, then it will fail the disk preparation in order to not overwrite that data. It does this as a safety feature so that data is not lost.
  • If a deployment attempt with director fails and is then repeated after the overcloud is deleted, then by default the data from the previous deployment will still be on the server disks. This data may cause the repeated deployment to fail because of how the ceph-disk command behaves.
Note

If an overcloud node is accidentally deleted and disk cleaning is enabled, then the data will be removed and can only be put back into the environment by rebuilding the node with Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director.

3.3. Installing the undercloud

Several steps must be completed to install the undercloud. This procedure is installing the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) as the undercloud. Here is a summary of the installation steps:

  1. Create an installation user.
  2. Create directories for templates and images.
  3. Verify/Set the RHOSP-d node name.
  4. Register the RHOSP-d node.
  5. Install the RHOSP-d software.
  6. Configure the RHOSP-d software.
  7. Obtain and import disk images for the overcloud.
  8. Set a DNS server on the undercloud’s subnet.

Prerequisites

  • Have access to Red Hat’s software repositories through Red Hat’s Content Delivery Network (CDN).
  • Having root access to the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) node.

Procedure

  1. The RHOSP-d installation requires a non-root user with sudo privileges to do the installation.

    1. Create a user named stack:

      [root@director ~]# useradd stack
    2. Set a password for stack. When prompted, enter the new password:

      [root@director ~]# passwd stack
    3. Configure sudo access for the stack user:

      [root@director ~]# echo "stack ALL=(root) NOPASSWD:ALL" | tee -a /etc/sudoers.d/stack
      [root@director ~]# chmod 0440 /etc/sudoers.d/stack
    4. Switch to the stack user:

      [root@director ~]# su - stack

      The RHOSP-d installation will be done as the stack user.

  2. Create two new directories in the stack user’s home directory, one named templates and the other named images:

    [stack@director ~]$ mkdir ~/images
    [stack@director ~]$ mkdir ~/templates

    These directories will organize the system image files and Heat template files used to create the overcloud environment later.

  3. The installing and configuring process requires a fully qualified domain name (FQDN), along with an entry in the /etc/hosts file.

    1. Verify the RHOSP-d node’s host name:

      [stack@director ~]$ hostname -f
    2. If needed, set the host name:

      sudo hostnamectl set-hostname FQDN_HOST_NAME
      sudo hostnamectl set-hostname --transient FQDN_HOST_NAME
      Replace…​
      • FQDN_HOST_NAME with the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the RHOSP-d node.

        Example

        [stack@director ~]$ sudo hostnamectl set-hostname director.example.com
        [stack@director ~]$ sudo hostnamectl set-hostname --transient director.example.com

    3. Add an entry for the RHOSP-d node name to the /etc/hosts file. Add the following line to the /etc/hosts file:

      sudo echo "127.0.0.1 FQDN_HOST_NAME SHORT_HOST_NAME localhost localhost.localdomain localhost4 localhost4.localdomain4" >> /etc/hosts
      Replace…​
      • FQDN_HOST_NAME with the full qualified domain name of the RHOSP-d node.
      • SHORT_HOST_NAME with the short domain name of the RHOSP-d node.

        Example

        [stack@director ~]$ sudo echo "127.0.0.1 director.example.com director localhost localhost.localdomain localhost4 localhost4.localdomain4" >> /etc/hosts

  4. Register the RHOSP-d node on the Red Hat Content Delivery Network (CDN), and enable the required Red Hat software repositories using the Red Hat Subscription Manager.

    1. Register the RHOSP-d node:

      [stack@director ~]$ sudo subscription-manager register

      When prompted, enter an authorized Customer Portal user name and password.

    2. Lookup the valid Pool ID for the RHOSP entitlement:

      [stack@director ~]$ sudo subscription-manager list --available --all --matches="*Hyperconverged*"

      Example Output

      Subscription Name:   Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud
      Provides:            Red Hat OpenStack
                           Red Hat Ceph Storage
      SKU:                 RS00160
      Contract:            1111111
      Pool ID:             a1b2c3d4e5f6g7h8i9
      Provides Management: Yes
      Available:           1
      Suggested:           1
      Service Level:       Self-Support
      Service Type:        L1-L3
      Subscription Type:   Standard
      Ends:                05/27/2018
      System Type:         Virtual

    3. Using the Pool ID from the previous step, attach the RHOSP entitlement:

      [stack@director ~]$ sudo subscription-manager attach --pool=POOL_ID
      Replace…​
      • POOL_ID with the valid pool id from the previous step.

        Example

        [stack@director ~]$ sudo subscription-manager attach --pool=a1b2c3d4e5f6g7h8i9

    4. Disable the default software repositories, and enable the required software repositories:

      [stack@director ~]$ sudo subscription-manager repos --disable=*
      [stack@director ~]$ sudo subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-extras-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-rh-common-rpms --enable=rhel-ha-for-rhel-7-server-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-13-rpms
    5. If needed, update the base system software to the latest package versions, and reboot the RHOSP-d node:

      [stack@director ~]$ sudo yum update
      [stack@director ~]$ sudo reboot

      Wait for the node to be completely up and running before continuing to the next step.

  5. Install all the RHOSP-d software packages:

    [stack@director ~]$ sudo yum install python-tripleoclient ceph-ansible
  6. Configure the RHOSP-d software.

    1. Red Hat provides a basic undercloud configuration template to use. Copy the undercloud.conf.sample file to the stack user’s home directory, named undercloud.conf:

      [stack@director ~]$ cp /usr/share/instack-undercloud/undercloud.conf.sample ~/undercloud.conf
    2. The undercloud configuration template contains two sections: [DEFAULT] and [auth]. Open the undercloud.conf file for editing. Edit the undercloud_hostname with the RHOSP-d node name. Uncomment the following parameters under the [DEFAULT] section in the undercloud.conf file by deleting the # before the parameter. Edit the parameter values with the appropriate values as required for this solution’s network configuration:

      Parameter

      Network

      Edit Value?

      Example Value

      local_ip

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.1/24

      network_gateway

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.1

      undercloud_public_vip

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.2

      undercloud_admin_vip

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.3

      local_interface

      Provisioning

      Yes

      eth1

      network_cidr

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.0/24

      masquerade_network

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.0/24

      dhcp_start

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.5

      dhcp_end

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.24

      inspection_interface

      Provisioning

      No

      br-ctlplane

      inspection_iprange

      Provisioning

      Yes

      192.0.2.100,192.0.2.120

      inspection_extras

      N/A

      Yes

      true

      inspection_runbench

      N/A

      Yes

      false

      inspection_enable_uefi

      N/A

      Yes

      true

      Save the changes after editing the undercloud.conf file. See the Undercloud configuration parameters for detailed descriptions of these configuration parameters.

      Note

      Consider enabling Ironic’s disk cleaning feature, if overcloud nodes are going to be repurposed again. See the Understanding Ironic disk cleaning between deployments section for more details.

    3. Run the RHOSP-d configuration script:

      [stack@director ~]$ openstack undercloud install
      Note

      This script will take several minutes to complete. This script will install additional software packages and generates two files:

      undercloud-passwords.conf
      A list of all passwords for the director’s services.
      stackrc
      A set of initialization variables to help you access the director’s command line tools.
    4. Verify that the configuration script started and enabled all of the RHOSP services:

      [stack@director ~]$ sudo systemctl list-units openstack-*
    5. The configuration script gives the stack user access to all the container management commands. Refresh the stack user’s permissions:

      [stack@director ~]$ exec su -l stack
    6. Initialize the stack user’s environment to use the RHOSP-d command-line tools:

      [stack@director ~]$ source ~/stackrc

      The command-line prompt will change, which indicates that OpenStack commands will authenticate and execute against the undercloud:

      Example

      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$

  7. The RHOSP-d requires several disk images for provisioning the overcloud nodes.

    1. Obtain these disk images by installing rhosp-director-images and rhosp-director-images-ipa software packages:

      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ sudo yum install rhosp-director-images rhosp-director-images-ipa
    2. Extract the archive files to the images directory in the stack user’s home directory:

      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ cd ~/images
      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ for x in /usr/share/rhosp-director-images/overcloud-full-latest-13.0.tar /usr/share/rhosp-director-images/ironic-python-agent-latest-13.0.tar ; do tar -xvf $x ; done
    3. Import the disk images into the RHOSP-d:

      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack overcloud image upload --image-path /home/stack/images/
    4. To view a list of imported disk images, execute the following command:

      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack image list

      Image Name

      Image Type

      Image Description

      bm-deploy-kernel

      Deployment

      Kernel file used for provisioning and deploying systems.

      bm-deploy-ramdisk

      Deployment

      RAMdisk file used for provisioning and deploying systems.

      overcloud-full-vmlinuz

      Overcloud

      Kernel file used for the base system, which is written to the node’s disk.

      overcloud-full-initrd

      Overcloud

      RAMdisk file used for the base system, which is written to the node’s disk.

      overcloud-full

      Overcloud

      The rest of the software needed for the base system, which is written to the node’s disk.

      Note

      The openstack image list command will not display the introspection PXE disk images. The introspection PXE disk images are copied to the /httpboot/ directory.

      (undercloud) [stack@director images]$ ls -l /httpboot
      total 341460
      -rwxr-xr-x. 1 root              root                5153184 Mar 31 06:58 agent.kernel
      -rw-r--r--. 1 root              root              344491465 Mar 31 06:59 agent.ramdisk
      -rw-r--r--. 1 ironic-inspector  ironic-inspector        337 Mar 31 06:23 inspector.ipxe
  8. Set the DNS server so that it resolves the overcloud node host names.

    1. List the subnets:

      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack subnet list
    2. Define the name server using the undercloud’s neutron subnet:

      openstack subnet set --dns-nameserver DNS_NAMESERVER_IP SUBNET_NAME_or_ID
      Replace…​
      • DNS_NAMESERVER_IP with the IP address of the DNS server.
      • SUBNET_NAME_or_ID with the neutron subnet name or id.

        Example

        (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack subnet set --dns-nameserver 192.0.2.4 local-subnet

        Note

        Reuse the --dns-nameserver DNS_NAMESERVER_IP option for each name server.

    3. Verify the DNS server by viewing the subnet details:

      (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack subnet show SUBNET_NAME_or_ID
      Replace…​
      • SUBNET_NAME_or_ID with the neutron subnet name or id.

        Example

        (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack subnet show local-subnet
        +-------------------+-----------------------------------------------+
        | Field             | Value                                         |
        +-------------------+-----------------------------------------------+
        | ...               |                                               |
        | dns_nameservers   | 192.0.2.4                                     |
        | ...               |                                               |
        +-------------------+-----------------------------------------------+

Additional Resources

  • For more information on all the undercloud configuration parameters located in the undercloud.conf file, see the Configuring the Director section in the RHOSP Director Installation and Usage Guide.

3.4. Configuring the undercloud to clean the disks before deploying the overcloud

Updating the undercloud configuration file to clean disks before deploying the overcloud.

Warning

Enabling this feature will destroy all data on all disks before they are provisioned in the overcloud deployment.

Procedure

  1. There are two options, an automatic or manual way to cleaning the disks before deploying the overcloud:

    1. First option is automatically cleaning the disks by editing the undercloud.conf file, and add the following line:

      clean_nodes = True
      Note

      The bare metal provisioning service runs a wipefs --force --all command to accomplish the cleaning.

    Warning

    Enabling this feature will destroy all data on all disks before they are provisioned in the overcloud deployment. Also, this will do an additional power cycle after the first introspection and before each deployment.

    1. The second option is to keep automatic cleaning off and run the following commands for each Ceph node:

      [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal node manage NODE
      [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal node clean NODE --clean-steps '[{"interface": "deploy", "step": "erase_devices_metadata"}]'
      [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal node provide NODE
      Replace…​
      • NODE with the Ceph host name.

Chapter 4. Deploying Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director

As a technician, you can deploy and manage the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director interface. Also, you should have a basic understanding of resource isolation, so there is not resource contention between Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage.

4.1. Prerequisites

4.2. Exporting an overcloud plan using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director

This procedure is for exporting a deployment plan using the OpenStack Platform Director. The default deployment plan contains a common, and exportable overcloud configuration.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the IP address or host name of the undercloud into a web browser.

    Note

    If not using SSL, then the undercloud URL will need to use port 3000. For example: http://192.168.0.4:3000

  2. Login to the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director user interface using the correct credentials.

    RH OSP Director Web UI Login Screen mod
    Note

    The default user name is admin. You can obtain the admin password by running the following command:

    [stack@director ~]$ sudo hiera admin_password
  3. On the Plans tab, select the drop-down menu 1 from the Overcloud plan, and select Export 2 .

    RH OSP Director Export Plan Menu mod
  4. Click on the Download button.

    RH OSP Director Export Plan Download mod

    This will download a compressed tarball file to the local hard drive, which includes all the plan files.

    Important

    If you need to add or modify the files contained within the tarball file, then before importing the tarball file you must recreate the tarball file, as follows:

    Example

    tar -czf my-deployment-plan.tar.gz -C my-deployment-plan-local-files/ .

    Note

    Currently, the OpenStack Platform Director interface does not support advance configuration of the plan, such as a custom network configuration. Advance configuration must be done manually by editing the files directly.

4.3. Importing an overcloud plan using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director

This procedure is for importing a deployment plan using the OpenStack Platform Director that has previously been exported.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the IP address or host name of the undercloud into a web browser.

    Note

    If not using SSL, then the undercloud URL will need to use port 3000. For example: http://192.168.0.4:3000

  2. Login to the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director user interface using the correct credentials.

    RH OSP Director Web UI Login Screen mod
    Note

    The default user name is admin. You can obtain the admin password by running the following command:

    [stack@director ~]$ sudo hiera admin_password
  3. On the Plans tab, select the Import Plan button.

    RH OSP Director Import Plan Button mod

  4. Enter Plan Name 1 and click on the Choose File button 2 . Browse to the location of the tarball file, and select it for import. Once the file is selected, click on the Upload Files and Create Plan button 3 .

    RH OSP Director Import Plan Screen mod

4.4. Deploying the overcloud using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director

This procedure deploys the overcloud using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the IP address or host name of the undercloud into a web browser.

    Note

    If not using SSL, then the undercloud URL will need to include port 3000. For example: http://192.168.0.4:3000

  2. Login to the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director user interface using the correct credentials.

    RH OSP Director Web UI Login Screen mod
    Note

    The default user name is admin. You can obtain the admin password by running the following command:

    [stack@director ~]$ sudo hiera admin_password
  3. Select the default overcloud plan 1 or select the Import Plan 2 .

    RH OSP Director Manage Plans Screen Import or Overcloud Plan mod

    For more information on importing a plan, see Section 4.3, “Importing an overcloud plan using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director”

  4. From the plan configuration page, prepare the hardware by adding registered nodes.

    Figure 4.1. Example Plan Configuration Page

    RH OSP Director Default Plan Main Page mod
    1. Click on the Register Nodes button 1 to registered the nodes.

      RH OSP Director Overcloud Plan Workflow Screen Step1 mod
    2. Click on the Add New Node button 1 .

      RH OSP Director Adding Node Button mod

      Alternatively, you can prepare the nodes by customizing the instackenv.json host definition file and uploading it. To create a custom instackenv.json host definition file, see Section 5.2.2, “Registering and introspecting the hardware” and Section 5.2.3, “Setting the root device” to prepare the nodes.

    3. Fill out all the required fields, denoted by a small red asterisks, on the register node page.
    4. After all the required field are filled out, click on the Register Node button 1 .

      RH OSP Director Register Node Button mod

    5. Once the node is registered, select the node 1 , and click on the Introspect Nodes 2 button.

      RH OSP Director Introspection Button mod1

    6. Once the introspection is done, select the node 1 , and click on the Provide Nodes 2 button.

      RH OSP Director Introspection Button mod2

  5. From the plan configuration page, edit the deployment configuration.

    1. Click on the Edit Configuration button 1 .

      RH OSP Director Overcloud Plan Workflow Screen Step2 mod
    2. On the Overall Settings tab 1 , click on the General Deployment Options section 2 , and enable the HA services via Docker, Containerized Deployment, and Default Container Images.

      RH OSP Director Configure the General Deployment Options mod
    3. On the Overall Settings tab 1 , click on the Storage section 2 , and enable the Ceph Storage Backend 3 .

      RH OSP Director Overall Settings Storage Section Enable Ceph mod

      Click on the Save Changes button.

      RH OSP Director Overall Settings Save Cancel Button Set mod
    4. Click on the Parameters tab 1 , then click on the Ceph Storage Backend section 2 to edit additional Ceph parameters.

      RH OSP Director Parameters Tab Ceph Storage Backend mod

      Update the CephAnsibleExtraConfig field with the following values:

      {"ceph_osd_docker_memory_limit": "5g", "ceph_osd_docker_cpu_limit": 1, "ceph_mds_docker_memory_limit": "4g", "ceph_mds_docker_cpu_limit": 1}

      Update the CephConfigOverrides field with the following values.

      {"osd_recovery_op_priority": 3, "osd_recovery_max_active": 3, "osd_max_backfills": 1}

      Update the CephConfigOverrides field with the following values.

      {"osd_recovery_op_priority": 3, "osd_recovery_max_active": 3, "osd_max_backfills": 1}

      Set the CephPoolDefaultSize value to 3.

      Update the CephAnsibleDisksConfig field with a disk list.

      Example

      {"devices":["/dev/sda","/dev/sdb","/dev/sdc","/dev/sdd","/dev/sde","/dev/sdf","/dev/sdg","/dev/sdh","/dev/sdi","/dev/sdj","/dev/sdk","/dev/sdl"],"dedicated_devices":["/dev/sdm","/dev/sdm","/dev/sdm","/dev/sdm","/dev/sdn","/dev/sdn","/dev/sdn","/dev/sdn","/dev/sdo","/dev/sdo","/dev/sdo","/dev/sdo"],"journal_size":5120}

      Note

      This disk listing is for block devices (devices) being used as OSDs, and the block devices dedicated (dedicated_devices) as OSD journals. See Section 5.5.5, “Setting the Red Hat Ceph Storage parameters” for more information.

    5. Click on the Save And Close button.

      RH OSP Director Overall Settings Save Cancel Button Set mod
    6. Back on the plan configuration page, the saved configuration changes will appear under the Specify Deployment Configuration step.

      RH OSP Director Overcloud Plan Workflow Screen Complete Config Step2 mod
  6. Configure the roles for the hyperconverged nodes by clicking on the Manage Roles link 1 .

    RH OSP Director Manage Roles mod
    1. Unselect the BlockStorage 1 , CephStorage 2 , and Compute 3 roles by clicking on them.

      RH OSP Director Manage Roles Uncheck Default Roles mod
    2. Select the ComputeHCI 1 role by clicking on it.

      RH OSP Director Manage Roles Check ComputeHCI Role mod
    3. Back on the plan configuration page, configure the Compute HCI role by clicking on the levers icon 1 .

      RH OSP Director Configure the ComputeHCI Role mod
    4. On the Parameters tab, update the following parameters:

      • The ExtraConfig field with the calculated resource allocation values.

        See Appendix E, Tuning the Nova reserved memory and CPU allocation manually for how to calculate the appropriate values.

      • The ComputeHCIIPs field with all the relevant IP addresses for the environment.

        Example

        {"storage_mgmt":["172.16.2.203","172.16.2.204","172.16.2.205"],"storage":["172.16.1.203","172.16.1.204","172.16.1.205"],"tenant":["192.168.3.203","192.168.3.204","192.168.3.205"],"internal_api":["192.168.2.203","192.168.2.204","192.168.2.205"]}

      • The OvercloudComputeHCIFlavor field with the following value:

        osd-compute
      • The ComputeHCISchedulerHints field with the following value:

        {"capabilities:node":"hci-%index%"}
    5. Click on the Save And Close button.

      RH OSP Director Overall Settings Save Cancel Button Set mod
    6. Back on the plan configuration page, configure the Controller role by clicking on the levers icon 1 .

      RH OSP Director Configure the Controller Role mod
    7. On the Parameters tab 1 , update the ControllerIPs field with the relevant IP addresses.

      Example

      {"storage_mgmt":["172.16.2.200","172.16.2.201","172.16.2.202"],"storage":["172.16.1.200","172.16.1.201","172.16.1.202"],"tenant":["192.168.3.200","192.168.3.201","192.168.3.202"],"internal_api":["192.168.2.200","192.168.2.201","192.168.2.202"]}

    8. On the Services tab 1 , in the Ntp section 2 , update the NtpServer field 3 with the relevant NTP server name.

      RH OSP Director Configure the NtpServer Field mod
    9. Click on the Save And Close button.

      RH OSP Director Overall Settings Save Cancel Button Set mod
  7. Assign the number of nodes needed in the environment for each role.

    Figure 4.2. Example

    RH OSP Director Overall Assign Nodes to Each Role mod
  8. From the plan configuration page, click on the Edit Configuration button 1 .

    RH OSP Director Overcloud Plan Workflow Screen Step2 mod

    Edit the network configuration by clicking on the Network Configuration section 1 , and select Network Isolation 2 .

    RH OSP Director Overall Settings Network Configuration mod

    1. Select one of the NIC configuration templates or use a custom plan.

      RH OSP Director Select NIC Configuration mod

      To customize the NICs in the environment, first you need to export the plan.

      See Section 4.2, “Exporting an overcloud plan using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Director” on how to export a plan.

      1. Download the plan tarball file and make the necessary additions or modifications locally.

        Example

        RH OSP Director Export Plan Download mod

      2. After updating the plan tarball file, click the drop down menu and select Edit.

        RH OSP Director Edit Custom Plan mod

      3. Import the plan. Enter Plan Name 1 and click on the Choose File button 2 . Browse to the location of the tarball file, and select it for import. Once the file is selected, click on the Upload Files and Create Plan button 3 .

        RH OSP Director Import Plan Screen mod

      4. Click on the Edit Configuration button.

        RH OSP Director Overcloud Plan Workflow Screen Step2 mod

      5. On the Overall Settings tab 1 , click on the Other section 2 .
      6. Select the Others section and include the custom templates.
      7. Select any new or modified files from the file list.

        Example

        RH OSP Director Include Custom Config File mod

      8. Click on the Parameters tab and update any of the values accordingly.
  9. Now, it is time to deploy the plan. From the plan configuration page, click on the Validate and Deploy button to deploy the overcloud plan.

    RH OSP Director Validate and Deploy mod
  10. Wait for the overcloud deployment to finish.

4.5. Additional Resources

Chapter 5. Deploying Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud using the command-line interface

As a technician, you can deploy and manage the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution using the command-line interface.

5.1. Prerequisites

5.2. Preparing the nodes before deploying the overcloud using the command-line interface

As a technician, before you can deploy the overcloud, the undercloud needs to understand the hardware being used in the environment.

Note

The Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) is also known as the undercloud.

5.2.1. Prerequisites

5.2.2. Registering and introspecting the hardware

The Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) runs an introspection process on each node and collects data about the node’s hardware. This introspection data is stored on the RHOSP-d node, and is used for various purposes, such as benchmarking and root disk assignments.

Prerequisites

  • Complete the software installation of the RHOSP-d node.
  • The MAC addresses for the network interface cards (NICs).
  • IPMI User name and password

Procedure

Do the following steps on the RHOSP-d node, as the stack user:

  1. Create the osd-compute flavor:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack flavor create --id auto --ram 2048 --disk 40 --vcpus 2 osd-compute
    [stack@director ~]$ openstack flavor set --property "capabilities:boot_option"="local" --property "capabilities:profile"="osd-compute" osd-compute
  2. Create and populate a host definition file for the Ironic service to manage the nodes.

    1. Create the instackenv.json host definition file:

      [stack@director ~]$ touch ~/instackenv.json
    2. Add a definition block for each node between the nodes stanza square brackets ({"nodes": []}), using this template:

      {
        "pm_password": "IPMI_USER_PASSWORD",
        "name": "NODE_NAME",
        "pm_user": "IPMI_USER_NAME",
        "pm_addr": "IPMI_IP_ADDR",
        "pm_type": "pxe_ipmitool",
        "mac": [
                "NIC_MAC_ADDR"
               ],
        "arch": "x86_64",
        "capabilities": "node:_NODE_ROLE-INSTANCE_NUM_,boot_option:local"
      },
      Replace…​
      • IPMI_USER_PASSWORD with the IPMI password.
      • NODE_NAME with a descriptive name of the node. This is an optional parameter.
      • IPMI_USER_NAME with the IPMI user name that has access to power the node on or off.
      • IPMI_IP_ADDR with the IPMI IP address.
      • NIC_MAC_ADDR with the network card MAC address handling the PXE boot.
      • NODE_ROLE-INSTANCE_NUM with the node’s role, along with a node number. This solution uses two roles: control and osd-compute.

        {
          "nodes": [
             {
                 "pm_password": "AbC1234",
                 "name": "m630_slot1",
                 "pm_user": "ipmiadmin",
                 "pm_addr": "10.19.143.61",
                 "pm_type": "pxe_ipmitool",
                 "mac": [
                     "c8:1f:66:65:33:41"
                 ],
                 "arch": "x86_64",
                  "capabilities": "node:control-0,boot_option:local"
             },
             {
                 "pm_password": "AbC1234",
                 "name": "m630_slot2",
                 "pm_user": "ipmiadmin",
                 "pm_addr": "10.19.143.62",
                 "pm_type": "pxe_ipmitool",
                 "mac": [
                     "c8:1f:66:65:33:42"
                 ],
                 "arch": "x86_64",
                  "capabilities": "node:osd-compute-0,boot_option:local"
             },
             ... Continue adding node definition blocks for each node in the initial deployment here.
          ]
        }
        Note

        The osd-compute role is a custom role that is created in a later step. To predictably control node placement, add these nodes in order. For example:

        [stack@director ~]$ grep capabilities ~/instackenv.json
        	 "capabilities": "node:control-0,boot_option:local"
        	 "capabilities": "node:control-1,boot_option:local"
        	 "capabilities": "node:control-2,boot_option:local"
        	 "capabilities": "node:osd-compute-0,boot_option:local"
        	 "capabilities": "node:osd-compute-1,boot_option:local"
        	 "capabilities": "node:osd-compute-2,boot_option:local"
  3. Import the nodes into the Ironic database:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal import ~/instackenv.json
    1. Verify that the openstack baremetal import command populated the Ironic database with all the nodes:

      [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal node list
  4. Assign the bare metal boot kernel and RAMdisk images to all the nodes:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal configure boot
  5. To start the nodes, collect their hardware data and store the information in the Ironic database, execute the following:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal introspection bulk start
    Note

    Bulk introspection can take a long time to complete based on the number of nodes imported. Setting the inspection_runbench value to false in ~/undercloud.conf file will speed up the bulk introspection process, but it will not collect the sysbench and fio benchmark data will not be collected, which can be useful data for the RHOSP-d.

    1. Verify that the introspection process completes without errors for all the nodes:

      [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal introspection bulk status

Additional Resources

  • For more information on assigning node identification parameters, see the Controlling Node Placement chapter of the RHOSP Advanced Overcloud Customization Guide.

5.2.3. Setting the root device

The Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) must identify the root disk to provision the nodes. By default Ironic will image the first block device, typically this block device is /dev/sda. Follow this procedure to change the root disk device according to the disk configuration of the Compute/OSD nodes.

This procedure will use the following Compute/OSD node disk configuration as an example:

  • OSD : 12 x 1TB SAS disks presented as /dev/[sda, sdb, …​, sdl] block devices
  • OSD Journal : 3 x 400GB SATA SSD disks presented as /dev/[sdm, sdn, sdo] block devices
  • Operating System : 2 x 250GB SAS disks configured in RAID1 presented as /dev/sdp block device

Since an OSD will use /dev/sda, Ironic will use /dev/sdp, the RAID 1 disk, as the root disk instead. During the hardware introspection process, Ironic stores the world-wide number (WWN) and size of each block device.

Prerequisites

Procedure

Run one of the following commands on the RHOSP-d node.

  1. Configure the root disk device to use the smallest root device:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal configure boot --root-device=smallest

or

  1. Configure the root disk device to use the disk’s by-path name:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal configure boot --root-device=disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:1f.1-scsi-0:0:0:0
Note

Ironic will apply this root device directive to all nodes within Ironic’s database.

  1. Verify the correct root disk device was set:

    openstack baremetal introspection data save NODE_NAME_or_UUID | jq .
    Replace…​
    NODE_NAME_or_UUID with the host name or UUID of the node.

Additional Resources

5.2.4. Verifying that Ironic’s disk cleaning is working

To verify if Ironic’s disk cleaning feature is working, you can toggle the node’s state, then observe if the node’s state goes into a cleaning state.

Prerequisites

  • Installing the undercloud.

Procedure

  1. Set the node’s state to manage:

    openstack baremetal node manage $NODE_NAME

    Example

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal node manage osdcompute-0

  2. Set the node’s state to provide:

    openstack baremetal node provide NODE_NAME

    Example

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal node provide osdcompute-0

  3. Check the node status:

    openstack node list

5.2.5. Additional Resources

5.3. Configuring a container image source

As a technician, you can containerize the overcloud, but this first requires access to a registry with the required container images. Here you can find information on how to prepare the registry and the overcloud configuration to use container images for Red Hat OpenStack Platform.

There are several methods for configuring the overcloud to use a registry, based on the use case.

5.3.1. Registry methods

Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud supports the following registry types, choose one of the following methods:

Remote Registry
The overcloud pulls container images directly from registry.access.redhat.com. This method is the easiest for generating the initial configuration. However, each overcloud node pulls each image directly from the Red Hat Container Catalog, which can cause network congestion and slower deployment. In addition, all overcloud nodes require internet access to the Red Hat Container Catalog.
Local Registry
Create a local registry on the undercloud, synchronize the images from registry.access.redhat.com, and the overcloud pulls the container images from the undercloud. This method allows you to store a registry internally, which can speed up the deployment and decrease network congestion. However, the undercloud only acts as a basic registry and provides limited life cycle management for container images.

5.3.2. Including additional container images for Red Hat OpenStack Platform services

The Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud uses additional services besides the core Red Hat OpenStack Platform services. These additional services require additional container images, and you enable these services with their corresponding environment file. These environment files enable the composable containerized services in the overcloud and the director needs to know these services are enabled to prepare their images.

Prerequisites

  • A running undercloud.

Procedure

  1. As the stack user, on the undercloud node, using the openstack overcloud container image prepare command to include the additional services.

    1. Include the following environment file using the -e option:

      • Ceph Storage Cluster : /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml
    2. Include the following --set options for Red Hat Ceph Storage:

      --set ceph_namespace
      Defines the namespace for the Red Hat Ceph Storage container image.
      --set ceph_image
      Defines the name of the Red Hat Ceph Storage container image. Use image name: rhceph-3-rhel7.
      --set ceph_tag
      Defines the tag to use for the Red Hat Ceph Storage container image. When --tag-from-label is specified, the versioned tag is discovered starting from this tag.
  2. Run the image prepare command:

    Example

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack overcloud container image prepare \
      ...
      -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
      --set ceph_namespace=registry.access.redhat.com/rhceph \
      --set ceph_image=rhceph-3-rhel7 \
      --tag-from-label {version}-{release} \
      ...

    Note

    These options are passed in addition to any other options (…​) that need to be passed to the openstack overcloud container image prepare command.

5.3.3. Using the Red Hat registry as a remote registry source

Red Hat hosts the overcloud container images on registry.access.redhat.com. Pulling the images from a remote registry is the simplest method because the registry is already setup and all you require is the URL and namespace of the image you aim to pull.

Prerequisites

  • A running Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud 10 environment.
  • Access to the Internet.

Procedure

  1. To pull the images directly from registry.access.redhat.com in the overcloud deployment, an environment file is required to specify the image parameters. The following command automatically creates this environment file:

    (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack overcloud container image prepare \
      --namespace=registry.access.redhat.com/rhosp13 \
      --prefix=openstack- \
      --tag-from-label {version}-{release} \
      --output-env-file=/home/stack/templates/overcloud_images.yaml
    Note

    Use the -e option to include any environment files for optional services.

  2. This creates an overcloud_images.yaml environment file, which contains image locations, on the undercloud. Include this file with all future upgrade and deployment operations.

Additional Resources

  • For more details, see the Including additional container images for Red Hat OpenStack Platform services section in the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud Deployment Guide.

5.3.4. Using the undercloud as a local registry

You can configure a local registry on the undercloud to store overcloud container images. This method involves the following:

  • The director pulls each image from the registry.access.redhat.com.
  • The director creates the overcloud.

    • During the overcloud creation, the nodes pull the relevant images from the undercloud.

Prerequisites

  • A running Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud environment.
  • Access to the Internet.

Procedure

  1. Create a template to pull the images to the local registry:

    (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack overcloud container image prepare \
      --namespace=registry.access.redhat.com/rhosp13 \
      --prefix=openstack- \
      --tag-from-label {version}-{release} \
      --output-images-file /home/stack/local_registry_images.yaml
    • Use the -e option to include any environment files for optional services.

      Note

      This version of the openstack overcloud container image prepare command targets the registry on the registry.access.redhat.com to generate an image list. It uses different values than the openstack overcloud container image prepare command used in a later step.

  2. This creates a file called local_registry_images.yaml with the container image information. Pull the images using the local_registry_images.yaml file:

    (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ sudo openstack overcloud container image upload \
      --config-file  /home/stack/local_registry_images.yaml \
      --verbose
    Note

    The container images consume approximately 10 GB of disk space.

  3. Find the namespace of the local images. The namespace uses the following pattern:

    <REGISTRY_IP_ADDRESS>:8787/rhosp13

    Use the IP address of the undercloud, which you previously set with the local_ip parameter in the undercloud.conf file. Alternatively, you can also obtain the full namespace with the following command:

    (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ docker images | grep -v redhat.com | grep -o '^.*rhosp13' | sort -u
  4. Create a template for using the images in our local registry on the undercloud. For example:

    (undercloud) [stack@director ~]$ openstack overcloud container image prepare \
      --namespace=192.168.24.1:8787/rhosp13 \
      --prefix=openstack- \
      --tag-from-label {version}-{release} \
      --output-env-file=/home/stack/templates/overcloud_images.yaml
    • Use the -e option to include any environment files for optional services.
    • If using Ceph Storage, include the additional parameters to define the Ceph Storage container image location: --set ceph_namespace, --set ceph_image, --set ceph_tag.
    Note

    This version of the openstack overcloud container image prepare command targets a Red Hat Satellite server. It uses different values than the openstack overcloud container image prepare command used in a previous step.

  5. This creates an overcloud_images.yaml environment file, which contains image locations on the undercloud. Include this file with all future upgrade and deployment operations.

Additional Resources

  • See the Including additional container images for Red Hat OpenStack Platform services section in the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud Deployment Guide for more information.

Next Steps

  • Prepare the overcloud for an upgrade.

5.3.5. Additional Resources

  • See Section 4.2 in the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Fast Forward Upgrades Guide for more information.

5.4. Isolating resources and tuning the overcloud using the command-line interface

Resource contention between Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOSP) and Red Hat Ceph Storage (RHCS) might cause a degradation of either service. Therefore, isolating system resources is important with the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure Cloud solution.

Likewise, tuning the overcloud is equally important for a more predictable performance outcome for a given workload.

To isolate resources and tune the overcloud, you will continue to refine the custom templates created previously.

5.4.1. Prerequisites

5.4.2. Reserving CPU and memory resources for hyperconverged nodes

By default, the Nova Compute service parameters do not take into account the colocation of Ceph OSD services on the same node. Hyperconverged nodes need to be tuned in order to maintain stability and maximize the number of possible instances. Using a plan environment file allows you to set resource constraints for the Nova Compute service on hyperconverged nodes. Plan environment files define workflows, and the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) executes the plan file with the OpenStack Workflow (Mistral) service.

The RHOSP-d also provides a default plan environment file specifically for configuring resource constraints on hyperconverged nodes:

/usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/plan-samples/plan-environment-derived-params.yaml

Using the -p parameter invokes a plan environment file during the overcloud deployment.

This plan environment file will direct the OpenStack Workflow to:

  1. Retrieve hardware introspection data.
  2. Calculate optimal CPU and memory constraints for Compute on hyper-converged nodes based on that data.
  3. Autogenerate the necessary parameters to configure those constraints.

In the plan-environment-derived-params.yaml plan environment file, the hci_profile_config option defines several CPU and memory allocation workload profiles. The hci_profile parameter sets which workload profile is enabled.

Here is the default hci_profile:

Default Example

hci_profile: default
    hci_profile_config:
      default:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 2048
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 50
      many_small_vms:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 1024
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 20
      few_large_vms:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 4096
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 80
      nfv_default:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 8192
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 90

In the above example, assumes that the average guest will use 2 GB of memory and 50% of their CPUs.

You can create a custom workload profile for the environment by adding a new profile to the hci_profile_config section. You can enable this custom workload profile by setting the hci_profile parameter to the profile’s name.

Custom Example

hci_profile: my_workload
    hci_profile_config:
      default:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 2048
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 50
      many_small_vms:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 1024
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 20
      few_large_vms:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 4096
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 80
      nfv_default:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 8192
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 90
      my_workload:
        average_guest_memory_size_in_mb: 131072
        average_guest_cpu_utilization_percentage: 100

The my_workload profile assumes that the average guest will use 128 GB of RAM and 100% of the CPUs allocated to the guest.

Additional Resources

5.4.3. Reserving CPU resources for Ceph

With hyperconverged deployments there can be contention between the Nova compute and Ceph processes for CPU resources. By default ceph-ansible will limit each OSD to one vCPU by using the --cpu-quota option on the docker run command. The ceph_osd_docker_cpu_limit option overrides this default limit, allowing you to use more vCPUs for each Ceph OSD process, for example:

CephAnsibleExtraConfig:
  ceph_osd_docker_cpu_limit: 2

Red Hat recommends setting the ceph_osd_docker_cpu_limit value to 2 as a starting point, and then adjust this value based on the hardware being used and workload being ran on this hyperconverged environment. This configuration option can be set in the ~/templates/ceph.yaml file.

Important

Always test the workload before running it in a production environment.

Additional Resources

5.4.4. Reserving memory resources for Ceph

With hyperconverged deployments there can be contention between the Nova compute and Ceph processes for memory resources. Deployments of the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution will use ceph-ansible to automatically tune Ceph’s memory settings to reduce memory contention between collocated processes. The BlueStore object store is the recommended backend for hyperconverged deployments because of its better memory-handling features.

The ceph_osd_docker_memory_limit option is automatically set to the maximum memory size of the node as discovered by Ansible, regardless of the Ceph object store backend used, either FileStore or BlueStore.

Warning

Red Hat recommends not overriding the ceph_osd_docker_memory_limit option.

The osd_memory_target option is the preferred way to reduce memory growth by the Ceph OSD processes. The osd_memory_target option is automatically set if the is_hci option is set to true, for example:

CephAnsibleExtraConfig:
  is_hci: true

These configuration options can be set in the ~/templates/ceph.yaml file.

Note

The osd_memory_target option was introduced with the BlueStore object store feature starting with Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2.

Additional Resources

5.4.5. Tuning the backfilling and recovery operations for Ceph

Ceph uses a backfilling and recovery process to rebalance the storage cluster, whenever an OSD is removed. This is done to keep multiple copies of the data, according to the placement group policy. These two operations use system resources, so when a Ceph storage cluster is under load, then Ceph’s performance will drop as Ceph diverts resources to the backfill and recovery process. To maintain acceptable performance of the Ceph storage when an OSD is removed, then reduce the priority of backfill and recovery operations. The trade off for reducing the priority is that there are less data replicas for a longer period of time, and putting the data at a slightly greater risk.

The three variables to modify are:

osd_recovery_max_active
The number of active recovery requests per OSD at one time. More requests will accelerate recovery, but the requests place an increased load on the cluster.
osd_max_backfills
The maximum number of backfills allowed to or from a single OSD.
osd_recovery_op_priority
The priority set for recovery operations. It is relative to osd client op priority.

Since the osd_recovery_max_active and osd_max_backfills parameters are set to the correct values already, there is no need to add them to the ceph.yaml file. If you want to overwrite the default values of 3 and 1 respectively, then add them to the ceph.yaml file.

Additional Resources

  • For more information on the OSD configurable parameters, see the Red Hat Ceph Storage Configuration Guide.

5.4.6. Additional Resources

5.5. Defining the overcloud using the command-line interface

As a technician, you can create a customizable set of TripleO Heat templates which defines the overcloud.

5.5.1. Prerequisites

  • Verify that all the requirements are met.
  • Deploy the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director, also known as the undercloud.

The high-level steps for defining the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud overcloud:

5.5.2. Creating a directory for the custom templates

The installation of the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) creates a set of TripleO Heat templates. These TripleO Heat templates are located in the /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/ directory. Red Hat recommends copying these templates before customizing them.

Prerequisites

Procedure

Do the following step on the command-line interface of the RHOSP-d node.

  1. Create new directories for the custom templates:

    [stack@director ~]$ mkdir -p ~/templates/nic-configs

5.5.3. Configuring the overcloud networks

This procedure will customize the network configuration files for isolated networks and assigning them to the Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOSP) services.

Prerequisites

  • Verify that all the network requirements are met.

Procedure

Do the following steps on the RHOSP director node, as the stack user.

  1. Choose the Compute NIC configuration template applicable to the environment:

    • /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/single-nic-vlans/compute.yaml
    • /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/single-nic-linux-bridge-vlans/compute.yaml
    • /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/multiple-nics/compute.yaml
    • /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/bond-with-vlans/compute.yaml

      Note

      See the README.md in each template’s respective directory for details about the NIC configuration.

  2. Create a new directory within the ~/templates/ directory:

    [stack@director ~]$ touch ~/templates/nic-configs
  3. Copy the chosen template to the ~/templates/nic-configs/ directory and rename it to compute-hci.yaml:

    Example

    [stack@director ~]$ cp /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/bond-with-vlans/compute.yaml ~/templates/nic-configs/compute-hci.yaml

  4. Add following definition, if it does note already exist, in the parameters: section of the ~/templates/nic-configs/compute-hci.yaml file:

    StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID:
        default: 40
        description: Vlan ID for the storage mgmt network traffic.
        type: number
  5. Map StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID to a specific NIC on each node. For example, if you chose to trunk VLANs to a single NIC (single-nic-vlans/compute.yaml), then add the following entry to the network_config: section of ~/templates/nic-configs/compute-hci.yaml:

    type: vlan
    device: em2
    mtu: 9000
    use_dhcp: false
    vlan_id: {get_param: StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID}
    addresses:
      -
        ip_netmask: {get_param: StorageMgmtIpSubnet}
    Important

    Red Hat recommends setting the mtu to 9000, when mapping a NIC to StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID. This MTU setting provides measurable performance improvement to the performance of Red Hat Ceph Storage. For more details, see Configuring Jumbo Frames in the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Advanced Overcloud Customization guide.

  6. Create a new file in the custom templates directory:

    [stack@director ~]$ touch ~/templates/network.yaml
  7. Open and edit the network.yaml file.

    1. Add the resource_registry section:

      resource_registry:
    2. Add the following two lines under the resource_registry: section:

      OS::TripleO::Controller::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/controller-nics.yaml
      OS::TripleO::Compute::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/compute-nics.yaml

      These two lines point the RHOSP services to the network configurations of the Controller/Monitor and Compute/OSD nodes respectively.

    3. Add the parameter_defaults section:

      parameter_defaults:
    4. Add the following default parameters for the Neutron bridge mappings for the tenant network:

      NeutronBridgeMappings: 'datacentre:br-ex,tenant:br-tenant'
      NeutronNetworkType: 'vxlan'
      NeutronTunnelType: 'vxlan'
      NeutronExternalNetworkBridge: "''"

      This defines the bridge mappings assigned to the logical networks and enables the tenants to use vxlan.

    5. The two TripleO Heat templates referenced in step 2b requires parameters to define each network. Under the parameter_defaults section add the following lines:

      # Internal API used for private OpenStack Traffic
      InternalApiNetCidr: IP_ADDR_CIDR
      InternalApiAllocationPools: [{'start': 'IP_ADDR_START', 'end': 'IP_ADDR_END'}]
      InternalApiNetworkVlanID: VLAN_ID
      
      # Tenant Network Traffic - will be used for VXLAN over VLAN
      TenantNetCidr: IP_ADDR_CIDR
      TenantAllocationPools: [{'start': 'IP_ADDR_START', 'end': 'IP_ADDR_END'}]
      TenantNetworkVlanID: VLAN_ID
      
      # Public Storage Access - Nova/Glance <--> Ceph
      StorageNetCidr: IP_ADDR_CIDR
      StorageAllocationPools: [{'start': 'IP_ADDR_START', 'end': 'IP_ADDR_END'}]
      StorageNetworkVlanID: VLAN_ID
      
      # Private Storage Access - Ceph cluster/replication
      StorageMgmtNetCidr: IP_ADDR_CIDR
      StorageMgmtAllocationPools: [{'start': 'IP_ADDR_START', 'end': 'IP_ADDR_END'}]
      StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID: VLAN_ID
      
      # External Networking Access - Public API Access
      ExternalNetCidr: IP_ADDR_CIDR
      
      # Leave room for floating IPs in the External allocation pool (if required)
      ExternalAllocationPools: [{'start': 'IP_ADDR_START', 'end': 'IP_ADDR_END'}]
      
      # Set to the router gateway on the external network
      ExternalInterfaceDefaultRoute: IP_ADDRESS
      
      # Gateway router for the provisioning network (or undercloud IP)
      ControlPlaneDefaultRoute: IP_ADDRESS
      
      # The IP address of the EC2 metadata server, this is typically the IP of the undercloud
      EC2MetadataIp: IP_ADDRESS
      
      # Define the DNS servers (maximum 2) for the Overcloud nodes
      DnsServers: ["DNS_SERVER_IP","DNS_SERVER_IP"]
      Replace…​
      • IP_ADDR_CIDR with the appropriate IP address and net mask (CIDR).
      • IP_ADDR_START with the appropriate starting IP address.
      • IP_ADDR_END with the appropriate ending IP address.
      • IP_ADDRESS with the appropriate IP address.
      • VLAN_ID with the appropriate VLAN identification number for the corresponding network.
      • DNS_SERVER_IP with the appropriate IP address for defining two DNS servers, separated by a comma (,).

        See the appendix for an example network.yaml file.

Additional Resources

  • For more information on Isolating Networks, see the Red Hat OpenStack Platform Advance Overcloud Customization Guide.

5.5.4. Creating the Controller and ComputeHCI roles

The overcloud has five default roles: Controller, Compute, BlockStorage, ObjectStorage, and CephStorage. These roles contains a list of services. You can mix these services to create a custom deployable role.

Prerequisites

Procedure

Do the following step on the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director node, as the stack user.

  1. Generate a custom roles_data_custom.yaml file that includes the Controller and the ComputeHCI:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack overcloud roles generate -o ~/custom-templates/roles_data_custom.yaml Controller ComputeHCI

Additional Resources

5.5.5. Setting the Red Hat Ceph Storage parameters

This procedure defines what Red Hat Ceph Storage (RHCS) OSD parameters to use.

Prerequisites

Procedure

Do the following steps on the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director node, as the stack user.

  1. Open for editing the ~/templates/ceph.yaml file.

    1. To use the BlueStore object store backend, update the following lines under the CephAnsibleExtraConfig section:

      Example

      CephAnsibleExtraConfig:
        osd_scenario: lvm
        osd_objectstore: bluestore

    2. Update the following options under the parameter_defaults section:

      Example

      parameter_defaults:
          CephPoolDefaultSize: 3
          CephPoolDefaultPgNum: NUM
          CephAnsibleDisksConfig:
            osd_scenario: lvm
            osd_objectstore: bluestore
            devices:
              - /dev/sda
              - /dev/sdb
              - /dev/sdc
              - /dev/sdd
              - /dev/nvme0n1
              - /dev/sde
              - /dev/sdf
              - /dev/sdg
              - /dev/nvme1n1
          CephAnsibleExtraConfig:
            osd_scenario: lvm
            osd_objectstore: bluestore
            ceph_osd_docker_cpu_limit: 2
            is_hci: true
      
          CephConfigOverrides:
            osd_recovery_op_priority: 3
            osd_recovery_max_active: 3
            osd_max_backfills: 1

      Replace…​

      NUM with the calculated values from the Ceph PG calculator.

      For this example, the following Compute/OSD node disk configuration is being used:

      • OSD : 12 x 1TB SAS disks presented as /dev/[sda, sdb, …​, sdg] block devices
      • OSD WAL and DB devices : 2 x 400GB NVMe SSD disks presented as /dev/[nvme0n1, nvme1n1] block devices

Additional Resources

  • For more details on tuning Ceph OSD parameters, see the Red Hat Ceph Storage Storage Strategies Guide.
  • For more details on using the BlueStore object store, see the Red Hat Ceph Storage Administration Guide.
  • For examples of the LVM scenario, see the LVM simple and LVM advance sections in the Red Hat Ceph Storage Installation Guide.

5.5.6. Configuring the overcloud nodes layout

The overcloud layout for the nodes defines, how many of these nodes to deploy based on the type, which pool of IP addresses to assign, and other parameters.

Prerequisites

Procedure

Do the following steps on the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director node, as the stack user.

  1. Create the layout.yaml file in the custom templates directory:

    [stack@director ~]$ touch ~/templates/layout.yaml
  2. Open the layout.yaml file for editing.

    1. Add the resource registry section by adding the following line:

      resource_registry:
    2. Add the following lines under the resource_registry section for configuring the Controller and ComputeHCI roles to use a pool of IP addresses:

        OS::TripleO::Controller::Ports::InternalApiPort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/internal_api_from_pool.yaml
        OS::TripleO::Controller::Ports::TenantPort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/tenant_from_pool.yaml
        OS::TripleO::Controller::Ports::StoragePort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/storage_from_pool.yaml
        OS::TripleO::Controller::Ports::StorageMgmtPort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/storage_mgmt_from_pool.yaml
      
        OS::TripleO::ComputeHCI::Ports::InternalApiPort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/internal_api_from_pool.yaml
        OS::TripleO::ComputeHCI::Ports::TenantPort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/tenant_from_pool.yaml
        OS::TripleO::ComputeHCI::Ports::StoragePort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/storage_from_pool.yaml
        OS::TripleO::ComputeHCI::Ports::StorageMgmtPort: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/ports/storage_mgmt_from_pool.yaml
    3. Add a new section for the parameter defaults called parameter_defaults and include the following parameters underneath this section:

      parameter_defaults:
        NtpServer: NTP_IP_ADDR
        ControllerHostnameFormat: 'controller-%index%'
        ComputeHCIHostnameFormat: 'compute-hci-%index%'
        ControllerCount: 3
        ComputeHCICount: 3
        OvercloudComputeFlavor: compute
        OvercloudComputeHCIFlavor: osd-compute
      Replace…​

      NTP_IP_ADDR with the IP address of the NTP source. Time synchronization is very important!

      Example

      parameter_defaults:
        NtpServer: 10.5.26.10
        ControllerHostnameFormat: 'controller-%index%'
        ComputeHCIHostnameFormat: 'compute-hci-%index%'
        ControllerCount: 3
        ComputeHCICount: 3
        OvercloudComputeFlavor: compute
        OvercloudComputeHCIFlavor: osd-compute

      The value of 3 for the ControllerCount and ComputeHCICount parameters means three Controller/Monitor nodes and three Compute/OSD nodes will be deployed.

    4. Under the parameter_defaults section, add a two scheduler hints, one called ControllerSchedulerHints and the other called ComputeHCISchedulerHints. Under each scheduler hint, add the node name format for predictable node placement, as follows:

        ControllerSchedulerHints:
          'capabilities:node': 'control-%index%'
        ComputeHCISchedulerHints:
          'capabilities:node': 'osd-compute-%index%'
    5. Under the parameter_defaults section, add the required IP addresses for each node profile, for example:

      Example

        ControllerIPs:
          internal_api:
            - 192.168.2.200
            - 192.168.2.201
            - 192.168.2.202
          tenant:
            - 192.168.3.200
            - 192.168.3.201
            - 192.168.3.202
          storage:
            - 172.16.1.200
            - 172.16.1.201
            - 172.16.1.202
          storage_mgmt:
            - 172.16.2.200
            - 172.16.2.201
            - 172.16.2.202
      
        ComputeHCIIPs:
          internal_api:
            - 192.168.2.203
            - 192.168.2.204
            - 192.168.2.205
          tenant:
            - 192.168.3.203
            - 192.168.3.204
            - 192.168.3.205
          storage:
            - 172.16.1.203
            - 172.16.1.204
            - 172.16.1.205
          storage_mgmt:
            - 172.16.2.203
            - 172.16.2.204
            - 172.16.2.205

      From this example, node control-0 would have the following IP addresses: 192.168.2.200, 192.168.3.200, 172.16.1.200, and 172.16.2.200.

5.5.7. Additional Resources

5.6. Deploying the overcloud using the command-line interface

As a technician, you can deploy the overcloud nodes so the Nova Compute and the Ceph OSD services are colocated on the same node.

5.6.1. Prerequisites

5.6.2. Verifying the available nodes for Ironic

Before deploying the overcloud nodes, verify that the nodes are powered off and available.

Warning

The nodes can not be in maintenance mode.

Prerequisites

  • Having the stack user available on the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director node.

Procedure

  1. Run the following command to verify all nodes are powered off, and available:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack baremetal node list

5.6.3. Configuring the controller for Pacemaker fencing

Isolating a node in a cluster so data corruption doesn’t happen is called fencing. Fencing protects the integrity of cluster and cluster resources.

Prerequisites

  • An IPMI user and password.
  • Having the stack user available on the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director node.

Procedure

  1. Generate the fencing Heat environment file:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack overcloud generate fencing --ipmi-lanplus instackenv.json --output fencing.yaml
  2. Include the fencing.yaml file with the openstack overcloud deploy command.

5.6.4. Running the deploy command

After all the customization and tuning, it is time to deploy the overcloud.

Note

The deployment of the overcloud can take a long time to finish based on the sized of the deployment.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Run the following command:

    [stack@director ~]$ time openstack overcloud deploy \
    --templates /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates \
    --stack overcloud \
    -p /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/plan-samples/plan-environment-derived-params.yaml
    -r /home/stack/templates/roles_data_custom.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker-ha.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/overcloud_images.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
    -e ~/templates/network.yaml \
    -e ~/templates/ceph.yaml \
    -e ~/templates/layout.yaml
    -e /home/stack/fencing.yaml
    Command Details
    • The time command is used to tell you how long the deployment takes.
    • The openstack overcloud deploy command does the actual deployment.
    • Replace $NTP_IP_ADDR with the IP address of the NTP source. Time synchronization is very important!
    • The --templates argument uses the default directory (/usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/) containing the TripleO Heat templates to deploy.
    • The -p argument points to the plan environment file for HCI deployments. See the Reserving CPU and memory resources for hyperconverged nodes section for more details.
    • The -r argument points to the roles file and overrides the default role_data.yaml file.
    • The -e argument points to an explicit template file to use during the deployment.
    • The puppet-pacemaker.yaml file configures the controller node services in a highly available pacemaker cluster.
    • The storage-environment.yaml file configures Ceph as a storage backend, whose parameter_defaults are passed by the custom template, ceph.yaml.
    • The network-isolation.yaml file configures network isolation for different services, whose parameters are passed by the custom template, network.yaml. This file will be created automatically when the deployment starts.
    • The network.yaml file is explained in Configuring the overcloud networks section for more details.
    • The ceph.yaml file is explained in Setting the Red Hat Ceph Storage parameters section for more details.
    • The compute.yaml file is explained in Changing Nova reserved memory and CPU allocations section for more details.
    • The layout.yaml file is explained in Configuring the overcloud node profile layouts section for more details.
    • The fencing.yaml file is explained in Configuring the controller for Pacemaker fencing section for more details.

      Important

      The order of the arguments matters. The custom template files will override the default template files.

      Note

      Optionally, add the --rhel-reg, --reg-method, --reg-org options, if you want to use the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) node as a software repository for package installations.

  2. Wait for the overcloud deployment to finish.

Additional Resources

  • See Table 5.2 Deployment Parameters in the Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 Director Installation and Usage Guide for more information on the overcloud parameters.

5.6.5. Verifying a successful overcloud deployment

It is important to verify if the overcloud deployment was successful.

Prerequisites

  • Having the stack user available on the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director node.

Procedure

  1. Watch the deployment process and look for failures:

    [stack@director ~]$ heat resource-list -n5 overcloud | egrep -i 'fail|progress'

    Example output from a successful overcloud deployment:

    2016-12-20 23:25:04Z [overcloud]: CREATE_COMPLETE  Stack CREATE completed successfully
    
     Stack overcloud CREATE_COMPLETE
    
    Started Mistral Workflow. Execution ID: aeca4d71-56b4-4c72-a980-022623487c05
    /home/stack/.ssh/known_hosts updated.
    Original contents retained as /home/stack/.ssh/known_hosts.old
    Overcloud Endpoint: http://10.19.139.46:5000/v2.0
    Overcloud Deployed
  2. After the deployment finishes, view the IP addresses for the overcloud nodes:

    [stack@director ~]$ openstack server list

Chapter 6. Upgrading the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution to the latest versions

As a technician, you can upgrade the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution to the latest versions of Red Hat OpenStack 13, and Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.

Basic Upgrade Workflow

  1. Backup the existing Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution environment.
  2. Performing the upgrade to the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution environment.
  3. Rebooting the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution environment.

6.1. Prerequisites

  • A running Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud 13 environment.

6.2. Backing up the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution

Before upgrading the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution, Red Hat recommends backing up the environment first.

Note

Confirm that you have sufficient disk space available on the undercloud node before performing the backup process. Expect the archive file to be at least 3.5 GB, if not larger.

Prerequisites

  • A running Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution.
  • Need root access to Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) node.

Procedure

  1. Log into the undercloud node as the root user.
  2. Create a backup directory, and change the ownership of the directory to the stack user:

    [root@director ~]# mkdir /backup
    [root@director ~]# chown stack /backup
  3. Back up the MariaDB databases:

    [root@director ~]# cd /backup
    [root@director ~]# mysqldump --opt --all-databases > /backup/undercloud-all-databases.sql
  4. Archive the database backup and the configuration files:

    [root@director ~]# tar --xattrs --ignore-failed-read -cf \
    undercloud-backup-`date +%F`.tar \
    /backup/undercloud-backup-`date +%F`.tar \
    /backup/undercloud-all-databases.sql \
    /etc \
    /var/log \
    /var/lib/glance \
    /var/lib/certmonger \
    /var/lib/docker \
    /var/lib/registry \
    /srv/node \
    /root \
    /home/stack

    The --ignore-failed-read option skips any directory that does not apply to the undercloud. The --xattrs option includes extended attributed, for backing up the metadata for the object storage. Copy this tar file to a secure location.

6.3. Upgrading the Red Hat OpenStack and Red Hat Ceph Storage to the latest versions

Upgrading the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution involves several steps:

  1. Upgrading the undercloud.
  2. Preparing the container image source.
  3. Preparing for the overcloud upgrade.
  4. Upgrading the nodes in the overcloud.
  5. Upgrading the Red Hat Ceph Storage environment.
  6. Converging the upgrade.

Prerequisites

  • A running Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud solution.
  • A full backup of the undercloud environment.
  • Having root access to Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d) node.
  • Having the stack user available on the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director node.

Procedure

  1. If not already enabled, register the RHOSP-d node on the Red Hat Content Delivery Network (CDN), and enable the required Red Hat software repositories using the Red Hat Subscription Manager.

    1. Register the RHOSP-d node:

      [root@director ~]# subscription-manager register

      When prompted, enter an authorized Customer Portal user name and password.

    2. Lookup the valid Pool ID for the RHOSP entitlement:

      [root@director ~]# subscription-manager list --available --all --matches="*Hyperconverged*"

      Example Output

      Subscription Name:   Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud
      Provides:            Red Hat OpenStack
                           Red Hat Ceph Storage
      SKU:                 RS00160
      Contract:            1111111
      Pool ID:             a1b2c3d4e5f6g7h8i9
      Provides Management: Yes
      Available:           1
      Suggested:           1
      Service Level:       Self-Support
      Service Type:        L1-L3
      Subscription Type:   Standard
      Ends:                05/27/2018
      System Type:         Virtual

    3. Using the Pool ID from the previous step, and attach the Red Hat OpenStack Platform entitlement:

      subscription-manager attach --pool=POOL_ID
      Replace…​

      POOL_ID with the valid pool id from the previous step.

      Example

      [root@director ~]# subscription-manager attach --pool=a1b2c3d4e5f6g7h8i9

    4. Disable the default software repositories, and enable the required software repositories:

      [root@director ~]# subscription-manager repos --disable=*
      [root@director ~]# subscription-manager repos --enable=rhel-7-server-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-extras-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-rh-common-rpms --enable=rhel-ha-for-rhel-7-server-rpms --enable=rhel-7-server-openstack-13-rpms
    5. If needed, update the base system software to the latest package versions, and reboot the RHOSP-d node:

      [root@director ~]# yum update
      [root@director ~]# shutdown -r now

      Wait for the node to be completely up and running before continuing to the next step.

  2. Update the python-tripleoclient package and any dependencies to ensure you have the latest scripts for the minor version update:

    [root@director ~]# yum update python-tripleoclient
  3. Update the undercloud environment:

    [root@director ~]# openstack undercloud upgrade
  4. Wait until the undercloud upgrade process completes.
  5. Reboot the undercloud to update the operating system’s kernel and other system packages:

    [root@director ~]# shutdown -r now
  6. After the reboot completes, logon as the stack user, then source in the stackrc profile:

    [stack@director ~]$ source stackrc
  7. Create an updated environment file for the container image source. For example, to use images from registry.access.redhat.com:

    (undercloud) $ openstack overcloud container image prepare \
    --namespace=registry.access.redhat.com/rhosp13 \
    --prefix=openstack- \
    --tag=latest \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
    --set ceph_namespace=registry.access.redhat.com \
    --set ceph_image=rhceph/rhceph-3-rhel7 \
    --set ceph_tag=latest \
    --push-destination={push_destination} \
    --output-env-file ~/templates/overcloud_images.yaml \
    --output-images-file overcloud_containers.yaml
  8. Pull the container images from registry.access.redhat.com to the undercloud:

    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud container image upload \
    --config-file  /home/stack/overcloud_containers.yaml \
    --verbose

    Pulling the required images might take some time depending on the speed of the network and the undercloud disk.

    Note

    The container images consume approximately 10 GB of disk space.

  9. Prepare for the overcloud update:

    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update prepare \
    --templates /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates \
    --stack overcloud \
    --libvirt-type kvm \
    --ntp-server NTP_SERVER \
    -r /home/stack/templates/roles_data.yaml \
    -n /home/stack/templates/network_data.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/ceph.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/layout.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-environment.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker-ha.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/overcloud_images.yaml
    Replace…​
    NTP_SERVER with the IP address or host name of the NTP server.
    Note

    If needed, include any additional environment files with the -e parameter.

  10. Update each node one at a time:

    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes controller-0
    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes controller-1
    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes controller-2
    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes compute-hci-0
    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes compute-hci-1
    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes compute-hci-2
    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes compute-hci-3
    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update run --nodes compute-hci-4
  11. Upgrade Red Hat Ceph Storage environment:

    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud ceph-upgrade run \
    --stack overcloud \
    --libvirt-type kvm \
    --ntp-server NTP_SERVER \
    --templates /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates \
    -r /home/stack/templates/roles_data.yaml \
    -n /home/stack/templates/network_data.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/ceph.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/layout.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-environment.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker-ha.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/overcloud_images.yaml \
    --ceph-ansible-playbook '/usr/share/ceph-ansible/infrastructure-playbooks/rolling_update.yml'
    Replace…​
    NTP_SERVER with the IP address or host name of the NTP server.
    Note

    If needed, include any additional environment files with the -e parameter.

  12. Converge the update:

    (undercloud) $ sudo openstack overcloud update converge \
    --templates /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates \
    --stack overcloud \
    --libvirt-type kvm \
    --ntp-server NTP_SERVER \
    -r /home/stack/templates/roles_data.yaml \
    -n /home/stack/templates/network_data.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/ceph.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/layout.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-environment.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/ceph-ansible/ceph-ansible.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker.yaml \
    -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/docker-ha.yaml \
    -e /home/stack/templates/overcloud_images.yaml
    Replace…​
    NTP_SERVER with the IP address or host name of the NTP server.
    Note

    If needed, include any additional environment files with the -e parameter.

Appendix A. Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud required repositories

Table A.1. Required repositories

Name

Repository

Description of Requirement

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Server (RPMs)

rhel-7-server-rpms

Base operating system repository.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Server - Extras (RPMs)

rhel-7-server-extras-rpms

Contains Red Hat OpenStack Platform dependencies.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Server - RH Common (RPMs)

rhel-7-server-rh-common-rpms

Contains tools for deploying and configuring Red Hat OpenStack Platform.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux High Availability (for RHEL 7 Server) (RPMs)

rhel-ha-for-rhel-7-server-rpms

High availability tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Used for Controller node high availability.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 13 for RHEL 7 (RPMs)

rhel-7-server-openstack-13-rpms

Core Red Hat OpenStack Platform repository. Also contains packages for Red Hat OpenStack Platform director.

Red Hat Ceph Storage 3 OSD for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Server (RPMs)

rhel-7-server-rhceph-3-osd-rpms

Repository for RHCS Object Storage Daemons (OSDs). Enabled on Compute nodes.

Red Hat Ceph Storage 3 MON for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Server (RPMs)

rhel-7-server-rhceph-3-mon-rpms

Repository for RHCS Monitor daemon. Enabled on Controller nodes.

Red Hat Ceph Storage 3 Tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Workstation (RPMs)

rhel-7-server-rhceph-3-tools-rpms

Repository for RHCS tools and clients, such as the Ceph Object Gateway.

Appendix B. Red Hat Hyper-converaged Infrastructure for Cloud undercloud configuration parameters

local_ip
The IP address defined for the director’s provisioning network. This is also the IP address the director uses for its DHCP and PXE boot services.
network_gateway
The gateway for the overcloud instances. This is the undercloud node, which forwards traffic to the external network.
undercloud_public_vip
The IP address defined for the director’s Public API. Use an IP address on the provisioning network that does not conflict with any other IP addresses or address ranges. The director configuration attaches this IP address to its software bridge as a routed IP address, which uses the /32 netmask.
undercloud_admin_vip
The IP address defined for the director’s Admin API. Use an IP address on the provisioning network that does not conflict with any other IP addresses or address ranges. The director configuration attaches this IP address to its software bridge as a routed IP address, which uses the /32 netmask.
local_interface
The chosen interface for the director’s provisioning NIC. This is also the device the director uses for its DHCP and PXE boot services. The configuration script attaches this interface to a custom bridge defined with the inspection_interface parameter.
network_cidr
The network that the director uses to manage overcloud instances. This is the provisioning network, which the undercloud’s neutron service manages.
masquerade_network
Defines the network that will masquerade for external access. This provides the provisioning network with a degree of network address translation (NAT), so that it has external access through the director.
dhcp_start
The start of the DHCP allocation range for overcloud nodes. Ensure this range contains enough IP addresses to allocate to all nodes.
dhcp_end
The end of the DHCP allocation range for overcloud nodes. Ensure this range contains enough IP addresses to allocate to all nodes.
inspection_interface
The bridge the director uses for node introspection. This is custom bridge that the director configuration creates. The local_interface attaches to this bridge. Leave this as the default, br-ctlplane.
inspection_iprange
A range of IP address that the director’s introspection service uses during the PXE boot and provisioning process. Use comma-separated values to define the start and end of this range. Verify this range contains enough IP addresses for the nodes and does not conflict with the range for dhcp_start and dhcp_end.
inspection_extras
Defines whether to enable extra hardware collection during the inspection process. Requires python-hardware or python-hardware-detect package on the introspection image.
inspection_runbench
Runs a set of benchmarks during node introspection. Set to true to enable. This option is necessary if you intend to perform benchmark analysis when inspecting the hardware of registered nodes.
inspection_enable_uefi
Defines whether to support introspection of nodes with UEFI-only firmware.

Appendix C. Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud - Nova memory and CPU calculator script source

This is the Python source code for the nova_mem_cpu_calc.py script.

#!/usr/bin/env python
# Filename:                nova_mem_cpu_calc.py
# Supported Langauge(s):   Python 2.7.x
# Time-stamp:              <2017-03-10 20:31:18 jfulton>
# -------------------------------------------------------
# This program was originally written by Ben England
# -------------------------------------------------------
# Calculates cpu_allocation_ratio and reserved_host_memory
# for nova.conf based on on the following inputs:
#
# input command line parameters:
# 1 - total host RAM in GB
# 2 - total host cores
# 3 - Ceph OSDs per server
# 4 - average guest size in GB
# 5 - average guest CPU utilization (0.0 to 1.0)
#
# It assumes that we want to allow 3 GB per OSD
# (based on prior Ceph Hammer testing)
# and that we want to allow an extra 1/2 GB per Nova (KVM guest)
# based on test observations that KVM guests' virtual memory footprint
# was actually significantly bigger than the declared guest memory size
# This is more of a factor for small guests than for large guests.
# -------------------------------------------------------
import sys
from sys import argv

NOTOK = 1  # process exit status signifying failure
MB_per_GB = 1000

GB_per_OSD = 3
GB_overhead_per_guest = 0.5  # based on measurement in test environment
cores_per_OSD = 1.0  # may be a little low in I/O intensive workloads

def usage(msg):
  print msg
  print(
    ("Usage: %s Total-host-RAM-GB Total-host-cores OSDs-per-server " +
     "Avg-guest-size-GB Avg-guest-CPU-util") % sys.argv[0])
  sys.exit(NOTOK)

if len(argv) < 5: usage("Too few command line params")
try:
  mem = int(argv[1])
  cores = int(argv[2])
  osds = int(argv[3])
  average_guest_size = int(argv[4])
  average_guest_util = float(argv[5])
except ValueError:
  usage("Non-integer input parameter")

average_guest_util_percent = 100 * average_guest_util

# print inputs
print "Inputs:"
print "- Total host RAM in GB: %d" % mem
print "- Total host cores: %d" % cores
print "- Ceph OSDs per host: %d" % osds
print "- Average guest memory size in GB: %d" % average_guest_size
print "- Average guest CPU utilization: %.0f%%" % average_guest_util_percent

# calculate operating parameters based on memory constraints only
left_over_mem = mem - (GB_per_OSD * osds)
number_of_guests = int(left_over_mem /
                       (average_guest_size + GB_overhead_per_guest))
nova_reserved_mem_MB = MB_per_GB * (
                        (GB_per_OSD * osds) +
                        (number_of_guests * GB_overhead_per_guest))
nonceph_cores = cores - (cores_per_OSD * osds)
guest_vCPUs = nonceph_cores / average_guest_util
cpu_allocation_ratio = guest_vCPUs / cores

# display outputs including how to tune Nova reserved mem

print "\nResults:"
print "- number of guests allowed based on memory = %d" % number_of_guests
print "- number of guest vCPUs allowed = %d" % int(guest_vCPUs)
print "- nova.conf reserved_host_memory = %d MB" % nova_reserved_mem_MB
print "- nova.conf cpu_allocation_ratio = %f" % cpu_allocation_ratio

if nova_reserved_mem_MB > (MB_per_GB * mem * 0.8):
    print "ERROR: you do not have enough memory to run hyperconverged!"
    sys.exit(NOTOK)

if cpu_allocation_ratio < 0.5:
    print "WARNING: you may not have enough CPU to run hyperconverged!"

if cpu_allocation_ratio > 16.0:
    print(
        "WARNING: do not increase VCPU overcommit ratio " +
        "beyond OSP8 default of 16:1")
    sys.exit(NOTOK)

print "\nCompare \"guest vCPUs allowed\" to \"guests allowed based on memory\" for actual guest count"

Appendix D. Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud - example network.yaml file

Example

resource_registry:
  OS::TripleO::OsdCompute::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/compute-nics.yaml
  OS::TripleO::Controller::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/controller-nics.yaml

parameter_defaults:
  NeutronBridgeMappings: 'datacentre:br-ex,tenant:br-tenant'
  NeutronNetworkType: 'vxlan'
  NeutronTunnelType: 'vxlan'
  NeutronExternalNetworkBridge: "''"

  # Internal API used for private OpenStack Traffic
  InternalApiNetCidr: 192.168.2.0/24
  InternalApiAllocationPools: [{'start': '192.168.2.10', 'end': '192.168.2.200'}]
  InternalApiNetworkVlanID: 4049

  # Tenant Network Traffic - will be used for VXLAN over VLAN
  TenantNetCidr: 192.168.3.0/24
  TenantAllocationPools: [{'start': '192.168.3.10', 'end': '192.168.3.200'}]
  TenantNetworkVlanID: 4050

  # Public Storage Access - Nova/Glance <--> Ceph
  StorageNetCidr: 172.16.1.0/24
  StorageAllocationPools: [{'start': '172.16.1.10', 'end': '172.16.1.200'}]
  StorageNetworkVlanID: 4046

  # Private Storage Access - Ceph background cluster/replication
  StorageMgmtNetCidr: 172.16.2.0/24
  StorageMgmtAllocationPools: [{'start': '172.16.2.10', 'end': '172.16.2.200'}]
  StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID: 4047

  # External Networking Access - Public API Access

  ExternalNetCidr: 10.19.137.0/21
  # Leave room for floating IPs in the External allocation pool (if required)
  ExternalAllocationPools: [{'start': '10.19.139.37', 'end': '10.19.139.48'}]
  # Set to the router gateway on the external network
  ExternalInterfaceDefaultRoute: 10.19.143.254

  # Gateway router for the provisioning network (or Undercloud IP)
  ControlPlaneDefaultRoute: 192.168.1.1
  # The IP address of the EC2 metadata server. Generally the IP of the Undercloud
  EC2MetadataIp: 192.168.1.1
  # Define the DNS servers (maximum 2) for the overcloud nodes
  DnsServers: ["10.19.143.247","10.19.143.248"]

Appendix E. Tuning the Nova reserved memory and CPU allocation manually

Tuning the Nova environment for the planned workload can be a trial and error process. Red Hat recommends starting will a calculated base set of defaults and tune from there.

By tuning the reserved_host_memory_mb and cpu_allocation_ratio parameters, you can maximize the number of possible guests for the workload. Also, by fine tuning these values you can find the desired trade off between determinism and guest-hosting capacity for the workload.

Tuning Nova reserved memory

Nova’s reserved_host_memory_mb parameter is the amount of memory, in megabytes (MB), to reserve for the node. Keep in mind, that on a hyper-converged Compute/OSD nodes, the memory must be shared between the two services, as not to starve either service of their required resources.

The following is an example of how to determine the reserved_host_memory_mb value for a hyper-converged node. Given a node with 256GB of RAM and 10 OSDs, assuming that each OSD consumes 3GB of RAM, that is 30GB of RAM for Ceph, and leaving 226GB of RAM for Nova Compute. If the average guest each uses 2GB of RAM, then the overall system could host 113 guest machines. However, there is the additional overhead for each guest machine running on the hypervisor that you must account for. Assuming this overhead is 500MB, the maximum number of 2GB guest machines that could be ran would be approximately 90.

Here is the mathematical formulas:

Approximate Number of Guest Machines = ( Memory Available for Nova in GB / ( Memory per Guest Machine in GB + Hypervisor Memory Overhead in GB ) )

Example

90.4 = ( 226 / ( 2 + .5 ) )

Given the approximate number of guest machines and the number of OSDs, the amount of memory to reserve for Nova can be calculated.

Nova Reserved Memory in MB = 1000 * ( ( OSD Memory Size in GB * Number of OSDs ) + ( Approximate Number of Guest Machines * Hypervisor Memory Overhead in GB ) )

Example

75000 = 1000 * ( ( 3 * 10 ) + ( 90 * .5 ) )

Thus, reserved_host_memory_mb would equal 75000. The parameter value must be in megabytes (MB).

Tuning CPU allocation ratio

Nova’s cpu_allocation_ratio parameter is used by the Nova scheduler when choosing which compute nodes to run the guest machines. If the ratio of guest machines to compute nodes is 16:1, and the number of cores (vCPUs) on a node is 56, then the Nova scheduler may schedule enough guests to consume 896 cores, before it considers the node is unable to handle any more guest machines. The reason is because, the Nova scheduler does not take into account the CPU needs of the Ceph OSD services running on the same node as the Nova scheduler. Modifying the cpu_allocation_ratio parameter allows Ceph to have the CPU resources it needs to operate effectively without those CPU resources being given to Nova Compute.

The following is an example of how to determine the cpu_allocation_ratio value for a hyper-converged node. Given a node has 56 cores and 10 OSDs, and assuming that one core is used by each OSD, that leaves 46 cores for Nova. If each guest machine utilizes 100% of its core, then the number of available cores for guest machines is divided by the total number of cores on the node. In this scenario, the cpu_allocation_ratio value is 0.821429.

However, because guest machines do not typically utilize 100% of their cores, the ratio must take into account an anticipated utilization percentage when determining the number of cores per guest machine. In a scenario, where you only anticipate on average, 10% core utilization per guest machine, the cpu_allocation_ratio value must be 8.214286.

Here is the mathematical formulas:

  1. Number of Non Ceph Cores = Total Number of Cores on the Node - ( Number of Cores per OSD * Number of OSDs)
  2. Number of Guest Machine vCPUs = Number of Non Ceph Cores / Average Guest Machine CPU Utilization
  3. CPU Allocation Ratio = Number of Guest Machine vCPUs / Total Number of Cores on the Node

Example

  1. 46 = 56 - ( 1 * 10 )
  2. 460 = 46 / .1
  3. 8.214286 = 460 / 56

Nova memory and CPU calculator

Red Hat provides a calculator script to do all these calculations for you. The script name is nova_mem_cpu_calc.py, and takes 5 input parameters:

nova_mem_cpu_calc.py TOTAL_NODE_RAM_GB TOTAL_NODE_CORES NUM_OSDs_PER_NODE AVG_GUEST_MEM_SIZE_GB AVG_GUEST_CPU_UTIL
Replace…​
  • TOTAL_NODE_RAM_GB with the total size of RAM in GB on the node.
  • TOTAL_NODE_CORES with the total number of cores on the node.
  • NUM_OSDs_PER_NODE with the number of Ceph OSDs per node.
  • AVG_GUEST_MEM_SIZE_GB with the average memory size in GB for the guest machine.
  • AVG_GUEST_CPU_UTIL with the average CPU utilization, expressed as a decimal, for the guest machine.

Example

[stack@director ~]$ ./nova_mem_cpu_calc.py 256 56 10 2 0.1

Additional Resources

  • See the appendix for the full source code of the nova_mem_cpu_calc.py script.

Appendix F. Changing Nova reserved memory and CPU allocation manually

Creating a custom template to overwrite the reserved_host_memory_mb and cpu_allocation_ratio default values.

Prerequisites

  • Deploy the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director (RHOSP-d), also known as the undercloud.
  • Create a Directory for Custom Templates.

Procedure

Do the following steps on the RHOSP-d node, as the stack user.

  1. Create the compute.yaml file in the custom templates directory:

    [stack@director ~]$ touch ~/templates/compute.yaml
  2. Open the compute.yaml file for editing.

    1. Add the reserved_host_memory and cpu_allocation_ratio configuration parameters to the ExtraConfig section, under the parameter defaults section:

      parameter_defaults:
        ExtraConfig:
          nova::compute::reserved_host_memory: MEMORY_SIZE_IN_MB
          nova::cpu_allocation_ratio: CPU_RATIO
      Replace…​
      • MEMORY_SIZE_IN_MB with the memory size in megabytes (MB).
      • CPU_RATIO with the ratio decimal value.

        Example

            nova::compute::reserved_host_memory: 75000
            nova::cpu_allocation_ratio: 8.2

        Note

        Red Hat OpenStack Platform director refers to the reserved_host_memory_mb parameter used by Nova as the reserved_host_memory parameter.

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