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Managing IdM users, groups, hosts, and access control rules

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9

Configuring users and hosts, managing them in groups, and controlling access with host-based (HBAC) and role-based access control (RBAC) rules

Red Hat Customer Content Services

Abstract

This documentation collection provides instructions on creating users, groups, and hosts in Identity Management on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, and managing access to those hosts via HBAC and RBAC rules.

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Chapter 1. Introduction to the IdM command-line utilities

The following sections describe the basics of using the Identity Management (IdM) command-line utilities.

Prerequisites

1.1. What is the IPA command line interface

The IPA command line interface (CLI) is the basic command-line interface for Identity Management (IdM) administration.

It supports a lot of subcommands that are used to manage IdM, such as the ipa user-add command to add a new user.

IPA CLI allows you to:

  • Add, manage, or remove users, groups, hosts and other objects in the network.
  • Manage certificates.
  • Search entries.
  • Display and list objects.
  • Set access rights.
  • Get help with the correct command syntax.

1.2. What is the IPA help

The IPA help is a built-in documentation system for the IdM server.

IPA command line interface (CLI) generates available help topics from loaded IdM plugin modules. If you want to run the IPA help successfully, you need to:

  • Have an IdM server installed and running.
  • Be authenticated with a valid Kerberos ticket.

Executing the ipa help command without options displays information about basic help usage and the most common command examples.

Executing help with options has the following syntax:

$ ipa help [TOPIC | COMMAND | topics | commands]
  • [] — Brackets mean that all parameters are optional and you can write just ipa help and the command will be executed.
  • | — The pipe character means or. Therefore, you can use TOPIC or COMMAND or topics or commands with the basic ipa help command.
  • topics — You can run the command ipa help topics and it will execute correctly. The command displays a list of topics that are covered by IPA help, for example, user, cert, server and many others.
  • TOPIC — The TOPIC with capital letters means variable, therefore, you can use the particular topic, for example, ipa help user
  • commands — You can run the command ipa help commands and it will execute correctly. The command displays a list of commands which are covered by the IPA help, for example, user-add, ca-enable, server-show and many others.
  • COMMAND — The COMMAND with capital letters means variable, therefore, you can use the particular command, for example, ipa help user-add

1.3. Using IPA help topics

The following procedure helps you to understand using the IPA help in the command line interface.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter ipa help topics to display a list of topics covered by help.

    $ ipa help topics
  3. Select one of the topics and create a command according to the following pattern: ipa help [topic_name], instead of the topic_name string, add one of the topics you listed in the previous step.

    In the example, we use the following topic: user

    $ ipa help user
  4. If the IPA help command is too long and you cannot see the whole text, use the following syntax:

    $ ipa help user | less

    You can then scroll down and read the whole help.

The IPA CLI displays a help page for the user topic. After reading the overview, you can see many examples with patterns for working with topic commands.

1.4. Using IPA help commands

The following procedure helps you to understand creating the IPA help commands in the command line interface.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter ipa help commands to display a list of commands covered by help.

    $ ipa help commands
  3. Select one of the commands and create a help command according to the following pattern: ipa help <COMMAND>, instead of the <COMMAND> string, add one of the commands you listed in the previous step.

    $ ipa help user-add

Additional resources

  • The ipa man page.

1.5. Structure of IPA commands

The IPA CLI distinguishes the following types of commands:

  • Built-in commands — Built-in commands are all available in the IdM server.
  • Plug-in provided commands

Structure of IPA commands allows you to manage various types of objects. For example:

  • Users,
  • Hosts,
  • DNS records,
  • Certificates,

and many others.

For most of these objects, the IPA CLI includes commands to:

  • Add (add)
  • Modify (mod)
  • Delete (del)
  • Search (find)
  • Display (show)

Commands have the following structure:

ipa user-add, ipa user-mod, ipa user-del, ipa user-find, ipa user-show

ipa host-add, ipa host-mod, ipa host-del, ipa host-find, ipa host-show

ipa dnsrecord-add, ipa dnsrecord-mod, ipa dnsrecord-del, ipa dnsrecord-find, ipa dnrecord-show

You can create a user with the ipa user-add [options], where [options] are optional. If you use just the ipa user-add command, the script asks you for details one by one.

To change an existing object, you need to define the object, therefore the command includes also object: ipa user-mod USER_NAME [options].

1.6. Using an IPA command to add a user account to IdM

The following describes adding a new user to the Identity Management (IdM) database using command line.

Prerequisites

  • You need to have administrator privileges to add user accounts to the IdM server.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter the command for adding a new user:

    $ ipa user-add

    The command runs a script where you can add basic data necessary for creating a user account.

  3. In the First name: field, enter the first name of the new user and press the Enter key.
  4. In the Last name: field, enter the last name of the new user and press the Enter key.
  5. In the User login [suggested user name]: enter the user name or just press the Enter key if the suggested user name works for you.

    User name must be unique for the whole IdM database. If an error occurs, that the user already exists, you need to start from the beginning with the ipa user-add command and try a different user name.

After you successfully added the user name, the user account has been added to the IdM database and the IPA command line interface (CLI) prints on the output the following log:

----------------------
Added user "euser"
----------------------
User login: euser
First name: Example
Last name: User
Full name: Example User
Display name: Example User
Initials: EU
Home directory: /home/euser
GECOS: Example User
Login shell: /bin/sh
Principal name: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Principal alias: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Email address: euser@idm.example.com
UID: 427200006
GID: 427200006
Password: False
Member of groups: ipausers
Kerberos keys available: False

As you can see, a user password is not set to the user account. If you want to add also password, use the ipa user-add command in the following syntax:

$ ipa user-add --first=Example --last=User --password

The IPA CLI then asks you for adding or confirming a user name and password.

If the user has been already created, you can add only the password with the ipa user-mod command.

Additional resources

  • Run the ipa help user-add command for more information about parameters.

1.7. Using an IPA command to modify a user account in IdM

You can change many parameters for each user account. For example, you can add a new password to the user.

Basic command syntax is different from the user-add syntax because you need to define the existing user account for which you want to perform changes, for example, add a password.

Prerequisites

  • You need to have administrator privileges to modify user accounts in the IdM server.

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Enter the command for adding a password:

    $ ipa user-mod euser --password

    The command runs a script where you can add the new password.

  3. Enter the new password and press the Enter key.

After you successfully added the user name, the user account has been added to the IdM database and the IPA CLI prints on the output the following log:

----------------------
Modified user "euser"
----------------------
User login: euser
First name: Example
Last name: User
Home directory: /home/euser
Principal name: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Principal alias: euser@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
Email address: euser@idm.example.com
UID: 427200006
GID: 427200006
Password: True
Member of groups: ipausers
Kerberos keys available: True

The user password is now set for the account and the user can log into IdM.

Additional resources

  • Run the ipa help user-mod command for more information about parameters.

1.8. How to supply a list of values to the IdM utilities

Identity Management (IdM) stores values for multi-valued attributes in lists.

IdM supports the following methods of supplying multi-valued lists:

  • Using the same command-line argument multiple times within the same command invocation:

    $ ipa permission-add --right=read --permissions=write --permissions=delete ...
  • Alternatively, you can enclose the list in curly braces, in which case the shell performs the expansion:

    $ ipa permission-add --right={read,write,delete} ...

Examples above show a command permission-add which adds permissions to an object. The object is not mentioned in the example. Instead of …​ you need to add the object for which you want to add permissions.

When you update such multi-valued attributes from the command line, IdM completely overwrites the previous list of values with a new list. Therefore, when updating a multi-valued attribute, you must specify the whole new list, not just a single value you want to add.

In the command above, the list of permissions includes reading, writing and deleting. When you decide to update the list with the permission-mod command, you must add all values, otherwise those not mentioned will be deleted.

Example 1: — The ipa permission-mod command updates all previously added permissions.

$ ipa permission-mod --right=read --right=write --right=delete ...

or

$ ipa permission-mod --right={read,write,delete} ...

Example 2 — The ipa permission-mod command deletes the --right=delete argument because it is not included in the command:

$ ipa permission-mod --right=read --right=write ...

or

$ ipa permission-mod --right={read,write} ...

1.9. How to use special characters with the IdM utilities

When passing command-line arguments that include special characters to the ipa commands, escape these characters with a backslash (\). For example, common special characters include angle brackets (< and >), ampersand (&), asterisk (*), or vertical bar (|).

For example, to escape an asterisk (*):

$ ipa certprofile-show certificate_profile --out=exported\*profile.cfg

Commands containing unescaped special characters do not work as expected because the shell cannot properly parse such characters.

Chapter 2. Managing user accounts using the command line

This chapter includes basic description of user life cycle in IdM (Identity Management). The following sections show you how to:

  • Create user accounts
  • Activate stage user accounts
  • Preserve user accounts
  • Delete active, stage, or preserved user accounts
  • Restore preserved user accounts

2.1. User life cycle

Identity Management (IdM) supports three user account states:

  • Stage users are not allowed to authenticate. This is an initial state. Some of the user account properties required for active users cannot be set, for example, group membership.
  • Active users are allowed to authenticate. All required user account properties must be set in this state.
  • Preserved users are former active users that are considered inactive and cannot authenticate to IdM. Preserved users retain most of the account properties they had as active users, but they are not part of any user groups.

A flow chart displaying 4 items: Active users - Stage users - Preserved users - Deleted users. Arrows communicate the relationships between each kind of user: Active users can be "preserved" as Preserved users. Preserved users can be "restored" as Active users. Preserved users can be "staged" as Stage users and Stage users can be "activated" into Active users. All users can be deleted to become "Deleted users".

You can delete user entries permanently from the IdM database.

Important

Deleted user accounts cannot be restored. When you delete a user account, all the information associated with the account is permanently lost.

A new administrator can only be created by a user with administrator rights, such as the default admin user. If you accidentally delete all administrator accounts, the Directory Manager must create a new administrator manually in the Directory Server.

Warning

Do not delete the admin user. As admin is a pre-defined user required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands. If you want to define and use an alternative admin user, disable the pre-defined admin user with ipa user-disable admin after you granted admin permissions to at least one different user.

Warning

Do not add local users to IdM. The Name Service Switch (NSS) always resolves IdM users and groups before resolving local users and groups. This means that, for example, IdM group membership does not work for local users.

2.2. Adding users using the command line

You can add user as:

  • Active — user accounts which can be actively used by their users.
  • Stage — users cannot use these accounts. Use it if you want to prepare new user accounts. When users are ready to use their accounts, then you can activate them.

The following procedure describes adding active users to the IdM server with the ipa user-add command.

Similarly, you can create stage user accounts with the ipa stageuser-add command.

Note

IdM automatically assigns a unique user ID (UID) to the new user accounts. You can also do this manually, however, the server does not validate whether the UID number is unique. Due to this, multiple user entries might have the same ID number assigned. Red Hat recommends to prevent having multiple entries with the same UID.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Add user login, user’s first name, last name and optionally, you can also add their email address.

    $ ipa user-add user_login --first=first_name --last=last_name --email=email_address

    IdM supports user names that can be described by the following regular expression:

    [a-zA-Z0-9_.][a-zA-Z0-9_.-]{0,252}[a-zA-Z0-9_.$-]?
    Note

    User names ending with the trailing dollar sign ($) are supported to enable Samba 3.x machine support.

    If you add a user name containing uppercase characters, IdM automatically converts the name to lowercase when saving it. Therefore, IdM always requires to enter user names in lowercase when logging in. Additionally, it is not possible to add user names which differ only in letter casing, such as user and User.

    The default maximum length for user names is 32 characters. To change it, use the ipa config-mod --maxusername command. For example, to increase the maximum user name length to 64 characters:

    $ ipa config-mod --maxusername=64
     Maximum username length: 64
     ...

    The ipa user-add command includes a lot of parameters. To list them all, use the ipa help command:

    $ ipa help user-add

    For details about ipa help command, see What is the IPA help.

You can verify if the new user account is successfully created by listing all IdM user accounts:

$ ipa user-find

This command lists all user accounts with details.

2.3. Activating users using the command line

To activate a user account by moving it from stage to active, use the ipa stageuser-activate command.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Activate the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa stageuser-activate user_login
    -------------------------
    Stage user user_login activated
    -------------------------
    ...

You can verify if the new user account is successfully created by listing all IdM user accounts:

$ ipa user-find

This command lists all user accounts with details.

2.4. Preserving users using the command line

You can preserve a user account if you want to remove it, but keep the option to restore it later. To preserve a user account, use the --preserve option with the ipa user-del or ipa stageuser-del commands.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Preserve the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa user-del --preserve user_login
    --------------------
    Deleted user "user_login"
    --------------------
    Note

    Despite the output saying the user account was deleted, it has been preserved.

2.5. Deleting users using the command line

IdM (Identity Management) enables you to delete users permanently. You can delete:

  • Active users with the following command: ipa user-del
  • Stage users with the following command: ipa stageuser-del
  • Preserved users with the following command: ipa user-del

When deleting multiple users, use the --continue option to force the command to continue regardless of errors. A summary of the successful and failed operations is printed to the stdout standard output stream when the command completes.

$ ipa user-del --continue user1 user2 user3

If you do not use --continue, the command proceeds with deleting users until it encounters an error, after which it stops and exits.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Delete the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa user-del user_login
    --------------------
    Deleted user "user_login"
    --------------------

The user account has been permanently deleted from IdM.

2.6. Restoring users using the command line

You can restore a preserved users to:

  • Active users: ipa user-undel
  • Stage users: ipa user-stage

Restoring a user account does not restore all of the account’s previous attributes. For example, the user’s password is not restored and must be set again.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open terminal and connect to the IdM server.
  2. Activate the user account with the following command:

    $ ipa user-undel user_login
    ------------------------------
    Undeleted user account "user_login"
    ------------------------------

    Alternatively, you can restore user accounts as staged:

    $ ipa user-stage user_login
    ------------------------------
    Staged user account "user_login"
    ------------------------------

Verification steps

  • You can verify if the new user account is successfully created by listing all IdM user accounts:

    $ ipa user-find

    This command lists all user accounts with details.

Chapter 3. Managing user accounts using the IdM Web UI

Identity Management (IdM) provides several stages that can help you to manage various user work life situations:

Creating a user account

Creating a stage user account before an employee starts their career in your company and be prepared in advance for the day when the employee appears in the office and want to activate the account.

You can omit this step and create the active user account directly. The procedure is similar to creating a stage user account.

Activating a user account
Activating the account the first working day of the employee.
Disabling a user account
If the user go to a parental leave for couple of months, you will need to disable the account temporarily.
Enabling a user account
When the user returns, you will need to re-enable the account.
Preserving a user account
If the user wants to leave the company, you will need to delete the account with a possibility to restore it because people can return to the company after some time.
Restoring a user account
Two years later, the user is back and you need to restore the preserved account.
Deleting a user account
If the employee the employee is dismissed you will delete the account without a backup.

3.1. User life cycle

Identity Management (IdM) supports three user account states:

  • Stage users are not allowed to authenticate. This is an initial state. Some of the user account properties required for active users cannot be set, for example, group membership.
  • Active users are allowed to authenticate. All required user account properties must be set in this state.
  • Preserved users are former active users that are considered inactive and cannot authenticate to IdM. Preserved users retain most of the account properties they had as active users, but they are not part of any user groups.

A flow chart displaying 4 items: Active users - Stage users - Preserved users - Deleted users. Arrows communicate the relationships between each kind of user: Active users can be "preserved" as Preserved users. Preserved users can be "restored" as Active users. Preserved users can be "staged" as Stage users and Stage users can be "activated" into Active users. All users can be deleted to become "Deleted users".

You can delete user entries permanently from the IdM database.

Important

Deleted user accounts cannot be restored. When you delete a user account, all the information associated with the account is permanently lost.

A new administrator can only be created by a user with administrator rights, such as the default admin user. If you accidentally delete all administrator accounts, the Directory Manager must create a new administrator manually in the Directory Server.

Warning

Do not delete the admin user. As admin is a pre-defined user required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands. If you want to define and use an alternative admin user, disable the pre-defined admin user with ipa user-disable admin after you granted admin permissions to at least one different user.

Warning

Do not add local users to IdM. The Name Service Switch (NSS) always resolves IdM users and groups before resolving local users and groups. This means that, for example, IdM group membership does not work for local users.

3.2. Adding users in the Web UI

Usually, you need to create a new user account before a new employee starts to work. Such a stage account is not accessible and you need to activate it later.

Note

Alternatively, you can create an active user account directly. For adding active user, follow the procedure below and add the user account in the Active users tab.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing IdM or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Stage Users tab.

    Alternatively, you can add the user account in the Users → Active users, however, you cannot add user groups to the account.

  3. Click the + Add icon.
  4. In the Add stage user dialog box, enter First name and Last name of the new user.
  5. [Optional] In the User login field, add a login name.

    If you leave it empty, the IdM server creates the login name in the following pattern: The first letter of the first name and the surname. The whole login name can have up to 32 characters.

  6. [Optional] In the GID drop down menu, select groups in which the user should be included.
  7. [Optional] In the Password and Verify password fields, enter your password and confirm it, ensuring they both match.
  8. Click on the Add button.

    Screenshot of the "Add stage user" pop-up window with the "New Password" the "Verify Password" fields filled in. The "Add" button is at the bottom left.

At this point, you can see the user account in the Stage Users table.

Screenshot of the IdM Web UI showing user entries in the Stage Users table. This is selected from the Identity tab - the Users sub-tab - and the Stage users category listed on the left.

Note

If you click on the user name, you can edit advanced settings, such as adding a phone number, address, or occupation.

3.3. Activating stage users in the IdM Web UI

A stage user account must be activated before the user can log in to IdM and before the user can be added to an IdM group. This section describes how to activate stage user accounts.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.
  • At least one staged user account in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Stage users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user account you want to activate.
  4. Click on the Activate button.

    Screenshot of the IdM Web UI showing user entries in the "Stage Users" table. This is selected from the Identity tab - the Users sub-tab - and the Stage users category listed on the left.

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

If the activation is successful, the IdM Web UI displays a green confirmation that the user has been activated and the user account has been moved to Active users. The account is active and the user can authenticate to the IdM domain and IdM Web UI. The user is prompted to change their password on the first login.

Screenshot of the IdM Web UI showing the "staged.user" user entry in the "Active Users" table. Its status is "enabled."

Note

At this stage, you can add the active user account to user groups.

3.4. Disabling user accounts in the Web UI

You can disable active user accounts. Disabling a user account deactivates the account, therefore, user accounts cannot be used to authenticate and using IdM services, such as Kerberos, or perform any tasks.

Disabled user accounts still exist within IdM and all of the associated information remains unchanged. Unlike preserved user accounts, disabled user accounts remain in the active state and can be a member of user groups.

Note

After disabling a user account, any existing connections remain valid until the user’s Kerberos TGT and other tickets expire. After the ticket expires, the user will not be able to renew it.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user accounts you want to disable.
  4. Click on the Disable button.

    Screenshot of the "Active Users" page with a table displaying attributes for several users such as User login - First name - Last name - Status - UID - Email address - Telephone Number - Job Title. The entry for the "euser" account has been highlighted and so have the "Enable" and "Disable" buttons at the top right.

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

If the disabling procedure has been successful, you can verify in the Status column in the Active users table.

Screenshot of the same "Active Users" page with the table displaying attributes for several users. The "euser" account is now greyed-out and shows "Disabled" in its "Status" column.

3.5. Enabling user accounts in the Web UI

With IdM you can enable disabled active user accounts. Enabling a user account activates the disabled account.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.
  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user accounts you want to enable.
  4. Click on the Enable button.

    Screenshot of the "Active Users" page with a table displaying attributes for several users such as User login - First name - Last name - Status - UID - Email address - Telephone Number - Job Title. The entry for the "euser" account has been highlighted and so have the "Enable" and "Disable" buttons at the top right.

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

If the change has been successful, you can verify in the Status column in the Active users table.

3.6. Preserving active users in the IdM Web UI

Preserving user accounts enables you to remove accounts from the Active users tab, yet keeping these accounts in IdM.

Preserve the user account if the employee leaves the company. If you want to disable user accounts for a couple of weeks or months (parental leave, for example), disable the account. For details, see Disabling user accounts in the Web UI. The preserved accounts are not active and users cannot use them to access your internal network, however, the account stays in the database with all the data.

You can move the restored accounts back to the active mode.

Note

The list of users in the preserved state can provide a history of past user accounts.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM (Identity Management) Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.
  3. Click the check-box of the user accounts you want to preserve.
  4. Click on the Delete button.

    A screenshot of the "Active Users" page displaying a table of users. The checkbox for the entry for the "preserved.user" account has been checked and the "Delete" button at the top is highlighted.

  5. In the Remove users dialog box, switch the Delete mode radio button to preserve.
  6. Click on the Delete button.

    A screenshot of a pop-up window titled "Remove users." The contents say "Are you sure you want to delete selected entries?" and specifies "preserved.user" below. There is a label "Delete mode" with two radial options: "delete" and "preserve" (which is selected). There are "Delete" and "Cancel" buttons at the bottom right corner of the window.

As a result, the user account is moved to Preserved users.

If you need to restore preserved users, see the Restoring users in the IdM Web UI.

3.7. Restoring users in the IdM Web UI

IdM (Identity Management) enables you to restore preserved user accounts back in the active state.

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Preserved users tab.
  3. Click the check-box at the user accounts you want to restore.
  4. Click on the Restore button.

    A screenshot of the "Preserved users" page displaying a table of users and their attributes. The checkbox next to one user entry is checked and the "Restore" button at the top right is highlighted.

  5. In the Confirmation dialog box, click on the OK button.

The IdM Web UI displays a green confirmation and moves the user accounts to the Active users tab.

3.8. Deleting users in the IdM Web UI

Deleting users is an irreversible operation, causing the user accounts to be permanently deleted from the IdM database, including group memberships and passwords. Any external configuration for the user, such as the system account and home directory, is not deleted, but is no longer accessible through IdM.

You can delete:

  • Active users — the IdM Web UI offers you with the options:

  • Stage users — you can just delete stage users permanently.
  • Preserved users — you can delete preserved users permanently.

The following procedure describes deleting active users. Similarly, you can delete user accounts on:

  • The Stage users tab
  • The Preserved users tab

Prerequisites

  • Administrator privileges for managing the IdM Web UI or User Administrator role.

Procedure

  1. Log in to the IdM Web UI.

    For details, see Accessing the IdM Web UI in a web browser.

  2. Go to Users → Active users tab.

    Alternatively, you can delete the user account in the Users → Stage users or Users → Preserved users.

  3. Click the Delete icon.
  4. In the Remove users dialog box, switch the Delete mode radio button to delete.
  5. Click on the Delete button.

The users accounts have been permanently deleted from IdM.

Chapter 4. Managing user accounts using Ansible playbooks

You can manage users in IdM using Ansible playbooks. After presenting the user life cycle, this chapter describes how to use Ansible playbooks for the following operations:

4.1. User life cycle

Identity Management (IdM) supports three user account states:

  • Stage users are not allowed to authenticate. This is an initial state. Some of the user account properties required for active users cannot be set, for example, group membership.
  • Active users are allowed to authenticate. All required user account properties must be set in this state.
  • Preserved users are former active users that are considered inactive and cannot authenticate to IdM. Preserved users retain most of the account properties they had as active users, but they are not part of any user groups.

A flow chart displaying 4 items: Active users - Stage users - Preserved users - Deleted users. Arrows communicate the relationships between each kind of user: Active users can be "preserved" as Preserved users. Preserved users can be "restored" as Active users. Preserved users can be "staged" as Stage users and Stage users can be "activated" into Active users. All users can be deleted to become "Deleted users".

You can delete user entries permanently from the IdM database.

Important

Deleted user accounts cannot be restored. When you delete a user account, all the information associated with the account is permanently lost.

A new administrator can only be created by a user with administrator rights, such as the default admin user. If you accidentally delete all administrator accounts, the Directory Manager must create a new administrator manually in the Directory Server.

Warning

Do not delete the admin user. As admin is a pre-defined user required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands. If you want to define and use an alternative admin user, disable the pre-defined admin user with ipa user-disable admin after you granted admin permissions to at least one different user.

Warning

Do not add local users to IdM. The Name Service Switch (NSS) always resolves IdM users and groups before resolving local users and groups. This means that, for example, IdM group membership does not work for local users.

4.2. Ensuring the presence of an IdM user using an Ansible playbook

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of a user in IdM using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • The ansible-freeipa package is installed on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the data of the user whose presence in IdM you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/add-user.yml file. For example, to create user named idm_user and add Password123 as the user password:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle users
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Create user idm_user
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: idm_user
          first: Alice
          last: Acme
          uid: 1000111
          gid: 10011
          phone: "+555123457"
          email: idm_user@acme.com
          passwordexpiration: "2023-01-19 23:59:59"
          password: "Password123"
          update_password: on_create

    You must use the following options to add a user:

    • name: the login name
    • first: the first name string
    • last: the last name string

    For the full list of available user options, see the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/README-user.md Markdown file.

    Note

    If you use the update_password: on_create option, Ansible only creates the user password when it creates the user. If the user is already created with a password, Ansible does not generate a new password.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-IdM-user.yml

Verification steps

  • You can verify if the new user account exists in IdM by using the ipa user-show command:

    1. Log into ipaserver as admin:

      $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
      Password:
      [admin@server /]$
    2. Request a Kerberos ticket for admin:

      $ kinit admin
      Password for admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM:
    3. Request information about idm_user:

      $ ipa user-show idm_user
        User login: idm_user
        First name: Alice
        Last name: Acme
        ....

    The user named idm_user is present in IdM.

4.3. Ensuring the presence of multiple IdM users using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of multiple users in IdM using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the data of the users whose presence you want to ensure in IdM. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/ensure-users-present.yml file. For example, to create users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, and idm_user_3, and add Password123 as the password of idm_user_1:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle users
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Create user idm_users
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          users:
          - name: idm_user_1
            first: Alice
            last: Acme
            uid: 10001
            gid: 10011
            phone: "+555123457"
            email: idm_user@acme.com
            passwordexpiration: "2023-01-19 23:59:59"
            password: "Password123"
          - name: idm_user_2
            first: Bob
            last: Acme
            uid: 100011
            gid: 10011
          - name: idm_user_3
            first: Eve
            last: Acme
            uid: 1000111
            gid: 10011
    Note

    If you do not specify the update_password: on_create option, Ansible re-sets the user password every time the playbook is run: if the user has changed the password since the last time the playbook was run, Ansible re-sets password.

  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-users.yml

Verification steps

  • You can verify if the user account exists in IdM by using the ipa user-show command:

    1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

      $ ssh administrator@server.idm.example.com
      Password:
      [admin@server /]$
    2. Display information about idm_user_1:

      $ ipa user-show idm_user_1
        User login: idm_user_1
        First name: Alice
        Last name: Acme
        Password: True
        ....

    The user named idm_user_1 is present in IdM.

4.4. Ensuring the presence of multiple IdM users from a JSON file using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes how you can ensure the presence of multiple users in IdM using an Ansible playbook. The users are stored in a JSON file.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary tasks. Reference the JSON file with the data of the users whose presence you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ensure-users-present-ymlfile.yml file:

    ---
    - name: Ensure users' presence
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Include users.json
        include_vars:
          file: users.json
    
      - name: Users present
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          users: "{{ users }}"
  3. Create the users.json file, and add the IdM users into it. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/users.json file. For example, to create users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, and idm_user_3, and add Password123 as the password of idm_user_1:

    {
      "users": [
       {
        "name": "idm_user_1",
        "first": "Alice",
        "last": "Acme",
        "password": "Password123"
       },
       {
        "name": "idm_user_2",
        "first": "Bob",
        "last": "Acme"
       },
       {
        "name": "idm_user_3",
        "first": "Eve",
        "last": "Acme"
       }
      ]
    }
  4. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-users-present-jsonfile.yml

Verification steps

  • You can verify if the user accounts are present in IdM using the ipa user-show command:

    1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

      $ ssh administrator@server.idm.example.com
      Password:
      [admin@server /]$
    2. Display information about idm_user_1:

      $ ipa user-show idm_user_1
        User login: idm_user_1
        First name: Alice
        Last name: Acme
        Password: True
        ....

    The user named idm_user_1 is present in IdM.

4.5. Ensuring the absence of users using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes how you can use an Ansible playbook to ensure that specific users are absent from IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the users whose absence from IdM you want to ensure. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user/ensure-users-present.yml file. For example, to delete users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, and idm_user_3:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle users
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Delete users idm_user_1, idm_user_2, idm_user_3
        ipauser:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          users:
          - name: idm_user_1
          - name: idm_user_2
          - name: idm_user_3
          state: absent
  3. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/delete-users.yml

Verification steps

You can verify that the user accounts do not exist in IdM by using the ipa user-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh administrator@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Request information about idm_user_1:

    $ ipa user-show idm_user_1
    ipa: ERROR: idm_user_1: user not found

    The user named idm_user_1 does not exist in IdM.

4.6. Additional resources

  • See the README-user.md Markdown file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See sample Ansible playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/user directory.

Chapter 5. Granting sudo access to an IdM user on an IdM client

This section describes how to grant sudo access to users in Identity Management.

5.1. Sudo access on an IdM client

System administrators can grant sudo access to allow non-root users to execute administrative commands that are normally reserved for the root user. Consequently, when users need to perform an administrative command normally reserved for the root user, they precede that command with sudo. After entering their password, the command is executed as if they were the root user. To execute a sudo command as another user or group, such as a database service account, you can configure a RunAs alias for a sudo rule.

If a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 host is enrolled as an Identity Management (IdM) client, you can specify sudo rules defining which IdM users can perform which commands on the host in the following ways:

  • Locally in the /etc/sudoers file
  • Centrally in IdM

This section describes creating a central sudo rule for an IdM client using the command line interface (CLI) and the IdM Web UI.

You can also configure password-less authentication for sudo using the Generic Security Service Application Programming Interface (GSSAPI), the native way for UNIX-based operating systems to access and authenticate Kerberos services. You can use the pam_sss_gss.so Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) to invoke GSSAPI authentication via the SSSD service, allowing users to authenticate to the sudo command with a valid Kerberos ticket.

Additional resources

5.2. Granting sudo access to an IdM user on an IdM client using the CLI

In Identity Management (IdM), you can grant sudo access for a specific command to an IdM user account on a specific IdM host. First, add a sudo command and then create a sudo rule for one or more commands.

For example, complete this procedure to create the idm_user_reboot sudo rule to grant the idm_user account the permission to run the /usr/sbin/reboot command on the idmclient machine.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as IdM administrator.
  • You have created a user account for idm_user in IdM and unlocked the account by creating a password for the user. For details on adding a new IdM user using the CLI, see Adding users using the command line.
  • No local idm_user account is present on the idmclient host. The idm_user user is not listed in the local /etc/passwd file.

Procedure

  1. Retrieve a Kerberos ticket as the IdM admin.

    [root@idmclient ~]# kinit admin
  2. Add the /usr/sbin/reboot command to the IdM database of sudo commands:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudocmd-add /usr/sbin/reboot
    -------------------------------------
    Added Sudo Command "/usr/sbin/reboot"
    -------------------------------------
      Sudo Command: /usr/sbin/reboot
  3. Create a sudo rule named idm_user_reboot:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add idm_user_reboot
    ---------------------------------
    Added Sudo Rule "idm_user_reboot"
    ---------------------------------
      Rule name: idm_user_reboot
      Enabled: TRUE
  4. Add the /usr/sbin/reboot command to the idm_user_reboot rule:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add-allow-command idm_user_reboot --sudocmds '/usr/sbin/reboot'
      Rule name: idm_user_reboot
      Enabled: TRUE
      Sudo Allow Commands: /usr/sbin/reboot
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------
  5. Apply the idm_user_reboot rule to the IdM idmclient host:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add-host idm_user_reboot --hosts idmclient.idm.example.com
    Rule name: idm_user_reboot
    Enabled: TRUE
    Hosts: idmclient.idm.example.com
    Sudo Allow Commands: /usr/sbin/reboot
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------
  6. Add the idm_user account to the idm_user_reboot rule:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add-user idm_user_reboot --users idm_user
    Rule name: idm_user_reboot
    Enabled: TRUE
    Users: idm_user
    Hosts: idmclient.idm.example.com
    Sudo Allow Commands: /usr/sbin/reboot
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------
Note

Propagating the changes from the server to the client can take a few minutes.

Verification steps

  1. Log in to the idmclient host as the idm_user account.
  2. Display which sudo rules the idm_user account is allowed to perform.

    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo -l
    Matching Defaults entries for idm_user on idmclient:
        !visiblepw, always_set_home, match_group_by_gid, always_query_group_plugin,
        env_reset, env_keep="COLORS DISPLAY HOSTNAME HISTSIZE KDEDIR LS_COLORS",
        env_keep+="MAIL PS1 PS2 QTDIR USERNAME LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE",
        env_keep+="LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES",
        env_keep+="LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE",
        env_keep+="LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS _XKB_CHARSET XAUTHORITY KRB5CCNAME",
        secure_path=/sbin\:/bin\:/usr/sbin\:/usr/bin
    
    User idm_user may run the following commands on idmclient:
        (root) /usr/sbin/reboot
  3. Reboot the machine using sudo. Enter the password for idm_user when prompted:

    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo /usr/sbin/reboot
    [sudo] password for idm_user:

5.3. Granting sudo access to an IdM user on an IdM client using the IdM Web UI

In Identity Management (IdM), you can grant sudo access for a specific command to an IdM user account on a specific IdM host. First, add a sudo command and then create a sudo rule for one or more commands.

Complete this procedure to create the idm_user_reboot sudo rule to grant the idm_user account the permission to run the /usr/sbin/reboot command on the idmclient machine.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as IdM administrator.
  • You have created a user account for idm_user in IdM and unlocked the account by creating a password for the user. For details on adding a new IdM user using the command-line interface, see Adding users using the command line.
  • No local idm_user account is present on the idmclient host. The idm_user user is not listed in the local /etc/passwd file.

Procedure

  1. Add the /usr/sbin/reboot command to the IdM database of sudo commands:

    1. Navigate to PolicySudoSudo Commands.
    2. Click Add in the upper right corner to open the Add sudo command dialog box.
    3. Enter the command you want the user to be able to perform using sudo: /usr/sbin/reboot.

      Figure 5.1. Adding IdM sudo command

      A screenshot of a pop-up window labeled "Add sudo command." There is a required field labeled "Sudo command" with contents "/usr/sbin/reboot". A "Description" field is empty. The bottom-right of the window has four buttons: "Add" - "Add and Add Another" - "Add and Edit" - "Cancel".
    4. Click Add.
  2. Use the new sudo command entry to create a sudo rule to allow idm_user to reboot the idmclient machine:

    1. Navigate to PolicySudoSudo rules.
    2. Click Add in the upper right corner to open the Add sudo rule dialog box.
    3. Enter the name of the sudo rule: idm_user_reboot.
    4. Click Add and Edit.
    5. Specify the user:

      1. In the Who section, check the Specified Users and Groups radio button.
      2. In the User category the rule applies to subsection, click Add to open the Add users into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box.
      3. In the Add users into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box in the Available column, check the idm_user checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.
      4. Click Add.
    6. Specify the host:

      1. In the Access this host section, check the Specified Hosts and Groups radio button.
      2. In the Host category this rule applies to subsection, click Add to open the Add hosts into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box.
      3. In the Add hosts into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box in the Available column, check the idmclient.idm.example.com checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.
      4. Click Add.
    7. Specify the commands:

      1. In the Command category the rule applies to subsection of the Run Commands section, check the Specified Commands and Groups radio button.
      2. In the Sudo Allow Commands subsection, click Add to open the Add allow sudo commands into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box.
      3. In the Add allow sudo commands into sudo rule "idm_user_reboot" dialog box in the Available column, check the /usr/sbin/reboot checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.
      4. Click Add to return to the idm_sudo_reboot page.

      Figure 5.2. Adding IdM sudo rule

      A screenshot of an overview of the sudo rule that was added. There is a "Who" section with a table of users the rule applies to. There is an "Access this host" section with a table of hosts that the rule applies to. There is a "Run Commands" section with a table of commands that pertain to the rule.
    8. Click Save in the top left corner.

The new rule is enabled by default.

Note

Propagating the changes from the server to the client can take a few minutes.

Verification steps

  1. Log in to idmclient as idm_user.
  2. Reboot the machine using sudo. Enter the password for idm_user when prompted:

    $ sudo /usr/sbin/reboot
    [sudo] password for idm_user:

If the sudo rule is configured correctly, the machine reboots.

5.4. Creating a sudo rule on the CLI that runs a command as a service account on an IdM client

In IdM, you can configure a sudo rule with a RunAs alias to run a sudo command as another user or group. For example, you might have an IdM client that hosts a database application, and you need to run commands as the local service account that corresponds to that application.

Use this example to create a sudo rule on the command line called run_third-party-app_report to allow the idm_user account to run the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report command as the thirdpartyapp service account on the idmclient host.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as IdM administrator.
  • You have created a user account for idm_user in IdM and unlocked the account by creating a password for the user. For details on adding a new IdM user using the CLI, see Adding users using the command line.
  • No local idm_user account is present on the idmclient host. The idm_user user is not listed in the local /etc/passwd file.
  • You have a custom application named third-party-app installed on the idmclient host.
  • The report command for the third-party-app application is installed in the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report directory.
  • You have created a local service account named thirdpartyapp to execute commands for the third-party-app application.

Procedure

  1. Retrieve a Kerberos ticket as the IdM admin.

    [root@idmclient ~]# kinit admin
  2. Add the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report command to the IdM database of sudo commands:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudocmd-add /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
    ----------------------------------------------------
    Added Sudo Command "/opt/third-party-app/bin/report"
    ----------------------------------------------------
      Sudo Command: /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
  3. Create a sudo rule named run_third-party-app_report:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add run_third-party-app_report
    --------------------------------------------
    Added Sudo Rule "run_third-party-app_report"
    --------------------------------------------
      Rule name: run_third-party-app_report
      Enabled: TRUE
  4. Use the --users=<user> option to specify the RunAs user for the sudorule-add-runasuser command:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add-runasuser run_third-party-app_report --users=thirdpartyapp
      Rule name: run_third-party-app_report
      Enabled: TRUE
      RunAs External User: thirdpartyapp
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

    The user (or group specified with the --groups=* option) can be external to IdM, such as a local service account or an Active Directory user. Do not add a % prefix for group names.

  5. Add the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report command to the idm_user_reboot rule:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add-allow-command run_third-party-app_report --sudocmds '/opt/third-party-app/bin/report'
    Rule name: run_third-party-app_report
    Enabled: TRUE
    Sudo Allow Commands: /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
    RunAs External User: thirdpartyapp
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------
  6. Apply the run_third-party-app_report rule to the IdM idmclient host:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add-host run_third-party-app_report --hosts idmclient.idm.example.com
    Rule name: run_third-party-app_report
    Enabled: TRUE
    Hosts: idmclient.idm.example.com
    Sudo Allow Commands: /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
    RunAs External User: thirdpartyapp
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------
  7. Add the idm_user account to the run_third-party-app_report rule:

    [root@idmclient ~]# ipa sudorule-add-user run_third-party-app_report --users idm_user
    Rule name: run_third-party-app_report
    Enabled: TRUE
    Users: idm_user
    Hosts: idmclient.idm.example.com
    Sudo Allow Commands: /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
    RunAs External User: thirdpartyapp
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
Note

Propagating the changes from the server to the client can take a few minutes.

Verification steps

  1. Log in to the idmclient host as the idm_user account.
  2. Test the new sudo rule:

    1. Display which sudo rules the idm_user account is allowed to perform.

      [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo -l
      Matching Defaults entries for idm_user@idm.example.com on idmclient:
          !visiblepw, always_set_home, match_group_by_gid, always_query_group_plugin,
          env_reset, env_keep="COLORS DISPLAY HOSTNAME HISTSIZE KDEDIR LS_COLORS",
          env_keep+="MAIL PS1 PS2 QTDIR USERNAME LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE",
          env_keep+="LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES",
          env_keep+="LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE",
          env_keep+="LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS _XKB_CHARSET XAUTHORITY KRB5CCNAME",
          secure_path=/sbin\:/bin\:/usr/sbin\:/usr/bin
      
      User idm_user@idm.example.com may run the following commands on idmclient:
          (thirdpartyapp) /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
    2. Run the report command as the thirdpartyapp service account.

      [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo -u thirdpartyapp /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
      [sudo] password for idm_user@idm.example.com:
      Executing report...
      Report successful.

5.5. Creating a sudo rule in the IdM WebUI that runs a command as a service account on an IdM client

In IdM, you can configure a sudo rule with a RunAs alias to run a sudo command as another user or group. For example, you might have an IdM client that hosts a database application, and you need to run commands as the local service account that corresponds to that application.

Use this example to create a sudo rule in the IdM WebUI called run_third-party-app_report to allow the idm_user account to run the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report command as the thirdpartyapp service account on the idmclient host.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as IdM administrator.
  • You have created a user account for idm_user in IdM and unlocked the account by creating a password for the user. For details on adding a new IdM user using the CLI, see Adding users using the command line.
  • No local idm_user account is present on the idmclient host. The idm_user user is not listed in the local /etc/passwd file.
  • You have a custom application named third-party-app installed on the idmclient host.
  • The report command for the third-party-app application is installed in the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report directory.
  • You have created a local service account named thirdpartyapp to execute commands for the third-party-app application.

Procedure

  1. Add the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report command to the IdM database of sudo commands:

    1. Navigate to PolicySudoSudo Commands.
    2. Click Add in the upper right corner to open the Add sudo command dialog box.
    3. Enter the command: /opt/third-party-app/bin/report.

      A screenshot of a pop-up window labeled "Add sudo command." There is a required field labeled "Sudo command" with contents "/opt/third-party-app/bin/report". A "Description" field is empty. The bottom-right of the window has four buttons: "Add" - "Add and Add Another" - "Add and Edit" - "Cancel".
    4. Click Add.
  2. Use the new sudo command entry to create the new sudo rule:

    1. Navigate to PolicySudoSudo rules.
    2. Click Add in the upper right corner to open the Add sudo rule dialog box.
    3. Enter the name of the sudo rule: run_third-party-app_report.

      A screenshot of a pop-up window labeled "Add sudo rule." There is a required field labeled "Rule name" with contents "run_third-party-app_report". The bottom-right of the window has four buttons: "Add" - "Add and Add Another" - "Add and Edit" - "Cancel".
    4. Click Add and Edit.
    5. Specify the user:

      1. In the Who section, check the Specified Users and Groups radio button.
      2. In the User category the rule applies to subsection, click Add to open the Add users into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box.
      3. In the Add users into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box in the Available column, check the idm_user checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.

        A screenshot of a pop-up window labeled "Add users into sudo rule." You can select users from an Available list on the left and move them to a Prospective column on the right. The bottom-right of the window has two buttons: "Add" - "Cancel".
      4. Click Add.
    6. Specify the host:

      1. In the Access this host section, check the Specified Hosts and Groups radio button.
      2. In the Host category this rule applies to subsection, click Add to open the Add hosts into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box.
      3. In the Add hosts into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box in the Available column, check the idmclient.idm.example.com checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.

        A screenshot of a pop-up window labeled "Add hosts into sudo rule." You can select hosts from an Available list on the left and move them to a Prospective column on the right. The bottom-right of the window has two buttons: "Add" - "Cancel".
      4. Click Add.
    7. Specify the commands:

      1. In the Command category the rule applies to subsection of the Run Commands section, check the Specified Commands and Groups radio button.
      2. In the Sudo Allow Commands subsection, click Add to open the Add allow sudo commands into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box.
      3. In the Add allow sudo commands into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box in the Available column, check the /opt/third-party-app/bin/report checkbox, and move it to the Prospective column.

        A screenshot of a pop-up window labeled "Add allow sudo commands into sudo rule." You can select sudo commands from an Available list on the left and move them to a Prospective column on the right. The bottom-right of the window has two buttons: "Add" - "Cancel".
      4. Click Add to return to the run_third-party-app_report page.
    8. Specify the RunAs user:

      1. In the As Whom section, check the Specified Users and Groups radio button.
      2. In the RunAs Users subsection, click Add to open the Add RunAs users into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box.
      3. In the Add RunAs users into sudo rule "run_third-party-app_report" dialog box, enter the thirdpartyapp service account in the External box and move it to the Prospective column.

        A screenshot of a dialog box where you can specify the "thirdpartyapp" service account as an external user.
      4. Click Add to return to the run_third-party-app_report page.
    9. Click Save in the top left corner.

The new rule is enabled by default.

Figure 5.3. Details of the sudo rule

A screenshot of an overview of the sudo rule that was added. The "Who" section has an entry for "idm_user." The "Access this host" section has "idmclient.idm.example.com." The "Run Commands" section has the "/opt/third-party-app/bin/report" command. The "As Whom" section lists the "thirdpartyapp" account.
Note

Propagating the changes from the server to the client can take a few minutes.

Verification steps

  1. Log in to the idmclient host as the idm_user account.
  2. Test the new sudo rule:

    1. Display which sudo rules the idm_user account is allowed to perform.

      [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo -l
      Matching Defaults entries for idm_user@idm.example.com on idmclient:
          !visiblepw, always_set_home, match_group_by_gid, always_query_group_plugin,
          env_reset, env_keep="COLORS DISPLAY HOSTNAME HISTSIZE KDEDIR LS_COLORS",
          env_keep+="MAIL PS1 PS2 QTDIR USERNAME LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE",
          env_keep+="LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES",
          env_keep+="LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE",
          env_keep+="LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS _XKB_CHARSET XAUTHORITY KRB5CCNAME",
          secure_path=/sbin\:/bin\:/usr/sbin\:/usr/bin
      
      User idm_user@idm.example.com may run the following commands on idmclient:
          (thirdpartyapp) /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
    2. Run the report command as the thirdpartyapp service account.

      [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo -u thirdpartyapp /opt/third-party-app/bin/report
      [sudo] password for idm_user@idm.example.com:
      Executing report...
      Report successful.

5.6. Enabling GSSAPI authentication for sudo on an IdM client

The following procedure describes enabling Generic Security Service Application Program Interface (GSSAPI) authentication on an IdM client for the sudo and sudo -i commands via the pam_sss_gss.so PAM module. With this configuration, IdM users can authenticate to the sudo command with their Kerberos ticket.

Prerequisites

  • You have created a sudo rule for an IdM user that applies to an IdM host. For this example, you have created the idm_user_reboot sudo rule to grant the idm_user account the permission to run the /usr/sbin/reboot command on the idmclient host.
  • You need root privileges to modify the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file and PAM files in the /etc/pam.d/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Open the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf configuration file.
  2. Add the following entry to the [domain/<domain_name>] section.

    [domain/<domain_name>]
    pam_gssapi_services = sudo, sudo-i
  3. Save and close the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file.
  4. Restart the SSSD service to load the configuration changes.

    [root@idmclient ~]# systemctl restart sssd
  5. Open the /etc/pam.d/sudo PAM configuration file.
  6. Add the following entry as the first line of the auth section in the /etc/pam.d/sudo file.

    #%PAM-1.0
    auth sufficient pam_sss_gss.so
    auth       include      system-auth
    account    include      system-auth
    password   include      system-auth
    session    include      system-auth
  7. Save and close the /etc/pam.d/sudo file.
  8. Open the /etc/pam.d/sudo-i PAM configuration file.
  9. Add the following entry as the first line of the auth section in the /etc/pam.d/sudo-i file.

    #%PAM-1.0
    auth sufficient pam_sss_gss.so
    auth       include      sudo
    account    include      sudo
    password   include      sudo
    session    optional     pam_keyinit.so force revoke
    session    include      sudo
  10. Save and close the /etc/pam.d/sudo-i file.

Verification steps

  1. Log into the host as the idm_user account.

    [root@idm-client ~]# ssh -l idm_user@idm.example.com localhost
    idm_user@idm.example.com's password:
  2. Verify that you have a ticket-granting ticket as the idm_user account.

    [idmuser@idmclient ~]$ klist
    Ticket cache: KCM:1366201107
    Default principal: idm_user@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    
    Valid starting       Expires              Service principal
    01/08/2021 09:11:48  01/08/2021 19:11:48  krbtgt/IDM.EXAMPLE.COM@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    	renew until 01/15/2021 09:11:44
  3. (Optional) If you do not have Kerberos credentials for the idm_user account, destroy your current Kerberos credentials and request the correct ones.

    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ kdestroy -A
    
    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ kinit idm_user@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    Password for idm_user@idm.example.com:
  4. Reboot the machine using sudo, without specifying a password.

    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo /usr/sbin/reboot

5.7. Enabling GSSAPI authentication and enforcing Kerberos authentication indicators for sudo on an IdM client

The following procedure describes enabling Generic Security Service Application Program Interface (GSSAPI) authentication on an IdM client for the sudo and sudo -i commands via the pam_sss_gss.so PAM module. Additionally, only users who have logged in with a smart card will authenticate to those commands with their Kerberos ticket.

Note

You can use this procedure as a template to configure GSSAPI authentication with SSSD for other PAM-aware services, and further restrict access to only those users that have a specific authentication indicator attached to their Kerberos ticket.

Prerequisites

  • You have created a sudo rule for an IdM user that applies to an IdM host. For this example, you have created the idm_user_reboot sudo rule to grant the idm_user account the permission to run the /usr/sbin/reboot command on the idmclient host.
  • You have configured smart card authentication for the idmclient host.
  • You need root privileges to modify the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file and PAM files in the /etc/pam.d/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Open the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf configuration file.
  2. Add the following entries to the [domain/<domain_name>] section.

    [domain/<domain_name>]
    pam_gssapi_services = sudo, sudo-i
    pam_gssapi_indicators_map = sudo:pkinit, sudo-i:pkinit
  3. Save and close the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file.
  4. Restart the SSSD service to load the configuration changes.

    [root@idmclient ~]# systemctl restart sssd
  5. Open the /etc/pam.d/sudo PAM configuration file.
  6. Add the following entry as the first line of the auth section in the /etc/pam.d/sudo file.

    #%PAM-1.0
    auth sufficient pam_sss_gss.so
    auth       include      system-auth
    account    include      system-auth
    password   include      system-auth
    session    include      system-auth
  7. Save and close the /etc/pam.d/sudo file.
  8. Open the /etc/pam.d/sudo-i PAM configuration file.
  9. Add the following entry as the first line of the auth section in the /etc/pam.d/sudo-i file.

    #%PAM-1.0
    auth sufficient pam_sss_gss.so
    auth       include      sudo
    account    include      sudo
    password   include      sudo
    session    optional     pam_keyinit.so force revoke
    session    include      sudo
  10. Save and close the /etc/pam.d/sudo-i file.

Verification steps

  1. Log into the host as the idm_user account and authenticate with a smart card.

    [root@idmclient ~]# ssh -l idm_user@idm.example.com localhost
    PIN for smart_card
  2. Verify that you have a ticket-granting ticket as the smart card user.

    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ klist
    Ticket cache: KEYRING:persistent:1358900015:krb_cache_TObtNMd
    Default principal: idm_user@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    
    Valid starting       Expires              Service principal
    02/15/2021 16:29:48  02/16/2021 02:29:48  krbtgt/IDM.EXAMPLE.COM@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    	renew until 02/22/2021 16:29:44
  3. Display which sudo rules the idm_user account is allowed to perform.

    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo -l
    Matching Defaults entries for idmuser on idmclient:
        !visiblepw, always_set_home, match_group_by_gid, always_query_group_plugin,
        env_reset, env_keep="COLORS DISPLAY HOSTNAME HISTSIZE KDEDIR LS_COLORS",
        env_keep+="MAIL PS1 PS2 QTDIR USERNAME LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE",
        env_keep+="LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES",
        env_keep+="LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE",
        env_keep+="LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS _XKB_CHARSET XAUTHORITY KRB5CCNAME",
        secure_path=/sbin\:/bin\:/usr/sbin\:/usr/bin
    
    User idm_user may run the following commands on idmclient:
        (root) /usr/sbin/reboot
  4. Reboot the machine using sudo, without specifying a password.

    [idm_user@idmclient ~]$ sudo /usr/sbin/reboot

5.8. SSSD options controlling GSSAPI authentication for PAM services

You can use the following options for the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf configuration file to adjust the GSSAPI configuration within the SSSD service.

pam_gssapi_services
GSSAPI authentication with SSSD is disabled by default. You can use this option to specify a comma-separated list of PAM services that are allowed to try GSSAPI authentication using the pam_sss_gss.so PAM module. To explicitly disable GSSAPI authentication, set this option to -.
pam_gssapi_indicators_map

This option only applies to Identity Management (IdM) domains. Use this option to list Kerberos authentication indicators that are required to grant PAM access to a service. Pairs must be in the format <PAM_service>:_<required_authentication_indicator>_.

Valid authentication indicators are:

  • otp for two-factor authentication
  • radius for RADIUS authentication
  • pkinit for PKINIT, smart card, or certificate authentication
  • hardened for hardened passwords
pam_gssapi_check_upn
This option is enabled and set to true by default. If this option is enabled, the SSSD service requires that the user name matches the Kerberos credentials. If false, the pam_sss_gss.so PAM module authenticates every user that is able to obtain the required service ticket.

Examples

The following options enable Kerberos authentication for the sudo and sudo-i services, requires that sudo users authenticated with a one-time password, and user names must match the Kerberos principal. Because these settings are in the [pam] section, they apply to all domains:

[pam]
pam_gssapi_services = sudo, sudo-i
pam_gssapi_indicators_map = sudo:otp
pam_gssapi_check_upn = true

You can also set these options in individual [domain] sections to overwrite any global values in the [pam] section. The following options apply different GSSAPI settings to each domain:

For the idm.example.com domain
  • Enable GSSAPI authentication for the sudo and sudo -i services.
  • Require certificate or smart card authentication authenticators for the sudo command.
  • Require one-time password authentication authenticators for the sudo -i command.
  • Enforce matching user names and Kerberos principals.
For the ad.example.com domain
  • Enable GSSAPI authentication only for the sudo service.
  • Do not enforce matching user names and principals.
[domain/idm.example.com]
pam_gssapi_services = sudo, sudo-i
pam_gssapi_indicators_map = sudo:pkinit, sudo-i:otp
pam_gssapi_check_upn = true
...

[domain/ad.example.com]
pam_gssapi_services = sudo
pam_gssapi_check_upn = false
...

5.9. Troubleshooting GSSAPI authentication for sudo

If you are unable to authenticate to the sudo service with a Kerberos ticket from IdM, use the following scenarios to troubleshoot your configuration.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • If you see the following error, the Kerberos service might not able to resolve the correct realm for the service ticket based on the host name:

    Server not found in Kerberos database

    In this situation, add the hostname directly to [domain_realm] section in the /etc/krb5.conf Kerberos configuration file:

    [idm-user@idm-client ~]$ cat /etc/krb5.conf
    ...
    
    [domain_realm]
     .example.com = EXAMPLE.COM
     example.com = EXAMPLE.COM
     server.example.com = EXAMPLE.COM
  • If you see the following error, you do not have any Kerberos credentials:

    No Kerberos credentials available

    In this situation, retrieve Kerberos credentials with the kinit utility or authenticate with SSSD:

    [idm-user@idm-client ~]$ kinit idm-user@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    Password for idm-user@idm.example.com:
  • If you see either of the following errors in the /var/log/sssd/sssd_pam.log log file, the Kerberos credentials do not match the username of the user currently logged in:

    User with UPN [<UPN>] was not found.
    
    UPN [<UPN>] does not match target user [<username>].

    In this situation, verify that you authenticated with SSSD, or consider disabling the pam_gssapi_check_upn option in the /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file:

    [idm-user@idm-client ~]$ cat /etc/sssd/sssd.conf
    ...
    
    pam_gssapi_check_upn = false
  • For additional troubleshooting, you can enable debugging output for the pam_sss_gss.so PAM module.

    • Add the debug option at the end of all pam_sss_gss.so entries in PAM files, such as /etc/pam.d/sudo and /etc/pam.d/sudo-i:

      [root@idm-client ~]# cat /etc/pam.d/sudo
      #%PAM-1.0
      auth       sufficient   pam_sss_gss.so   debug
      auth       include      system-auth
      account    include      system-auth
      password   include      system-auth
      session    include      system-auth
      [root@idm-client ~]# cat /etc/pam.d/sudo-i
      #%PAM-1.0
      auth       sufficient   pam_sss_gss.so   debug
      auth       include      sudo
      account    include      sudo
      password   include      sudo
      session    optional     pam_keyinit.so force revoke
      session    include      sudo
    • Try to authenticate with the pam_sss_gss.so module and review the console output. In this example, the user did not have any Kerberos credentials.

      [idm-user@idm-client ~]$ sudo ls -l /etc/sssd/sssd.conf
      pam_sss_gss: Initializing GSSAPI authentication with SSSD
      pam_sss_gss: Switching euid from 0 to 1366201107
      pam_sss_gss: Trying to establish security context
      pam_sss_gss: SSSD User name: idm-user@idm.example.com
      pam_sss_gss: User domain: idm.example.com
      pam_sss_gss: User principal:
      pam_sss_gss: Target name: host@idm.example.com
      pam_sss_gss: Using ccache: KCM:
      pam_sss_gss: Acquiring credentials, principal name will be derived
      pam_sss_gss: Unable to read credentials from [KCM:] [maj:0xd0000, min:0x96c73ac3]
      pam_sss_gss: GSSAPI: Unspecified GSS failure.  Minor code may provide more information
      pam_sss_gss: GSSAPI: No credentials cache found
      pam_sss_gss: Switching euid from 1366200907 to 0
      pam_sss_gss: System error [5]: Input/output error

5.10. Using an Ansible playbook to ensure sudo access for an IdM user on an IdM client

In Identity Management (IdM), you can ensure sudo access to a specific command is granted to an IdM user account on a specific IdM host.

Complete this procedure to ensure a sudo rule named idm_user_reboot exists. The rule grants idm_user the permission to run the /usr/sbin/reboot command on the idmclient machine.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaservers in it:

    [ipaservers]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Add one or more sudo commands:

    1. Create an ensure-reboot-sudocmd-is-present.yml Ansible playbook that ensures the presence of the /usr/sbin/reboot command in the IdM database of sudo commands. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/sudocmd/ensure-sudocmd-is-present.yml file:

      ---
      - name: Playbook to manage sudo command
        hosts: ipaserver
        become: true
      
        tasks:
        # Ensure sudo command is present
        - ipasudocmd:
            ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
            name: /usr/sbin/reboot
            state: present
    2. Run the playbook:

      $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-reboot-sudocmd-is-present.yml
  3. Create a sudo rule that references the commands:

    1. Create an ensure-sudorule-for-idmuser-on-idmclient-is-present.yml Ansible playbook that uses the sudo command entry to ensure the presence of a sudo rule. The sudo rule allows idm_user to reboot the idmclient machine. To simplify this step, you can copy and modify the example in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/sudorule/ensure-sudorule-is-present.yml file:

      ---
      - name: Tests
        hosts: ipaserver
        become: true
      
        tasks:
        # Ensure a sudorule is present granting idm_user the permission to run /usr/sbin/reboot on idmclient
        - ipasudorule:
            ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
            name: idm_user_reboot
            description: A test sudo rule.
            allow_sudocmd: /usr/sbin/reboot
            host: idmclient.idm.example.com
            user: idm_user
            state: present
    2. Run the playbook:

      $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-sudorule-for-idmuser-on-idmclient-is-present.yml

Verification steps

Test that the sudo rule whose presence you have ensured on the IdM server works on idmclient by verifying that idm_user can reboot idmclient using sudo. Note that it can take a few minutes for the changes made on the server to take effect on the client.

  1. Log in to idmclient as idm_user.
  2. Reboot the machine using sudo. Enter the password for idm_user when prompted:

    $ sudo /usr/sbin/reboot
    [sudo] password for idm_user:

If sudo is configured correctly, the machine reboots.

Additional resources

  • See the README-sudocmd.md, README-sudocmdgroup.md, and README-sudorule.md files in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.

Chapter 6. Using ldapmodify to manage IdM users externally

You can modify Identity Management (IdM) LDAP directly from the command-line interface (CLI) using the ldapmodify and ldapdelete utilities. The utilities provide full functionality for adding, editing, and deleting your directory contents. You can use these utilities to manage both the configuration entries of the server and the data in the user entries. The utilities can also be used to write scripts to perform bulk management of one or more directories.

6.1. Templates for managing IdM user accounts externally

This section describes templates for various user management operations in IdM. The templates show which attributes you must modify using ldapmodify to achieve the following goals:

  • Adding a new stage user
  • Modifying a user’s attribute
  • Enabling a user
  • Disabling a user
  • Preserving a user

The templates are formatted in the LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF). LDIF is a standard plain text data interchange format for representing LDAP directory content and update requests.

Using the templates, you can configure the LDAP provider of your provisioning system to manage IdM user accounts.

For detailed example procedures, see the following sections:

Templates for adding a new stage user

  • A template for adding a user with UID and GID assigned automatically. The distinguished name (DN) of the created entry must start with uid=user_login:

    dn: uid=user_login,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
    changetype: add
    objectClass: top
    objectClass: inetorgperson
    uid: user_login
    sn: surname
    givenName: first_name
    cn: full_name
  • A template for adding a user with UID and GID assigned statically:

    dn: uid=user_login,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
    changetype: add
    objectClass: top
    objectClass: person
    objectClass: inetorgperson
    objectClass: organizationalperson
    objectClass: posixaccount
    uid: user_login
    uidNumber: UID_number
    gidNumber: GID_number
    sn: surname
    givenName: first_name
    cn: full_name
    homeDirectory: /home/user_login

    You are not required to specify any IdM object classes when adding stage users. IdM adds these classes automatically after the users are activated.

Templates for modifying existing users

  • Modifying a user’s attribute:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    replace: attribute_to_modify
    attribute_to_modify: new_value
  • Disabling a user:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    replace: nsAccountLock
    nsAccountLock: TRUE
  • Enabling a user:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    replace: nsAccountLock
    nsAccountLock: FALSE

    Updating the nssAccountLock attribute has no effect on stage and preserved users. Even though the update operation completes successfully, the attribute value remains nssAccountLock: TRUE.

  • Preserving a user:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modrdn
    newrdn: uid=user_login
    deleteoldrdn: 0
    newsuperior: cn=deleted users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
Note

Before modifying a user, obtain the user’s distinguished name (DN) by searching using the user’s login. In the following example, the user_allowed_to_modify_user_entries user is a user allowed to modify user and group information, for example activator or IdM administrator. The password in the example is this user’s password:

[...]
# ldapsearch -LLL -x -D "uid=user_allowed_to_modify_user_entries,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com" -w "Secret123" -H ldap://r8server.idm.example.com -b "cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com" uid=test_user
dn: uid=test_user,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
memberOf: cn=ipausers,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com

6.2. Templates for managing IdM group accounts externally

This section describes templates for various user group management operations in IdM. The templates show which attributes you must modify using ldapmodify to achieve the following aims:

  • Creating a new group
  • Deleting an existing group
  • Adding a member to a group
  • Removing a member from a group

The templates are formatted in the LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF). LDIF is a standard plain text data interchange format for representing LDAP directory content and update requests.

Using the templates, you can configure the LDAP provider of your provisioning system to manage IdM group accounts.

Creating a new group

dn: cn=group_name,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
changetype: add
objectClass: top
objectClass: ipaobject
objectClass: ipausergroup
objectClass: groupofnames
objectClass: nestedgroup
objectClass: posixgroup
uid: group_name
cn: group_name
gidNumber: GID_number

Modifying groups

  • Deleting an existing group:

    dn: group_distinguished_name
    changetype: delete
  • Adding a member to a group:

    dn: group_distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    add: member
    member: uid=user_login,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com

    Do not add stage or preserved users to groups. Even though the update operation completes successfully, the users will not be updated as members of the group. Only active users can belong to groups.

  • Removing a member from a group:

    dn: distinguished_name
    changetype: modify
    delete: member
    member: uid=user_login,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
Note

Before modifying a group, obtain the group’s distinguished name (DN) by searching using the group’s name.

# ldapsearch -YGSSAPI -H ldap://server.idm.example.com -b "cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com" "cn=group_name"
dn: cn=group_name,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
ipaNTSecurityIdentifier: S-1-5-21-1650388524-2605035987-2578146103-11017
cn: testgroup
objectClass: top
objectClass: groupofnames
objectClass: nestedgroup
objectClass: ipausergroup
objectClass: ipaobject
objectClass: posixgroup
objectClass: ipantgroupattrs
ipaUniqueID: 569bf864-9d45-11ea-bea3-525400f6f085
gidNumber: 1997010017

6.3. Preserving an IdM user with ldapmodify

This section describes how to use ldapmodify to preserve an IdM user; that is, how to deactivate a user account after the employee has left the company.

Prerequisites

  • You can authenticate as an IdM user with a role to preserve users.

Procedure

  1. Log in as an IdM user with a role to preserve users:

    $ kinit admin
  2. Enter the ldapmodify command and specify the Generic Security Services API (GSSAPI) as the Simple Authentication and Security Layer (SASL) mechanism to be used for authentication:

    # ldapmodify -Y GSSAPI
    SASL/GSSAPI authentication started
    SASL username: admin@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    SASL SSF: 256
    SASL data security layer installed.
  3. Enter the dn of the user you want to preserve:

    dn: uid=user1,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
  4. Enter modrdn as the type of change you want to perform:

    changetype: modrdn
  5. Specify the newrdn for the user:

    newrdn: uid=user1
  6. Indicate that you want to preserve the user:

    deleteoldrdn: 0
  7. Specify the new superior DN:

    newsuperior: cn=deleted users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com

    Preserving a user moves the entry to a new location in the directory information tree (DIT). For this reason, you must specify the DN of the new parent entry as the new superior DN.

  8. Press Enter again to confirm that this is the end of the entry:

    [Enter]
    
    modifying rdn of entry "uid=user1,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com"
  9. Exit the connection using Ctrl + C.

Verification steps

  • Verify that the user has been preserved by listing all preserved users:

    $ ipa user-find --preserved=true
    --------------
    1 user matched
    --------------
      User login: user1
      First name: First 1
      Last name: Last 1
      Home directory: /home/user1
      Login shell: /bin/sh
      Principal name: user1@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Principal alias: user1@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
      Email address: user1@idm.example.com
      UID: 1997010003
      GID: 1997010003
      Account disabled: True
      Preserved user: True
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

Chapter 7. Configuring IdM for external provisioning of users

As a system administrator, you can configure Identity Management (IdM) to support the provisioning of users by an external solution for managing identities.

Rather than use the ipa utility, the administrator of the external provisioning system can access the IdM LDAP using the ldapmodify utility. The administrator can add individual stage users from the CLI using ldapmodify or using an LDIF file.

The assumption is that you, as an IdM administrator, fully trust your external provisioning system to only add validated users. However, at the same time you do not want to assign the administrators of the external provisioning system the IdM role of User Administrator to enable them to add new active users directly.

You can configure a script to automatically move the staged users created by the external provisioning system to active users automatically.

This chapter contains these sections:

  1. Preparing Identity Management (IdM) to use an external provisioning system to add stage users to IdM.
  2. Creating a script to move the users added by the external provisioning system from stage to active users.
  3. Using an external provisioning system to add an IdM stage user. You can do that in two ways:

7.1. Preparing IdM accounts for automatic activation of stage user accounts

This procedure shows how to configure two IdM user accounts to be used by an external provisioning system. By adding the accounts to a group with an appropriate password policy, you enable the external provisioning system to manage user provisioning in IdM. In the following, the user account to be used by the external system to add stage users is named provisionator. The user account to be used to automatically activate the stage users is named activator.

Prerequisites

  • The host on which you perform the procedure is enrolled into IdM.

Procedure

  1. Log in as IdM administrator:

    $ kinit admin
  2. Create a user named provisionator with the privileges to add stage users.

    1. Add the provisionator user account:
    $ ipa user-add provisionator --first=provisioning --last=account --password
    1. Grant the provisionator user the required privileges.

      1. Create a custom role, System Provisioning, to manage adding stage users:

        $ ipa role-add --desc "Responsible for provisioning stage users" "System Provisioning"
      2. Add the Stage User Provisioning privilege to the role. This privilege provides the ability to add stage users:

        $ ipa role-add-privilege "System Provisioning" --privileges="Stage User Provisioning"
      3. Add the provisionator user to the role:

        $ ipa role-add-member --users=provisionator "System Provisioning"
      4. Verify that the provisionator exists in IdM:
      $ ipa user-find provisionator --all --raw
      --------------
      1 user matched
      --------------
        dn: uid=provisionator,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
        uid: provisionator
        [...]
  3. Create a user, activator, with the privileges to manage user accounts.

    1. Add the activator user account:

      $ ipa user-add activator --first=activation --last=account --password
    2. Grant the activator user the required privileges by adding the user to the default User Administrator role:

      $ ipa role-add-member --users=activator "User Administrator"
  4. Create a user group for application accounts:

    $ ipa group-add application-accounts
  5. Update the password policy for the group. The following policy prevents password expiration and lockout for the account but compensates the potential risks by requiring complex passwords:

    $ ipa pwpolicy-add application-accounts --maxlife=10000 --minlife=0 --history=0 --minclasses=4 --minlength=8 --priority=1 --maxfail=0 --failinterval=1 --lockouttime=0
  6. (Optional) Verify that the password policy exists in IdM:

    $ ipa pwpolicy-show application-accounts
      Group: application-accounts
      Max lifetime (days): 10000
      Min lifetime (hours): 0
      History size: 0
    [...]
  7. Add the provisioning and activation accounts to the group for application accounts:

    $ ipa group-add-member application-accounts --users={provisionator,activator}
  8. Change the passwords for the user accounts:

    $ kpasswd provisionator
    $ kpasswd activator

    Changing the passwords is necessary because new IdM users passwords expire immediately.

7.2. Configuring automatic activation of IdM stage user accounts

This procedure shows how to create a script for activating stage users. The system runs the script automatically at specified time intervals. This ensures that new user accounts are automatically activated and available for use shortly after they are created.

Important

The procedure assumes that the owner of the external provisioning system has already validated the users and that they do not require additional validation on the IdM side before the script adds them to IdM.

It is sufficient to enable the activation process on only one of your IdM servers.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Generate a keytab file for the activation account:

    # ipa-getkeytab -s server.idm.example.com -p "activator" -k /etc/krb5.ipa-activation.keytab

    If you want to enable the activation process on more than one IdM server, generate the keytab file on one server only. Then copy the keytab file to the other servers.

  2. Create a script, /usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all, with the following contents to activate all users:

    #!/bin/bash
    
    kinit -k -i activator
    
    ipa stageuser-find --all --raw | grep "  uid:" | cut -d ":" -f 2 | while read uid; do ipa stageuser-activate ${uid}; done
  3. Edit the permissions and ownership of the ipa-activate-all script to make it executable:

    # chmod 755 /usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all
    # chown root:root /usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all
  4. Create a systemd unit file, /etc/systemd/system/ipa-activate-all.service, with the following contents:

    [Unit]
    Description=Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated
    
    [Service]
    Environment=KRB5_CLIENT_KTNAME=/etc/krb5.ipa-activation.keytab
    Environment=KRB5CCNAME=FILE:/tmp/krb5cc_ipa-activate-all
    ExecStart=/usr/local/sbin/ipa-activate-all
  5. Create a systemd timer, /etc/systemd/system/ipa-activate-all.timer, with the following contents:

    [Unit]
    Description=Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated
    
    [Timer]
    OnBootSec=15min
    OnUnitActiveSec=1min
    
    [Install]
    WantedBy=multi-user.target
  6. Reload the new configuration:

    # systemctl daemon-reload
  7. Enable ipa-activate-all.timer:

    # systemctl enable ipa-activate-all.timer
  8. Start ipa-activate-all.timer:

    # systemctl start ipa-activate-all.timer
  9. (Optional) Verify that the ipa-activate-all.timer daemon is running:

    # systemctl status ipa-activate-all.timer
    ● ipa-activate-all.timer - Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated
       Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/ipa-activate-all.timer; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
       Active: active (waiting) since Wed 2020-06-10 16:34:55 CEST; 15s ago
      Trigger: Wed 2020-06-10 16:35:55 CEST; 44s left
    
    Jun 10 16:34:55 server.idm.example.com systemd[1]: Started Scan IdM every minute for any stage users that must be activated.

7.3. Adding an IdM stage user defined in an LDIF file

This section describes how an administrator of an external provisioning system can access IdM LDAP and use an LDIF file to add stage users. While the example below shows adding one single user, multiple users can be added in one file in bulk mode.

Prerequisites

  • IdM administrator has created the provisionator account and a password for it. For details, see Preparing IdM accounts for automatic activation of stage user accounts.
  • You as the external administrator know the password of the provisionator account.
  • You can SSH to the IdM server from your LDAP server.
  • You are able to supply the minimal set of attributes that an IdM stage user must have to allow the correct processing of the user life cycle, namely:

    • The distinguished name (dn)
    • The common name (cn)
    • The last name (sn)
    • The uid

Procedure

  1. On the external server, create an LDIF file that contains information about the new user:

    dn: uid=stageidmuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
    changetype: add
    objectClass: top
    objectClass: inetorgperson
    uid: stageidmuser
    sn: surname
    givenName: first_name
    cn: full_name
  2. Transfer the LDIF file from the external server to the IdM server:

    $ scp add-stageidmuser.ldif provisionator@server.idm.example.com:/provisionator/
    Password:
    add-stageidmuser.ldif                                                                                          100%  364   217.6KB/s   00:00
  3. Use the SSH protocol to connect to the IdM server as provisionator:

    $ ssh provisionator@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [provisionator@server ~]$
  4. On the IdM server, obtain the Kerberos ticket-granting ticket (TGT) for the provisionator account:

    [provisionator@server ~]$ kinit provisionator
  5. Enter the ldapadd command with the -f option and the name of the LDIF file. Specify the name of the IdM server and the port number:

    ~]$ ldapadd -h server.idm.example.com -p 389 -f  add-stageidmuser.ldif
    SASL/GSSAPI authentication started
    SASL username: provisionator@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    SASL SSF: 256
    SASL data security layer installed.
    adding the entry "uid=stageidmuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com"

7.4. Adding an IdM stage user directly from the CLI using ldapmodify

This section describes how an administrator of an external provisioning system can access the Identity Management (IdM) LDAP and use the ldapmodify utility to add a stage user.

Prerequisites

  • The IdM administrator has created the provisionator account and a password for it. For details, see Preparing IdM accounts for automatic activation of stage user accounts.
  • You as the external administrator know the password of the provisionator account.
  • You can SSH to the IdM server from your LDAP server.
  • You are able to supply the minimal set of attributes that an IdM stage user must have to allow the correct processing of the user life cycle, namely:

    • The distinguished name (dn)
    • The common name (cn)
    • The last name (sn)
    • The uid

Procedure

  1. Use the SSH protocol to connect to the IdM server using your IdM identity and credentials:

    $ ssh provisionator@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [provisionator@server ~]$
  2. Obtain the TGT of the provisionator account, an IdM user with a role to add new stage users:

    $ kinit provisionator
  3. Enter the ldapmodify command and specify Generic Security Services API (GSSAPI) as the Simple Authentication and Security Layer (SASL) mechanism to use for authentication. Specify the name of the IdM server and the port:

    # ldapmodify -h server.idm.example.com -p 389 -Y GSSAPI
    SASL/GSSAPI authentication started
    SASL username: provisionator@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM
    SASL SSF: 56
    SASL data security layer installed.
  4. Enter the dn of the user you are adding:

    dn: uid=stageuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
  5. Enter add as the type of change you are performing:

    changetype: add
  6. Specify the LDAP object class categories required to allow the correct processing of the user life cycle:

    objectClass: top
    objectClass: inetorgperson

    You can specify additional object classes.

  7. Enter the uid of the user:

    uid: stageuser
  8. Enter the cn of the user:

    cn: Babs Jensen
  9. Enter the last name of the user:

    sn: Jensen
  10. Press Enter again to confirm that this is the end of the entry:

    [Enter]
    
    adding new entry "uid=stageuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com"
  11. Exit the connection using Ctrl + C.

Verification steps

Verify the contents of the stage entry to make sure your provisioning system added all required POSIX attributes and the stage entry is ready to be activated.

  • To display the new stage user’s LDAP attributes, enter the ipa stageuser-show --all --raw command:

    $ ipa stageuser-show stageuser --all --raw
      dn: uid=stageuser,cn=staged users,cn=accounts,cn=provisioning,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
      uid: stageuser
      sn: Jensen
      cn: Babs Jensen
      has_password: FALSE
      has_keytab: FALSE
      nsaccountlock: TRUE
      objectClass: top
      objectClass: inetorgperson
      objectClass: organizationalPerson
      objectClass: person
    1. Note that the user is explicitly disabled by the nsaccountlock attribute.

7.5. Additional resources

Chapter 8. Managing self-service rules in IdM using the CLI

This chapter introduces self-service rules in Identity Management (IdM) and describes how to create and edit self-service access rules in the command-line interface (CLI).

8.1. Self-service access control in IdM

Self-service access control rules define which operations an Identity Management (IdM) entity can perform on its IdM Directory Server entry: for example, IdM users have the ability to update their own passwords.

This method of control allows an authenticated IdM entity to edit specific attributes within its LDAP entry, but does not allow add or delete operations on the entire entry.

Warning

Be careful when working with self-service access control rules: configuring access control rules improperly can inadvertently elevate an entity’s privileges.

8.2. Creating self-service rules using the CLI

This procedure describes creating self-service access rules in IdM using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • To add a self-service rule, use the ipa selfservice-add command and specify the following two options:

    --permissions
    sets the read and write permissions the Access Control Instruction (ACI) grants.
    --attrs
    sets the complete list of attributes to which this ACI grants permission.

For example, to create a self-service rule allowing users to modify their own name details:

$ ipa selfservice-add "Users can manage their own name details" --permissions=write --attrs=givenname --attrs=displayname --attrs=title --attrs=initials
-----------------------------------------------------------
Added selfservice "Users can manage their own name details"
-----------------------------------------------------------
    Self-service name: Users can manage their own name details
    Permissions: write
    Attributes: givenname, displayname, title, initials

8.3. Editing self-service rules using the CLI

This procedure describes editing self-service access rules in IdM using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Optional: Display existing self-service rules with the ipa selfservice-find command.
  2. Optional: Display details for the self-service rule you want to modify with the ipa selfservice-show command.
  3. Use the ipa selfservice-mod command to edit a self-service rule.

For example:

$ ipa selfservice-mod "Users can manage their own name details" --attrs=givenname --attrs=displayname --attrs=title --attrs=initials --attrs=surname
--------------------------------------------------------------
Modified selfservice "Users can manage their own name details"
--------------------------------------------------------------
Self-service name: Users can manage their own name details
Permissions: write
Attributes: givenname, displayname, title, initials
Important

Using the ipa selfservice-mod command overwrites the previously defined permissions and attributes, so always include the complete list of existing permissions and attributes along with any new ones you want to define.

Verification steps

  • Use the ipa selfservice-show command to display the self-service rule you edited.
$ ipa selfservice-show "Users can manage their own name details"
--------------------------------------------------------------
Self-service name: Users can manage their own name details
Permissions: write
Attributes: givenname, displayname, title, initials

8.4. Deleting self-service rules using the CLI

This procedure describes deleting self-service access rules in IdM using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Use the ipa selfservice-del command to delete a self-service rule.

For example:

$ ipa selfservice-del "Users can manage their own name details"
-----------------------------------------------------------
Deleted selfservice "Users can manage their own name details"
-----------------------------------------------------------

Verification steps

  • Use the ipa selfservice-find command to display all self-service rules. The rule you just deleted should be missing.

Chapter 9. Managing self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces self-service rules in Identity Management (IdM) and describes how to create and edit self-service access rules in the web interface (IdM Web UI).

9.1. Self-service access control in IdM

Self-service access control rules define which operations an Identity Management (IdM) entity can perform on its IdM Directory Server entry: for example, IdM users have the ability to update their own passwords.

This method of control allows an authenticated IdM entity to edit specific attributes within its LDAP entry, but does not allow add or delete operations on the entire entry.

Warning

Be careful when working with self-service access control rules: configuring access control rules improperly can inadvertently elevate an entity’s privileges.

9.2. Creating self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This procedure describes how to create self-service access rules in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Self Service Permissions.
  2. Click Add at the top-right of the list of the self-service access rules:

    Adding a self-service rule

  3. The Add Self Service Permission window opens. Enter the name of the new self-service rule in the Self-service name field. Spaces are allowed:

    Form for adding a self-service rule

  4. Select the check boxes next to the attributes you want users to be able to edit.
  5. Optional: If an attribute you would like to provide access to is not listed, you can add a listing for it:

    1. Click the Add button.
    2. Enter the attribute name in the Attribute text field of the following Add Custom Attribute window.
    3. Click the OK button to add the attribute
    4. Verify that the new attribute is selected
  6. Click the Add button at the bottom of the form to save the new self-service rule.
    Alternatively, you can save and continue editing the self-service rule by clicking the Add and Edit button, or save and add further rules by clicking the Add and Add another button.

9.3. Editing self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This procedure describes how to edit self-service access rules in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Self Service Permissions.
  2. Click on the name of the self-service rule you want to modify.

    Editing an existing self-service rule

  3. The edit page only allows you to edit the list of attributes to you want to add or remove to the self-service rule. Select or deselect the appropriate check boxes.
  4. Click the Save button to save your changes to the self-service rule.

9.4. Deleting self-service rules using the IdM Web UI

This procedure describes how to delete self-service access rules in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Self Service Permissions.
  2. Select the check box next to the rule you want to delete, then click on the Delete button on the right of the list.

    Deleting a self-service rule

  3. A dialog opens, click on Delete to confirm.

Chapter 10. Using Ansible playbooks to manage self-service rules in IdM

This section introduces self-service rules in Identity Management (IdM) and describes how to create and edit self-service access rules using Ansible playbooks. Self-service access control rules allow an IdM entity to perform specified operations on its IdM Directory Server entry.

This section covers the following topics:

10.1. Self-service access control in IdM

Self-service access control rules define which operations an Identity Management (IdM) entity can perform on its IdM Directory Server entry: for example, IdM users have the ability to update their own passwords.

This method of control allows an authenticated IdM entity to edit specific attributes within its LDAP entry, but does not allow add or delete operations on the entire entry.

Warning

Be careful when working with self-service access control rules: configuring access control rules improperly can inadvertently elevate an entity’s privileges.

10.2. Using Ansible to ensure that a self-service rule is present

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to define self-service rules and ensure their presence on an Identity Management (IdM) server. In this example, the new Users can manage their own name details rule grants users the ability to change their own givenname, displayname, title and initials attributes. This allows them to, for example, change their display name or initials if they want to.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the selfservice-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/selfservice-present.yml selfservice-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the selfservice-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaselfservice task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the new self-service rule.
    • Set the permission variable to a comma-separated list of permissions to grant: read and write.
    • Set the attribute variable to a list of attributes that users can manage themselves: givenname, displayname, title, and initials.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Self-service present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure self-service rule "Users can manage their own name details" is present
        ipaselfservice:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "Users can manage their own name details"
          permission: read, write
          attribute:
          - givenname
          - displayname
          - title
          - initials
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory selfservice-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Self-service access control in IdM.
  • See the README-selfservice.md file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice directory.

10.3. Using Ansible to ensure that a self-service rule is absent

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure a specified self-service rule is absent from your IdM configuration. The example below describes how to make sure the Users can manage their own name details self-service rule does not exist in IdM. This will ensure that users cannot, for example, change their own display name or initials.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the selfservice-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/selfservice-absent.yml selfservice-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the selfservice-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaselfservice task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the self-service rule.
    • Set the state variable to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Self-service absent
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure self-service rule "Users can manage their own name details" is absent
        ipaselfservice:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "Users can manage their own name details"
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory selfservice-absent-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Self-service access control in IdM.
  • See the README-selfservice.md file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice directory.

10.4. Using Ansible to ensure that a self-service rule has specific attributes

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that an already existing self-service rule has specific settings. In the example, you ensure the Users can manage their own name details self-service rule also has the surname member attribute.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.
  • The Users can manage their own name details self-service rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the selfservice-member-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/selfservice-member-present.yml selfservice-member-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the selfservice-member-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaselfservice task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the self-service rule to modify.
    • Set the attribute variable to surname.
    • Set the action variable to member.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Self-service member present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure selfservice "Users can manage their own name details" member attribute surname is present
        ipaselfservice:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "Users can manage their own name details"
          attribute:
          - surname
          action: member
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory selfservice-member-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Self-service access control in IdM.
  • See the README-selfservice.md file available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice directory.

10.5. Using Ansible to ensure that a self-service rule does not have specific attributes

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that a self-service rule does not have specific settings. You can use this playbook to make sure a self-service rule does not grant undesired access. In the example, you ensure the Users can manage their own name details self-service rule does not have the givenname and surname member attributes.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.
  • The Users can manage their own name details self-service rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the selfservice-member-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice/selfservice-member-absent.yml selfservice-member-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the selfservice-member-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaselfservice task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the self-service rule you want to modify.
    • Set the attribute variable to givenname and surname.
    • Set the action variable to member.
    • Set the state variable to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Self-service member absent
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure selfservice "Users can manage their own name details" member attributes givenname and surname are absent
        ipaselfservice:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "Users can manage their own name details"
          attribute:
          - givenname
          - surname
          action: member
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory selfservice-member-absent-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Self-service access control in IdM.
  • See the README-selfservice.md file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/selfservice directory.

Chapter 11. Managing user groups in IdM CLI

This chapter introduces user groups management using the IdM CLI.

A user group is a set of users with common privileges, password policies, and other characteristics.

A user group in Identity Management (IdM) can include:

  • IdM users
  • other IdM user groups
  • external users, which are users that exist outside of IdM

11.1. The different group types in IdM

IdM supports the following types of groups:

POSIX groups (the default)

POSIX groups support Linux POSIX attributes for their members. Note that groups that interact with Active Directory cannot use POSIX attributes.

POSIX attributes identify users as separate entities. Examples of POSIX attributes relevant to users include uidNumber, a user number (UID), and gidNumber, a group number (GID).

Non-POSIX groups

Non-POSIX groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

All members of this type of group must belong to the IdM domain.

External groups

Use external groups to add group members that exist in an identity store outside of the IdM domain, such as:

  • A local system
  • An Active Directory domain
  • A directory service

External groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

Table 11.1. User groups created by default

Group nameDefault group members

ipausers

All IdM users

admins

Users with administrative privileges, including the default admin user

editors

This is a legacy group that no longer has any special privileges

trust admins

Users with privileges to manage the Active Directory trusts

When you add a user to a user group, the user gains the privileges and policies associated with the group. For example, to grant administrative privileges to a user, add the user to the admins group.

Warning

Do not delete the admins group. As admins is a pre-defined group required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands.

In addition, IdM creates user private groups by default whenever a new user is created in IdM. For more information about private groups, see Adding users without a private group.

11.2. Direct and indirect group members

User group attributes in IdM apply to both direct and indirect members: when group B is a member of group A, all users in group B are considered indirect members of group A.

For example, in the following diagram:

  • User 1 and User 2 are direct members of group A.
  • User 3, User 4, and User 5 are indirect members of group A.

Figure 11.1. Direct and Indirect Group Membership

A chart with Group A (with 2 users) and Group B (with 3 users). Group B is nested inside Group A so Group A contains a total of 5 users.

If you set a password policy for user group A, the policy also applies to all users in user group B.

11.3. Adding a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to add a user group using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Add a user group by using the ipa group-add group_name command. For example, to create group_a:

    $ ipa group-add group_a
    ---------------------
    Added group "group_a"
    ---------------------
      Group name: group_a
      GID: 1133400009

    By default, ipa group-add adds a POSIX user group. To specify a different group type, add options to ipa group-add:

    You can specify a custom GID when adding a user group by using the --gid=custom_GID option. If you do this, be careful to avoid ID conflicts. If you do not specify a custom GID, IdM automatically assigns a GID from the available ID range.

Warning

Do not add local groups to IdM. The Name Service Switch (NSS) always resolves IdM users and groups before resolving local users and groups. This means that, for example, IdM group membership does not work for local users.

11.4. Searching for user groups using IdM CLI

This section describes how to search for existing user groups using IdM CLI.

Procedure

  • Display all user groups by using the ipa group-find command. To specify a group type, add options to ipa group-find:

    • Display all POSIX groups using the ipa group-find --posix command.
    • Display all non-POSIX groups using the ipa group-find --nonposix command.
    • Display all external groups using the ipa group-find --external command.

      For more information on different group types, see The different group types in IdM.

11.5. Deleting a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to delete a user group using IdM CLI. Note that deleting a group does not delete the group members from IdM.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Delete a user group by using the ipa group-del group_name command. For example, to delete group_a:

    $ ipa group-del group_a
    --------------------------
    Deleted group "group_a"
    --------------------------

11.6. Adding a member to a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to add a member to a user group using IdM CLI. You can add both users and user groups as members of a user group. For more information, see The different group types in IdM and Direct and indirect group members.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • Add a member to a user group by using the ipa group-add-member command.

    Specify the type of member using these options:

    • --users adds an IdM user
    • --external adds a user that exists outside the IdM domain, in the format of DOMAIN\user_name or user_name@domain
    • --groups adds an IdM user group

    For example, to add group_b as a member of group_a:

    $ ipa group-add-member group_a --groups=group_b
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Member users: user_a
    Member groups: group_b
    Indirect Member users: user_b
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

    Members of group_b are now indirect members of group_a.

Important

When adding a group as a member of another group, do not create recursive groups. For example, if Group A is a member of Group B, do not add Group B as a member of Group A. Recursive groups can cause unpredictable behavior.

Note

After you add a member to a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment. This is because when any given host resolves users, groups and netgroups, the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) first looks into its cache and performs server lookups only for missing or expired records.

11.7. Adding users without a user private group

By default, IdM creates user private groups (UPGs) whenever a new user is created in IdM. UPGs are a specific group type:

  • The UPG has the same name as the newly created user.
  • The user is the only member of the UPG. The UPG cannot contain any other members.
  • The GID of the private group matches the UID of the user.

However, it is possible to add users without creating a UPG.

11.7.1. Users without a user private group

If a NIS group or another system group already uses the GID that would be assigned to a user private group, it is necessary to avoid creating a UPG.

You can do this in two ways:

In both cases, IdM will require specifying a GID when adding new users, otherwise the operation will fail. This is because IdM requires a GID for the new user, but the default user group ipausers is a non-POSIX group and therefore does not have an associated GID. The GID you specify does not have to correspond to an already existing group.

Note

Specifying the GID does not create a new group. It only sets the GID attribute for the new user, because the attribute is required by IdM.

11.7.2. Adding a user without a user private group when private groups are globally enabled

You can add a user without creating a user private group (UPG) even when UPGs are enabled on the system. This requires manually setting a GID for the new user. For details on why this is needed, see Users without a user private group.

Procedure

  • To prevent IdM from creating a UPG, add the --noprivate option to the ipa user-add command.

    Note that for the command to succeed, you must specify a custom GID. For example, to add a new user with GID 10000:

    $ ipa user-add jsmith --first=John --last=Smith --noprivate --gid 10000

11.7.3. Disabling user private groups globally for all users

You can disable user private groups (UPGs) globally. This prevents the creation of UPGs for all new users. Existing users are unaffected by this change.

Procedure

  1. Obtain administrator privileges:

    $ kinit admin
  2. IdM uses the Directory Server Managed Entries Plug-in to manage UPGs. List the instances of the plug-in:

    $ ipa-managed-entries --list
  3. To ensure IdM does not create UPGs, disable the plug-in instance responsible for managing user private groups:

    $ ipa-managed-entries -e "UPG Definition" disable
    Disabling Plugin
    Note

    To re-enable the UPG Definition instance later, use the ipa-managed-entries -e "UPG Definition" enable command.

  4. Restart Directory Server to load the new configuration.

    $ sudo systemctl restart dirsrv.target

    To add a user after UPGs have been disabled, you need to specify a GID. For more information, see Adding a user when user private groups are globally disabled

Verification steps

  • To check if UPGs are globally disabled, use the disable command again:

    $ ipa-managed-entries -e "UPG Definition" disable
    Plugin already disabled

11.7.4. Adding a user when user private groups are globally disabled

When user private groups (UPGs) are disabled globally, IdM does not assign a GID to a new user automatically. To successfully add a user, you must assign a GID manually or by using an automember rule. For details on why this is required, see Users without a user private group.

Prerequisities

Procedure

  • To make sure adding a new user succeeds when creating UPGs is disabled, choose one of the following:

    • Specify a custom GID when adding a new user. The GID does not have to correspond to an already existing user group.

      For example, when adding a user from the command line, add the --gid option to the ipa user-add command.

    • Use an automember rule to add the user to an existing group with a GID.

11.8. Adding users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the IdM CLI

This section describes how to add users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the IdM CLI. Member managers can add users or groups to IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You must be logged in as the administrator. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • You must have the name of the user or group you are adding as member managers and the name of the group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  • Add a user as a member manager to an IdM user group by using the ipa group-add-member-manager command.

    For example, to add the user test as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-add-member-manager group_a --users=test
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by users: test
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

    User test can now manage members of group_a.

  • Add a group as a member manager to an IdM user group by using the ipa group-add-member-manager command.

    For example, to add the group group_admins as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-add-member-manager group_a --groups=group_admins
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by groups: group_admins
    Membership managed by users: test
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

    Group group_admins can now manage members of group_a.

Note

After you add a member manager to a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Using the ipa group-show command to verify the user and group were added as member managers.

    $ ipa group-show group_a
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by groups: group_admins
    Membership managed by users: test

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-add-member-manager --help for more details.

11.9. Viewing group members using IdM CLI

This section describes how to view members of a group using IdM CLI. You can view both direct and indirect group members. For more information, see Direct and indirect group members.

Procedure:

  • To list members of a group, use the ipa group-show group_name command. For example:

    $ ipa group-show group_a
      ...
      Member users: user_a
      Member groups: group_b
      Indirect Member users: user_b
    Note

    The list of indirect members does not include external users from trusted Active Directory domains. The Active Directory trust user objects are not visible in the Identity Management interface because they do not exist as LDAP objects within Identity Management.

11.10. Removing a member from a user group using IdM CLI

This section describes how to remove a member from a user group using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Optional. Use the ipa group-show command to confirm that the group includes the member you want to remove.
  2. Remove a member from a user group by using the ipa group-remove-member command.

    Specify members to remove using these options:

    • --users removes an IdM user
    • --external removes a user that exists outside the IdM domain, in the format of DOMAIN\user_name or user_name@domain
    • --groups removes an IdM user group

    For example, to remove user1, user2, and group1 from a group called group_name:

    $ ipa group-remove-member group_name --users=user1 --users=user2 --groups=group1

11.11. Removing users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the IdM CLI

This section describes how to remove users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the IdM CLI. Member managers can remove users or groups from IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You must be logged in as the administrator. For details, see Using kinit to log in to IdM manually.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager user or group you are removing and the name of the group they are managing.

Procedure

  • Remove a user as a member manager of an IdM user group by using the ipa group-remove-member-manager command.

    For example, to remove the user test as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-remove-member-manager group_a --users=test
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    Membership managed by groups: group_admins
    ---------------------------
    Number of members removed 1
    ---------------------------

    User test can no longer manage members of group_a.

  • Remove a group as a member manager of an IdM user group by using the ipa group-remove-member-manager command.

    For example, to remove the group group_admins as a member manager of group_a:

    $ ipa group-remove-member-manager group_a --groups=group_admins
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009
    ---------------------------
    Number of members removed 1
    ---------------------------

    Group group_admins can no longer manage members of group_a.

Note

After you remove a member manager from a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Using the ipa group-show command to verify the user and group were removed as member managers.

    $ ipa group-show group_a
    Group name: group_a
    GID: 1133400009

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-remove-member-manager --help for more details.

Chapter 12. Managing user groups in IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces user groups management using the IdM web UI.

A user group is a set of users with common privileges, password policies, and other characteristics.

A user group in Identity Management (IdM) can include:

  • IdM users
  • other IdM user groups
  • external users, which are users that exist outside of IdM

12.1. The different group types in IdM

IdM supports the following types of groups:

POSIX groups (the default)

POSIX groups support Linux POSIX attributes for their members. Note that groups that interact with Active Directory cannot use POSIX attributes.

POSIX attributes identify users as separate entities. Examples of POSIX attributes relevant to users include uidNumber, a user number (UID), and gidNumber, a group number (GID).

Non-POSIX groups

Non-POSIX groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

All members of this type of group must belong to the IdM domain.

External groups

Use external groups to add group members that exist in an identity store outside of the IdM domain, such as:

  • A local system
  • An Active Directory domain
  • A directory service

External groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

Table 12.1. User groups created by default

Group nameDefault group members

ipausers

All IdM users

admins

Users with administrative privileges, including the default admin user

editors

This is a legacy group that no longer has any special privileges

trust admins

Users with privileges to manage the Active Directory trusts

When you add a user to a user group, the user gains the privileges and policies associated with the group. For example, to grant administrative privileges to a user, add the user to the admins group.

Warning

Do not delete the admins group. As admins is a pre-defined group required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands.

In addition, IdM creates user private groups by default whenever a new user is created in IdM. For more information about private groups, see Adding users without a private group.

12.2. Direct and indirect group members

User group attributes in IdM apply to both direct and indirect members: when group B is a member of group A, all users in group B are considered indirect members of group A.

For example, in the following diagram:

  • User 1 and User 2 are direct members of group A.
  • User 3, User 4, and User 5 are indirect members of group A.

Figure 12.1. Direct and Indirect Group Membership

A chart with Group A (with 2 users) and Group B (with 3 users). Group B is nested inside Group A so Group A contains a total of 5 users.

If you set a password policy for user group A, the policy also applies to all users in user group B.

12.3. Adding a user group using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to add a user group using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups, and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click Add to start adding the group.
  3. Fill out the information about the group. For more information about user group types, see The different group types in IdM.

    You can specify a custom GID for the group. If you do this, be careful to avoid ID conflicts. If you do not specify a custom GID, IdM automatically assigns a GID from the available ID range.

    Screenshot of the "Add user group" pop-up window with the following fields: Group name (which is a required field) - Description - Group Type - GID. The "Add" button is at the bottom.
  4. Click Add to confirm.

12.4. Deleting a user group using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to delete a user group using the IdM Web UI. Note that deleting a group does not delete the group members from IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups.
  2. Select the group to delete.
  3. Click Delete.
  4. Click Delete to confirm.

12.5. Adding a member to a user group using IdM Web UI

You can add both users and user groups as members of a user group. For more information, see The different group types in IdM and Direct and indirect group members.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of group member you want to add: Users, User Groups, or External.

    A screenshot of the "User Group" page highlighting the three buttons for the three categories of group members you can add: "Users" - "User Groups" - "External users".
  4. Click Add.
  5. Select the check box next to one or more members you want to add.
  6. Click the rightward arrow to move the selected members to the group.

    A screenshot of the "Add users into user group group_a" pop-up window with a column to the left with "Available users" logins that can be checked. There is a right-arrow you can click to add users to the "Prospective" list on the right.
  7. Click Add to confirm.

12.6. Adding users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the Web UI

This section describes how to add users or groups as member managers to an IdM user group using the Web UI. Member managers can add users or groups to IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must have the name of the user or group you are adding as member managers and the name of the group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of group member manager you want to add: Users or User Groups.

    groups add member manager
  4. Click Add.
  5. Select the check box next to one or more members you want to add.
  6. Click the rightward arrow to move the selected members to the group.

    groups add member managers users
  7. Click Add to confirm.
Note

After you add a member manager to a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Verify the newly added user or user group has been added to the member manager list of users or user groups:

    groups member manager added

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-add-member-manager --help for more information.

12.7. Viewing group members using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to view members of a group using the IdM Web UI. You can view both direct and indirect group members. For more information, see Direct and indirect group members.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Select Identity → Groups.
  2. Select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  3. Click the name of the group you want to view.
  4. Switch between Direct Membership and Indirect Membership.

    A screenshot showing radial buttons next to the "Direct Membership" and "Indirect Membership" options next to "Show Results."

12.8. Removing a member from a user group using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to remove a member from a user group using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of group member you want to remove: Users, User Groups, or External.

    A screenshot of the "User Group" page highlighting the three buttons for the three categories of group members you can add: "Users" - "User Groups" - "External users".
  4. Select the check box next to the member you want to remove.
  5. Click Delete.
  6. Click Delete to confirm.

12.9. Removing users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the Web UI

This section describes how to remove users or groups as member managers from an IdM user group using the Web UI. Member managers can remove users or groups from IdM user groups but cannot change the attributes of a group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager user or group you are removing and the name of the group they are managing.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Groups and select User Groups in the left sidebar.
  2. Click the name of the group.
  3. Select the type of member manager you want to remove: Users or User Groups.

    groups add member manager
  4. Select the check box next to the member manager you want to remove.
  5. Click Delete.
  6. Click Delete to confirm.
Note

After you remove a member manager from a user group, the update may take some time to spread to all clients in your Identity Management environment.

Verification steps

  • Verify the user or user group has been removed from the member manager list of users or user groups:

    groups member manager removed

Additional resources

  • See ipa group-add-member-manager --help for more details.

Chapter 13. Managing user groups using Ansible playbooks

This section introduces user group management using Ansible playbooks.

A user group is a set of users with common privileges, password policies, and other characteristics.

A user group in Identity Management (IdM) can include:

  • IdM users
  • other IdM user groups
  • external users, which are users that exist outside of IdM

The section includes the following topics:

13.1. The different group types in IdM

IdM supports the following types of groups:

POSIX groups (the default)

POSIX groups support Linux POSIX attributes for their members. Note that groups that interact with Active Directory cannot use POSIX attributes.

POSIX attributes identify users as separate entities. Examples of POSIX attributes relevant to users include uidNumber, a user number (UID), and gidNumber, a group number (GID).

Non-POSIX groups

Non-POSIX groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

All members of this type of group must belong to the IdM domain.

External groups

Use external groups to add group members that exist in an identity store outside of the IdM domain, such as:

  • A local system
  • An Active Directory domain
  • A directory service

External groups do not support POSIX attributes. For example, these groups do not have a GID defined.

Table 13.1. User groups created by default

Group nameDefault group members

ipausers

All IdM users

admins

Users with administrative privileges, including the default admin user

editors

This is a legacy group that no longer has any special privileges

trust admins

Users with privileges to manage the Active Directory trusts

When you add a user to a user group, the user gains the privileges and policies associated with the group. For example, to grant administrative privileges to a user, add the user to the admins group.

Warning

Do not delete the admins group. As admins is a pre-defined group required by IdM, this operation causes problems with certain commands.

In addition, IdM creates user private groups by default whenever a new user is created in IdM. For more information about private groups, see Adding users without a private group.

13.2. Direct and indirect group members

User group attributes in IdM apply to both direct and indirect members: when group B is a member of group A, all users in group B are considered indirect members of group A.

For example, in the following diagram:

  • User 1 and User 2 are direct members of group A.
  • User 3, User 4, and User 5 are indirect members of group A.

Figure 13.1. Direct and Indirect Group Membership

A chart with Group A (with 2 users) and Group B (with 3 users). Group B is nested inside Group A so Group A contains a total of 5 users.

If you set a password policy for user group A, the policy also applies to all users in user group B.

13.3. Ensuring the presence of IdM groups and group members using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of IdM groups and group members - both users and user groups - using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary user and group information:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle groups
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Create group ops with gid 1234
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: ops
          gidnumber: 1234
    
      - name: Create group sysops
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: sysops
          user:
          - idm_user
    
      - name: Create group appops
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: appops
    
      - name: Add group members sysops and appops to group ops
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: ops
          group:
          - sysops
          - appops
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-group-members.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the ops group contains sysops and appops as direct members and idm_user as an indirect member by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about ops:

    ipaserver]$ ipa group-show ops
      Group name: ops
      GID: 1234
      Member groups: sysops, appops
      Indirect Member users: idm_user

    The appops and sysops groups - the latter including the idm_user user - exist in IdM.

Additional resources

  • See the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/README-group.md Markdown file.

13.4. Ensuring the presence of member managers in IdM user groups using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the presence of IdM member managers - both users and user groups - using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.
  • You must have the name of the user or group you are adding as member managers and the name of the group you want them to manage.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary user and group member management information:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle membership management
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure user test is present for group_a
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: group_a
          membermanager_user: test
    
      - name: Ensure group_admins is present for group_a
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: group_a
          membermanager_group: group_admins
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/add-member-managers-user-groups.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the group_a group contains test as a member manager and group_admins is a member manager of group_a by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about managergroup1:

    ipaserver]$ ipa group-show group_a
      Group name: group_a
      GID: 1133400009
      Membership managed by groups: group_admins
      Membership managed by users: test

Additional resources

  • See ipa host-add-member-manager --help.
  • See the ipa man page.

13.5. Ensuring the absence of member managers in IdM user groups using Ansible playbooks

The following procedure describes ensuring the absence of IdM member managers - both users and user groups - using an Ansible playbook.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible controller.
  • You must have the name of the existing member manager user or group you are removing and the name of the group they are managing.

Procedure

  1. Create an inventory file, for example inventory.file, and define ipaserver in it:

    [ipaserver]
    server.idm.example.com
  2. Create an Ansible playbook file with the necessary user and group member management information:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to handle membership management
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure member manager user and group members are absent for group_a
        ipagroup:
          ipaadmin_password: MySecret123
          name: group_a
          membermanager_user: test
          membermanager_group: group_admins
          action: member
          state: absent
  3. Run the playbook:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i path_to_inventory_directory/inventory.file path_to_playbooks_directory/ensure-member-managers-are-absent.yml

Verification steps

You can verify if the group_a group does not contain test as a member manager and group_admins as a member manager of group_a by using the ipa group-show command:

  1. Log into ipaserver as administrator:

    $ ssh admin@server.idm.example.com
    Password:
    [admin@server /]$
  2. Display information about group_a:

    ipaserver]$ ipa group-show group_a
      Group name: group_a
      GID: 1133400009

Additional resources

  • See ipa host-remove-member-manager --help.
  • See the ipa man page.

Chapter 14. Automating group membership using IdM CLI

Using automatic group membership allows you to assign users and hosts to groups automatically based on their attributes. For example, you can:

  • Divide employees' user entries into groups based on the employees' manager, location, or any other attribute.
  • Divide hosts based on their class, location, or any other attribute.
  • Add all users or all hosts to a single global group.

This chapter covers the following topics:

14.1. Benefits of automatic group membership

Using automatic membership for users allows you to:

  • Reduce the overhead of manually managing group memberships

    You no longer have to assign every user and host to groups manually.

  • Improve consistency in user and host management

    Users and hosts are assigned to groups based on strictly defined and automatically evaluated criteria.

  • Simplify the management of group-based settings

    Various settings are defined for groups and then applied to individual group members, for example sudo rules, automount, or access control. Adding users and hosts to groups automatically makes managing these settings easier.

14.2. Automember rules

When configuring automatic group membership, the administrator defines automember rules. An automember rule applies to a specific user or host target group. It cannot apply to more than one group at a time.

After creating a rule, the administrator adds conditions to it. These specify which users or hosts get included or excluded from the target group:

  • Inclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an inclusive condition, it will be included in the target group.

  • Exclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an exclusive condition, it will not be included in the target group.

The conditions are specified as regular expressions in the Perl-compatible regular expressions (PCRE) format. For more information on PCRE, see the pcresyntax(3) man page.

Note

IdM evaluates exclusive conditions before inclusive conditions. In case of a conflict, exclusive conditions take precedence over inclusive conditions.

An automember rule applies to every entry created in the future. These entries will be automatically added to the specified target group. If an entry meets the conditions specified in multiple automember rules, it will be added to all the corresponding groups.

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM CLI.

14.3. Adding an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes adding an automember rule using the IdM CLI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

After adding an automember rule, you can add conditions to it using the procedure described in Adding a condition to an automember rule.

Note

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-add command to add an automember rule.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the target group name.
    • Grouping Type. This specifies whether the rule targets a user group or a host group. To target a user group, enter group. To target a host group, enter hostgroup.

    For example, to add an automember rule for a user group named user_group:

    $ ipa automember-add
    Automember Rule: user_group
    Grouping Type: group
    --------------------------------
    Added automember rule "user_group"
    --------------------------------
        Automember Rule: user_group

Verification steps

14.4. Adding a condition to an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to add a condition to an automember rule using the IdM CLI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Define one or more inclusive or exclusive conditions using the ipa automember-add-condition command.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the target rule name. See Automember rules for details.
    • Attribute Key. This specifies the entry attribute to which the filter will apply. For example, uid for users.
    • Grouping Type. This specifies whether the rule targets a user group or a host group. To target a user group, enter group. To target a host group, enter hostgroup.
    • Inclusive regex and Exclusive regex. These specify one or more conditions as regular expressions. If you only want to specify one condition, press Enter when prompted for the other.

    For example, the following condition targets all users with any value (.*) in their user login attribute (uid).

    $ ipa automember-add-condition
    Automember Rule: user_group
    Attribute Key: uid
    Grouping Type: group
    [Inclusive Regex]: .*
    [Exclusive Regex]:
    ----------------------------------
    Added condition(s) to "user_group"
    ----------------------------------
      Automember Rule: user_group
      Inclusive Regex: uid=.*
    ----------------------------
    Number of conditions added 1
    ----------------------------

    As another example, you can use an automembership rule to target all Windows users synchronized from Active Directory (AD). To achieve this, create a condition that that targets all users with ntUser in their objectClass attribute, which is shared by all AD users:

    $ ipa automember-add-condition
    Automember Rule: ad_users
    Attribute Key: objectclass
    Grouping Type: group
    [Inclusive Regex]: ntUser
    [Exclusive Regex]:
    -------------------------------------
    Added condition(s) to "ad_users"
    -------------------------------------
      Automember Rule: ad_users
      Inclusive Regex: objectclass=ntUser
    ----------------------------
    Number of conditions added 1
    ----------------------------

Verification steps

14.5. Viewing existing automember rules using IdM CLI

This section describes how to view existing automember rules using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-find command.
  2. When prompted, specify the Grouping type:

    • To target a user group, enter group.
    • To target a host group, enter hostgroup.

      For example:

    $ ipa automember-find
    Grouping Type: group
    ---------------
    1 rules matched
    ---------------
      Automember Rule: user_group
      Inclusive Regex: uid=.*
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

14.6. Deleting an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to delete an automember rule using the IdM CLI.

Deleting an automember rule also deletes all conditions associated with the rule. To remove only specific conditions from a rule, see Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-del command.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the rule you want to delete.
    • Grouping rule. This specifies whether the rule you want to delete is for a user group or a host group. Enter group or hostgroup.

14.7. Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to remove a specific condition from an automember rule.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-remove-condition command.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Automember rule. This is the name of the rule from which you want to remove a condition.
    • Attribute Key. This is the target entry attribute. For example, uid for users.
    • Grouping Type. This specifies whether the condition you want to delete is for a user group or a host group. Enter group or hostgroup.
    • Inclusive regex and Exclusive regex. These specify the conditions you want to remove. If you only want to specify one condition, press Enter when prompted for the other.

      For example:

    $ ipa automember-remove-condition
    Automember Rule: user_group
    Attribute Key: uid
    Grouping Type: group
    [Inclusive Regex]: .*
    [Exclusive Regex]:
    -----------------------------------
    Removed condition(s) from "user_group"
    -----------------------------------
      Automember Rule: user_group
    ------------------------------
    Number of conditions removed 1
    ------------------------------

14.8. Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM CLI

Automember rules apply automatically to user and host entries created after the rules were added. They are not applied retroactively to entries that existed before the rules were added.

To apply automember rules to previously added entries, you have to manually rebuild automatic membership. Rebuilding automatic membership re-evaluates all existing automember rules and applies them either to all user or hosts entries, or to specific entries.

Note

Rebuilding automatic membership does not remove user or host entries from groups, even if the entries no longer match the group’s inclusive conditions. To remove them manually, see Removing a member from a user group using IdM CLI or Removing IdM host group members using the CLI.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  • To rebuild automatic membership, enter the ipa automember-rebuild command. Use the following options to specify the entries to target:

    • To rebuild automatic membership for all users, use the --type=group option:

      $ ipa automember-rebuild --type=group
      --------------------------------------------------------
      Automember rebuild task finished. Processed (9) entries.
      --------------------------------------------------------
    • To rebuild automatic membership for all hosts, use the --type=hostgroup option.
    • To rebuild automatic membership for a specified user or users, use the --users=target_user option:

      $ ipa automember-rebuild --users=target_user1 --users=target_user2
      --------------------------------------------------------
      Automember rebuild task finished. Processed (2) entries.
      --------------------------------------------------------
    • To rebuild automatic membership for a specified host or hosts, use the --hosts=client.idm.example.com option.

14.9. Configuring a default automember group using IdM CLI

When you configure a default automember group, new user or host entries that do not match any automember rule are automatically added to this default group.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Enter the ipa automember-default-group-set command to configure a default automember group.
  2. When prompted, specify:

    • Default (fallback) Group, which specifies the target group name.
    • Grouping Type, which specifies whether the target is a user group or a host group. To target a user group, enter group. To target a host group, enter hostgroup.

      For example:

      $ ipa automember-default-group-set
      Default (fallback) Group: default_user_group
      Grouping Type: group
      ---------------------------------------------------
      Set default (fallback) group for automember "default_user_group"
      ---------------------------------------------------
        Default (fallback) Group: cn=default_user_group,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=example,dc=com
    Note

    To remove the current default automember group, enter the ipa automember-default-group-remove command.

Verification steps

  • To verify that the group is set correctly, enter the ipa automember-default-group-show command. The command displays the current default automember group. For example:

    $ ipa automember-default-group-show
    Grouping Type: group
      Default (fallback) Group: cn=default_user_group,cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=example,dc=com

Chapter 15. Automating group membership using IdM Web UI

Using automatic group membership enables you to assign users and hosts to groups automatically based on their attributes. For example, you can:

  • Divide employees' user entries into groups based on the employees' manager, location, or any other attribute.
  • Divide hosts based on their class, location, or any other attribute.
  • Add all users or all hosts to a single global group.

This chapter covers the following topics:

15.1. Benefits of automatic group membership

Using automatic membership for users allows you to:

  • Reduce the overhead of manually managing group memberships

    You no longer have to assign every user and host to groups manually.

  • Improve consistency in user and host management

    Users and hosts are assigned to groups based on strictly defined and automatically evaluated criteria.

  • Simplify the management of group-based settings

    Various settings are defined for groups and then applied to individual group members, for example sudo rules, automount, or access control. Adding users and hosts to groups automatically makes managing these settings easier.

15.2. Automember rules

When configuring automatic group membership, the administrator defines automember rules. An automember rule applies to a specific user or host target group. It cannot apply to more than one group at a time.

After creating a rule, the administrator adds conditions to it. These specify which users or hosts get included or excluded from the target group:

  • Inclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an inclusive condition, it will be included in the target group.

  • Exclusive conditions

    When a user or host entry meets an exclusive condition, it will not be included in the target group.

The conditions are specified as regular expressions in the Perl-compatible regular expressions (PCRE) format. For more information on PCRE, see the pcresyntax(3) man page.

Note

IdM evaluates exclusive conditions before inclusive conditions. In case of a conflict, exclusive conditions take precedence over inclusive conditions.

An automember rule applies to every entry created in the future. These entries will be automatically added to the specified target group. If an entry meets the conditions specified in multiple automember rules, it will be added to all the corresponding groups.

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM Web UI.

15.3. Adding an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes adding an automember rule using the IdM Web UI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

Note

Existing entries are not affected by the new rule. If you want to change existing entries, see Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target group of the new rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules.
  2. Click Add.
  3. In the Automember rule field, select the group to which the rule will apply. This is the target group name.

    Screenshot of the "Add Rule" window displaying the drop-down field for the Automember Rule where you can choose between rules you have previously defined.
  4. Click Add to confirm.
  5. Optional: You can add conditions to the new rule using the procedure described in Adding a condition to an automember rule using IdM Web UI.

15.4. Adding a condition to an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to add a condition to an automember rule using the IdM Web UI. For information about automember rules, see Automember rules.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules.
  2. Click on the rule to which you want to add a condition.
  3. In the Inclusive or Exclusive sections, click Add.

    A screenshot of the User group rule page displaying attributes for the user_group rule. The "Inclusive" section has a table with an "Attribute" column and an "Expression" column with an entry for the Attribute "uid" and its Expression is ".*". At the bottom is the Exclusive section which also has a table with an Attribute column and an Expression column but it has no entries.
  4. In the Attribute field, select the required attribute, for example uid.
  5. In the Expression field, define a regular expression.
  6. Click Add.

    For example, the following condition targets all users with any value (.*) in their user ID (uid) attribute.

    Screenshot of the "Add Condition into automember" pop-up window displaying a drop-down menu for an Attribute (uid is selected) and a field for the corresponding "Expression" (which is required and .* has been entered). The "Add" button is at the bottom of the window.

15.5. Viewing existing automember rules and conditions using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to view existing automember rules and conditions using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules to view the respective automember rules.
  2. Optional: Click on a rule to see the conditions for that rule in the Inclusive or Exclusive sections.

    A screenshot of the details of the user group rule "user_group." There is a "General" section displaying the name of the Automember rule and a "Description." There is an "Inclusive" section at the bottom with a table displaying entries with columns labeled "Attribute" and "Expression." This table has one entry with uid as the Attribute and .* as the Expression. At the very bottom there is an "Exclusive" section with a table that matches the structure of the "Inclusive" table but it has no entries.

15.6. Deleting an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to delete an automember rule using the IdM Web UI.

Deleting an automember rule also deletes all conditions associated with the rule. To remove only specific conditions from a rule, see Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules to view the respective automember rules.
  2. Select the check box next to the rule you want to remove.
  3. Click Delete.

    A screenshot of the "User group rules" page displaying a table of automember rules. The checkbox for the "user_group" entry has been selected and the "Delete" button has been highlighted.
  4. Click Delete to confirm.

15.7. Removing a condition from an automember rule using IdM Web UI

This section describes how to remove a specific condition from an automember rule using the IdM Web UI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select either User group rules or Host group rules to view the respective automember rules.
  2. Click on a rule to see the conditions for that rule in the Inclusive or Exclusive sections.
  3. Select the check box next to the conditions you want to remove.
  4. Click Delete.

    A screenshot of the "User group rule" page displaying information for "user_group". An entry in the "Inclusive" section has its checkbox checked and the "Delete" button that pertains to the "Inclusive" section is highlighted.
  5. Click Delete to confirm.

15.8. Applying automember rules to existing entries using IdM Web UI

Automember rules apply automatically to user and host entries created after the rules were added. They are not applied retroactively to entries that existed before the rules were added.

To apply automember rules to previously added entries, you have to manually rebuild automatic membership. Rebuilding automatic membership re-evaluates all existing automember rules and applies them either to all user or hosts entries, or to specific entries.

Note

Rebuilding automatic membership does not remove user or host entries from groups, even if the entries no longer match the group’s inclusive conditions. To remove them manually, see Removing a member from a user group using IdM Web UI or Removing host group members in the IdM Web UI.

15.8.1. Rebuilding automatic membership for all users or hosts

This section describes how to rebuild automatic membership for all user or host entries.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Select IdentityUsers or Hosts.
  2. Click ActionsRebuild auto membership.

    A screenshot highlighting that "Rebuild auto membership" is an option from the "Actions" drop-down menu.

15.8.2. Rebuilding automatic membership for a single user or host only

This section describes how to rebuild automatic membership for a specific user or host entry.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. Select IdentityUsers or Hosts.
  2. Click on the required user or host name.
  3. Click ActionsRebuild auto membership.

    A screenshot highlighting the "Rebuild auto membership" option among many others in the contents of the "Actions" drop-down menu.

15.9. Configuring a default user group using IdM Web UI

When you configure a default user group, new user entries that do not match any automember rule are automatically added to this default group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target user group you want to set as default exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select User group rules.
  2. In the Default user group field, select the group you want to set as the default user group.

    Setting a default user group

15.10. Configuring a default host group using IdM Web UI

When you configure a default host group, new host entries that do not match any automember rule are automatically added to this default group.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI.
  • You must be a member of the admins group.
  • The target host group you want to set as default exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Click Identity → Automember, and select Host group rules.
  2. In the Default host group field, select the group you want to set as the default host group.

    Setting a default host group

Chapter 16. Using Ansible to automate group membership in IdM

Using automatic group membership, you can assign users and hosts user groups and host groups automatically, based on their attributes. For example, you can:

  • Divide employees' user entries into groups based on the employees' manager, location, position or any other attribute. You can list all attributes by entering ipa user-add --help on the command-line.
  • Divide hosts into groups based on their class, location, or any other attribute. You can list all attributes by entering ipa host-add --help on the command-line.
  • Add all users or all hosts to a single global group.

You can use Red Hat Ansible Engine to automate the management of automatic group membership in Identity Management (IdM).

This section covers the following topics:

16.1. Preparing your Ansible control node for managing IdM

As a system administrator managing Identity Management (IdM), when working with Red Hat Ansible Engine, it is good practice to do the following:

  • Create a subdirectory dedicated to Ansible playbooks in your home directory, for example ~/MyPlaybooks.
  • Copy and adapt sample Ansible playbooks from the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/* and /usr/share/doc/rhel-system-roles/* directories and subdirectories into your ~/MyPlaybooks directory.
  • Include your inventory file in your ~/MyPlaybooks directory.

By following this practice, you can find all your playbooks in one place and you can run your playbooks without invoking root privileges.

Note

You only need root privileges on the managed nodes to execute the ipaserver, ipareplica, ipaclient and ipabackup ansible-freeipa roles. These roles require privileged access to directories and the dnf software package manager.

This section describes how to create the ~/MyPlaybooks directory and configure it so that you can use it to store and run Ansible playbooks.

Prerequisites

  • You have installed an IdM server on your managed nodes, server.idm.example.com and replica.idm.example.com.
  • You have configured DNS and networking so you can log in to the managed nodes, server.idm.example.com and replica.idm.example.com, directly from the control node.
  • You know the IdM admin password.

Procedure

  1. Create a directory for your Ansible configuration and playbooks in your home directory:

    $ mkdir ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Change into the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks
  3. Create the ~/MyPlaybooks/ansible.cfg file with the following content:

    [defaults]
    inventory = /home/your_username/MyPlaybooks/inventory
    
    [privilege_escalation]
    become=True
  4. Create the ~/MyPlaybooks/inventory file with the following content:

    [eu]
    server.idm.example.com
    
    [us]
    replica.idm.example.com
    
    [ipaserver:children]
    eu
    us

    This configuration defines two host groups, eu and us, for hosts in these locations. Additionally, this configuration defines the ipaserver host group, which contains all hosts from the eu and us groups.

  5. [Optional] Create an SSH public and private key. To simplify access in your test environment, do not set a password on the private key:

    $ ssh-keygen
  6. Copy the SSH public key to the IdM admin account on each managed node:

    $ ssh-copy-id admin@server.idm.example.com
    $ ssh-copy-id admin@replica.idm.example.com

    You must enter the IdM admin password when you enter these commands.

16.2. Using Ansible to ensure that an automember rule for an IdM user group is present

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure an automember rule for an Identity Management (IdM) group exists. In the example, the presence of an automember rule is ensured for the testing_group user group.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM admin password.
  • The testing_group user group exists in IdM.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to your ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Copy the automember-group-present.yml Ansible playbook file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/automember-group-present.yml automember-group-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the automember-group-present-copy.yml file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaautomember task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM admin.
    • Set the name variable to testing_group.
    • Set the automember_type variable to group.
    • Ensure that the state variable is set to present.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Automember group present example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure group automember rule admins is present
        ipaautomember:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: testing_group
          automember_type: group
          state: present
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory automember-group-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

16.3. Using Ansible to ensure that a specified condition is present in an IdM user group automember rule

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that a specified condition exists in an automember rule for an Identity Management (IdM) group. In the example, the presence of a UID-related condition in the automember rule is ensured for the testing_group group. By specifying the .* condition, you ensure that all future IdM users automatically become members of the testing_group.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM admin password.
  • The testing_group user group and automember user group rule exist in IdM.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to your ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Copy the automember-hostgroup-rule-present.yml Ansible playbook file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/ directory and name it, for example, automember-usergroup-rule-present.yml:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/automember-hostgroup-rule-present.yml automember-usergroup-rule-present.yml
  3. Open the automember-usergroup-rule-present.yml file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by modifying the following parameters:

    • Rename the playbook to correspond to your use case, for example: Automember user group rule member present.
    • Rename the task to correspond to your use case, for example: Ensure an automember condition for a user group is present.
    • Set the following variables in the ipaautomember task section:

      • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM admin.
      • Set the name variable to testing_group.
      • Set the automember_type variable to group.
      • Ensure that the state variable is set to present.
      • Ensure that the action variable is set to member.
      • Set the inclusive key variable to UID.
      • Set the inclusive expression variable to .*

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Automember user group rule member present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure an automember condition for a user group is present
        ipaautomember:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: testing_group
          automember_type: group
          state: present
          action: member
          inclusive:
            - key: UID
              expression: .*
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory automember-usergroup-rule-present.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log in as an IdM administrator.

    $ kinit admin
  2. Add a user, for example:

    $ ipa user-add user101 --first user --last 101
    -----------------------
    Added user "user101"
    -----------------------
      User login: user101
      First name: user
      Last name: 101
      ...
      Member of groups: ipausers, testing_group
      ...

Additional resources

16.4. Using Ansible to ensure that a condition is absent from an IdM user group automember rule

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure a condition is absent from an automember rule for an Identity Management (IdM) group. In the example, the absence of a condition in the automember rule is ensured that specifies that users whose initials are dp should be included. The automember rule is applied to the testing_group group. By applying the condition, you ensure that no future IdM user whose initials are dp becomes a member of the testing_group.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM admin password.
  • The testing_group user group and automember user group rule exist in IdM.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to your ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Copy the automember-hostgroup-rule-absent.yml Ansible playbook file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/ directory and name it, for example, automember-usergroup-rule-absent.yml:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/automember-hostgroup-rule-absent.yml automember-usergroup-rule-absent.yml
  3. Open the automember-usergroup-rule-absent.yml file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by modifying the following parameters:

    • Rename the playbook to correspond to your use case, for example: Automember user group rule member absent.
    • Rename the task to correspond to your use case, for example: Ensure an automember condition for a user group is absent.
    • Set the following variables in the ipaautomember task section:

      • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM admin.
      • Set the name variable to testing_group.
      • Set the automember_type variable to group.
      • Ensure that the state variable is set to absent.
      • Ensure that the action variable is set to member.
      • Set the inclusive key variable to initials.
      • Set the inclusive expression variable to dp.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Automember user group rule member absent
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure an automember condition for a user group is absent
        ipaautomember:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: testing_group
          automember_type: group
          state: absent
          action: member
          inclusive:
            - key: initials
              expression: dp
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory automember-usergroup-rule-absent.yml

Verification steps

  1. Log in as an IdM administrator.

    $ kinit admin
  2. View the automember group:

    $ ipa automember-show --type=group testing_group
     Automember Rule: testing_group

The absence of an Inclusive Regex: initials=dp entry in the output confirms that the testing_group automember rule does not contain the condition specified.

Additional resources

16.5. Using Ansible to ensure that an automember rule for an IdM user group is absent

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure an automember rule is absent for an Identity Management (IdM) group. In the example, the absence of an automember rule is ensured for the testing_group group.

Note

Deleting an automember rule also deletes all conditions associated with the rule. To remove only specific conditions from a rule, see Using Ansible to ensure that a condition is absent in an IdM user group automember rule.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM admin password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to your ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Copy the automember-group-absent.yml Ansible playbook file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/automember-group-absent.yml automember-group-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the automember-group-absent-copy.yml file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaautomember task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM admin.
    • Set the name variable to testing_group.
    • Set the automember_type variable to group.
    • Ensure that the state variable is set to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Automember group absent example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure group automember rule admins is absent
        ipaautomember:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: testing_group
          automember_type: group
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory automember-group-absent.yml

Additional resources

16.6. Using Ansible to ensure that a condition is present in an IdM host group automember rule

This section describes how to use Ansible to ensure that a condition is present in an IdM host group automember rule. The example describes how to ensure that hosts with the FQDN of .*.idm.example.com are members of the primary_dns_domain_hosts host group and hosts whose FQDN is .*.example.org are not members of the primary_dns_domain_hosts host group.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM admin password.
  • The primary_dns_domain_hosts host group and automember host group rule exist in IdM.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • In the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory, you have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to your ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Copy the automember-hostgroup-rule-present.yml Ansible playbook file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/automember/automember-hostgroup-rule-present.yml automember-hostgroup-rule-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the automember-hostgroup-rule-present-copy.yml file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaautomember task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM admin.
    • Set the name variable to primary_dns_domain_hosts.
    • Set the automember_type variable to hostgroup.
    • Ensure that the state variable is set to present.
    • Ensure that the action variable is set to member.
    • Ensure that the inclusive key variable is set to fqdn.
    • Set the corresponding inclusive expression variable to .*.idm.example.com.
    • Set the exclusive key variable to fqdn.
    • Set the corresponding exclusive expression variable to .*.example.org.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Automember user group rule member present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure an automember condition for a user group is present
        ipaautomember:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: primary_dns_domain_hosts
          automember_type: hostgroup
          state: present
          action: member
          inclusive:
            - key: fqdn
              expression: .*.idm.example.com
          exclusive:
            - key: fqdn
              expression: .*.example.org
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory automember-hostgroup-rule-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

16.7. Additional resources

Chapter 17. Delegating permissions to user groups to manage users using IdM CLI

Delegation is one of the access control methods in IdM, along with self-service rules and role-based access control (RBAC). You can use delegation to assign permissions to one group of users to manage entries for another group of users.

This section covers the following topics:

17.1. Delegation rules

You can delegate permissions to user groups to manage users by creating delegation rules.

Delegation rules allow a specific user group to perform write (edit) operations on specific attributes for users in another user group. This form of access control rule is limited to editing the values of a subset of attributes you specify in a delegation rule; it does not grant the ability to add or remove whole entries or control over unspecified attributes.

Delegation rules grant permissions to existing user groups in IdM. You can use delegation to, for example, allow the managers user group to manage selected attributes of users in the employees user group.

17.2. Creating a delegation rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to create a delegation rule using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-add command. Specify the following options:

    • --group: the group who is being granted permissions to the entries of users in the user group.
    • --membergroup: the group whose entries can be edited by members of the delegation group.
    • --permissions: whether users will have the right to view the given attributes (read) and add or change the given attributes (write). If you do not specify permissions, only the write permission will be added.
    • --attrs: the attributes which users in the member group are allowed to view or edit.

    For example:

$ ipa delegation-add "basic manager attributes" --permissions=read --permissions=write --attrs=businesscategory --attrs=departmentnumber --attrs=employeetype --attrs=employeenumber --group=managers --membergroup=employees
-------------------------------------------
Added delegation "basic manager attributes"
-------------------------------------------
  Delegation name: basic manager attributes
  Permissions: read, write
  Attributes: businesscategory, departmentnumber, employeetype, employeenumber
  Member user group: employees
  User group: managers

17.3. Viewing existing delegation rules using IdM CLI

This section describes how to view existing delegation rules using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-find command:
$ ipa delegation-find
--------------------
1 delegation matched
--------------------
  Delegation name: basic manager attributes
  Permissions: read, write
  Attributes: businesscategory, departmentnumber, employeenumber, employeetype
  Member user group: employees
  User group: managers
----------------------------
Number of entries returned 1
----------------------------

17.4. Modifying a delegation rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to modify an existing delegation rule using the IdM CLI.

Important

The --attrs option overwrites whatever the previous list of supported attributes was, so always include the complete list of attributes along with any new attributes. This also applies to the --permissions option.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-mod command with the desired changes. For example, to add the displayname attribute to the basic manager attributes example rule:

    $ ipa delegation-mod "basic manager attributes" --attrs=businesscategory --attrs=departmentnumber --attrs=employeetype --attrs=employeenumber --attrs=displayname
    ----------------------------------------------
    Modified delegation "basic manager attributes"
    ----------------------------------------------
      Delegation name: basic manager attributes
      Permissions: read, write
      Attributes: businesscategory, departmentnumber, employeetype, employeenumber, displayname
      Member user group: employees
      User group: managers

17.5. Deleting a delegation rule using IdM CLI

This section describes how to delete an existing delegation rule using the IdM CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • Enter the ipa delegation-del command.
  • When prompted, enter the name of the delegation rule you want to delete:

    $ ipa delegation-del
    Delegation name: basic manager attributes
    ---------------------------------------------
    Deleted delegation "basic manager attributes"
    ---------------------------------------------

Chapter 18. Delegating permissions to user groups to manage users using IdM WebUI

Delegation is one of the access control methods in IdM, along with self-service rules and role-based access control (RBAC). You can use delegation to assign permissions to one group of users to manage entries for another group of users.

This section covers the following topics:

18.1. Delegation rules

You can delegate permissions to user groups to manage users by creating delegation rules.

Delegation rules allow a specific user group to perform write (edit) operations on specific attributes for users in another user group. This form of access control rule is limited to editing the values of a subset of attributes you specify in a delegation rule; it does not grant the ability to add or remove whole entries or control over unspecified attributes.

Delegation rules grant permissions to existing user groups in IdM. You can use delegation to, for example, allow the managers user group to manage selected attributes of users in the employees user group.

18.2. Creating a delegation rule using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to create a delegation rule using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.
  2. Click Add.

    A screenshot of the IdM Web UI displaying contents of the "Role-Based Access Control" drop-down sub-menu from the "IPA Server" tab. There are five options in the "Role-Based Access Control" drop-down menu: Roles - Privileges - Permissions - Self Service Permissions - Delegations.
  3. In the Add delegation window, do the following:

    1. Name the new delegation rule.
    2. Set the permissions by selecting the check boxes that indicate whether users will have the right to view the given attributes (read) and add or change the given attributes (write).
    3. In the User group drop-down menu, select the group who is being granted permissions to view or edit the entries of users in the member group.
    4. In the Member user group drop-down menu, select the group whose entries can be edited by members of the delegation group.
    5. In the attributes box, select the check boxes by the attributes to which you want to grant permissions.

      A screenshot of the "Add delegation" pop-up window where you can enter details for a delegation. The entry options include a text field for the Delegation name and checkboxes for "read" and "write" permissions. There is also a drop-down menu for the User group - a drop-down menu for the Member user group - and many checkboxes for Attributes (such as departmentnumber - employeenumber - businesscategory - employeetype).
    6. Click the Add button to save the new delegation rule.

18.3. Viewing existing delegation rules using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to view existing delegation rules using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  • From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.

    A screenshot of the IdM Web UI displaying the "Delegations" page from the "Role-Based Access Control" submenu of the "IPA Server" tab. There is a table displaying Delegations organized by their "Delegation name."

18.4. Modifying a delegation rule using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to modify an existing delegation rule using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.

    A screenshot of the IdM Web UI displaying the Role-Based Access Control sub page from the IPA Server tab. The Delegations page displays a table with an entry for the "basic manager attributes" Delegation name.
  2. Click on the rule you want to modify.
  3. Make the desired changes:

    • Change the name of the rule.
    • Change granted permissions by selecting the check boxes that indicate whether users will have the right to view the given attributes (read) and add or change the given attributes (write).
    • In the User group drop-down menu, select the group who is being granted permissions to view or edit the entries of users in the member group.
    • In the Member user group drop-down menu, select the group whose entries can be edited by members of the delegation group.
    • In the attributes box, select the check boxes by the attributes to which you want to grant permissions. To remove permissions to an attribute, uncheck the relevant check box.

      The Delegation page displays details of the "basic manager attributes" Delegation such as the Delegation name - Permissions (which is required - such as "read" and "write") - User group (required such as "managers") - Member user group (required such as "employees") and Attributes (required such as employeetype - businesscategory - departmentnumber - displayname - employeenumber - homedirectory). The "save" button at the top left is highlighted.
    • Click the Save button to save the changes.

18.5. Deleting a delegation rule using IdM WebUI

This section describes how to delete an existing delegation rule using the IdM WebUI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the IdM Web UI as a member of the admins group.

Procedure

  1. From the IPA Server menu, click Role-Based Access ControlDelegations.
  2. Select the check box next to the rule you want to remove.
  3. Click Delete.

    Screenshot of the "Role-Based Access Control" sub-menu of the "IPA Server" tab. The "Delegations" page displays a table with Delegation names and the checkbox for the "basic manager attributes" entry has been checked. The "Delete" button has been highlighted.
  4. Click Delete to confirm.

Chapter 19. Delegating permissions to user groups to manage users using Ansible playbooks

Delegation is one of the access control methods in IdM, along with self-service rules and role-based access control (RBAC). You can use delegation to assign permissions to one group of users to manage entries for another group of users.

This section covers the following topics:

19.1. Delegation rules

You can delegate permissions to user groups to manage users by creating delegation rules.

Delegation rules allow a specific user group to perform write (edit) operations on specific attributes for users in another user group. This form of access control rule is limited to editing the values of a subset of attributes you specify in a delegation rule; it does not grant the ability to add or remove whole entries or control over unspecified attributes.

Delegation rules grant permissions to existing user groups in IdM. You can use delegation to, for example, allow the managers user group to manage selected attributes of users in the employees user group.

19.2. Creating an Ansible inventory file for IdM

When working with Ansible, it is good practice to create, in your home directory, a subdirectory dedicated to Ansible playbooks that you copy and adapt from the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/* and /usr/share/doc/rhel-system-roles/* subdirectories. This practice has the following advantages:

  • You can find all your playbooks in one place.
  • You can run your playbooks without invoking root privileges.

Procedure

  1. Create a directory for your Ansible configuration and playbooks in your home directory:

    $ mkdir ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Change into the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks
  3. Create the ~/MyPlaybooks/ansible.cfg file with the following content:

    [defaults]
    inventory = /home/<username>/MyPlaybooks/inventory
    
    [privilege_escalation]
    become=True
  4. Create the ~/MyPlaybooks/inventory file with the following content:

    [eu]
    server.idm.example.com
    
    [us]
    replica.idm.example.com
    
    [ipaserver:children]
    eu
    us

    This configuration defines two host groups, eu and us, for hosts in these locations. Additionally, this configuration defines the ipaserver host group, which contains all hosts from the eu and us groups.

19.3. Using Ansible to ensure that a delegation rule is present

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to define privileges for a new IdM delegation rule and ensure its presence. In the example, the new basic manager attributes delegation rule grants the managers group the ability to read and write the following attributes for members of the employees group:

  • businesscategory
  • departmentnumber
  • employeenumber
  • employeetype

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.
    • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the delegation-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/delegation-present.yml delegation-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the delegation-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipadelegation task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the new delegation rule.
    • Set the permission variable to a comma-separated list of permissions to grant: read and write.
    • Set the attribute variable to a list of attributes the delegated user group can manage: businesscategory, departmentnumber, employeenumber, and employeetype.
    • Set the group variable to the name of the group that is being given access to view or modify attributes.
    • Set the membergroup variable to the name of the group whose attributes can be viewed or modified.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage a delegation rule
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure delegation "basic manager attributes" is present
        ipadelegation:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "basic manager attributes"
          permission: read, write
          attribute:
          - businesscategory
          - departmentnumber
          - employeenumber
          - employeetype
          group: managers
          membergroup: employees
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/MyPlaybooks/inventory delegation-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Delegation rules.
  • See the README-delegation.md file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/ipadelegation directory.

19.4. Using Ansible to ensure that a delegation rule is absent

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure a specified delegation rule is absent from your IdM configuration. The example below describes how to make sure the custom basic manager attributes delegation rule does not exist in IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.
    • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the delegation-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/delegation-present.yml delegation-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the delegation-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipadelegation task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the delegation rule.
    • Set the state variable to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Delegation absent
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure delegation "basic manager attributes" is absent
        ipadelegation:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "basic manager attributes"
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/MyPlaybooks/inventory delegation-absent-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Delegation rules.
  • See the README-delegation.md file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/ipadelegation directory.

19.5. Using Ansible to ensure that a delegation rule has specific attributes

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that a delegation rule has specific settings. You can use this playbook to modify a delegation role you have previously created. In the example, you ensure the basic manager attributes delegation rule only has the departmentnumber member attribute.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.
    • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.
  • The basic manager attributes delegation rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the delegation-member-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/delegation-member-present.yml delegation-member-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the delegation-member-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipadelegation task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the delegation rule to modify.
    • Set the attribute variable to departmentnumber.
    • Set the action variable to member.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Delegation member present
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure delegation "basic manager attributes" member attribute departmentnumber is present
        ipadelegation:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "basic manager attributes"
          attribute:
          - departmentnumber
          action: member
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/MyPlaybooks/inventory delegation-member-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Delegation rules.
  • See the README-delegation.md file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/ipadelegation directory.

19.6. Using Ansible to ensure that a delegation rule does not have specific attributes

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that a delegation rule does not have specific settings. You can use this playbook to make sure a delegation role does not grant undesired access. In the example, you ensure the basic manager attributes delegation rule does not have the employeenumber and employeetype member attributes.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have configured an Ansible control node that meets the following requirements:

    • You are using Ansible version 2.8 or later.
    • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package.
    • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server where you are configuring these options.
    • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.
  • The basic manager attributes delegation rule exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the delegation-member-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/delegation/delegation-member-absent.yml delegation-member-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the delegation-member-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipadelegation task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the delegation rule to modify.
    • Set the attribute variable to employeenumber and employeetype.
    • Set the action variable to member.
    • Set the state variable to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Delegation member absent
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure delegation "basic manager attributes" member attributes employeenumber and employeetype are absent
        ipadelegation:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: "basic manager attributes"
          attribute:
          - employeenumber
          - employeetype
          action: member
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/MyPlaybooks/inventory delegation-member-absent-copy.yml

Additional resources

  • See Delegation rules.
  • See the README-delegation.md file in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/ipadelegation directory.

Chapter 20. Managing role-based access controls in IdM using the CLI

This chapter introduces role-based access control in Identity Management (IdM) and describes the following operations in the command-line interface (CLI):

20.1. Role-based access control in IdM

Role-based access control (RBAC) in IdM grants a very different kind of authority to users compared to self-service and delegation access controls.

Role-based access control is composed of three parts:

  • Permissions grant the right to perform a specific task such as adding or deleting users, modifying a group, enabling read-access, etc.
  • Privileges combine permissions, for example all the permissions needed to add a new user.
  • Roles grant a set of privileges to users, user groups, hosts or host groups.

20.1.1. Permissions in IdM

Permissions are the lowest level unit of role-based access control, they define operations together with the LDAP entries to which those operations apply. Comparable to building blocks, permissions can be assigned to as many privileges as needed.
One or more rights define what operations are allowed:

  • write
  • read
  • search
  • compare
  • add
  • delete
  • all

These operations apply to three basic targets:

  • subtree: a domain name (DN); the subtree under this DN
  • target filter: an LDAP filter
  • target: DN with possible wildcards to specify entries

Additionally, the following convenience options set the corresponding attribute(s):

  • type: a type of object (user, group, etc); sets subtree and target filter
  • memberof: members of a group; sets a target filter
  • targetgroup: grants access to modify a specific group (such as granting the rights to manage group membership); sets a target

With IdM permissions, you can control which users have access to which objects and even which attributes of these objects. IdM enables you to allow or block individual attributes or change the entire visibility of a specific IdM function, such as users, groups, or sudo, to all anonymous users, all authenticated users, or just a certain group of privileged users.
For example, the flexibility of this approach to permissions is useful for an administrator who wants to limit access of users or groups only to the specific sections these users or groups need to access and to make the other sections completely hidden to them.

Note

A permission cannot contain other permissions.

20.1.2. Default managed permissions

Managed permissions are permissions that come by default with IdM. They behave like other permissions created by the user, with the following differences:

  • You cannot delete them or modify their name, location, and target attributes.
  • They have three sets of attributes:

    • Default attributes, the user cannot modify them, as they are managed by IdM
    • Included attributes, which are additional attributes added by the user
    • Excluded attributes, which are attributes removed by the user

A managed permission applies to all attributes that appear in the default and included attribute sets but not in the excluded set.

Note

While you cannot delete a managed permission, setting its bind type to permission and removing the managed permission from all privileges effectively disables it.

Names of all managed permissions start with System:, for example System: Add Sudo rule or System: Modify Services. Earlier versions of IdM used a different scheme for default permissions. For example, the user could not delete them and was only able to assign them to privileges. Most of these default permissions have been turned into managed permissions, however, the following permissions still use the previous scheme:

  • Add Automember Rebuild Membership Task
  • Add Configuration Sub-Entries
  • Add Replication Agreements
  • Certificate Remove Hold
  • Get Certificates status from the CA
  • Read DNA Range
  • Modify DNA Range
  • Read PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Modify PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Read Replication Agreements
  • Modify Replication Agreements
  • Remove Replication Agreements
  • Read LDBM Database Configuration
  • Request Certificate
  • Request Certificate ignoring CA ACLs
  • Request Certificates from a different host
  • Retrieve Certificates from the CA
  • Revoke Certificate
  • Write IPA Configuration
Note

If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the command line, the system does not allow you to change the attributes that you cannot modify, the command fails. If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the Web UI, the attributes that you cannot modify are disabled.

20.1.3. Privileges in IdM

A privilege is a group of permissions applicable to a role.
While a permission provides the rights to do a single operation, there are certain IdM tasks that require multiple permissions to succeed. Therefore, a privilege combines the different permissions required to perform a specific task.
For example, setting up an account for a new IdM user requires the following permissions:

  • Creating a new user entry
  • Resetting a user password
  • Adding the new user to the default IPA users group

Combining these three low-level tasks into a higher level task in the form of a custom privilege named, for example, Add User makes it easier for a system administrator to manage roles. IdM already contains several default privileges. Apart from users and user groups, privileges are also assigned to hosts and host groups, as well as network services. This practice permits a fine-grained control of operations by a set of users on a set of hosts using specific network services.

Note

A privilege may not contain other privileges.

20.1.4. Roles in IdM

A role is a list of privileges that users specified for the role possess.
In effect, permissions grant the ability to perform given low-level tasks (create a user entry, add an entry to a group, etc.), privileges combine one or more of these permissions needed for a higher-level task (such as creating a new user in a given group). Roles gather privileges together as needed: for example, a User Administrator role would be able to add, modify, and delete users.

Important

Roles are used to classify permitted actions. They are not used as a tool to implement privilege separation or to protect from privilege escalation.

Note

Roles can not contain other roles.

20.1.5. Predefined roles in Identity Management

Red Hat Identity Management provides the following range of pre-defined roles:

Table 20.1. Predefined Roles in Identity Management

RolePrivilegeDescription

Enrollment Administrator

Host Enrollment

Responsible for client, or host, enrollment

helpdesk

Modify Users and Reset passwords, Modify Group membership

Responsible for performing simple user administration tasks

IT Security Specialist

Netgroups Administrators, HBAC Administrator, Sudo Administrator

Responsible for managing security policy such as host-based access controls, sudo rules

IT Specialist

Host Administrators, Host Group Administrators, Service Administrators, Automount Administrators

Responsible for managing hosts

Security Architect

Delegation Administrator, Replication Administrators, Write IPA Configuration, Password Policy Administrator

Responsible for managing the Identity Management environment, creating trusts, creating replication agreements

User Administrator

User Administrators, Group Administrators, Stage User Administrators

Responsible for creating users and groups

20.2. Managing IdM permissions in the CLI

This section describes how to manage Identity Management (IdM) permissions using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create new permission entries with the ipa permission-add command.
    For example, to add a permission named dns admin:

    $ ipa permission-add "dns admin"
  2. Specify the properties of the permission with the following options:

    • --bindtype specifies the bind rule type. This option accepts the all, anonymous, and permission arguments. The permission bindtype means that only the users who are granted this permission via a role can exercise it.
      For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --bindtype=all

      If you do not specify --bindtype, then permission is the default value.

      Note

      It is not possible to add permissions with a non-default bind rule type to privileges. You also cannot set a permission that is already present in a privilege to a non-default bind rule type.

    • --right lists the rights granted by the permission, it replaces the deprecated --permissions option. The available values are add, delete, read, search, compare, write, all.

      You can set multiple attributes by using multiple --right options or with a comma-separated list inside curly braces. For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --right=read --right=write
      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --right={read,write}
      Note

      add and delete are entry-level operations (for example deleting a user, adding a group, etc.) while read, search, compare and write are more attribute-level: you can write to userCertificate but not read userPassword.

    • --attrs gives the list of attributes over which the permission is granted.
      You can set multiple attributes by using multiple --attrs options or by listing the options in a comma-separated list inside curly braces. For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --attrs=description --attrs=automountKey
      $ ipa permission-add "dns admin" --attrs={description,automountKey}

      The attributes provided with --attrs must exist and be allowed attributes for the given object type, otherwise the command fails with schema syntax errors.

    • --type defines the entry object type to which the permission applies, such as user, host, or service. Each type has its own set of allowed attributes.
      For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "manage service" --right=all --type=service --attrs=krbprincipalkey --attrs=krbprincipalname --attrs=managedby
    • --subtree gives a subtree entry; the filter then targets every entry beneath this subtree entry. Provide an existing subtree entry; --subtree does not accept wildcards or non-existent domain names (DNs). Include a DN within the directory.
      Because IdM uses a simplified, flat directory tree structure, --subtree can be used to target some types of entries, like automount locations, which are containers or parent entries for other configuration. For example:

      $ ipa permission-add "manage automount locations" --subtree="ldap://ldap.example.com:389/cn=automount,dc=example,dc=com" --right=write --attrs=automountmapname --attrs=automountkey --attrs=automountInformation
      Note

      The --type and --subtree options are mutually exclusive: you can see the inclusion of filters for --type as a simplification of --subtree, intending to make life easier for an admin.

    • --filter uses an LDAP filter to identify which entries the permission applies to.
      IdM automatically checks the validity of the given filter. The filter can be any valid LDAP filter, for example:

      $ ipa permission-add "manage Windows groups" --filter="(!(objectclass=posixgroup))" --right=write --attrs=description
    • --memberof sets the target filter to members of the given group after checking that the group exists. For example, to let the users with this permission modify the login shell of members of the engineers group:

      $ ipa permission-add ManageShell --right="write" --type=user --attr=loginshell --memberof=engineers
    • --targetgroup sets target to the specified user group after checking that the group exists. For example, to let those with the permission write the member attribute in the engineers group (so they can add or remove members):

      $ ipa permission-add ManageMembers --right="write" --subtree=cn=groups,cn=accounts,dc=example,dc=test --attr=member --targetgroup=engineers
    • Optionally, you can specify a target domain name (DN):

      • --target specifies the DN to apply the permission to. Wildcards are accepted.
      • --targetto specifies the DN subtree where an entry can be moved to.
      • --targetfrom specifies the DN subtree from where an entry can be moved.

20.3. Command options for existing permissions

Use the following variants to modify existing permissions as needed:

  • To edit existing permissions, use the ipa permission-mod command. You can use the same command options as for adding permissions.
  • To find existing permissions, use the ipa permission-find command. You can use the same command options as for adding permissions.
  • To view a specific permission, use the ipa permission-show command.
    The --raw argument shows the raw 389-ds ACI that is generated. For example:

     $ ipa permission-show <permission> --raw
  • The ipa permission-del command deletes a permission completely.

Additional resources

  • See the ipa man page.
  • See the ipa help command.

20.4. Managing IdM privileges in the CLI

This section describes how to manage Identity Management (IdM) privileges using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Add privilege entries using the ipa privilege-add command
    For example, to add a privilege named managing filesystems with a description:

    $ ipa privilege-add "managing filesystems" --desc="for filesystems"
  2. Assign the required permissions to the privilege group with the privilege-add-permission command
    For example, to add the permissions named managing automount and managing ftp services to the managing filesystems privilege:

    $ ipa privilege-add-permission "managing filesystems" --permissions="managing automount" --permissions="managing ftp services"

20.5. Command options for existing privileges

Use the following variants to modify existing privileges as needed:

  • To modify existing privileges, use the ipa privilege-mod command.
  • To find existing privileges, use the ipa privilege-find command.
  • To view a specific privilege, use the ipa privilege-show command.
  • The ipa privilege-remove-permission command removes one or more permissions from a privilege.
  • The ipa privilege-del command deletes a privilege completely.

Additional resources

  • See the ipa man page.
  • See the ipa help command.

20.6. Managing IdM roles in the CLI

This section describes how to manage Identity Management (IdM) roles using the command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Add new role entries using the ipa role-add command:

    $ ipa role-add --desc="User Administrator" useradmin
    ------------------------
    Added role "useradmin"
    ------------------------
    Role name: useradmin
    Description: User Administrator
  2. Add the required privileges to the role using the ipa role-add-privilege command:

    $ ipa role-add-privilege --privileges="user administrators" useradmin
    Role name: useradmin
    Description: User Administrator
    Privileges: user administrators
    ----------------------------
    Number of privileges added 1
    ----------------------------
  3. Add the required members to the role using the ipa role-add-member command. Allowed member types are: users, groups, hosts and hostgroups.
    For example, to add the group named useradmins to the previously created useradmin role:

    $ ipa role-add-member --groups=useradmins useradmin
    Role name: useradmin
    Description: User Administrator
    Member groups: useradmins
    Privileges: user administrators
    -------------------------
    Number of members added 1
    -------------------------

20.7. Command options for existing roles

Use the following variants to modify existing roles as needed:

  • To modify existing roles, use the ipa role-mod command.
  • To find existing roles, use the ipa role-find command.
  • To view a specific role, use the ipa role-show command.
  • To remove a member from the role, use the ipa role-remove-member command.
  • The ipa role-remove-privilege command removes one or more privileges from a role.
  • The ipa role-del command deletes a role completely.

Additional resources

  • See the ipa man page
  • See the ipa help command.

Chapter 21. Managing role-based access controls using the IdM Web UI

This chapter introduces role-based access control in Identity Management (IdM) and describes the following operations in the web interface (Web UI):

21.1. Role-based access control in IdM

Role-based access control (RBAC) in IdM grants a very different kind of authority to users compared to self-service and delegation access controls.

Role-based access control is composed of three parts:

  • Permissions grant the right to perform a specific task such as adding or deleting users, modifying a group, enabling read-access, etc.
  • Privileges combine permissions, for example all the permissions needed to add a new user.
  • Roles grant a set of privileges to users, user groups, hosts or host groups.

21.1.1. Permissions in IdM

Permissions are the lowest level unit of role-based access control, they define operations together with the LDAP entries to which those operations apply. Comparable to building blocks, permissions can be assigned to as many privileges as needed.
One or more rights define what operations are allowed:

  • write
  • read
  • search
  • compare
  • add
  • delete
  • all

These operations apply to three basic targets:

  • subtree: a domain name (DN); the subtree under this DN
  • target filter: an LDAP filter
  • target: DN with possible wildcards to specify entries

Additionally, the following convenience options set the corresponding attribute(s):

  • type: a type of object (user, group, etc); sets subtree and target filter
  • memberof: members of a group; sets a target filter
  • targetgroup: grants access to modify a specific group (such as granting the rights to manage group membership); sets a target

With IdM permissions, you can control which users have access to which objects and even which attributes of these objects. IdM enables you to allow or block individual attributes or change the entire visibility of a specific IdM function, such as users, groups, or sudo, to all anonymous users, all authenticated users, or just a certain group of privileged users.
For example, the flexibility of this approach to permissions is useful for an administrator who wants to limit access of users or groups only to the specific sections these users or groups need to access and to make the other sections completely hidden to them.

Note

A permission cannot contain other permissions.

21.1.2. Default managed permissions

Managed permissions are permissions that come by default with IdM. They behave like other permissions created by the user, with the following differences:

  • You cannot delete them or modify their name, location, and target attributes.
  • They have three sets of attributes:

    • Default attributes, the user cannot modify them, as they are managed by IdM
    • Included attributes, which are additional attributes added by the user
    • Excluded attributes, which are attributes removed by the user

A managed permission applies to all attributes that appear in the default and included attribute sets but not in the excluded set.

Note

While you cannot delete a managed permission, setting its bind type to permission and removing the managed permission from all privileges effectively disables it.

Names of all managed permissions start with System:, for example System: Add Sudo rule or System: Modify Services. Earlier versions of IdM used a different scheme for default permissions. For example, the user could not delete them and was only able to assign them to privileges. Most of these default permissions have been turned into managed permissions, however, the following permissions still use the previous scheme:

  • Add Automember Rebuild Membership Task
  • Add Configuration Sub-Entries
  • Add Replication Agreements
  • Certificate Remove Hold
  • Get Certificates status from the CA
  • Read DNA Range
  • Modify DNA Range
  • Read PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Modify PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Read Replication Agreements
  • Modify Replication Agreements
  • Remove Replication Agreements
  • Read LDBM Database Configuration
  • Request Certificate
  • Request Certificate ignoring CA ACLs
  • Request Certificates from a different host
  • Retrieve Certificates from the CA
  • Revoke Certificate
  • Write IPA Configuration
Note

If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the command line, the system does not allow you to change the attributes that you cannot modify, the command fails. If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the Web UI, the attributes that you cannot modify are disabled.

21.1.3. Privileges in IdM

A privilege is a group of permissions applicable to a role.
While a permission provides the rights to do a single operation, there are certain IdM tasks that require multiple permissions to succeed. Therefore, a privilege combines the different permissions required to perform a specific task.
For example, setting up an account for a new IdM user requires the following permissions:

  • Creating a new user entry
  • Resetting a user password
  • Adding the new user to the default IPA users group

Combining these three low-level tasks into a higher level task in the form of a custom privilege named, for example, Add User makes it easier for a system administrator to manage roles. IdM already contains several default privileges. Apart from users and user groups, privileges are also assigned to hosts and host groups, as well as network services. This practice permits a fine-grained control of operations by a set of users on a set of hosts using specific network services.

Note

A privilege may not contain other privileges.

21.1.4. Roles in IdM

A role is a list of privileges that users specified for the role possess.
In effect, permissions grant the ability to perform given low-level tasks (create a user entry, add an entry to a group, etc.), privileges combine one or more of these permissions needed for a higher-level task (such as creating a new user in a given group). Roles gather privileges together as needed: for example, a User Administrator role would be able to add, modify, and delete users.

Important

Roles are used to classify permitted actions. They are not used as a tool to implement privilege separation or to protect from privilege escalation.

Note

Roles can not contain other roles.

21.1.5. Predefined roles in Identity Management

Red Hat Identity Management provides the following range of pre-defined roles:

Table 21.1. Predefined Roles in Identity Management

RolePrivilegeDescription

Enrollment Administrator

Host Enrollment

Responsible for client, or host, enrollment

helpdesk

Modify Users and Reset passwords, Modify Group membership

Responsible for performing simple user administration tasks

IT Security Specialist

Netgroups Administrators, HBAC Administrator, Sudo Administrator

Responsible for managing security policy such as host-based access controls, sudo rules

IT Specialist

Host Administrators, Host Group Administrators, Service Administrators, Automount Administrators

Responsible for managing hosts

Security Architect

Delegation Administrator, Replication Administrators, Write IPA Configuration, Password Policy Administrator

Responsible for managing the Identity Management environment, creating trusts, creating replication agreements

User Administrator

User Administrators, Group Administrators, Stage User Administrators

Responsible for creating users and groups

21.2. Managing permissions in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to manage permissions in Identity Management (IdM) using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. To add a new permission, open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Permissions:

    Permissions task

  2. The list of permissions opens: Click the Add button at the top of the list of the permissions:

    Adding a new permission

  3. The Add Permission form opens. Specify the name of the new permission and define its properties accordingly:

    Form for adding a permission

  4. Select the appropriate Bind rule type:

    • permission is the default permission type, granting access through privileges and roles
    • all specifies that the permission applies to all authenticated users
    • anonymous specifies that the permission applies to all users, including unauthenticated users

      Note

      It is not possible to add permissions with a non-default bind rule type to privileges. You also cannot set a permission that is already present in a privilege to a non-default bind rule type.

  5. Choose the rights to grant with this permisthsion in Granted rights.
  6. Define the method to identify the target entries for the permission:

    • Type specifies an entry type, such as user, host, or service. If you choose a value for the Type setting, a list of all possible attributes which will be accessible through this ACI for that entry type appears under Effective Attributes. Defining Type sets Subtree and Target DN to one of the predefined values.
    • Subtree (required) specifies a subtree entry; every entry beneath this subtree entry is then targeted. Provide an existing subtree entry, as Subtree does not accept wildcards or non-existent domain names (DNs). For example: cn=automount,dc=example,dc=com
    • Extra target filter uses an LDAP filter to identify which entries the permission applies to. The filter can be any valid LDAP filter, for example: (!(objectclass=posixgroup))
      IdM automatically checks the validity of the given filter. If you enter an invalid filter, IdM warns you about this when you attempt to save the permission.
    • Target DN specifies the domain name (DN) and accepts wildcards. For example: uid=*,cn=users,cn=accounts,dc=com
    • Member of group sets the target filter to members of the given group. After you specify the filter settings and click Add, IdM validates the filter. If all the permission settings are correct, IdM will perform the search. If some of the permissions settings are incorrect, IdM will display a message informing you about which setting is set incorrectly.
  7. Add attributes to the permission:

    • If you set Type, choose the Effective attributes from the list of available ACI attributes.
    • If you did not use Type, add the attributes manually by writing them into the Effective attributes field. Add a single attribute at a time; to add multiple attributes, click Add to add another input field.

      Important

      If you do not set any attributes for the permission, then the permissions includes all attributes by default.

  8. Finish adding the permissions with the Add buttons at the bottom of the form:

    • Click the Add button to save the permission and go back to the list of permissions.
    • Alternatively, you can save the permission and continue adding additional permissions in the same form by clicking the Add and Add another button
    • The Add and Edit button enables you to save and continue editing the newly created permission.
  9. Optional. You can also edit the properties of an existing permission by clicking its name from the list of permissions to display the Permission settings page.
  10. Optional. If you need to remove an existing permission, click the Delete button once you ticked the check box next to its name in the list, to display The Remove permissions dialog.

    Note

    Operations on default managed permissions are restricted: the attributes you cannot modify are disabled in the IdM Web UI and you cannot delete the managed permissions completely.
    However, you can effectively disable a managed permission that has a bind type set to permission, by removing the managed permission from all privileges.

For example, to let those with the permission write the member attribute in the engineers group (so they can add or remove members):
Example for adding a permission

21.3. Managing privileges in the IdM WebUI

This section describes how to manage privileges in IdM using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. To add a new privilege, open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Privileges:

    Privileges task

  2. The list of privileges opens. Click the Add button at the top of the list of privileges:

    Adding a new privilege

  3. The Add Privilege form opens. Enter the name and a description of the privilege:

    Form for adding a privilege

  4. Click the Add and Edit button in order to save the new privilege and continue to the privilege configuration page to add permissions.
  5. Edit the properties of privileges by clicking on the privileges name in the privileges list. The privileges configuration page opens.
  6. The Permissions tab displays a list of permissions included in the selected privilege. Click the Add button at the top of the list to add permissions to the privilege:

    Adding Permissions

  7. Tick the check box next to the name of each permission to add, and use the > button to move the permissions to the Prospective column:

    Selecting Permissions

  8. Confirm by clicking the Add button.
  9. Optional. If you need to remove permissions, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to the relevant permission: the Remove privileges from permissions dialog opens.
  10. Optional. If you need to delete an existing privilege, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to its name in the list: the Remove privileges dialog opens.

21.4. Managing roles in the IdM Web UI

This section describes how to manage roles in Identity Management (IdM) using the web interface (IdM Web UI).

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. To add a new role, open the Role-Based Access Control sub-menu in the IPA Server tab and select Roles:

    Roles task

  2. The list of roles opens. Click the Add button at the top of the list of the role-based access control instructions.

    Adding a new role

  3. The Add Role form opens. Enter the role name and a description:

    Form for adding a role

  4. Click the Add and Edit button to save the new role and go to the role configuration page to add privileges and users.
  5. Edit the properties of roles by clicking on the roles name in the role list. The roles configuration page opens.
  6. Add members using the Users, Users Groups, Hosts, Host Groups or Services tabs, by clicking the Add button on top of the relevant list(s).

    Adding users

  7. In the window that opens, select the members on the left and use the > button to move them to the Prospective column.

    Selecting Users

  8. At the top of the Privileges tab, click Add.

    Adding Privileges

  9. Select the privileges on the left and use the > button to move them to the Prospective column.

    Selecting Privileges

  10. Click the Add button to save.
  11. Optional. If you need to remove privileges or members from a role, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to the name of the entity you want to remove. A dialog opens.
  12. Optional. If you need to remove an existing role, click the Delete button after you ticked the check box next to its name in the list, to display the Remove roles dialog.

Chapter 22. Preparing your environment for managing IdM using Ansible playbooks

As a system administrator managing Identity Management (IdM), when working with Red Hat Ansible Engine, it is good practice to do the following:

  • Create a subdirectory dedicated to Ansible playbooks in your home directory, for example ~/MyPlaybooks.
  • Copy and adapt sample Ansible playbooks from the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/* and /usr/share/doc/rhel-system-roles/* directories and subdirectories into your ~/MyPlaybooks directory.
  • Include your inventory file in your ~/MyPlaybooks directory.

Using this practice, you can find all your playbooks in one place and you can run your playbooks without invoking root privileges.

Note

You only need root privileges on the managed nodes to execute the ipaserver, ipareplica, ipaclient and ipabackup ansible-freeipa roles. These roles require privileged access to directories and the dnf software package manager.

This section describes how to create the ~/MyPlaybooks directory and configure it so that you can use it to store and run Ansible playbooks.

Prerequisites

  • You have installed an IdM server on your managed nodes, server.idm.example.com and replica.idm.example.com.
  • You have configured DNS and networking so you can log in to the managed nodes, server.idm.example.com and replica.idm.example.com, directly from the control node.
  • You know the IdM admin password.

Procedure

  1. Create a directory for your Ansible configuration and playbooks in your home directory:

    $ mkdir ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Change into the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks
  3. Create the ~/MyPlaybooks/ansible.cfg file with the following content:

    [defaults]
    inventory = /home/your_username/MyPlaybooks/inventory
    
    [privilege_escalation]
    become=True
  4. Create the ~/MyPlaybooks/inventory file with the following content:

    [eu]
    server.idm.example.com
    
    [us]
    replica.idm.example.com
    
    [ipaserver:children]
    eu
    us

    This configuration defines two host groups, eu and us, for hosts in these locations. Additionally, this configuration defines the ipaserver host group, which contains all hosts from the eu and us groups.

  5. [Optional] Create an SSH public and private key. To simplify access in your test environment, do not set a password on the private key:

    $ ssh-keygen
  6. Copy the SSH public key to the IdM admin account on each managed node:

    $ ssh-copy-id admin@server.idm.example.com
    $ ssh-copy-id admin@replica.idm.example.com

    These commands require that you enter the IdM admin password.

Chapter 23. Using Ansible playbooks to manage role-based access control in IdM

Role-based access control (RBAC) is a policy-neutral access-control mechanism defined around roles and privileges. The components of RBAC in Identity Management (IdM) are roles, privileges and permissions:

  • Permissions grant the right to perform a specific task such as adding or deleting users, modifying a group, enabling read-access, etc.
  • Privileges combine permissions, for example all the permissions needed to add a new user.
  • Roles grant a set of privileges to users, user groups, hosts or host groups.

Especially in large companies, using RBAC can help create a hierarchical system of administrators with their individual areas of responsibility.

This chapter describes the following operations performed when managing RBAC using Ansible playbooks:

23.1. Permissions in IdM

Permissions are the lowest level unit of role-based access control, they define operations together with the LDAP entries to which those operations apply. Comparable to building blocks, permissions can be assigned to as many privileges as needed.
One or more rights define what operations are allowed:

  • write
  • read
  • search
  • compare
  • add
  • delete
  • all

These operations apply to three basic targets:

  • subtree: a domain name (DN); the subtree under this DN
  • target filter: an LDAP filter
  • target: DN with possible wildcards to specify entries

Additionally, the following convenience options set the corresponding attribute(s):

  • type: a type of object (user, group, etc); sets subtree and target filter
  • memberof: members of a group; sets a target filter
  • targetgroup: grants access to modify a specific group (such as granting the rights to manage group membership); sets a target

With IdM permissions, you can control which users have access to which objects and even which attributes of these objects. IdM enables you to allow or block individual attributes or change the entire visibility of a specific IdM function, such as users, groups, or sudo, to all anonymous users, all authenticated users, or just a certain group of privileged users.
For example, the flexibility of this approach to permissions is useful for an administrator who wants to limit access of users or groups only to the specific sections these users or groups need to access and to make the other sections completely hidden to them.

Note

A permission cannot contain other permissions.

23.2. Default managed permissions

Managed permissions are permissions that come by default with IdM. They behave like other permissions created by the user, with the following differences:

  • You cannot delete them or modify their name, location, and target attributes.
  • They have three sets of attributes:

    • Default attributes, the user cannot modify them, as they are managed by IdM
    • Included attributes, which are additional attributes added by the user
    • Excluded attributes, which are attributes removed by the user

A managed permission applies to all attributes that appear in the default and included attribute sets but not in the excluded set.

Note

While you cannot delete a managed permission, setting its bind type to permission and removing the managed permission from all privileges effectively disables it.

Names of all managed permissions start with System:, for example System: Add Sudo rule or System: Modify Services. Earlier versions of IdM used a different scheme for default permissions. For example, the user could not delete them and was only able to assign them to privileges. Most of these default permissions have been turned into managed permissions, however, the following permissions still use the previous scheme:

  • Add Automember Rebuild Membership Task
  • Add Configuration Sub-Entries
  • Add Replication Agreements
  • Certificate Remove Hold
  • Get Certificates status from the CA
  • Read DNA Range
  • Modify DNA Range
  • Read PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Modify PassSync Managers Configuration
  • Read Replication Agreements
  • Modify Replication Agreements
  • Remove Replication Agreements
  • Read LDBM Database Configuration
  • Request Certificate
  • Request Certificate ignoring CA ACLs
  • Request Certificates from a different host
  • Retrieve Certificates from the CA
  • Revoke Certificate
  • Write IPA Configuration
Note

If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the command line, the system does not allow you to change the attributes that you cannot modify, the command fails. If you attempt to modify a managed permission from the Web UI, the attributes that you cannot modify are disabled.

23.3. Privileges in IdM

A privilege is a group of permissions applicable to a role.
While a permission provides the rights to do a single operation, there are certain IdM tasks that require multiple permissions to succeed. Therefore, a privilege combines the different permissions required to perform a specific task.
For example, setting up an account for a new IdM user requires the following permissions:

  • Creating a new user entry
  • Resetting a user password
  • Adding the new user to the default IPA users group

Combining these three low-level tasks into a higher level task in the form of a custom privilege named, for example, Add User makes it easier for a system administrator to manage roles. IdM already contains several default privileges. Apart from users and user groups, privileges are also assigned to hosts and host groups, as well as network services. This practice permits a fine-grained control of operations by a set of users on a set of hosts using specific network services.

Note

A privilege may not contain other privileges.

23.4. Roles in IdM

A role is a list of privileges that users specified for the role possess.
In effect, permissions grant the ability to perform given low-level tasks (create a user entry, add an entry to a group, etc.), privileges combine one or more of these permissions needed for a higher-level task (such as creating a new user in a given group). Roles gather privileges together as needed: for example, a User Administrator role would be able to add, modify, and delete users.

Important

Roles are used to classify permitted actions. They are not used as a tool to implement privilege separation or to protect from privilege escalation.

Note

Roles can not contain other roles.

23.5. Predefined roles in Identity Management

Red Hat Identity Management provides the following range of pre-defined roles:

Table 23.1. Predefined Roles in Identity Management

RolePrivilegeDescription

Enrollment Administrator

Host Enrollment

Responsible for client, or host, enrollment

helpdesk

Modify Users and Reset passwords, Modify Group membership

Responsible for performing simple user administration tasks

IT Security Specialist

Netgroups Administrators, HBAC Administrator, Sudo Administrator

Responsible for managing security policy such as host-based access controls, sudo rules

IT Specialist

Host Administrators, Host Group Administrators, Service Administrators, Automount Administrators

Responsible for managing hosts

Security Architect

Delegation Administrator, Replication Administrators, Write IPA Configuration, Password Policy Administrator

Responsible for managing the Identity Management environment, creating trusts, creating replication agreements

User Administrator

User Administrators, Group Administrators, Stage User Administrators

Responsible for creating users and groups

23.6. Using Ansible to ensure an IdM RBAC role with privileges is present

To exercise more granular control over role-based access (RBAC) to resources in Identity Management (IdM) than the default roles provide, create a custom role.

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to define privileges for a new IdM custom role and ensure its presence. In the example, the new user_and_host_administrator role contains a unique combination of the following privileges that are present in IdM by default:

  • Group Administrators
  • User Administrators
  • Stage User Administrators
  • Group Administrators

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory:

    $ cd ~/<MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the role-member-user-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/role-member-user-present.yml role-member-user-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the role-member-user-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the iparole task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the new role.
    • Set the privilege list to the names of the IdM privileges that you want to include in the new role.
    • Optionally, set the user variable to the name of the user to whom you want to grant the new role.
    • Optionally, set the group variable to the name of the group to which you want to grant the new role.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage IPA role with members.
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: yes
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - iparole:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: user_and_host_administrator
          user: idm_user01
          group: idm_group01
          privilege:
          - Group Administrators
          - User Administrators
          - Stage User Administrators
          - Group Administrators
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/<MyPlaybooks>/inventory role-member-user-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

23.7. Using Ansible to ensure an IdM RBAC role is absent

As a system administrator managing role-based access control (RBAC) in Identity Management (IdM), you may want to ensure the absence of an obsolete role so that no administrator assigns it to any user accidentally.

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure a role is absent. The example below describes how to make sure the custom user_and_host_administrator role does not exist in IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory:

    $ cd ~/<MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the role-is-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/role-is-absent.yml role-is-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the role-is-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the iparole task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the role.
    • Ensure that the state variable is set to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage IPA role with members.
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: yes
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - iparole:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: user_and_host_administrator
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/<MyPlaybooks>/inventory role-is-absent-copy.yml

Additional resources

23.8. Using Ansible to ensure that a group of users is assigned to an IdM RBAC role

As a system administrator managing role-based access control (RBAC) in Identity Management (IdM), you may want to assign a role to a specific group of users, for example junior administrators.

The following example describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure the built-in IdM RBAC helpdesk role is assigned to junior_sysadmins.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory:

    $ cd ~/<MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the role-member-group-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/role-member-group-present.yml role-member-group-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the role-member-group-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the iparole task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the role you want to assign.
    • Set the group variable to the name of the group.
    • Set the action variable to member.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage IPA role with members.
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: yes
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - iparole:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: helpdesk
          group: junior_sysadmins
          action: member
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/<MyPlaybooks>/inventory role-member-group-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

23.9. Using Ansible to ensure that specific users are not assigned to an IdM RBAC role

As a system administrator managing role-based access control (RBAC) in Identity Management (IdM), you may want to ensure that an RBAC role is not assigned to specific users after they have, for example, moved to different positions within the company.

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that the users named user_01 and user_02 are not assigned to the helpdesk role.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory:

    $ cd ~/<MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the role-member-user-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/role-member-user-absent.yml role-member-user-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the role-member-user-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the iparole task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the role you want to assign.
    • Set the user list to the names of the users.
    • Set the action variable to member.
    • Set the state variable to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage IPA role with members.
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: yes
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - iparole:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: helpdesk
          user
          - user_01
          - user_02
          action: member
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/<MyPlaybooks>/inventory role-member-user-absent-copy.yml

Additional resources

23.10. Using Ansible to ensure a service is a member of an IdM RBAC role

As a system administrator managing role-based access control (RBAC) in Identity Management (IdM), you may want to ensure that a specific service that is enrolled into IdM is a member of a particular role. The following example describes how to ensure that the custom web_administrator role can manage the HTTP service that is running on the client01.idm.example.com server.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory.
  • The web_administrator role exists in IdM.
  • The HTTP/client01.idm.example.com@IDM.EXAMPLE.COM service exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory:

    $ cd ~/<MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the role-member-service-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/role-member-service-present-absent.yml role-member-service-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the role-member-service-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the iparole task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the role you want to assign.
    • Set the service list to the name of the service.
    • Set the action variable to member.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage IPA role with members.
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: yes
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - iparole:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: web_administrator
          service:
          - HTTP/client01.idm.example.com
          action: member
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/<MyPlaybooks>/inventory role-member-service-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

23.11. Using Ansible to ensure a host is a member of an IdM RBAC role

As a system administrator managing role-based access control in Identity Management (IdM), you may want to ensure that a specific host or host group is associated with a specific role. The following example describes how to ensure that the custom web_administrator role can manage the client01.idm.example.com IdM host on which the HTTP service is running.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory.
  • The web_administrator role exists in IdM.
  • The client01.idm.example.com host exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory:

    $ cd ~/<MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the role-member-host-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/role-member-host-present.yml role-member-host-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the role-member-host-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the iparole task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the role you want to assign.
    • Set the host list to the name of the host.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage IPA role with members.
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: yes
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - iparole:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: web_administrator
          host:
          - client01.idm.example.com
          action: member
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/<MyPlaybooks>/inventory role-member-host-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

23.12. Using Ansible to ensure a host group is a member of an IdM RBAC role

As a system administrator managing role-based access control in Identity Management (IdM), you may want to ensure that a specific host or host group is associated with a specific role. The following example describes how to ensure that the custom web_administrator role can manage the web_servers group of IdM hosts on which the HTTP service is running.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory.
  • The web_administrator role exists in IdM.
  • The web_servers host group exists in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/<MyPlaybooks>/ directory:

    $ cd ~/<MyPlaybooks>/
  2. Make a copy of the role-member-hostgroup-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/role/role-member-hostgroup-present.yml role-member-hostgroup-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the role-member-hostgroup-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the iparole task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the role you want to assign.
    • Set the hostgroup list to the name of the hostgroup.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Playbook to manage IPA role with members.
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: yes
      gather_facts: no
    
      tasks:
      - iparole:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: web_administrator
          hostgroup:
          - web_servers
          action: member
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i ~/<MyPlaybooks>/inventory role-member-hostgroup-present-copy.yml

Additional resources

Chapter 24. Using Ansible playbooks to manage RBAC privileges

Role-based access control (RBAC) is a policy-neutral access-control mechanism defined around roles, privileges, and permissions. Especially in large companies, using RBAC can help create a hierarchical system of administrators with their individual areas of responsibility.

This chapter describes the following operations for using Ansible playbooks to manage RBAC privileges in Identity Management (IdM):

Prerequisites

24.1. Using Ansible to ensure a custom IdM RBAC privilege is present

To have a fully-functioning custom privilege in Identity Management (IdM) role-based access control (RBAC), you need to proceed in stages:

  1. Create a privilege with no permissions attached.
  2. Add permissions of your choice to the privilege.

The following procedure describes how to create an empty privilege using an Ansible playbook so that you can later add permissions to it. The example describes how to create a privilege named full_host_administration that is meant to combine all IdM permissions related to host administration.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the privilege-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/privilege-present.yml privilege-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the privilege-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaprivilege task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the new privilege, full_host_administration.
    • Optionally, describe the privilege using the description variable.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Privilege present example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure privilege full_host_administration is present
        ipaprivilege:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: full_host_administration
          description: This privilege combines all IdM permissions related to host administration
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory privilege-present-copy.yml

24.2. Using Ansible to ensure member permissions are present in a custom IdM RBAC privilege

To have a fully-functioning custom privilege in Identity Management (IdM) role-based access control (RBAC), you need to proceed in stages:

  1. Create a privilege with no permissions attached.
  2. Add permissions of your choice to the privilege.

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to add permissions to a privilege created in the previous step. The example describes how to add all IdM permissions related to host administration to a privilege named full_host_administration. By default, the permissions are distributed between the Host Enrollment, Host Administrators and Host Group Administrator privileges.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.
  • The full_host_administration privilege exists. For information on how to create a privilege using Ansible, see Using Ansible to ensure a custom IdM RBAC privilege is present.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the privilege-member-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/privilege-member-present.yml privilege-member-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the privilege-member-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaprivilege task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the privilege.
    • Set the permission list to the names of the permissions that you want to include in the privilege.
    • Make sure that the action variable is set to member.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Privilege member present example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure that permissions are present for the "full_host_administration" privilege
        ipaprivilege:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: full_host_administration
          permission:
          - "System: Add krbPrincipalName to a Host"
          - "System: Enroll a Host"
          - "System: Manage Host Certificates"
          - "System: Manage Host Enrollment Password"
          - "System: Manage Host Keytab"
          - "System: Manage Host Principals"
          - "Retrieve Certificates from the CA"
          - "Revoke Certificate"
          - "System: Add Hosts"
          - "System: Add krbPrincipalName to a Host"
          - "System: Enroll a Host"
          - "System: Manage Host Certificates"
          - "System: Manage Host Enrollment Password"
          - "System: Manage Host Keytab"
          - "System: Manage Host Keytab Permissions"
          - "System: Manage Host Principals"
          - "System: Manage Host SSH Public Keys"
          - "System: Manage Service Keytab"
          - "System: Manage Service Keytab Permissions"
          - "System: Modify Hosts"
          - "System: Remove Hosts"
          - "System: Add Hostgroups"
          - "System: Modify Hostgroup Membership"
          - "System: Modify Hostgroups"
          - "System: Remove Hostgroups"
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory privilege-member-present-copy.yml

24.3. Using Ansible to ensure an IdM RBAC privilege does not include a permission

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control.

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to remove a permission from a privilege. The example describes how to remove the Request Certificates ignoring CA ACLs permission from the default Certificate Administrators privilege because, for example, the administrator considers it a security risk.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the privilege-member-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/privilege-member-absent.yml privilege-member-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the privilege-member-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaprivilege task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the privilege.
    • Set the permission list to the names of the permissions that you want to remove from the privilege.
    • Make sure that the action variable is set to member.
    • Make sure that the state variable is set to absent.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Privilege absent example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure that the "Request Certificate ignoring CA ACLs" permission is absent from the "Certificate Administrators" privilege
        ipaprivilege:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: Certificate Administrators
          permission:
          - "Request Certificate ignoring CA ACLs"
          action: member
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory privilege-member-absent-copy.yml

24.4. Using Ansible to rename a custom IdM RBAC privilege

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control.

The following procedure describes how to rename a privilege because, for example, you have removed a few permissions from it. As a result, the name of the privilege is no longer accurate. In the example, the administrator renames a full_host_administration privilege to limited_host_administration.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.
  • The full_host_administration privilege exists. For more information on how to add a privilege, see Using Ansible to ensure a custom IdM RBAC privilege is present.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the privilege-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/privilege-present.yml rename-privilege.yml
  3. Open the rename-privilege.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaprivilege task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the current name of the privilege.
    • Add the rename variable and set it to the new name of the privilege.
    • Add the state variable and set it to renamed.
  5. Rename the playbook itself, for example:

    ---
    - name: Rename a privilege
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
  6. Rename the task in the playbook, for example:

    [...]
    tasks:
    - name: Ensure the full_host_administration privilege is renamed to limited_host_administration
      ipaprivilege:
      [...]

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Rename a privilege
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure the full_host_administration privilege is renamed to limited_host_administration
        ipaprivilege:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: full_host_administration
          rename: limited_host_administration
          state: renamed
  7. Save the file.
  8. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory rename-privilege.yml

24.5. Using Ansible to ensure an IdM RBAC privilege is absent

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control. The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that an RBAC privilege is absent. The example describes how to ensure that the CA administrator privilege is absent. As a result of the procedure, the admin administrator becomes the only user capable of managing certificate authorities in IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • You have created an Ansible inventory file with the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) of the IdM server on which you want to do the configuring.
  • Your Ansible inventory file is located in the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the privilege-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/privilege/privilege-absent.yml privilege-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the privilege-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipaprivilege task section:

    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the privilege you want to remove.
    • Make sure that the state variable is set it to absent.
  5. Rename the task in the playbook, for example:

    [...]
    tasks:
    - name: Ensure privilege "CA administrator" is absent
      ipaprivilege:
      [...]

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Privilege absent example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure privilege "CA administrator" is absent
        ipaprivilege:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: CA administrator
          state: absent
  6. Save the file.
  7. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory privilege-absent-copy.yml

24.6. Additional resources

  • See Privileges in IdM.
  • See Permissions in IdM.
  • See the README-privilege file available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/ipaprivilege directory.

Chapter 25. Using Ansible playbooks to manage RBAC permissions in IdM

Role-based access control (RBAC) is a policy-neutral access control mechanism defined around roles, privileges, and permissions. Especially in large companies, using RBAC can help create a hierarchical system of administrators with their individual areas of responsibility.

This chapter describes the following operations performed when managing RBAC permissions in Identity Management (IdM) using Ansible playbooks:

Prerequisites

25.1. Using Ansible to ensure an RBAC permission is present

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control (RBAC).

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure a permission is present in IdM so that it can be added to a privilege. The example describes how to ensure the following target state:

  • The MyPermission permission exists.
  • The MyPermission permission can only be applied to hosts.
  • A user granted a privilege that contains the permission can do all of the following possible operations on an entry:

    • Write
    • Read
    • Search
    • Compare
    • Add
    • Delete

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • The example assumes that you have created and configured the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory as a central location to store copies of sample playbooks.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the permission-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/permission-present.yml permission-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the permission-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipapermission task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the permission.
    • Set the object_type variable to host.
    • Set the right variable to all.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Permission present example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure that the "MyPermission" permission is present
        ipapermission:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: MyPermission
          object_type: host
          right: all
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory permission-present-copy.yml

25.2. Using Ansible to ensure an RBAC permission with an attribute is present

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control (RBAC).

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure a permission is present in IdM so that it can be added to a privilege. The example describes how to ensure the following target state:

  • The MyPermission permission exists.
  • The MyPermission permission can only be used to add hosts.
  • A user granted a privilege that contains the permission can do all of the following possible operations on a host entry:

    • Write
    • Read
    • Search
    • Compare
    • Add
    • Delete
  • The host entries created by a user that is granted a privilege that contains the MyPermission permission can have a description value.
Note

The type of attribute that you can specify when creating or modifying a permission is not constrained by the IdM LDAP schema. However, specifying, for example, attrs: car_licence if the object_type is host later results in the ipa: ERROR: attribute "car-license" not allowed error message when you try to exercise the permission and add a specific car licence value to a host.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • The example assumes that you have created and configured the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory as a central location to store copies of sample playbooks.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the permission-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/permission-present.yml permission-present-with-attribute.yml
  3. Open the permission-present-with-attribute.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipapermission task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the permission.
    • Set the object_type variable to host.
    • Set the right variable to all.
    • Set the attrs variable to description.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Permission present example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure that the "MyPermission" permission is present with an attribute
        ipapermission:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: MyPermission
          object_type: host
          right: all
          attrs: description
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory permission-present-with-attribute.yml

Additional resources

25.3. Using Ansible to ensure an RBAC permission is absent

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control (RBAC).

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure a permission is absent in IdM so that it cannot be added to a privilege.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • The example assumes that you have created and configured the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory as a central location to store copies of sample playbooks.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the permission-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/permission-absent.yml permission-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the permission-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipapermission task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the permission.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Permission absent example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure that the "MyPermission" permission is absent
        ipapermission:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: MyPermission
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory permission-absent-copy.yml

25.4. Using Ansible to ensure an attribute is a member of an IdM RBAC permission

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control (RBAC).

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that an attribute is a member of an RBAC permission in IdM. As a result, a user with the permission can create entries that have the attribute.

The example describes how to ensure that the host entries created by a user with a privilege that contains the MyPermission permission can have gecos and description values.

Note

The type of attribute that you can specify when creating or modifying a permission is not constrained by the IdM LDAP schema. However, specifying, for example, attrs: car_licence if the object_type is host later results in the ipa: ERROR: attribute "car-license" not allowed error message when you try to exercise the permission and add a specific car licence value to a host.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • The example assumes that you have created and configured the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory as a central location to store copies of sample playbooks.
  • The MyPermission permission exists.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the permission-member-present.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/permission-member-present.yml permission-member-present-copy.yml
  3. Open the permission-member-present-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipapermission task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the permission.
    • Set the attrs list to the description and gecos variables.
    • Make sure the action variable is set to member.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Permission member present example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure that the "gecos" and "description" attributes are present in "MyPermission"
        ipapermission:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: MyPermission
          attrs:
          - description
          - gecos
          action: member
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory permission-member-present-copy.yml

25.5. Using Ansible to ensure an attribute is not a member of an IdM RBAC permission

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control (RBAC).

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to ensure that an attribute is not a member of an RBAC permission in IdM. As a result, when a user with the permission creates an entry in IdM LDAP, that entry cannot have a value associated with the attribute.

The example describes how to ensure the following target state:

  • The MyPermission permission exists.
  • The host entries created by a user with a privilege that contains the MyPermission permission cannot have the description attribute.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • The example assumes that you have created and configured the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory as a central location to store copies of sample playbooks.
  • The MyPermission permission exists.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the permission-member-absent.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/permission-member-absent.yml permission-member-absent-copy.yml
  3. Open the permission-member-absent-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipapermission task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the permission.
    • Set the attrs variable to description.
    • Set the action variable to member.
    • Make sure the state variable is set to absent

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Permission absent example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Ensure that an attribute is not a member of "MyPermission"
        ipapermission:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: MyPermission
          attrs: description
          action: member
          state: absent
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory permission-member-absent-copy.yml

25.6. Using Ansible to rename an IdM RBAC permission

As a system administrator of Identity Management (IdM), you can customize the IdM role-based access control.

The following procedure describes how to use an Ansible playbook to rename a permission. The example describes how to rename MyPermission to MyNewPermission.

Prerequisites

  • You know the IdM administrator password.
  • You have installed the ansible-freeipa package on the Ansible control node.
  • The example assumes that you have created and configured the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory as a central location to store copies of sample playbooks.
  • The MyPermission exists in IdM.
  • The MyNewPermission does not exist in IdM.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the ~/MyPlaybooks/ directory:

    $ cd ~/MyPlaybooks/
  2. Make a copy of the permission-renamed.yml file located in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/ directory:

    $ cp /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/permission/permission-renamed.yml permission-renamed-copy.yml
  3. Open the permission-renamed-copy.yml Ansible playbook file for editing.
  4. Adapt the file by setting the following variables in the ipapermission task section:

    • Adapt the name of the task to correspond to your use case.
    • Set the ipaadmin_password variable to the password of the IdM administrator.
    • Set the name variable to the name of the permission.

    This is the modified Ansible playbook file for the current example:

    ---
    - name: Permission present example
      hosts: ipaserver
      become: true
    
      tasks:
      - name: Rename the "MyPermission" permission
        ipapermission:
          ipaadmin_password: Secret123
          name: MyPermission
          rename: MyNewPermission
          state: renamed
  5. Save the file.
  6. Run the Ansible playbook specifying the playbook file and the inventory file:

    $ ansible-playbook -v -i inventory permission-renamed-copy.yml

25.7. Additional resources

  • See Permissions in IdM.
  • See Privileges in IdM.
  • See the README-permission file available in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/ directory.
  • See the sample playbooks in the /usr/share/doc/ansible-freeipa/playbooks/ipapermission directory.

Chapter 26. Using an ID view to override a user attribute value on an IdM client

If an Identity Management (IdM) user would like to override some of their user or group attributes stored in the IdM LDAP server, for example the login name, home directory, certificate used for authentication, or SSH keys, you as IdM administrator can redefine these values for a specific IdM client, using IdM ID views. For example, you can specify a different home directory for a user on the IdM client that the user most commonly uses for logging in to IdM.

This chapter describes how to redefine a POSIX attribute value associated with an IdM user on a host enrolled into IdM as a client. Specifically, the chapter describes how to redefine the user login name and home directory.

This chapter includes the following sections:

26.1. ID views

An ID view in Identity Management (IdM) is an IdM client-side view specifying the following information:

  • New values for centrally defined POSIX user or group attributes
  • The client host or hosts on which the new values apply.

An ID view contains one or more overrides. An override is a specific replacement of a centrally defined POSIX attribute value.

You can only define an ID view for an IdM client centrally on IdM servers. You cannot configure client-side overrides for an IdM client locally.

For example, you can use ID views to achieve the following goals:

  • Define different attribute values for different environments. For example, you can allow the IdM administrator or another IdM user to have different home directories on different IdM clients: you can configure /home/encrypted/username to be this user’s home directory on one IdM client and /dropbox/username on another client. Using ID views in this situation is convenient as alternatively, for example, changing fallback_homedir, override_homedir or other home directory variables in the client’s /etc/sssd/sssd.conf file would affect all users. See Adding an ID view to override an IdM user home directory on an IdM client for an example procedure.
  • Replace a previously generated attribute value with a different value, such as overriding a user’s UID. This ability can be useful when you want to achieve a system-wide change that would otherwise be difficult to do on the LDAP side, for example make 1009 the UID of an IdM user. IdM ID ranges, which are used to generate an IdM user UID, never start as low as 1000 or even 10000. If a reason exists for an IdM user to impersonate a local user with UID 1009 on all IdM clients, you can use ID views to override the UID of this IdM user that was generated when the user was created in IdM.
Important

You can only apply ID views to IdM clients, not to IdM servers.

26.2. Potential negative impact of ID views on SSSD performance

When you define an ID view, IdM places the desired override value in the IdM server’s System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) cache. The SSSD running on an IdM client then retrieves the override value from the server cache.

Applying an ID view can have a negative impact on System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) performance, because certain optimizations and ID views cannot run at the same time. For example, ID views prevent SSSD from optimizing the process of looking up groups on the server:

  • With ID views, SSSD must check every member on the returned list of group member names if the group name is overridden.
  • Without ID views, SSSD can only collect the user names from the member attribute of the group object.

This negative effect becomes most apparent when the SSSD cache is empty or after you clear the cache, which makes all entries invalid.

26.3. Attributes an ID view can override

ID views consist of user and group ID overrides. The overrides define the new POSIX attribute values.

User and group ID overrides can define new values for the following POSIX attributes:

User attributes
  • Login name (uid)
  • GECOS entry (gecos)
  • UID number (uidNumber)
  • GID number (gidNumber)
  • Login shell (loginShell)
  • Home directory (homeDirectory)
  • SSH public keys (ipaSshPubkey)
  • Certificate (userCertificate)
Group attributes
  • Group name (cn)
  • Group GID number (gidNumber)

26.4. Getting help for ID view commands

You can get help for commands involving Identity Management (IdM) ID views on the IdM command-line interface (CLI).

Prerequisites

  • You have obtained a Kerberos ticket for an IdM user.

Procedure

  • To display all commands used to manage ID views and overrides:

    $ ipa help idviews
    ID Views
    
    Manage ID Views
    
    IPA allows to override certain properties of users and groups[...]
    [...]
    Topic commands:
      idoverridegroup-add          Add a new Group ID override
      idoverridegroup-del          Delete a Group ID override
    [...]
  • To display detailed help for a particular command, add the --help option to the command:

    $ ipa idview-add --help
    Usage: ipa [global-options] idview-add NAME [options]
    
    Add a new ID View.
    Options:
      -h, --help      show this help message and exit
      --desc=STR      Description
    [...]

26.5. Using an ID view to override the login name of an IdM user on a specific host

This section describes how you as an Identity Management (IdM) system administrator can create an ID view for a specific IdM client that overrides a POSIX attribute value associated with a specific IdM user. The procedure uses the example of an ID view that enables an IdM user named idm_user to log in to an IdM client named host1 using the user_1234 login name.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in as IdM administrator.

Procedure

  1. Create a new ID view. For example, to create an ID view named example_for_host1:

    $ ipa idview-add example_for_host1
    ---------------------------
    Added ID View "example_for_host1"
    ---------------------------
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
  2. Add a user override to the example_for_host1 ID view. To override the user login:

    • Enter the ipa idoverrideuser-add command
    • Add the name of the ID view
    • Add the user name, also called the anchor
    • Add the --login option:

      $ ipa idoverrideuser-add example_for_host1 idm_user --login=user_1234
      -----------------------------
      Added User ID override "idm_user"
      -----------------------------
        Anchor to override: idm_user
        User login: user_1234

      For a list of the available options, run ipa idoverrideuser-add --help.

      Note

      The ipa idoverrideuser-add --certificate command replaces all existing certificates for the account in the specified ID view. To append an additional certificate, use the ipa idoverrideuser-add-cert command instead:

      $ ipa idoverrideuser-add-cert example_for_host1 user --certificate="MIIEATCC..."
  3. Optional: Using the ipa idoverrideuser-mod command, you can specify new attribute values for an existing user override.
  4. Apply example_for_host1 to the host1.idm.example.com host:

    $ ipa idview-apply example_for_host1 --hosts=host1.idm.example.com
    -----------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------
    hosts: host1.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
    ---------------------------------------------
    Note

    The ipa idview-apply command also accepts the --hostgroups option. The option applies the ID view to hosts that belong to the specified host group, but does not associate the ID view with the host group itself. Instead, the --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

    This means that if a host is added to the host group in the future, the ID view does not apply to the new host.

  5. To apply the new configuration to the host1.idm.example.com system immediately:

    1. SSH to the system as root:

      $ ssh root@host1
      Password:
    2. Clear the SSSD cache:

      root@host1 ~]# sss_cache -E
    3. Restart the SSSD daemon:
    root@host1 ~]# systemctl restart sssd

Verification steps

  • If you have the credentials of user_1234, you can use them to log in to IdM on host1:

    1. SSH to host1 using user_1234 as the login name:

      [root@r8server ~]# ssh user_1234@host1.idm.example.com
      Password:
      
      Last login: Sun Jun 21 22:34:25 2020 from 192.168.122.229
      [user_1234@host1 ~]$
    2. Display the working directory:

      [user_1234@host1 ~]$ pwd
      /home/idm_user/
  • Alternatively, if you have root credentials on host1, you can use them to check the output of the id command for idm_user and user_1234:

    [root@host1 ~]# id idm_user
    uid=779800003(user_1234) gid=779800003(idm_user) groups=779800003(idm_user)
    [root@host1 ~]# user_1234
    uid=779800003(user_1234) gid=779800003(idm_user) groups=779800003(idm_user)

26.6. Modifying an IdM ID view

An ID view in Identity Management (IdM) overrides a POSIX attribute value associated with a specific IdM user. This section describes how to modify an existing ID view. Specifically, it describes how to modify an ID view to enable the user named idm_user to use the /home/user_1234/ directory as the user home directory instead of /home/idm_user/ on the host1.idm.example.com IdM client.

Prerequisites

  • You have root access to host1.idm.example.com.
  • You are logged in as a user with the required privileges, for example admin.
  • You have an ID view configured for idm_user that applies to the host1 IdM client.

Procedure

  1. As root, create the directory that you want idm_user to use on host1.idm.example.com as the user home directory:

    [root@host1 /]# mkdir /home/user_1234/
  2. Change the ownership of the directory:

    [root@host1 /]# chown idm_user:idm_user /home/user_1234/
  3. Display the ID view, including the hosts to which the ID view is currently applied. To display the ID view named example_for_host1:

    $ ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
      dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
      User object override: idm_user
      Hosts the view applies to: host1.idm.example.com
      objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

    The output shows that the ID view currently applies to host1.idm.example.com.

  4. Modify the user override of the example_for_host1 ID view. To override the user home directory:

    • Enter the ipa idoverrideuser-add command
    • Add the name of the ID view
    • Add the user name, also called the anchor
    • Add the --homedir option:

      $ ipa idoverrideuser-mod example_for_host1 idm_user --homedir=/home/user_1234
      -----------------------------
      Modified an User ID override "idm_user"
      -----------------------------
        Anchor to override: idm_user
        User login: user_1234
        Home directory: /home/user_1234/

    For a list of the available options, run ipa idoverrideuser-mod --help.

  5. To apply the new configuration to the host1.idm.example.com system immediately:

    1. SSH to the system as root:

      $ ssh root@host1
      Password:
    2. Clear the SSSD cache:

      root@host1 ~]# sss_cache -E
    3. Restart the SSSD daemon:
    root@host1 ~]# systemctl restart sssd

Verification steps

  1. SSH to host1 as idm_user:

    [root@r8server ~]# ssh idm_user@host1.idm.example.com
    Password:
    
    Last login: Sun Jun 21 22:34:25 2020 from 192.168.122.229
    [user_1234@host1 ~]$
  2. Print the working directory:

    [user_1234@host1 ~]$ pwd
    /home/user_1234/

26.7. Adding an ID view to override an IdM user home directory on an IdM client

An ID view in Identity Management (IdM) overrides a POSIX attribute value associated with a specific IdM user. This section describes how to create an ID view that applies to idm_user on an IdM client named host1 to enable the user to use the /home/user_1234/ directory as the user home directory instead of /home/idm_user/.

Prerequisites

  • You have root access to host1.idm.example.com.
  • You are logged in as a user with the required privileges, for example admin.

Procedure

  1. As root, create the directory that you want idm_user to use on host1.idm.example.com as the user home directory:

    [root@host1 /]# mkdir /home/user_1234/
  2. Change the ownership of the directory:

    [root@host1 /]# chown idm_user:idm_user /home/user_1234/
  3. Create an ID view. For example, to create an ID view named example_for_host1:

    $ ipa idview-add example_for_host1
    ---------------------------
    Added ID View "example_for_host1"
    ---------------------------
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
  4. Add a user override to the example_for_host1 ID view. To override the user home directory:

    • Enter the ipa idoverrideuser-add command
    • Add the name of the ID view
    • Add the user name, also called the anchor
    • Add the --homedir option:
    $ ipa idoverrideuser-add example_for_host1 idm_user --homedir=/home/user_1234
    -----------------------------
    Added User ID override "idm_user"
    -----------------------------
      Anchor to override: idm_user
      Home directory: /home/user_1234/
  5. Apply example_for_host1 to the host1.idm.example.com host:

    $ ipa idview-apply example_for_host1 --hosts=host1.idm.example.com
    -----------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------
    hosts: host1.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
    ---------------------------------------------
    Note

    The ipa idview-apply command also accepts the --hostgroups option. The option applies the ID view to hosts that belong to the specified host group, but does not associate the ID view with the host group itself. Instead, the --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

    This means that if a host is added to the host group in the future, the ID view does not apply to the new host.

  6. To apply the new configuration to the host1.idm.example.com system immediately:

    1. SSH to the system as root:

      $ ssh root@host1
      Password:
    2. Clear the SSSD cache:

      root@host1 ~]# sss_cache -E
    3. Restart the SSSD daemon:
    root@host1 ~]# systemctl restart sssd

Verification steps

  1. SSH to host1 as idm_user:

    [root@r8server ~]# ssh idm_user@host1.idm.example.com
    Password:
    Activate the web console with: systemctl enable --now cockpit.socket
    
    Last login: Sun Jun 21 22:34:25 2020 from 192.168.122.229
    [idm_user@host1 /]$
  2. Print the working directory:

    [idm_user@host1 /]$ pwd
    /home/user_1234/

26.8. Applying an ID view to an IdM host group

The ipa idview-apply command accepts the --hostgroups option. However, the option acts as a one-time operation that applies the ID view to hosts that currently belong to the specified host group, but does not dynamically associate the ID view with the host group itself. The --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

If you add a new host to the host group later, you must apply the ID view to the new host manually, using the ipa idview-apply command with the --hosts option.

Similarly, if you remove a host from a host group, the ID view is still assigned to the host after the removal. To unapply the ID view from the removed host, you must run the ipa idview-unapply id_view_name --hosts=name_of_the_removed_host command.

This section describes how to achieve the following goals:

  1. How to create a host group and add hosts to it.
  2. How to apply an ID view to the host group.
  3. How to add a new host to the host group and apply the ID view to the new host.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create a host group and add hosts to it:

    1. Create a host group. For example, to create a host group named baltimore:

      [root@server ~]# ipa hostgroup-add --desc="Baltimore hosts" baltimore
      ---------------------------
      Added hostgroup "baltimore"
      ---------------------------
      Host-group: baltimore
      Description: Baltimore hosts
    2. Add hosts to the host group. For example, to add the host102 and host103 to the baltimore host group:

      [root@server ~]# ipa hostgroup-add-member --hosts={host102,host103} baltimore
      Host-group: baltimore
      Description: Baltimore hosts
      Member hosts: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 2
      -------------------------
  2. Apply an ID view to the hosts in the host group. For example, to apply the example_for_host1 ID view to the baltimore host group:

    [root@server ~]# ipa idview-apply --hostgroups=baltimore
    ID View Name: example_for_host1
    -----------------------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------------------
      hosts: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 2
    ---------------------------------------------
  3. Add a new host to the host group and apply the ID view to the new host:

    1. Add a new host to the host group. For example, to add the somehost.idm.example.com host to the baltimore host group:

      [root@server ~]# ipa hostgroup-add-member --hosts=somehost.idm.example.com baltimore
        Host-group: baltimore
        Description: Baltimore hosts
        Member hosts:  host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com,somehost.idm.example.com
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 1
      -------------------------
    2. Optionally, display the ID view information. For example, to display the details about the example_for_host1 ID view:

      [root@server ~]# ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
        dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
        ID View Name: example_for_host1
      [...]
        Hosts the view applies to: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
        objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

      The output shows that the ID view is not applied to somehost.idm.example.com, the newly-added host in the baltimore host group.

    3. Apply the ID view to the new host. For example, to apply the example_for_host1 ID view to somehost.idm.example.com:

      [root@server ~]# ipa idview-apply --host=somehost.idm.example.com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
      -----------------------------------------
      Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
      -----------------------------------------
        hosts: somehost.idm.example.com
      ---------------------------------------------
      Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
      ---------------------------------------------

Verification steps

  • Display the ID view information again:

    [root@server ~]# ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
      dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
    [...]
      Hosts the view applies to: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com, somehost.idm.example.com
      objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

    The output shows that ID view is now applied to somehost.idm.example.com, the newly-added host in the baltimore host group.

26.9. Migrating NIS domains to Identity Management

You can use ID views to set host specific UIDs and GIDs for existing hosts to prevent changing permissions for files and directories when migrating NIS domains into IdM.

Prerequisites

  • You authenticated yourself as an admin using the kinit admin command.

Procedure

  1. Add users and groups in the IdM domain.

    1. Create users using the ipa user-add command. For more information see: Adding users to IdM.
    2. Create groups using the ipa group-add command. For more information see: Adding groups to IdM.
  2. Override IDs IdM generated during the user creation:

    1. Create a new ID view using ipa idview-add command. For more information see: Getting help for ID view commands.
    2. Add ID overrides for the users and groups to the ID view using ipa idoverrideuser-add and idoverridegroup-add respectively.
  3. Assign the ID view to the specific hosts using ipa idview-apply command.
  4. Decommission the NIS domains.

Verification

  1. To check if all users and groups were added to the ID view correctly, use the ipa idview-show command.

    $ ipa idview-show example-view
      ID View Name: example-view
      User object overrides: example-user1
      Group object overrides: example-group

Chapter 27. Using ID views for Active Directory users

You can use ID views to specify new values for the POSIX attributes of your Active Directory (AD) users in an IdM-AD Trust environment.

By default, IdM applies the Default Trust View to all AD users. You can configure additional ID views on individual IdM clients to further adjust which POSIX attributes specific users receive.

27.1. How the Default Trust View works

The Default Trust View is the default ID view that is always applied to AD users and groups in trust-based setups. It is created automatically when you establish the trust using the ipa-adtrust-install command and cannot be deleted.

Note

The Default Trust View only accepts overrides for AD users and groups, not for IdM users and groups.

Using the Default Trust View, you can define custom POSIX attributes for AD users and groups, thus overriding the values defined in AD.

Table 27.1. Applying the Default Trust View

 Values in ADDefault Trust ViewResult

Login

ad_user

ad_user

ad_user

UID

111

222

222

GID

111

(no value)

111

You can also configure additional ID Views to override the Default Trust View on IdM clients. IdM applies the values from the host-specific ID view on top of the Default Trust View:

  • If an attribute is defined in the host-specific ID view, IdM applies the value from this ID view.
  • If an attribute is not defined in the host-specific ID view, IdM applies the value from the Default Trust View.

Table 27.2. Applying a host-specific ID view on top of the Default Trust View

 Values in ADDefault Trust ViewHost-specific ID viewResult

Login

ad_user

ad_user

(no value)

ad_user

UID

111

222

333

333

GID

111

(no value)

333

333

Note

You can only apply host-specific ID views to override the Default Trust View on IdM clients. IdM servers and replicas always apply the values from the Default Trust View.

27.2. Defining global attributes for an AD user by modifying the Default Trust View

If you want to override a POSIX attribute for an Active Directory (AD) user throughout your entire IdM deployment, modify the entry for that user in the Default Trust View. This procedure sets the GID for the AD user ad_user@ad.example.com to 732000006.

Prerequisites

  • You are working with an IdM server that is a Trust Controller or Trust Agent.
  • You have authenticated as an IdM administator.

Procedure

  1. As an IdM administrator, create an ID override for the AD user in the Default Trust View that changes the GID number to 732000006:

    # ipa idoverrideuser-add 'Default Trust View' ad_user@ad.example.com --gidnumber=732000006
  2. Clear the entry for the ad_user@ad.example.com user from the SSSD cache on all IdM servers and clients. This removes stale data and allows the new override value to apply.

    # sssctl cache-expire -u ad_user@ad.example.com

Verification

  • Retrieve information for the ad_user@ad.example.com user to verify the GID reflects the updated value.

    # id ad_user@ad.example.com
    uid=702801456(ad_user@ad.example.com) gid=732000006(ad_admins)
    groups=732000006(ad_admins),702800513(domain users@ad.example.com)

27.3. Overriding Default Trust View attributes for an AD user on an IdM client with an ID view

You might want to override some POSIX attributes from the Default Trust View for an Active Directory (AD) user. For example, you might need to give an AD user a different GID on one particular IdM client. You can use an ID view to override a value from the Default Trust View for an AD user and apply it to a single host. This procedure explains how to set the GID for the ad_user@ad.example.com AD user on the host1.idm.example.com IdM client to 732001337.

Prerequisites

  • You have root access to the host1.idm.example.com IdM client.
  • You are logged in as a user with the required privileges, for example the admin user.

Procedure

  1. Create an ID view. For example, to create an ID view named example_for_host1:

    $ ipa idview-add example_for_host1
    ---------------------------
    Added ID View "example_for_host1"
    ---------------------------
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
  2. Add a user override to the example_for_host1 ID view. To override the user’s GID:

    • Enter the ipa idoverrideuser-add command
    • Add the name of the ID view
    • Add the user name, also called the anchor
    • Add the --gidnumber= option:
    $ ipa idoverrideuser-add example_for_host1 ad_user@ad.example.com --gidnumber=732001337
    -----------------------------
    Added User ID override "ad_user@ad.example.com"
    -----------------------------
      Anchor to override: ad_user@ad.example.com
      GID: 732001337
  3. Apply example_for_host1 to the host1.idm.example.com IdM client:

    $ ipa idview-apply example_for_host1 --hosts=host1.idm.example.com
    -----------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------
    hosts: host1.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
    ---------------------------------------------
    Note

    The ipa idview-apply command also accepts the --hostgroups option. The option applies the ID view to hosts that belong to the specified host group, but does not associate the ID view with the host group itself. Instead, the --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

    This means that if a host is added to the host group in the future, the ID view does not apply to the new host.

  4. Clear the entry for the ad_user@ad.example.com user from the SSSD cache on the host1.idm.example.com IdM client. This removes stale data and allows the new override value to apply.

    [root@host1 ~]# sssctl cache-expire -u ad_user@ad.example.com

Verification Steps

  1. SSH to host1 as ad_user@ad.example.com:

    [root@r8server ~]# ssh ad_user@ad.example.com@host1.idm.example.com
  2. Retrieve information for the ad_user@ad.example.com user to verify the GID reflects the updated value.

    [ad_user@ad.example.com@host1 ~]$ id ad_user@ad.example.com
    uid=702801456(ad_user@ad.example.com) gid=732001337(admins2)
    groups=732001337(admins2),702800513(domain users@ad.example.com)

27.4. Applying an ID view to an IdM host group

The ipa idview-apply command accepts the --hostgroups option. However, the option acts as a one-time operation that applies the ID view to hosts that currently belong to the specified host group, but does not dynamically associate the ID view with the host group itself. The --hostgroups option expands the members of the specified host group and applies the --hosts option individually to every one of them.

If you add a new host to the host group later, you must apply the ID view to the new host manually, using the ipa idview-apply command with the --hosts option.

Similarly, if you remove a host from a host group, the ID view is still assigned to the host after the removal. To unapply the ID view from the removed host, you must run the ipa idview-unapply id_view_name --hosts=name_of_the_removed_host command.

This section describes how to achieve the following goals:

  1. How to create a host group and add hosts to it.
  2. How to apply an ID view to the host group.
  3. How to add a new host to the host group and apply the ID view to the new host.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Create a host group and add hosts to it:

    1. Create a host group. For example, to create a host group named baltimore:

      [root@server ~]# ipa hostgroup-add --desc="Baltimore hosts" baltimore
      ---------------------------
      Added hostgroup "baltimore"
      ---------------------------
      Host-group: baltimore
      Description: Baltimore hosts
    2. Add hosts to the host group. For example, to add the host102 and host103 to the baltimore host group:

      [root@server ~]# ipa hostgroup-add-member --hosts={host102,host103} baltimore
      Host-group: baltimore
      Description: Baltimore hosts
      Member hosts: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 2
      -------------------------
  2. Apply an ID view to the hosts in the host group. For example, to apply the example_for_host1 ID view to the baltimore host group:

    [root@server ~]# ipa idview-apply --hostgroups=baltimore
    ID View Name: example_for_host1
    -----------------------------------------
    Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
    -----------------------------------------
      hosts: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
    ---------------------------------------------
    Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 2
    ---------------------------------------------
  3. Add a new host to the host group and apply the ID view to the new host:

    1. Add a new host to the host group. For example, to add the somehost.idm.example.com host to the baltimore host group:

      [root@server ~]# ipa hostgroup-add-member --hosts=somehost.idm.example.com baltimore
        Host-group: baltimore
        Description: Baltimore hosts
        Member hosts:  host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com,somehost.idm.example.com
      -------------------------
      Number of members added 1
      -------------------------
    2. Optionally, display the ID view information. For example, to display the details about the example_for_host1 ID view:

      [root@server ~]# ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
        dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
        ID View Name: example_for_host1
      [...]
        Hosts the view applies to: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com
        objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

      The output shows that the ID view is not applied to somehost.idm.example.com, the newly-added host in the baltimore host group.

    3. Apply the ID view to the new host. For example, to apply the example_for_host1 ID view to somehost.idm.example.com:

      [root@server ~]# ipa idview-apply --host=somehost.idm.example.com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
      -----------------------------------------
      Applied ID View "example_for_host1"
      -----------------------------------------
        hosts: somehost.idm.example.com
      ---------------------------------------------
      Number of hosts the ID View was applied to: 1
      ---------------------------------------------

Verification steps

  • Display the ID view information again:

    [root@server ~]# ipa idview-show example_for_host1 --all
      dn: cn=example_for_host1,cn=views,cn=accounts,dc=idm,dc=example,dc=com
      ID View Name: example_for_host1
    [...]
      Hosts the view applies to: host102.idm.example.com, host103.idm.example.com, somehost.idm.example.com
      objectclass: ipaIDView, top, nsContainer

    The output shows that ID view is now applied to somehost.idm.example.com, the newly-added host in the baltimore host group.

Chapter 28. Adjusting ID ranges manually

An IdM server generates unique user ID (UID) and group ID (GID) numbers. By creating and assigning different ID ranges to replicas, it also ensures that they never generate the same ID numbers. By default, this process is automatic. However, you can manually adjust the IdM ID range during the IdM server installation, or manually define a replica’s DNA ID range.

28.1. ID ranges

ID numbers are divided into ID ranges. Keeping separate numeric ranges for individual servers and replicas eliminates the chance that an ID number issued for an entry is already used by another entry on another server or replica.

Note that there are two distinct types of ID ranges:

  • The IdM ID range, which is assigned during the installation of the first server. This range cannot be modified after it is created. However, you can create a new IdM ID range in addition to the original one. For more information, see Automatic ID ranges assignment and Adding a new IdM ID range.
  • The Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID ranges, which can be modified by the user. These have to fit within an existing IdM ID range. For more information, see Assigning DNA ID ranges manually.

    Replicas can also have a next DNA ID range assigned. A replica uses its next range when it runs out of IDs in its current range. Next ranges are not assigned automatically when a replica is deleted and you must assign them manually.

The ranges are updated and shared between the server and replicas by the DNA plug-in, as part of the back end 389 Directory Server instance for the domain.

The DNA range definition is set by two attributes:

  • The server’s next available number: the low end of the DNA range
  • The range size: the number of ID’s in the DNA range

The initial bottom range is set during the plug-in instance configuration. After that, the plug-in updates the bottom value. Breaking the available numbers into ranges allows the servers to continually assign numbers without overlapping with each other.

28.2. Automatic ID ranges assignment

IdM ID ranges

By default, an IdM ID range is automatically assigned during the IdM server installation. The ipa-server-install command randomly selects and assigns a range of 200,000 IDs from a total of 10,000 possible ranges. Selecting a random range in this way significantly reduces the probability of conflicting IDs in case you decide to merge two separate IdM domains in the future.

Note

This IdM ID range cannot be modified after it is created. You can only manually adjust the Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID ranges, using the commands described in Assigning DNA ID ranges manually. A DNA range matching the IdM ID range is automatically created during installation.

DNA ID ranges

If you have a single IdM server installed, it controls the whole DNA ID range. When you install a new replica and the replica requests its own DNA ID range, the initial ID range for the server splits and is distributed between the server and replica: the replica receives half of the remaining DNA ID range that is available on the initial server. The server and replica then use their respective portions of the original ID range for new user or group entries. Also, if the replica is close to depleting its allocated ID range and fewer than 100 IDs remain, the replica contacts the other available servers to request a new DNA ID range.

Important

When you install a replica, it does not immediately receive an ID range. A replica receives an ID range the first time the DNA plug-in is used, for example when you first add a user.

If the initial server stops functioning before the replica requests a DNA ID range from it, the replica is unable to contact the server to request the ID range. Attempting to add a new user on the replica then fails. In such situations, you can find out what ID range is assigned to the disabled server, and assign an ID range to the replica manually.

28.3. Assigning the IdM ID range manually during server installation

You can override the default behavior and set an IdM ID range manually instead of having it assigned randomly.

Important

Do not set ID ranges that include UID values of 1000 and lower; these values are reserved for system use. Also, do not set an ID range that would include the 0 value; the SSSD service does not handle the 0 ID value.

Procedure

  • You can define the IdM ID range manually during server installation by using the following two options with ipa-server-install:

    • --idstart gives the starting value for UID and GID numbers.
    • --idmax gives the maximum UID and GID number; by default, the value is the --idstart starting value plus 199,999.

Verification steps

  • To check if the ID range was assigned correctly, you can display the assigned IdM ID range by using the ipa idrange-find command:

    # ipa idrange-find
    ---------------
    1 range matched
    ---------------
      Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_id_range
      First Posix ID of the range: 882200000
      Number of IDs in the range: 200000
      Range type: local domain range
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 1
    ----------------------------

28.4. Adding a new IdM ID range

In some cases, you may want to create a new IdM ID range in addition to the original one; for example, when a replica has run out of IDs and the original IdM ID range is depleted.

Important

Adding a new IdM ID range does not create new DNA ID ranges automatically. You must assign new DNA ID ranges to replicas manually as needed. For more information on how to do this, see assigning DNA ID ranges manually.

Procedure

  1. To create a new IdM ID range, use the ipa idrange-add command. You must specify the new range name, the first ID number of the range and the range size:

    # ipa idrange-add IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range --base-id=1000000 --range-size=200000
    ------------------------------------------
    Added ID range "IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range"
    ------------------------------------------
      Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range
      First Posix ID of the range: 1000000
      Number of IDs in the range: 200000
      Range type: local domain range
  2. Optional: Update the ID range immediately:

    1. Clear the System Security Services Daemon (SSSD) cache:

      # sss_cache -E
    2. Restart the SSSD daemon:

      # systemctl restart sssd
    Note

    If you do not clear the SSSD cache and restart the service, it takes some time for SSSD to notice the new ID range. More specifically, it notices the range when it updates the domain list and other configuration data stored on the IdM server.

Verification steps

  • You can check if the new range is set correctly by using the ipa idrange-find command:

    # ipa idrange-find
    ----------------
    2 ranges matched
    ----------------
      Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_id_range
      First Posix ID of the range: 882200000
      Number of IDs in the range: 200000
      Range type: local domain range
    
      Range name: IDM.EXAMPLE.COM_new_range
      First Posix ID of the range: 1000000
      Number of IDs in the range: 200000
      Range type: local domain range
    ----------------------------
    Number of entries returned 2
    ----------------------------

28.5. Removing an ID range after removing a trust to AD

If you have removed a trust between your IdM and Active Directory (AD) environments, you might want to remove the ID range associated with it.

Warning

IDs allocated to ID ranges associated with trusted domains might still be used for ownership of files and directories on systems enrolled into IdM.

If you remove the ID range that corresponds to an AD trust that you have removed, you will not be able to resolve the ownership of any files and directories owned by AD users.

Prerequisites

  • You have removed a trust to an AD environment.

Procedure

  1. Display all the ID ranges that are currently in use:

    [root@server ~]# ipa idrange-find
  2. Identify the name of the ID range associated with the trust you have removed. The first part of the name of the ID range is the name of the trust, for example AD.EXAMPLE.COM_id_range.
  3. Remove the range:

    [root@server ~]# ipa idrange-del AD.EXAMPLE.COM_id_range
  4. Restart the SSSD service to remove references to the ID range you have removed.

    [root@server ~]# systemctl restart sssd

28.6. Displaying currently assigned DNA ID ranges

You can display both the currently active Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID range on a server, as well as its next DNA range if it has one assigned.

Procedure

  • To display which DNA ID ranges are configured for the servers in the topology, use the following commands:

    • ipa-replica-manage dnarange-show displays the current DNA ID range that is set on all servers or, if you specify a server, only on the specified server, for example:

      # ipa-replica-manage dnarange-show
      serverA.example.com: 1001-1500
      serverB.example.com: 1501-2000
      serverC.example.com: No range set
      
      # ipa-replica-manage dnarange-show serverA.example.com
      serverA.example.com: 1001-1500
    • ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-show displays the next DNA ID range currently set on all servers or, if you specify a server, only on the specified server, for example:

      # ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-show
      serverA.example.com: 2001-2500
      serverB.example.com: No on-deck range set
      serverC.example.com: No on-deck range set
      
      # ipa-replica-manage dnanextrange-show serverA.example.com
      serverA.example.com: 2001-2500

28.7. Manual ID range assignment

In certain situations, it is necessary to manually assign a Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID range, for example when:

  • A replica has run out of IDs and the IdM ID range is depleted

    A replica has exhausted the DNA ID range that was assigned to it, and requesting additional IDs failed because no more free IDs are available in the IdM range.

    To solve this situation, extend the DNA ID range assigned to the replica. You can do this in two ways:

    • Shorten the DNA ID range assigned to a different replica, then assign the newly available values to the depleted replica.
    • Create a new IdM ID range, then set a new DNA ID range for the replica within this created IdM range.

      For information on how to create a new IdM ID range, see Adding a new IdM ID range.

  • A replica stopped functioning

    A replica’s DNA ID range is not automatically retrieved when the replica stops functioning and must be deleted, which means the DNA ID range previously assigned to the replica becomes unavailable. You want to recover the DNA ID range and make it available for other replicas.

    To do this, find out what the ID range values are, before manually assigning that range to a different server. Also, to avoid duplicate UIDs or GIDs, make sure that no ID value from the recovered range was previously assigned to a user or group; you can do this by examining the UIDs and GIDs of existing users and groups.

You can manually assign a DNA ID range to a replica using the commands in Assigning DNA ID ranges manually.

Note

If you assign a new DNA ID range, the UIDs of the already existing entries on the server or replica stay the same. This does not pose a problem because even if you change the current DNA ID range, IdM keeps a record of what ranges were assigned in the past.

28.8. Assigning DNA ID ranges manually

In some cases, you may need to manually assign Distributed Numeric Assignment (DNA) ID ranges to existing replicas, for example to reassign a DNA ID range assigned to a non-functioning replica. For more information, see