Data Grid REST API

Red Hat Data Grid 8.1

Configure and interact with the Data Grid REST API

Red Hat Customer Content Services

Abstract

Access data, monitor and maintain clusters, perform administrative operations through the Data Grid REST API.

Chapter 1. Red Hat Data Grid

Data Grid is a high-performance, distributed in-memory data store.

Schemaless data structure
Flexibility to store different objects as key-value pairs.
Grid-based data storage
Designed to distribute and replicate data across clusters.
Elastic scaling
Dynamically adjust the number of nodes to meet demand without service disruption.
Data interoperability
Store, retrieve, and query data in the grid from different endpoints.

1.1. Data Grid Documentation

Documentation for Data Grid is available on the Red Hat customer portal.

1.2. Data Grid Downloads

Access the Data Grid Software Downloads on the Red Hat customer portal.

Note

You must have a Red Hat account to access and download Data Grid software.

1.3. Making open source more inclusive

Red Hat is committed to replacing problematic language in our code, documentation, and web properties. We are beginning with these four terms: master, slave, blacklist, and whitelist. Because of the enormity of this endeavor, these changes will be implemented gradually over several upcoming releases. For more details, see our CTO Chris Wright’s message.

Chapter 2. Data Grid REST Endpoint

Data Grid servers provide RESTful HTTP access to data through a REST endpoint built on Netty.

2.1. REST Authentication

Configure authentication to the REST endpoint with the Data Grid command line interface (CLI) and the user command. The CLI lets you create and manage users, passwords, and authorization roles for accessing the REST endpoint.

2.2. Supported Protocols

The Data Grid REST endpoint supports HTTP/1.1 and HTTP/2 protocols.

You can do either of the following to use HTTP/2:

Note

TLS/ALPN with JDK8 requires additional client configuration. Refer to the appropriate documentation for your REST client. In most cases you need to use either the Jetty ALPN Agent or OpenSSL bindings.

2.3. Data Formats and the REST API

Data Grid caches store data in formats that you can define with a MediaType.

The following example configures storage format for entries:

<cache>
   <encoding>
      <key media-type="application/x-java-object"/>
      <value media-type="application/xml; charset=UTF-8"/>
   </encoding>
</cache>

If you do not configure a MediaType, Data Grid defaults to application/octet-stream for both keys and values. However, if the cache is indexed, Data Grid defaults to application/x-protostream.

2.3.1. Supported Formats

You can write and read data in different formats and Data Grid can convert between those formats when required.

The following "standard" formats are interchangeable:

  • application/x-java-object
  • application/octet-stream
  • application/x-www-form-urlencoded
  • text/plain

You can also convert the preceding data formats into the following formats:

  • application/xml
  • application/json
  • application/x-jboss-marshalling
  • application/x-protostream
  • application/x-java-serialized

Data Grid also lets you convert between application/x-protostream and application/json.

All calls to the REST API can provide headers describing the content written or the required format of the content when reading. Data Grid supports the standard HTTP/1.1 headers "Content-Type" and "Accept" that are applied for values, plus the "Key-Content-Type" with similar effect for keys.

2.3.2. Accept Headers

The Data Grid REST endpoint is compliant with the RFC-2616 Accept header and negotiates the correct MediaType based on the conversions supported.

For example, send the following header when reading data:

Accept: text/plain;q=0.7, application/json;q=0.8, */*;q=0.6

The preceding header causes Data Grid to first return content in JSON format (higher priority 0.8). If it is not possible to convert the storage format to JSON, Data Grid attempts the next format of text/plain (second highest priority 0.7). Finally, Data Grid falls back to */*, which picks a suitable format based on the cache configuration.

2.3.3. Names with Special Characters

The creation of any REST resource requires a name that is part of the URL, and in case this name contains any special characters as defined in Section 2.2 of the RFC 3986 spec, it is necessary to encode it with the Percent encoding mechanism.

2.3.4. Key-Content-Type Headers

Most REST API calls have the Key included in the URL. Data Grid assumes the Key is a java.lang.String when handling those calls, but you can use a specific header Key-Content-Type for keys in different formats.

Key-Content-Type Header Examples

  • Specifying a byte[] Key as a Base64 string:

API call:

`PUT /my-cache/AQIDBDM=`

Headers:

Key-Content-Type: application/octet-stream

  • Specifying a byte[] Key as a hexadecimal string:

API call:

GET /my-cache/0x01CA03042F

Headers:

Key-Content-Type: application/octet-stream; encoding=hex
  • Specifying a double Key:

API call:

POST /my-cache/3.141456

Headers:

Key-Content-Type: application/x-java-object;type=java.lang.Double

The type parameter for application/x-java-object is restricted to:

  • Primitive wrapper types
  • java.lang.String
  • Bytes, making application/x-java-object;type=Bytes equivalent to application/octet-stream;encoding=hex

2.3.5. JSON/Protostream Conversion

When caches are indexed, or specifically configured to store application/x-protostream, you can send and receive JSON documents that are automatically converted to and from Protostream.

You must register a protobuf schema for the conversion to work.

To register protobuf schemas via REST, invoke a POST or PUT in the ___protobuf_metadata cache as in the following example:

curl -u user:password -X POST --data-binary @./schema.proto http://127.0.0.1:11222/rest/v2/caches/___protobuf_metadata/schema.proto

When writing JSON documents, a special field _type must be present in the document to identity the protobuf Message that corresponds to the document.

For example, consider the following schema:

message Person  {
  required string name = 1;
  required int32 age = 2;
}

The corresponding JSON document is as follows:

{
   "_type": "Person",
   "name": "user1",
   "age": 32
}

2.4. Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) Requests

The Data Grid REST connector supports CORS, including preflight and rules based on the request origin.

The following shows an example REST connector configuration with CORS rules:

<rest-connector name="rest1" socket-binding="rest" cache-container="default">
   <cors-rules>
      <cors-rule name="restrict host1"
                 allow-credentials="false">
         <allowed-origins>http://host1,https://host1</allowed-origins>
         <allowed-methods>GET</allowed-methods>
      </cors-rule>
      <cors-rule name="allow ALL"
                 allow-credentials="true"
                 max-age-seconds="2000">
         <allowed-origins>*</allowed-origins>
         <allowed-methods>GET,OPTIONS,POST,PUT,DELETE</allowed-methods>
         <allowed-headers>Key-Content-Type</allowed-headers>
      </cors-rule>
   </cors-rules>
</rest-connector>

Data Grid evaluates CORS rules sequentially based on the "Origin" header set by the browser.

In the preceding example, if the origin is either "http://host1" or "https://host1", then the rule "restrict host1" applies. If the origin is different, then the next rule is tested.

Because the "allow ALL" rule permits all origins, any script that has an origin other than "http://host1" or "https://host1" can perform the allowed methods and use the supplied headers.

For information about configuring CORS rules, see the Data Grid Server Configuration Schema.

2.4.1. Allowing all CORS permissions for some origins

The VM property infinispan.server.rest.cors-allow can be used when starting the server to allow all permissions to one or more origins. Example:

./bin/server.sh -Dinfinispan.server.rest.cors-allow=http://192.168.1.78:11222,http://host.mydomain.com

All origins specified using this method will take precedence over the configured rules.

Chapter 3. Interacting with the Data Grid REST API

The Data Grid REST API lets you monitor, maintain, and manage Data Grid deployments and provides access to your data.

3.1. Creating and Managing Caches

Create and manage Data Grid caches and perform operations on data.

3.1.1. Creating Caches

Create named caches across Data Grid clusters with POST requests that include XML or JSON configuration in the payload.

POST /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}

Table 3.1. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Content-Type

REQUIRED

Sets the MediaType for the Data Grid configuration payload; either application/xml or application/json.

Flags

OPTIONAL

Used to set AdminFlags

3.1.1.1. XML Configuration

Data Grid configuration in XML format must conform to the schema and include:

  • <infinispan> root element.
  • <cache-container> definition.

Example XML Configuration

<infinispan>
    <cache-container>
        <distributed-cache name="myCache" mode="SYNC">
          <encoding media-type="application/x-protostream"/>
          <memory max-count="1000000" when-full="REMOVE"/>
        </distributed-cache>
    </cache-container>
</infinispan>

3.1.1.2. JSON Configuration

Data Grid configuration in JSON format:

  • Requires the cache definition only.
  • Must follow the structure of an XML configuration.

    • XML elements become JSON objects.
    • XML attributes become JSON fields.

Example JSON Configuration

{
  "distributed-cache": {
    "name": "myCache",
    "mode": "SYNC",
    "encoding": {
      "media-type": "application/x-protostream"
      },
    "memory": {
      "max-count": 1000000,
      "when-full": "REMOVE"
    }
  }
}

3.1.2. Verifying Caches

Check if caches are available in Data Grid clusters with HEAD requests.

HEAD /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}

3.1.3. Creating Caches with Templates

Create caches from Data Grid templates with POST requests and the ?template= parameter.

POST /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}?template={templateName}

3.1.4. Retrieving Cache Configuration

Retrieve Data Grid cache configurations with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/caches/{name}?action=config

Table 3.2. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Accept

OPTIONAL

Sets the required format to return content. Supported formats are application/xml and application/json. The default is application/json. See Accept for more information.

3.1.5. Converting Cache Configurations to JSON

Invoke a POST request with valid XML configuration and the ?action=toJSON parameter. Data Grid responds with the equivalent JSON representation of the configuration.

POST /rest/v2/caches?action=toJSON

3.1.6. Retrieving All Cache Details

Invoke a GET request to retreive all details for Data Grid caches.

GET /rest/v2/caches/{name}

Data Grid provides a JSON response such as the following:

{
  "stats": {
    "time_since_start": -1,
    "time_since_reset": -1,
    "hits": -1,
    "current_number_of_entries": -1,
    "current_number_of_entries_in_memory": -1,
    "total_number_of_entries": -1,
    "stores": -1,
    "off_heap_memory_used": -1,
    "data_memory_used": -1,
    "retrievals": -1,
    "misses": -1,
    "remove_hits": -1,
    "remove_misses": -1,
    "evictions": -1,
    "average_read_time": -1,
    "average_read_time_nanos": -1,
    "average_write_time": -1,
    "average_write_time_nanos": -1,
    "average_remove_time": -1,
    "average_remove_time_nanos": -1,
    "required_minimum_number_of_nodes": -1
  },
  "size": 0,
  "configuration": {
    "distributed-cache": {
      "mode": "SYNC",
      "transaction": {
        "stop-timeout": 0,
        "mode": "NONE"
      }
    }
  },
  "rehash_in_progress": false,
  "bounded": false,
  "indexed": false,
  "persistent": false,
  "transactional": false,
  "secured": false,
  "has_remote_backup": false,
  "indexing_in_progress": false,
  "statistics": false
}
  • stats current stats of the cache.
  • size the estimated size for the cache.
  • configuration the cache configuration.
  • rehash_in_progress true when a rehashing is in progress.
  • indexing_in_progress true when indexing is in progress.
  • bounded when expiration is enabled.
  • indexed true if the cache is indexed.
  • persistent true if the cache is persisted.
  • transactional true if the cache is transactional.
  • secured true if the cache is secured.
  • has_remote_backup true if the cache has remote backups.

3.1.7. Adding Entries

Add entries to caches with POST requests.

POST /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}/{cacheKey}

The preceding request places the payload, or request body, in the cacheName cache with the cacheKey key. The request replaces any data that already exists and updates the Time-To-Live and Last-Modified values, if they apply.

If a value already exists for the specified key, the POST request returns an HTTP CONFLICT status and does not modify the value. To update values, you should use PUT requests. See Replacing Entries.

Table 3.3. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Key-Content-Type

OPTIONAL

Sets the content type for the key in the request. See Key-Content-Type for more information.

Content-Type

OPTIONAL

Sets the MediaType of the value for the key.

timeToLiveSeconds

OPTIONAL

Sets the number of seconds before the entry is automatically deleted. If you do not set this parameter, Data Grid uses the default value from the configuration. If you set a negative value, the entry is never deleted.

maxIdleTimeSeconds

OPTIONAL

Sets the number of seconds that entries can be idle. If a read or write operation does not occur for an entry after the maximum idle time elapses, the entry is automatically deleted. If you do not set this parameter, Data Grid uses the default value from the configuration. If you set a negative value, the entry is never deleted.

flags

OPTIONAL

The flags used to add the entry. See Flag for more information.

Note

The flags header also applies to all other operations involving data manipulation on the cache,

Note

If both timeToLiveSeconds and maxIdleTimeSeconds have a value of 0, Data Grid uses the default lifespan and maxIdle values from the configuration.

If only maxIdleTimeSeconds has a value of 0, Data Grid uses:

  • the default maxIdle value from the configuration.
  • the value for timeToLiveSeconds that you pass as a request parameter or a value of -1 if you do not pass a value.

If only timeToLiveSeconds has a value of 0, Data Grid uses:

  • the default lifespan value from the configuration.
  • the value for maxIdle that you pass as a request parameter or a value of -1 if you do not pass a value.

3.1.8. Replacing Entries

Replace entries in caches with PUT requests.

PUT /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}/{cacheKey}

If a value already exists for the specified key, the PUT request updates the value. If you do not want to modify existing values, use POST requests that return HTTP CONFLICT status instead of modifying values. See Adding Values.

3.1.9. Retrieving Data By Keys

Retrieve data for specific keys with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}/{cacheKey}

The server returns data from the given cache, cacheName, under the given key, cacheKey, in the response body. Responses contain Content-Type headers that correspond to the MediaType negotiation.

Note

Browsers can also access caches directly, for example as a content delivery network (CDN). Data Grid returns a unique ETag for each entry along with the Last-Modified and Expires header fields.

These fields provide information about the state of the data that is returned in your request. ETags allow browsers and other clients to request only data that has changed, which conserves bandwidth.

Table 3.4. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Key-Content-Type

OPTIONAL

Sets the content type for the key in the request. The default is application/x-java-object; type=java.lang.String. See Key-Content-Type for more information.

Accept

OPTIONAL

Sets the required format to return content. See Accept for more information.

Tip

Append the extended parameter to the query string to get additional information:

GET /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}/{cacheKey}?extended

The preceding request returns custom headers:

  • Cluster-Primary-Owner returns the node name that is the primary owner of the key.
  • Cluster-Node-Name returns the JGroups node name of the server that handled the request.
  • Cluster-Physical-Address returns the physical JGroups address of the server that handled the request.

3.1.10. Checking if Entries Exist

Verify that specific entries exists with HEAD requests.

HEAD /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}/{cacheKey}

The preceding request returns only the header fields and the same content that you stored with the entry. For example, if you stored a String, the request returns a String. If you stored binary, base64-encoded, blobs or serialized Java objects, Data Grid does not de-serialize the content in the request.

Note

HEAD requests also support the extended parameter.

Table 3.5. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Key-Content-Type

OPTIONAL

Sets the content type for the key in the request. The default is application/x-java-object; type=java.lang.String. See Key-Content-Type for more information.

3.1.11. Deleting Entries

Remove entries from caches with DELETE requests.

DELETE /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}/{cacheKey}

Table 3.6. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Key-Content-Type

OPTIONAL

Sets the content type for the key in the request. The default is application/x-java-object; type=java.lang.String. See Key-Content-Type for more information.

3.1.12. Deleting Caches

Remove caches from Data Grid clusters with DELETE requests.

DELETE /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}

3.1.13. Retrieving All Keys from Caches

Invoke GET requests to retrieve all the keys in a cache in JSON format.

GET /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=keys

Table 3.7. Request Parameters

ParameterRequired or OptionalValue

batch-size

OPTIONAL

Specifies the internal batch size when retrieving the keys. The default value is 1000.

3.1.14. Clearing Caches

To delete all data from a cache, invoke a POST request with the ?action=clear parameter.

POST /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=clear

3.1.15. Getting Cache Size

Retrieve the size of caches across the entire cluster with GET requests and the ?action=size parameter.

GET /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=size

3.1.16. Getting Cache Statistics

Obtain runtime statistics for caches with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=stats

3.1.17. Querying Caches

Perform Ickle queries on caches with GET requests and the ?action=search&query parameter.

GET /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=search&query={ickle query}

Data Grid responds with query hits such as the following:

{
  "total_results" : 150,
  "hits" : [ {
    "hit" : {
      "name" : "user1",
      "age" : 35
    }
  }, {
    "hit" : {
       "name" : "user2",
       "age" : 42
    }
  }, {
    "hit" : {
       "name" : "user3",
       "age" : 12
    }
  } ]
}
  • total_results displays the total number of results from the query.
  • hits is an array of matches from the query.
  • hit is an object that matches the query.

    Tip

    Hits can contain all fields or a subset of fields if you use a Select clause.

Table 3.8. Request Parameters

ParameterRequired or OptionalValue

query

REQUIRED

Specifies the query string.

max_results

OPTIONAL

Sets the number of results to return. The default is 10.

offset

OPTIONAL

Specifies the index of the first result to return. The default is 0.

query_mode

OPTIONAL

Specifies how the Data Grid server executes the query. Values are FETCH and BROADCAST. The default is FETCH.

To use the body of the request instead of specifying query parameters, invoke POST requests as follows:

POST /rest/v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=search

The following example shows a query in the request body:

{
 "query":"from Entity where name:\"user1\"",
 "max_results":20,
 "offset":10
}

3.1.18. Re-indexing Data

Re-index all data in caches with POST requests and the ?action=mass-index&mode={mode} parameter.

POST  /v2/caches/{cacheName}/search/indexes?action=mass-index&mode={mode}

Values for the mode parameter are as follows:

  • sync returns a response of 200 only after the re-indexing operation is complete.
  • async returns a response of 200 immediately and the re-indexing operation continues running in the cluster. You can check the status with the Index Statistics REST call.

3.1.19. Purging Indexes

Delete all indexes from caches with POST requests and the ?action=clear parameter.

POST  /v2/caches/{cacheName}/search/indexes?action=clear

3.1.20. Retrieving Index Statistics

Obtain information about indexes in caches with GET requests.

GET /v2/caches/{cacheName}/search/indexes/stats

Data Grid provides a JSON response such as the following:

{
    "indexed_class_names": ["org.infinispan.sample.User"],
    "indexed_entities_count": {
        "org.infinispan.sample.User": 4
    },
    "index_sizes": {
        "cacheName_protobuf": 14551
    },
    "reindexing": false
}
  • indexed_class_names Provides the class names of the indexes present in the cache. For Protobuf the value is always org.infinispan.query.remote.impl.indexing.ProtobufValueWrapper.
  • indexed_entities_count Provides the number of entities indexed per class.
  • index_sizes Provides the size, in bytes, for each index in the cache.
  • reindexing Indicates if a re-indexing operation was performed for the cache. If the value is true, the MassIndexer was started in the cache.

3.1.21. Retrieving Query Statistics

Get information about the queries that have been run in caches with GET requests.

GET /v2/caches/{cacheName}/search/query/stats

Data Grid provides a JSON response such as the following:

{
    "search_query_execution_count":20,
    "search_query_total_time":5,
    "search_query_execution_max_time":154,
    "search_query_execution_avg_time":2,
    "object_loading_total_time":1,
    "object_loading_execution_max_time":1,
    "object_loading_execution_avg_time":1,
    "objects_loaded_count":20,
    "search_query_execution_max_time_query_string": "FROM entity"
}
  • search_query_execution_count Provides the number of queries that have been run.
  • search_query_total_time Provides the total time spent on queries.
  • search_query_execution_max_time Provides the maximum time taken for a query.
  • search_query_execution_avg_time Provides the average query time.
  • object_loading_total_time Provides the total time spent loading objects from the cache after query execution.
  • object_loading_execution_max_time Provides the maximum time spent loading objects execution.
  • object_loading_execution_avg_time Provides the average time spent loading objects execution.
  • objects_loaded_count Provides the count of objects loaded.
  • search_query_execution_max_time_query_string Provides the slowest query executed.

3.1.22. Clearing Query Statistics

Reset runtime statistics with POST requests and the ?action=clear parameter.

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}/search/query/stats?action=clear

3.1.23. Listing Caches

List all available caches in Data Grid clusters with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/caches/

3.1.24. Cross-Site Operations with Caches

Perform cross-site replication operations with the Data Grid REST API.

3.1.24.1. Getting Status of All Backup Locations

Retrieve the status of all backup locations with GET requests.

GET /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/

Data Grid responds with the status of each backup location in JSON format, as in the following example:

{
  "NYC": "online",
  "LON": "offline"
}

Table 3.9. Returned Status

ValueDescription

online

All nodes in the local cluster have a cross-site view with the backup location.

offline

No nodes in the local cluster have a cross-site view with the backup location.

mixed

Some nodes in the local cluster have a cross-site view with the backup location, other nodes in the local cluster do not have a cross-site view. The response indicates status for each node.

3.1.24.2. Getting Status of Specific Backup Locations

Retrieve the status of a backup location with GET requests.

GET /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}

Data Grid responds with the status of each node in the site in JSON format, as in the following example:

{
  "NodeA":"offline",
  "NodeB":"online"
}

Table 3.10. Returned Status

ValueDescription

online

The node is online.

offline

The node is offline.

failed

Not possible to retrieve status. The remote cache could be shutting down or a network error occurred during the request.

3.1.24.3. Taking Backup Locations Offline

Take backup locations offline with POST requests and the ?action=take-offline parameter.

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=take-offline

3.1.24.4. Bringing Backup Locations Online

Bring backup locations online with the ?action=bring-online parameter.

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=bring-online

3.1.24.5. Pushing State to Backup Locations

Push cache state to a backup location with the ?action=start-push-state parameter.

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=start-push-state

3.1.24.6. Canceling State Transfer

Cancel state transfer operations with the ?action=cancel-push-state parameter.

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=cancel-push-state

3.1.24.7. Getting State Transfer Status

Retrieve status of state transfer operations with the ?action=push-state-status parameter.

GET /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups?action=push-state-status

Data Grid responds with the status of state transfer for each backup location in JSON format, as in the following example:

{
   "NYC":"CANCELED",
   "LON":"OK"
}

Table 3.11. Returned Status

ValueDescription

SENDING

State transfer to the backup location is in progress.

OK

State transfer completed successfully.

ERROR

An error occurred with state transfer. Check log files.

CANCELLING

State transfer cancellation is in progress.

3.1.24.8. Clearing State Transfer Status

Clear state transfer status for sending sites with the ?action=clear-push-state-status parameter.

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/local?action=clear-push-state-status

3.1.24.9. Modifying Take Offline Conditions

Sites go offline if certain conditions are met. Modify the take offline parameters to control when backup locations automatically go offline.

Procedure

  1. Check configured take offline parameters with GET requests and the take-offline-config parameter.

    GET /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}/take-offline-config

    The Data Grid response includes after_failures and min_wait fields as follows:

    {
      "after_failures": 2,
      "min_wait": 1000
    }
  2. Modify take offline parameters in the body of PUT requests.

    PUT /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}/take-offline-config

3.1.24.10. Canceling State Transfer from Receiving Sites

If the connection between two backup locations breaks, you can cancel state transfer on the site that is receiving the push.

Cancel state transfer from a remote site and keep the current state of the local cache with the ?action=cancel-receive-state parameter.

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=cancel-receive-state

3.1.25. Rolling Upgrades

Perform rolling upgrades of cache data between Data Grid clusters

3.1.25.1. Synchronizing Data

Synchronize data from a source cluster to a target cluster with POST requests and the ?action=sync-data parameter:

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=sync-data

When the operation completes, Data Grid responds with the total number of entries copied to the target cluster.

3.1.25.2. Disconnecting Source Clusters

After you synchronize data to target clusters, disconnect from the source cluster with POST requests and the ?action=disconnect-source parameter:

POST /v2/caches/{cacheName}?action=disconnect-source

3.2. Creating and Managing Counters

Create, delete, and modify counters via the REST API.

3.2.1. Creating Counters

Create counters with POST requests that include configuration in the payload.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}

Example Weak Counter

{
    "weak-counter":{
        "initial-value":5,
        "storage":"PERSISTENT",
        "concurrency-level":1
    }
}

Example Strong Counter

{
    "strong-counter":{
        "initial-value":3,
        "storage":"PERSISTENT",
        "upper-bound":5
    }
}

3.2.2. Deleting Counters

Remove specific counters with DELETE requests.

DELETE /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}

3.2.3. Retrieving Counter Configuration

Retrieve configuration for specific counters with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}/config

Data Grid responds with the counter configuration in JSON format.

3.2.4. Adding Values to Counters

Add values to specific counters with POST requests.

Important

This method processes plain/text content only.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}

If the request payload is empty, the counter is incremented by one, otherwise the payload is interpreted as a signed long and added to the counter.

Note

WEAK counters never respond after operations.

STRONG counters return the current value after each operation.

3.2.5. Getting Counter Values

Retrieve counter values with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}

Table 3.12. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Accept

OPTIONAL

The required format to return the content. Supported formats are application/json and text/plain. JSON is assumed if no header is provided.

3.2.6. Resetting Counters

Restore the intial value of counters without POST requests and the ?action=reset parameter.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}?action=reset

3.2.7. Incrementing Counters

Increment counter values with POST request` and the ?action=increment parameter.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}?action=increment
Note

WEAK counters never respond after operations.

STRONG counters return the current value after each operation.

3.2.8. Adding Deltas to Counters

Add arbitrary values to counters with POST requests that include the ?action=add and delta parameters.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}?action=add&delta={delta}
Note

WEAK counters never respond after operations.

STRONG counters return the current value after each operation.

3.2.9. Decrementing Counter Values

Decrement counter values with POST requests and the ?action=decrement parameter.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}?action=decrement
Note

WEAK counters never respond after operations.

STRONG counters return the current value after each operation.

3.2.10. Performing compareAndSet Operations on Strong Counters

Atomically set values for strong counters with GET requests and the compareAndSet parameter.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}?action=compareAndSet&expect={expect}&update={update}

Data Grid atomically sets the value to {update} if the current value is {expect}. If the operation is successful, Data Grid returns true.

3.2.11. Performing compareAndSwap Operations on Strong Counters

Atomically set values for strong counters with GET requests and the compareAndSwap parameter.

POST /rest/v2/counters/{counterName}?action=compareAndSwap&expect={expect}&update={update}

Data Grid atomically sets the value to {update} if the current value is {expect}. If the operation is successful, Data Grid returns the previous value in the payload.

3.2.12. Listing Counters

Retrieve a list of counters in Data Grid clusters with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/counters/

3.3. Working with Protobuf Schemas

Create and manage Protobuf schemas, .proto files, via the Data Grid REST API.

3.3.1. Creating Protobuf Schemas

Create Protobuf schemas across Data Grid clusters with POST requests that include the content of a protobuf file in the payload.

POST /rest/v2/schemas/{schemaName}

If the schema already exists, Data Grid returns CONFLICT. If the schema is not valid, either because of syntax errors, or because some of its dependencies are missing, Data Grid stores the schema and returns the error in the response body.

Data Grid responds with the schema name and any errors.

{
  "name" : "users.proto",
  "error" : {
    "message": "Schema users.proto has errors",
    "cause": "java.lang.IllegalStateException:Syntax error in error.proto at 3:8: unexpected label: messoge"
  }
}
  • name is the name of the Protobuf schema.
  • error is null for valid Protobuf schemas. If Data Grid cannot successfully validate the schema, it returns errors.

3.3.2. Reading Protobuf Schemas

Retrieve Protobuf schema from Data Grid with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/schemas/{schemaName}

3.3.3. Updating Protobuf Schemas

Modify Protobuf schemas with PUT requests that include the content of a protobuf file in the payload.

PUT /rest/v2/schemas/{schemaName}

If the schema is not valid, either because of syntax errors, or because some of its dependencies are missing, Data Grid updates the schema and returns the error in the response body.

{
  "name" : "users.proto",
  "error" : {
    "message": "Schema users.proto has errors",
    "cause": "java.lang.IllegalStateException:Syntax error in error.proto at 3:8: unexpected label: messoge"
  }
}
  • name is the name of the Protobuf schema.
  • error is null for valid Protobuf schemas. If Data Grid cannot successfully validate the schema, it returns errors.

3.3.4. Deleting Protobuf Schemas

Remove Protobuf schemas from Data Grid clusters with DELETE requests.

DELETE /rest/v2/schemas/{schemaName}

3.3.5. Listing Protobuf Schemas

List all available Protobuf schemas with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/schemas/

Data Grid responds with a list of all schemas available on the cluster.

[ {
  "name" : "users.proto",
  "error" : {
    "message": "Schema users.proto has errors",
    "cause": "java.lang.IllegalStateException:Syntax error in error.proto at 3:8: unexpected label: messoge"
  }
}, {
  "name" : "people.proto",
  "error" : null
}]
  • name is the name of the Protobuf schema.
  • error is null for valid Protobuf schemas. If Data Grid cannot successfully validate the schema, it returns errors.

3.4. Working with Cache Managers

Interact with Data Grid Cache Managers to get cluster and usage statistics.

3.4.1. Getting Basic Cache Manager Information

Retrieving information about Cache Managers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}

Data Grid responds with information in JSON format, as in the following example:

{
    "version":"xx.x.x-FINAL",
    "name":"default",
    "coordinator":true,
    "cache_configuration_names":[
        "___protobuf_metadata",
        "cache2",
        "CacheManagerResourceTest",
        "cache1"
    ],
    "cluster_name":"ISPN",
    "physical_addresses":"[127.0.0.1:35770]",
    "coordinator_address":"CacheManagerResourceTest-NodeA-49696",
    "cache_manager_status":"RUNNING",
    "created_cache_count":"3",
    "running_cache_count":"3",
    "node_address":"CacheManagerResourceTest-NodeA-49696",
    "cluster_members":[
        "CacheManagerResourceTest-NodeA-49696",
        "CacheManagerResourceTest-NodeB-28120"
    ],
    "cluster_members_physical_addresses":[
        "127.0.0.1:35770",
        "127.0.0.1:60031"
    ],
    "cluster_size":2,
    "defined_caches":[
        {
            "name":"CacheManagerResourceTest",
            "started":true
        },
        {
            "name":"cache1",
            "started":true
        },
        {
            "name":"___protobuf_metadata",
            "started":true
        },
        {
            "name":"cache2",
            "started":true
        }
    ]

}
  • version contains the Data Grid version
  • name contains the name of the cache manager as defined in the configuration
  • coordinator is true if the cache manager is the coordinator of the cluster
  • cache_configuration_names contains an array of all caches configurations defined in the cache manager
  • cluster_name contains the name of the cluster as defined in the configuration
  • physical_addresses contains the physical network addresses associated with the cache manager
  • coordinator_address contains the physical network addresses of the coordinator of the cluster
  • cache_manager_status the lifecycle status of the cache manager. For possible values, check the org.infinispan.lifecycle.ComponentStatus documentation
  • created_cache_count number of created caches, excludes all internal and private caches
  • running_cache_count number of created caches that are running
  • node_address contains the logical address of the cache manager
  • cluster_members and cluster_members_physical_addresses an array of logical and physical addresses of the members of the cluster
  • cluster_size number of members in the cluster
  • defined_caches A list of all caches defined in the cache manager, excluding private caches but including internal caches that are accessible

3.4.2. Getting Cluster Health

Retrieve health information for Data Grid clusters with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/health

Data Grid responds with cluster health information in JSON format, as in the following example:

{
    "cluster_health":{
        "cluster_name":"ISPN",
        "health_status":"HEALTHY",
        "number_of_nodes":2,
        "node_names":[
            "NodeA-36229",
            "NodeB-28703"
        ]
    },
    "cache_health":[
        {
            "status":"HEALTHY",
            "cache_name":"___protobuf_metadata"
        },
        {
            "status":"HEALTHY",
            "cache_name":"cache2"
        },
        {
            "status":"HEALTHY",
            "cache_name":"mycache"
        },
        {
            "status":"HEALTHY",
            "cache_name":"cache1"
        }
    ]

}
  • cluster_health contains the health of the cluster

    • cluster_name specifies the name of the cluster as defined in the configuration.
    • health_status provides one of the following:

      • DEGRADED indicates at least one of the caches is in degraded mode.
      • HEALTHY_REBALANCING indicates at least one cache is in the rebalancing state.
      • HEALTHY indicates all cache instances in the cluster are operating as expected.
      • FAILED indicates the cache failed to start with the provided configuration.
    • number_of_nodes displays the total number of cluster members. Returns a value of 0 for non-clustered (standalone) servers.
    • node_names is an array of all cluster members. Empty for standalone servers.
  • cache_health contains health information per-cache

    • status HEALTHY, DEGRADED, HEALTHY_REBALANCING or FAILED
    • cache_name the name of the cache as defined in the configuration.

3.4.3. Getting Cache Manager Health Status

Retrieve the health status of Cache Managers with GET requests that do not require authentication.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/health/status

Data Grid responds with one of the following in text/plain format:

  • HEALTHY
  • HEALTHY_REBALANCING
  • DEGRADED
  • FAILED

3.4.4. Checking REST Endpoint Availability

Verify Data Grid server REST endpoint availability with HEAD requests.

HEAD /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/health

If you receive a successful response code then the Data Grid REST server is running and serving requests.

3.4.5. Obtaining Global Configuration for Cache Managers

Retrieve global configuration for Cache Managers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/config

Table 3.13. Headers

HeaderRequired or OptionalParameter

Accept

OPTIONAL

The required format to return the content. Supported formats are application/json and application/xml. JSON is assumed if no header is provided.

3.4.6. Obtaining Configuration for All Caches

Retrieve the configuration for all caches with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/cache-configs

Data Grid responds with JSON arrays that contain each cache and cache configuration, as in the following example:

[
  {
      "name":"cache1",
      "configuration":{
          "distributed-cache":{
              "mode":"SYNC",
              "partition-handling":{
                  "when-split":"DENY_READ_WRITES"
              },
              "statistics":true
          }
      }
  },
  {
      "name":"cache2",
      "configuration":{
          "distributed-cache":{
              "mode":"SYNC",
              "transaction":{
                  "mode":"NONE"
              }
          }
      }
  }
]

3.4.7. Listing Available Cache Templates

Retrieve all available Data Grid cache templates with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/cache-configs/templates

3.4.8. (Experimental) Obtaining Cache Status and Information

Retrieve a list of all available caches for a Cache Manager, along with cache statuses and details, with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/caches

Data Grid responds with JSON arrays that lists and describes each available cache, as in the following example:

[ {
  "status" : "RUNNING",
  "name" : "cache1",
  "type" : "local-cache",
  "simple_cache" : false,
  "transactional" : false,
  "persistent" : false,
  "bounded": false,
  "secured": false,
  "indexed": true,
  "has_remote_backup": true,
  "health":"HEALTHY"
}, {
  "status" : "RUNNING",
  "name" : "cache2",
  "type" : "distributed-cache",
  "simple_cache" : false,
  "transactional" : true,
  "persistent" : false,
  "bounded": false,
  "secured": false,
  "indexed": true,
  "has_remote_backup": true,
  "health":"HEALTHY"
}]

3.4.9. Getting Cache Manager Statistics

Retrieve the statistics for Cache Managers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/stats

Data Grid responds with Cache Manager statistics in JSON format, as in the following example:

{
    "statistics_enabled":true,
    "read_write_ratio":0.0,
    "time_since_start":1,
    "time_since_reset":1,
    "number_of_entries":0,
    "total_number_of_entries":0,
    "off_heap_memory_used":0,
    "data_memory_used":0,
    "misses":0,
    "remove_hits":0,
    "remove_misses":0,
    "evictions":0,
    "average_read_time":0,
    "average_read_time_nanos":0,
    "average_write_time":0,
    "average_write_time_nanos":0,
    "average_remove_time":0,
    "average_remove_time_nanos":0,
    "required_minimum_number_of_nodes":1,
    "hits":0,
    "stores":0,
    "current_number_of_entries_in_memory":0,
    "hit_ratio":0.0,
    "retrievals":0
}
  • statistics_enabled is true if statistics collection is enabled for the Cache Manager.
  • read_write_ratio displays the read/write ratio across all caches.
  • time_since_start shows the time, in seconds, since the Cache Manager started.
  • time_since_reset shows the number of seconds since the Cache Manager statistics were last reset.
  • number_of_entries shows the total number of entries currently in all caches from the Cache Manager. This statistic returns entries in the local cache instances only.
  • total_number_of_entries shows the number of store operations performed across all caches for the Cache Manager.
  • off_heap_memory_used shows the amount, in bytes[], of off-heap memory used by this cache container.
  • data_memory_used shows the amount, in bytes[], that the current eviction algorithm estimates is in use for data across all caches. Returns 0 if eviction is not enabled.
  • misses shows the number of get() misses across all caches.
  • remove_hits shows the number of removal hits across all caches.
  • remove_misses shows the number of removal misses across all caches.
  • evictions shows the number of evictions across all caches.
  • average_read_time shows the average number of milliseconds taken for get() operations across all caches.
  • average_read_time_nanos same as average_read_time but in nanoseconds.
  • average_remove_time shows the average number of milliseconds for remove() operations across all caches.
  • average_remove_time_nanos same as average_remove_time but in nanoseconds.
  • required_minimum_number_of_nodes shows the required minimum number of nodes to guarantee data consistency.
  • hits provides the number of get() hits across all caches.
  • stores provides the number of put() operations across all caches.
  • current_number_of_entries_in_memory shows the total number of entries currently in all caches, excluding passivated entries.
  • hit_ratio provides the total percentage hit/(hit+miss) ratio for all caches.
  • retrievals shows the total number of get() operations.

3.4.10. Cross-Site Operations with Cache Managers

Perform cross-site operations with Cache Managers to apply the operations to all caches.

3.4.10.1. Getting Status of Backup Locations

Retrieve the status of all backup locations from Cache Managers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/x-site/backups/

Data Grid responds with status in JSON format, as in the following example:

{
   "SFO-3":{
      "status":"online"
   },
   "NYC-2":{
      "status":"mixed",
      "online":[
         "CACHE_1"
      ],
      "offline":[
         "CACHE_2"
      ]
   }
}

Table 3.14. Returned Status

ValueDescription

online

All nodes in the local cluster have a cross-site view with the backup location.

offline

No nodes in the local cluster have a cross-site view with the backup location.

mixed

Some nodes in the local cluster have a cross-site view with the backup location, other nodes in the local cluster do not have a cross-site view. The response indicates status for each node.

3.4.10.2. Taking Backup Locations Offline

Take backup locations offline with the ?action=take-offline parameter.

POST /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=take-offline

3.4.10.3. Bringing Backup Locations Online

Bring backup locations online with the ?action=bring-online parameter.

POST /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=bring-online

3.4.10.4. Starting State Transfer

Push state of all caches to remote sites with the ?action=start-push-state parameter.

POST /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=start-push-state

3.4.10.5. Canceling State Transfer

Cancel ongoing state transfer operations with the ?action=cancel-push-state parameter.

POST /rest/v2/cache-managers/{cacheManagerName}/x-site/backups/{siteName}?action=cancel-push-state

3.5. Working with Data Grid Servers

Monitor and manage Data Grid server instances.

3.5.1. Retrieving Basic Server Information

View basic information about Data Grid servers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/server

Data Grid responds with the server name, codename, and version in JSON format as in the following example:

{
  "version":"Infinispan 'Codename' xx.x.x.Final"
}

3.5.2. Getting Cache Managers

Retrieve lists of cache managers for Data Grid servers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/server/cache-managers

Data Grid responds with an array of the cache manager names configured for the server.

3.5.3. Adding Caches to Ignore Lists

Configure Data Grid to temporarily exclude specific caches from client requests. Send empty POST requests that include the names of the cache manager name and the cache.

POST /v2/server/ignored-caches/{cache-manager}/{cache}

Data Grid returns a service unavailable status (503) for REST client requests and a Server Error (code 0x85) for Hot Rod client requests.

Note

Data Grid currently supports one cache manager per server only. For future compatibility you must provide the cache manager name in the requests.

3.5.4. Removing Caches from Ignore Lists

Remove caches from the ignore list with DELETE requests.

DELETE /v2/server/ignored-caches/{cache-manager}/{cache}

3.5.5. Confirming Ignored Caches

Confirm that caches are ignored with GET requests.

GET /v2/server/ignored-caches/{cache-manager}

3.5.6. Obtaining Server Configuration

Retrieve Data Grid server configurations with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/server/config

Data Grid responds with the configuration in JSON format, as follows:

{
    "server":{
        "interfaces":{
            "interface":{
                "name":"public",
                "inet-address":{
                    "value":"127.0.0.1"
                }
            }
        },
        "socket-bindings":{
            "port-offset":0,
            "default-interface":"public",
            "socket-binding":[
                {
                    "name":"memcached",
                    "port":11221,
                    "interface":"memcached"
                }
            ]
        },
        "security":{
            "security-realms":{
                "security-realm":{
                    "name":"default"
                }
            }
        },
        "endpoints":{
            "socket-binding":"default",
            "security-realm":"default",
            "hotrod-connector":{
                "name":"hotrod"
            },
            "rest-connector":{
                "name":"rest"
            }
        }
    }
}

3.5.7. Getting Environment Variables

Retrieve all environment variables for Data Grid servers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/server/env

3.5.8. Getting JVM Memory Details

Retrieve JVM memory usage information for Data Grid servers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/server/memory

Data Grid responds with heap and non-heap memory statistics, direct memory usage, and information about memory pools and garbage collection in JSON format.

3.5.9. Getting JVM Thread Dumps

Retrieve the current thread dump for the JVM with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/server/threads

Data Grid responds with the current thread dump in text/plain format.

3.5.10. Getting Diagnostic Reports for Data Grid Servers

Retrieve aggregated reports for Data Grid servers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/server/report

Data Grid responds with a tar.gz archive that contains an aggregated report with diagnostic information about both the Data Grid server and the host. The report provides details about CPU, memory, open files, network sockets and routing, threads, in addition to configuration and log files.

3.5.11. Stopping Data Grid Servers

Stop Data Grid servers with POST requests.

POST /rest/v2/server?action=stop

Data Grid responds with 200(OK) and then stops running.

3.6. Working with Data Grid Clusters

Monitor and perform administrative tasks on Data Grid clusters.

3.6.1. Stopping Data Grid Clusters

Shut down entire Data Grid clusters with POST requests.

POST /rest/v2/cluster?action=stop

Data Grid responds with 200(OK) and then performs an orderly shutdown of the entire cluster.

3.6.2. Stopping Specific Data Grid Servers in Clusters

Shut down one or more specific servers in Data Grid clusters with GET requests and the ?action=stop&server parameter.

POST /rest/v2/cluster?action=stop&server={server1_host}&server={server2_host}

Data Grid responds with 200(OK).

3.7. Data Grid Server logging configuration

View and modify the logging configuration on Data Grid clusters at runtime.

3.7.1. Listing the logging appenders

View a list of all configured appenders with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/logging/appenders

Data Grid responds with a list of appenders in JSON format as in the following example:

{
  "STDOUT" : {
    "name" : "STDOUT"
  },
  "JSON-FILE" : {
    "name" : "JSON-FILE"
  },
  "HR-ACCESS-FILE" : {
    "name" : "HR-ACCESS-FILE"
  },
  "FILE" : {
    "name" : "FILE"
  },
  "REST-ACCESS-FILE" : {
    "name" : "REST-ACCESS-FILE"
  }
}

3.7.2. Listing the loggers

View a list of all configured loggers with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/logging/loggers

Data Grid responds with a list of loggers in JSON format as in the following example:

[ {
  "name" : "",
  "level" : "INFO",
  "appenders" : [ "STDOUT", "FILE" ]
}, {
  "name" : "org.infinispan.HOTROD_ACCESS_LOG",
  "level" : "INFO",
  "appenders" : [ "HR-ACCESS-FILE" ]
}, {
  "name" : "com.arjuna",
  "level" : "WARN",
  "appenders" : [ ]
}, {
  "name" : "org.infinispan.REST_ACCESS_LOG",
  "level" : "INFO",
  "appenders" : [ "REST-ACCESS-FILE" ]
} ]

3.7.3. Creating/modifying a logger

Create a new logger or modify an existing one with PUT requests.

PUT /rest/v2/logging/loggers/{loggerName}?level={level}&appender={appender}&appender={appender}...

Data Grid sets the level of the logger identified by {loggerName} to {level}. Optionally, it is possible to set one or more appenders for the logger. If no appenders are specified, those specified in the root logger will be used.

3.7.4. Removing a logger

Remove an existing logger with DELETE requests.

DELETE /rest/v2/logging/loggers/{loggerName}

Data Grid removes the logger identified by {loggerName}, effectively reverting to the use of the root logger configuration.

3.8. Using Server Tasks

Retrieve, execute, and upload Data Grid server tasks.

3.8.1. Retrieving Server Tasks Information

View information about available server tasks with GET requests.

GET /rest/v2/tasks

Table 3.15. Request Parameters

ParameterRequired or OptionalValue

type

OPTIONAL

user: will exclude internal (admin) tasks from the results

Data Grid responds with a list of available tasks. The list includes the names of tasks, the engines that handle tasks, the named parameters for tasks, the execution modes of tasks, either ONE_NODE or ALL_NODES, and the allowed security role in JSON format, as in the following example:

[
  {
    "name": "SimpleTask",
    "type": "TaskEngine",
    "parameters": [
      "p1",
      "p2"
    ],
    "execution_mode": "ONE_NODE",
    "allowed_role": null
  },
  {
    "name": "RunOnAllNodesTask",
    "type": "TaskEngine",
    "parameters": [
      "p1"
    ],
    "execution_mode": "ALL_NODES",
    "allowed_role": null
  },
  {
    "name": "SecurityAwareTask",
    "type": "TaskEngine",
    "parameters": [],
    "execution_mode": "ONE_NODE",
    "allowed_role": "MyRole"
  }
]

3.8.2. Executing Tasks

Execute tasks with GET requests that include the task name and required parameters prefixed with param.

GET /rest/v2/tasks/myTask?action=exec&param.p1=v1&param.p2=v2

Data Grid responds with the task result.

3.8.3. Uploading Script Tasks

Upload script tasks with PUT or POST requests.

Supply the script as the content payload of the request. After Data Grid uploads the script, you can execute it with GET requests.

POST /rest/v2/tasks/taskName

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