Chapter 6. Running System Containers

System containers provide a way to containerize services that need to run before the docker daemon is running. They use different technologies than the Docker-formatted containers, ostree for storage, runc for runtime, skopeo for searching and systemd for service management. Previously, such services were provided in the system as packages, or as part of the ostree in Atomic Host. Excluding applications from the Atomic Host system and containerizing them makes the system itself smaller. Red Hat provides the etcd and flannel services as system containers.

Note

To use the system containers on Atomic Host, you need to have the atomic command-line tool version 1.12 or later, along with ostree and runc utilities (all of which are included on the latest version of Atomic Host). To use system containers on RHEL Server systems, you must be running at least RHEL 7.3.3 (because the ostree package was not available on RHEL server until that release).

Because they are not Docker-formatted containers, you do not use the docker command for container management. The atomic command-line tool and systemd are used to pull, install and manage system containers. Here is a brief comparison between how you pull, install and run docker containers and system containers.

  • docker

    1. docker pull rhel7/rsyslog
    2. atomic install rhel7/syslog
    3. atomic run rhel7/rsyslog
  • system containers

    1. atomic pull --storage=ostree rhel7/etcd
    2. atomic install --system [--set=VARIABLE] rhel7/etcd (you will notice this command also runs systemctl start etcd)

The atomic install command supports several options to configure the settings for system containers. The --set option is used to pass variables which you would normally set for this service. These variables are stored in the manifest.json file.

To uninstall a system image, use:

# atomic containers delete rhel7/etcd
# atomic uninstall rhel7/etcd

System containers use runc as runtime, and docker and runc images are stored in different places on the system: /var/lib/containers/atomic/$NAME and /etc/systemd/system/$NAME.service respectively.

Therefore, when you use docker images and docker ps you will only see the Docker-formatted containers. The atomic tool will show all containers on the system:

# atomic containers list -a
  CONTAINER ID IMAGE                COMMAND              CREATED          STATUS    RUNTIME
  etcd         rhel7/etcd           /usr/bin/etcd-env.sh 2016-10-13 14:21 running   runc
  flannel      rhel7/flannel        /usr/bin/flanneld-ru 2016-10-13 15:12 failed    runc
  1cf730472572 rhel7/cockpit-ws     /container/atomic-ru 2016-10-13 17:55 exited    Docker
  9a2bb24e5978 rhel7/rsyslog        /bin/rsyslog.sh      2016-10-13 17:49 created   Docker
  34f95af8f8f9 rhel7/cockpit-ws     /container/atomic-ru 2016-09-27 19:10 exited    Docker

Note that unlike docker containers, where the services are managed by the docker daemon, with system containers you have to manage the dependencies between the services yourself. For example, flannel is a dependency for etcd and when you run flannel, it checks whether etcd is set up (if it is not, flannel will wait).

System containers require root privileges. Because runc requires root, containers also run as the root user.

6.1. Using the etcd System Container Image

6.1.1. Overview

The etcd service provides a highly-available key value store that can be used by applications that need to access and share configuration and service discovery information. Applications that use etcd include Kubernetes, flannel, OpenShift, fleet, vulcand, and locksmith.

The etcd container described here is what is referred to as a system container. A system container is designed to come up before the docker service or in a situation where no docker service is available. In this case, the etcd container can be used to bring up a keystore for the flannel system container, both of which can then be in place to provide networking services before the docker service comes up.

Prior to RHEL Atomic 7.3.2, there were two containerized versions of the etcd services maintained by Red Hat: etcd 2 (etcd container) and etcd 3 (etcd3 container). With 7.3.2, etcd 2 has been deprecated and etcd 3 is the only supported version of etcd. So the only available etcd container is:

  • etcd: This is based on etcd version 3.
Support for etcd

Along with the etcd 3 container, the etcd3 rpm package is also deprecated. Going forward, Red Hat expects to maintain only one version of etcd at a time. For RHEL Atomic 7.3.2, system containers in general and the etcd container specifically in supported as Tech Preview only.

Besides bypassing the docker service, this etcd container can also bypass the docker command and the storage area used to hold docker containers by default. To use the container, you need a combination of commands that include atomic (to pull, list, install, delete and unstall the image), skopeo (to inspect the image), runc (to ultimately run the image) and systemctl to manage the image among your other systemd services.

Here are some of the features of the etcd container:

  • Supports atomic pull: Use the atomic pull command to pull the container to your system.
  • Supports atomic install: Use the atomic install --system command to set up the etcd service to run as a systemd service.
  • Configures the etcd service: When the etcd service starts, a set of ETCD environment variables are exported. Those variables identify the location of the etcd data directory and set the IP addresses and ports the etcd service listens on.
  • System container: After you have used the atomic command to install the etcd container, you can use the systemd systemctl command to manage the service.

6.1.2. Getting and Running the etcd System Container

To use an etcd system container image on a RHEL Atomic system, you need to pull it, install it and enable it. There identity of the currently supported etcd container is:

registry.access.redhat.com/rhel7/etcd

The procedure below illustrates how to pull, install, and run the etcd container.

  1. Pull the etcd container: While logged into the RHEL Atomic system, get the etcd container by running the following command:

    # atomic pull --storage=ostree registry.access.redhat.com/rhel7/etcd
    Image rhel7/etcd is being pulled to ostree ...
    Pulling layer 2bf01635e2a0f7ed3800c8cb3effc5ff46adc6b9b86f0e80743c956371efe553
    Pulling layer 38bd6ce6e1f2271d48ecb41a70a86122060ea91871a154b37d54ec66f593706f
    Pulling layer 852368668be3e36086ae7a47c8b9e40b5ca87819b3200bc83d7a2f95b73f0f12
    Pulling layer e5d06327f2054d371f725243b619d66982c8d4589c1caa19bfcc23a93cf6b4d2
    Pulling layer 82e7326c732857423e13163ff1e41ad63b3e2bddef8809175f89dec25f58b6ee
    Pulling layer b65a93c9f67115dc4c9da8dfeee63b58ec52c6ea58ff7f727b00d932d1f4e8f5

    This pulls the etcd system container from the Red Hat Registry to the ostree storage area on the local system. By setting ostree storage, the docker storage area is not used and the docker daemon and docker command won’t see the pulled etcd container image.

  2. Install the etcd container: Type the following to do a default installation of the etcd container so it is set up as a systemd service.

    Note

    Before running atomic install, refer to "Configuring etcd" to see options you could add to the atomic install command to change it from the default install shown here.

    # atomic install --system rhel7/etcd
    Extracting to /var/lib/containers/atomic/etcd.0
    systemctl daemon-reload
    systemd-tmpfiles --create /etc/tmpfiles.d/etcd.conf
    systemctl enable etcd
  3. Start the etcd service: Use the systemctl command to start the installed etcd service as you would any other systemd service.

    # systemctl start etcd
  4. Check etcd with runc: To make sure the etcd container is running, you can use the runc list command as you would use docker ps to see containers running under docker:

    # runc list
    ID             PID     STATUS   BUNDLE                    CREATED
    etcd    4521    running  /sysroot/ostree/deploy... 2016-10-25T22:58:13.756410403Z
  5. Test that the etcd service is working: You can use the curl command to set and retrieve keys from your etcd service. This example assigns a value to a key called testkey, then retrieves that value:

    # curl -L http://127.0.0.1:2379/v2/keys/testkey -XPUT -d value="testing my etcd"
    {"action":"set","node":{"key":"/testkey","value":"testing my etcd","modifiedIndex":6,"createdIndex":6}}
    # curl -L http://127.0.0.1:2379/v2/keys/testkey
    {"action":"get","node":{"key":"/testkey","value":"testing my etcd","modifiedIndex":6,"createdIndex":6}}

Note that the first action does a set to set the key and the second does a get to return the value of the key.

The "Configuring etcd" section shows ways of setting up the etcd service in different ways.

6.1.3. Configuring etcd

You can change how the etcd service is configured on the atomic install command line or after it is running using the runc command.

6.1.3.1. Configuring etcd during "atomic install"

The correct way to configure the etcd container image is when you first run atomic install. Setting that are defined initially in the /etc/etcd/etcd.conf file inside of the container can be overridden on the atomic install command line using the --set option. For example, this example shows how to reset the value of ETCD_ADVERTISE_CLIENT_URLS value:

# atomic install --system --set ETCD_ADVERTISE_CLIENT_URLS="http://192.168.122.55:2379" rhel/etcd

Here is the list of other values and setting in the etcd.conf file that you can change on the atomic install command line. See the etcd.conf.yaml.sample page for descriptions of these settings.

# [member]
ETCD_NAME=default
ETCD_DATA_DIR="/var/lib/etcd/default.etcd"
#ETCD_WAL_DIR=""
#ETCD_SNAPSHOT_COUNT="10000"
#ETCD_HEARTBEAT_INTERVAL="100"
#ETCD_ELECTION_TIMEOUT="1000"
#ETCD_LISTEN_PEER_URLS="http://localhost:2380"
ETCD_LISTEN_CLIENT_URLS="http://localhost:2379"
#ETCD_MAX_SNAPSHOTS="5"
#ETCD_MAX_WALS="5"
#ETCD_CORS=""
#[cluster]
#ETCD_INITIAL_ADVERTISE_PEER_URLS="http://localhost:2380"
# if you use different ETCD_NAME (e.g. test), set ETCD_INITIAL_CLUSTER value for this name, i.e. "test=http://..."
#ETCD_INITIAL_CLUSTER="default=http://localhost:2380"
#ETCD_INITIAL_CLUSTER_STATE="new"
#ETCD_INITIAL_CLUSTER_TOKEN="etcd-cluster"
ETCD_ADVERTISE_CLIENT_URLS="http://localhost:2379"
#ETCD_DISCOVERY=""
#ETCD_DISCOVERY_SRV=""
#ETCD_DISCOVERY_FALLBACK="proxy"
#ETCD_DISCOVERY_PROXY=""
#ETCD_STRICT_RECONFIG_CHECK="false"
#[proxy]
#ETCD_PROXY="off"
#ETCD_PROXY_FAILURE_WAIT="5000"
#ETCD_PROXY_REFRESH_INTERVAL="30000"
#ETCD_PROXY_DIAL_TIMEOUT="1000"
#ETCD_PROXY_WRITE_TIMEOUT="5000"
#ETCD_PROXY_READ_TIMEOUT="0"
#[security]
#ETCD_CERT_FILE=""
#ETCD_KEY_FILE=""
#ETCD_CLIENT_CERT_AUTH="false"
#ETCD_TRUSTED_CA_FILE=""
#ETCD_PEER_CERT_FILE=""
#ETCD_PEER_KEY_FILE=""
#ETCD_PEER_CLIENT_CERT_AUTH="false"
#ETCD_PEER_TRUSTED_CA_FILE=""
#[logging]
#ETCD_DEBUG="false"
# examples for -log-package-levels etcdserver=WARNING,security=DEBUG
#ETCD_LOG_PACKAGE_LEVELS=""
#[profiling]
#ETCD_ENABLE_PPROF="false"

6.1.3.2. Configuring etcd with "runc"

With the etcd container running, you can configure settings in the etcd container using the runc exec command. For example, you could run the etcdctl command inside the etcd container to change the network range set by the Network value in the etcd keystore (used later by the flannel service) with the following command:

# runc exec etcd etcdctl set /atomic.io/network/config '{"Network":"10.40.0.0/16"}'
# runc exec etcd etcdctl get /atomic.io/network/config
{"Network":"10.40.0.0/16"}

The example just shown illustrates the runc exec command running etcdctl set at first to set the Network value. After that, runc executes the etcdctl get command to get configuration information.

6.1.4. Tips for Running etcd Container

If you are done with the etcd container image, you can remove it with the atomic uninstall command:

# atomic uninstall etcd

For more information on system containers, see Introduction to System Containers.

6.2. Using the flannel System Container Image

6.2.1. Overview

The flannel service was designed to provide virtual subnets for use among container hosts. Using flannel, Kubernetes (or other container platforms) can ensure that each container pod has a unique address that is routable within a Kubernetes cluster. As a result, the job of finding ports and services between containers is simpler.

The flannel container described here is what is referred to as a system container. A system container is designed to come up before the docker service or in a situation where no docker service is available. In this case, the flannel container is meant to be brought up after the etcd service (also available as a system container) and before docker and kubernetes services to provide virtual subnets that the later services can leverage.

Besides bypassing the docker service, the flannel container can also bypass the docker command and the storage area used to hold docker containers by default. To use the container, you need a combination of commands that include atomic (to pull, list, install, delete and unstall the image), skopeo (to inspect the image), runc (to ultimately run the image) and systemctl to manage the image among your other systemd services.

Note

For RHEL 7.3, system containers in general and the flannel container specifically are supported as Tech Preview only.

Here are some of the features of the flannel container:

  • Supports atomic pull: Use the atomic pull --storage=ostree" command to pull the container to the ostree storage area, instead of default docker storage, on your system.
  • Supports atomic install: Use the atomic install --system command to set up the flannel service to run as a systemd service.
  • Configures the flannel service: When the flannel service starts, configuration data are stored for flannel in the etcd keystore. To configure flannel, you can use the runc command to run an etcdctl command to configure flannel settings inside the etcd container.
  • System container: After you have used the atomic command to install the flannel container, you can use the systemd systemctl command to manage the service.

6.2.2. Getting and Running the RHEL flannel System Container

To use the flannel system container image on a RHEL system, you need to pull it, install it and enable it, as described in the following procedure:

  1. Pull and run the etcd container: The flannel container is dependent on there being an available etcd keystore. See Using the etcd System Container Image for information on pulling, installing, and running the etcd system container before setting up the flannel system container.
  2. Pull the flannel container: While logged into the RHEL system, get the RHEL etcd container by running the following command:

    # atomic pull --storage=ostree rhel7/flannel
    Image rhel7/flannel is being pulled to ostree ...
    Pulling layer 2bf01635e2a0f7ed3800c8cb3effc5ff46adc6b9b86f0e80743c956371efe553
    Pulling layer 38bd6ce6e1f2271d48ecb41a70a86122060ea91871a154b37d54ec66f593706f
    ...

    This pulls the flannel system container from the Red Hat registry to the ostree storage area on the local system. By setting ostree storage, the docker storage area is not used and the docker daemon and docker command won’t see the pulled flannel container image.

  3. Install the flannel container: Type the following to do a default installation of the flannel container so it is set up as a systemd service. See "Configuring flannel" to see options you could add to the atomic install command to change it from the default install shown here.

    # atomic install --system rhel7/flannel
    Extracting to /var/lib/containers/atomic/flannel.0
    systemctl daemon-reload
    systemd-tmpfiles --create /etc/tmpfiles.d/flannel.conf
    systemctl enable flannel
  4. Start the flannel service: Use the systemctl command to start the installed etcd service as you would any other systemd service.

    # systemctl start flannel
  5. Check etcd and flannel with runc: To make sure the flannel and etcd containers are running, you can use the runc list command as you would use docker ps to see containers running under docker:

    # runc list
    ID      PID     STATUS   BUNDLE                    CREATED
    etcd    4521    running  /sysroot/ostree/deploy... 2016-10-25T22:58:13.756410403Z
    flannel 6562    running  /sysroot/ostree/deploy... 2016-10-26T13:50:49.041148994Z
  6. Test that the flannel service is working: If the flannel service is working properly, the next time you start up the docker0 network interface, the docker network interface should pick up an address range from those assigned by flannel. After starting flannel and before restarting docker, run these commands:

    # ip a | grep docker | grep inet
        inet 172.17.0.1/16 scope global docker0
    # systemctl reboot
    # ip a | grep docker | grep inet
        inet 10.40.4.1/24 scope global docker0

Note that the docker0 interface picks up an address in the address range assigned by flannel and will, going forward, assign containers to addresses in the 10.40.4.0/24 address range.

The "Configuring flannel" section shows ways of setting up the etcd service in different ways.

6.2.3. Configuring flannel

You can change how the flannel service is configured on the atomic install command line or after it is running using the runc command.

6.2.3.1. Configuring etcd during "atomic install"

Environment variables that that are defined initially when the flannel container starts up can be overridden on the atomic install command line using the --set option. For example, this example shows how to reset the value of FLANNELD_ETCD_ENDPOINTS:

# atomic install --system --set FLANNELD_ETCD_ENDPOINTS="http://192.168.122.55:2379" rhel7/flannel

This is how two of these variables are set by default:

  • FLANNELD_ETCD_ENDPOINTS=http://127.0.0.1:2379: Identifies the location of the etcd service IP address and port number.
  • FLANNELD_ETCD_PREFIX=/atomic.io/network: Identifies the location of flannel values in the etcd keystore.

Here is the list of other values that you can change on the atomic install command line. See the Key Command Line Options and Environment Variables sections of the Flannel Github page for descriptions of these settings.

* *FLANNELD_PUBLIC_IP*
* *FLANNELD_ETCD_ENDPOINTS*
* *FLANNELD_ETCD_PREFIX*
* *FLANNELD_ETCD_KEYFILE*
* *FLANNELD_ETCD_CERTFILE*
* *FLANNELD_ETCD_CAFILE*
* *FLANNELD_IFACE*
* *FLANNELD_SUBNET_FILE*
* *FLANNELD_IP_MASQ*
* *FLANNELD_LISTEN*
* *FLANNELD_REMOTE*
* *FLANNELD_REMOTE_KEYFILE*
* *FLANNELD_REMOTE_CERTFILE*
* *FLANNELD_REMOTE_CAFILE*
* *FLANNELD_NETWORKS*

6.2.3.2. Configuring flannel with "runc"

Flannel settings that are stored in the etcd keystore can be changed by executing etcdctl commands in the etcd container. Here’s an example of how to change the Network value in the etcd keystore so that flannel uses a different set of IP address ranges.

# runc exec etcd etcdctl set /atomic.io/network/config '{"Network":"10.40.0.0/16"}'
# runc exec etcd etcdctl get /atomic.io/network/config
{"Network":"10.40.0.0/16"}

The example just shown illustrates the runc exec command running etcdctl set at first to set the Network value. After that, runc executes the etcdctl get command to get configuration information.

6.2.4. Tips for Running flannel Container

If you are done with the flannel container image, you can remove it with the atomic uninstall command:

# atomic uninstall flannel

For more information on system containers, see Introduction to System Containers.

6.3. Using the ovirt-guest-agent System Container Image for Red Hat Virtualization

6.3.1. Overview

The ovirt-guest-agent container launches the Red Hat Virtualization (RHV) management agent. This container is made to be deployed on Red Hat Enterprise Linux virtual machines that are running in a RHV environment. The agent provides an interface to the RHV manager that supplies heart-beat and other run-time data from inside the guest VM. The RHV manager can send control commands to shutdown, restart and otherwise change the state of the virtual machine through the agent.

The overt-guest-agent is added automatically to the Red Hat Atomic Image for RHV, which is an OVA-formatted image made for RHEV environments. You can download the image from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host download page. Or, you can get and run the container image manually on a RHEL Server or RHEL Atomic Host virtual machine you install yourself.

The ovirt-guest-agent container is a system container. System containers are designed to come up before the docker service or in a situation where no docker service is available. In this case, the ovirt-guest-agent allows the RHV manager to change the state of the virtual machine on which it is running whether the docker service is running or not.

Here are some of the features of the ovirt-guest-agent container:

  • Supports atomic pull: Use the atomic pull command to pull the ovirt-guest-agent container to your system.
  • Supports atomic install: Use the atomic install --system command to set up the ovirt-guest-agent service to run as a systemd service.
  • System container: After you have used the atomic command to install the ovirt-guest-agent container, you can use the systemd systemctl command to manage the service.

Note that the ovirt-guest-agent container image is not made to run in environments other than a RHEL or RHEL Atomic virtual machine in a RHV environment.

6.3.2. Getting and Running the ovirt-guest-agent System Container

To use an ovirt-guest-agent system container image on a RHEL Server or RHEL Atomic system, you need to pull it, install it and enable it. The identity of the currently supported ovirt-guest-agent container is:

registry.access.redhat.com/rhev4/ovirt-guest-agent

The procedure below illustrates how to pull, install, and run the ovirt-guest-agent container.

  1. Pull the ovirt-guest-agent container: While logged into the RHEL or RHEL Atomic system, get the ovirt-guest-agent container by running the following command:

    # atomic pull --storage=ostree registry.access.redhat.com/rhev4/ovirt-guest-agent

    This pulls the ovirt-guest-agent system container from the Red Hat Registry to the ostree storage area on the local system. By setting ostree storage, the docker storage area is not used and the docker daemon and docker command won’t see the pulled ovirt-guest-agent container image.

  2. Install the ovirt-guest-agent container: Type the following to do a default installation of the ovirt-guest-agent container so it is set up as a systemd service.

    # atomic install --system rhel7/ovirt-guest-agent
    Extracting to /var/lib/containers/atomic/ovirt-guest-agent.0
    systemctl daemon-reload
    systemd-tmpfiles --create /etc/tmpfiles.d/ovirt-guest-agent.conf
    systemctl enable ovirt-guest-agent
  3. Start the ovirt-guest-agent service: Use the systemctl command to start and enable the installed ovirt-guest-agent service as you would any other systemd service.

    # systemctl start ovirt-guest-agent
    # systemctl enable ovirt-guest-agent
  4. Check ovirt-guest-agent with runc: To make sure the ovirt-guest-agent container is running, you can use the runc list command as you would use docker ps to see containers running under docker:

    # runc list
    ID                   PID     STATUS   BUNDLE                CREATED
    ovirt-guest-agent    4521    running  /sysroot/ostree/de... 2017-04-07T21:01:07.279104535Z

6.3.3. Removing the ovirt-guest-agent Container and Image

If you are done with the ovirt-guest-agent container image, you can stop and remove the container, then uninstall the image:

# atomic containers delete ovirt-guest-agent
Do you wish to delete the following images?

   ID           NAME                 IMAGE_NAME                 STORAGE
   ovirt-guest- ovirt-guest-agent    registry.access.redhat.com ostree

Confirm (y/N) y
systemctl stop ovirt-guest-agent
systemctl disable ovirt-guest-agent
systemd-tmpfiles --remove /etc/tmpfiles.d/ovirt-guest-agent.conf
# atomic uninstall registry.access.redhat.com/rhev4/ovirt-guest-agent
Do you wish to delete the following images?

   IMAGE                                                STORAGE
   registry.access.redhat.com/rhev4/ovirt-guest-agent   ostree
Confirm (y/N) y

For more information on system containers, see Introduction to System Containers.

6.4. Using the open-vm-tools System Container Image for VMware

6.4.1. Overview

The open-vm-tools container provides services and modules that allow VMware technology to manage and otherwise work with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and RHEL Atomic Host virtual machines running in VMware environments. Kernel modules included in this container are made to improve performance of RHEL systems running as VMware guests. Services provided by this container include:

  • Graceful power operations
  • Script execution on guests during power operations
  • Enhanced guest automation via custom programs or file system operations
  • Guest authentication
  • Guest network, memory, and disk usage information collection
  • Guest heartbeat generation, used to determine if guests are available
  • Guest, host, and client desktop clock synchronization
  • Host access to obtain file-system-consistent guest file system snapshots
  • Guest script execution associated with quiescing guest file systems (pre-freeze and post-thaw)
  • Guest customization opportunities after guests power up
  • File folder sharing between VMware (Workstation or Fusion) and guest system
  • Text, graphics, and file pasting between guests, hosts and client desktops

The open-vm-tools container is a system container, designed to come up before the docker service or in a situation where no docker service is available. In this case, the open-vm-tools container allows VMware technologies to manage the RHEL or RHEL Atomic virtual machines on which it is running whether the docker service is running or not.

Here are some of the features of the open-vm-tools container on the RHEL guest system:

  • Supports atomic pull: Use the atomic pull command to pull the open-vm-tools container to your system.
  • Supports atomic install: Use the atomic install --system command to set up the open-vm-tools service to run as a systemd service.
  • System container: After you have used the atomic command to install the open-vm-tools container, you can use the systemd systemctl command to manage the service.

Note that the open-vm-tools container image is not made to run in environments other than a RHEL or RHEL Atomic virtual machine in a VMware environment.

6.4.2. Getting and Running the open-vm-tools System Container

To use an open-vm-tools system container image on a RHEL Server or RHEL Atomic system, you need to pull it, install it and enable it. The identity of the currently supported open-vm-tools container is:

registry.access.redhat.com/rhel7/open-vm-tools

The procedure below illustrates how to pull, install, and run the open-vm-tools container.

  1. Pull the open-vm-tools container: While logged into the RHEL or RHEL Atomic system, get the open-vm-tools container by running the following command:

    # atomic pull --storage=ostree registry.access.redhat.com/rhel7/open-vm-tools

    This pulls the open-vm-tools system container from the Red Hat Registry to the ostree storage area on the local system. By setting ostree storage, the docker storage area is not used and the docker daemon and docker command won’t see the pulled open-vm-tools container image.

  2. Install the open-vm-tools container: Type the following to do a default installation of the open-vm-tools container so it is set up as a systemd service.

    # atomic install --system rhel7/open-vm-tools
    Extracting to /var/lib/containers/atomic/open-vm-tools.0
    systemctl daemon-reload
    systemd-tmpfiles --create /etc/tmpfiles.d/open-vm-tools.conf
    systemctl enable open-vm-tools
  3. Start the open-vm-tools service: Use the systemctl command to start and enable the installed open-vm-tools service as you would any other systemd service.

    # systemctl start open-vm-tools
    # systemctl enable open-vm-tools
  4. Check open-vm-tools with runc: To make sure the open-vm-tools container is running, you can use the runc list command as you would use docker ps to see containers running under docker:

    # runc list
    ID               PID     STATUS   BUNDLE                CREATED
    open-vm-tools    4521    running  /sysroot/ostree/de... 2017-04-07T18:03:01.913246491Z

6.4.3. Removing the open-vm-tools Container and Image

If you are done with the open-vm-tools container image, you can stop and remove the container, then uninstall the image:

# atomic containers delete open-vm-tools
Do you wish to delete the following images?

   ID           NAME                 IMAGE_NAME                 STORAGE
   ovirt-guest- open-vm-tools    registry.access.redhat.com ostree

Confirm (y/N) y
systemctl stop open-vm-tools
systemctl disable open-vm-tools
systemd-tmpfiles --remove /etc/tmpfiles.d/open-vm-tools.conf
# atomic uninstall registry.access.redhat.com/rhel7/open-vm-tools
Do you wish to delete the following images?

   IMAGE                                                STORAGE
   registry.access.redhat.com/rhel7/open-vm-tools   ostree
Confirm (y/N) y

To learn more about how the open-vm-tools container was built, refer to Containerizing open-vm-tools. Using the instructions in that article allows you to build your own open-vm-tools container, using custom configuration settings. For more information on system containers, see Introduction to System Containers.