14.3. Managing Users and Groups for a CA, OCSP, KRA, or TKS

Many of the operations that users can perform are dictated by the groups that they belong to; for instance, agents for the CA manage certificates and profiles, while administrators manage CA server configuration.
Four subsystems — the CA, OCSP, KRA, and TKS — use the Java administrative console to manage groups and users. The TPS has web-based admin services, and users and groups are configured through its web service page.

14.3.1. Managing Groups

14.3.1.1. Creating a New Group

  1. Log into the administrative console.
    pkiconsole https://server.example.com:8443/subsystem_type
  2. Select Users and Groups from the navigation menu on the left.
  3. Select the Groups tab.
  4. Click Edit, and fill in the group information.
    It is only possible to add users who already exist in the internal database.
  5. Edit the ACLs to grant the group privileges. See Section 14.5.4, “Editing ACLs” for more information. If no ACIs are added to the ACLs for the group, the group will have no access permissions to any part of Certificate System.

14.3.1.2. Changing Members in a Group

Members can be added or deleted from all groups. The group for administrators must have at least one user entry.
  1. Log into the administrative console.
  2. Select Users and Groups from the navigation tree on the left.
  3. Click the Groups tab.
  4. Select the group from the list of names, and click Edit.
  5. Make the appropriate changes.
    • To change the group description, type a new description in the Group description field.
    • To remove a user from the group, select the user, and click Delete.
    • To add users, click Add User. Select the users to add from the dialog box, and click OK.

14.3.2. Managing Users (Administrators, Agents, and Auditors)

The users for each subsystem are maintained separately. Just because a person is an administrator in one subsystem does not mean that person has any rights (or even a user entry) for another subsystem. Users can be configured and, with their user certificates, trusted as agents, administrators, or auditors for a subsystem.

14.3.2.1. Creating Users

After you installed Certificate System, only the user created during the setup exists. This section describes how to create additional users.

Note

For security reasons, create individual accounts for Certificate System users.
14.3.2.1.1. Creating Users Using the Command Line
To create a user using the command line:
  1. Add a user account. For example, to add the example user to the CA:
    # pki -d ~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/ca/alias/ -c password -n caadmin \
         ca-user-add example --fullName "Example User"
    ---------------------
    Added user "example"
    ---------------------
      User ID: example
      Full name: Example User
    This command uses the caadmin user to add a new account.
  2. Optionally, add a user to a group. For example, to add the example user to the Certificate Manager Agents group:
    # pki -d ~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/ -p password -n "caadmin" \
         user-add-membership example Certificate Manager Agents
  3. Create a certificate request:
    • If a Key Recovery Authority (KRA) exists in your Certificate System environment:
      # CRMFPopClient -d ~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/ -p password \
           -n "user_name" -q POP_SUCCESS -b kra.transport -w "AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding" \
           -v -o ~/user_name.req
      This command stores the Certificate Signing Request (CSR) in the CRMF format in the ~/user_name.req file.
    • If no Key Recovery Authority (KRA) exists in your Certificate System environment:
      # PKCS10Client -d ~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/ -p password \
           -n "user_name" -o ~/user_name.req
      This command stores the CSR in pkcs10 format in the ~/user_name.req file.
  4. Create an enrollment request:
    1. Create the ~/cmc.role_crmf.cfg file with the following content:
      #numRequests: Total number of PKCS10 requests or CRMF requests.
      numRequests=1
      
      #input: full path for the PKCS10 request or CRMF request,
      #the content must be in Base-64 encoded format
      #Multiple files are supported. They must be separated by space.
      input=~/user_name.req
      
      #output: full path for the CMC request in binary format
      output=~/cmc.role_crmf.req
      
      #tokenname: name of token where agent signing cert can be found (default is internal)
      tokenname=internal
      
      #nickname: nickname for agent certificate which will be used
      #to sign the CMC full request.
      nickname=PKI Administrator for Example.com
      
      #dbdir: directory for cert8.db, key3.db and secmod.db
      dbdir=~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/
      
      #password: password for cert8.db which stores the agent
      #certificate
      password=password
      
      #format: request format, either pkcs10 or crmf
      format=crmf
      Set the parameters based on your environment and the CSR format used in the previous step.
    2. Pass the previously created configuration file to the CMCRequest utility to create the CMC request:
      # CMCRequest ~/cmc.role_crmf.cfg
  5. Submit a Certificate Management over CMS (CMC) request:
    1. Create the ~/HttpClient_role_crmf.cfg file with the following content:
      # #host: host name for the http server
      host=server.example.com
      
      #port: port number
      port=8443
      
      #secure: true for secure connection, false for nonsecure connection
      #For secure connection, in an ECC setup, must set environment variable 'export NSS_USE_DECODED_CKA_EC_POINT=1' prior to running this command
      secure=true
      
      #input: full path for the enrollment request, the content must be in binary format
      input=~/cmc.role_crmf.req
      
      #output: full path for the response in binary format
      output=~/cmc.role_crmf.resp
      
      #tokenname: name of token where SSL client authentication cert can be found (default is internal)
      #This parameter will be ignored if secure=false
      tokenname=internal
      
      #dbdir: directory for cert8.db, key3.db and secmod.db
      #This parameter will be ignored if secure=false
      dbdir=~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/
      
      #clientmode: true for client authentication, false for no client authentication
      #This parameter will be ignored if secure=false
      clientmode=true
      
      #password: password for cert8.db
      #This parameter will be ignored if secure=false and clientauth=false
      password=password
      
      #nickname: nickname for client certificate
      #This parameter will be ignored if clientmode=false
      nickname=PKI Administrator for Example.com
      
      #servlet: servlet name
      servlet=/ca/ee/ca/profileSubmitCMCFull
      
      Set the parameters based on your environment.
    2. Submit the request to the CA:
      # HttpClient ~/HttpClient_role_crmf.cfg
      Total number of bytes read = 3776
      after SSLSocket created, thread token is Internal Key Storage Token
      client cert is not null
      handshake happened
      writing to socket
      Total number of bytes read = 2523
      MIIJ1wYJKoZIhvcNAQcCoIIJyDCCCcQCAQMxDzANBglghkgBZQMEAgEFADAxBggr
      ...
      The response in data format is stored in ~/cmc.role_crmf.resp
    3. Verify the result:
      # CMCResponse ~/cmc.role_crmf.resp
      Certificates:
          Certificate:
              Data:
                  Version:  v3
                  Serial Number: 0xE
                  Signature Algorithm: SHA256withRSA - 1.2.840.113549.1.1.11
                  Issuer: CN=CA Signing Certificate,OU=pki-instance_name Security Domain
                  Validity:
                      Not Before: Friday, July 21, 2017 12:06:50 PM PDT America/Los_Angeles
                      Not  After: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:06:50 PM PST America/Los_Angeles
                  Subject: CN=user_name
      ...
      Number of controls is 1
      Control #0: CMCStatusInfoV2
         OID: {1 3 6 1 5 5 7 7 25}
         BodyList: 1
         Status: SUCCESS
  6. Optionally, to import the certificate as the user to its own ~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/ database:
    # certutil -d ~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/ -A -t "u,u,u" -n "user_name certificate" -i ~/cmc.role_crmf.resp
  7. Add the certificate to the user record:
    1. List certificates issued for the user to discover the certificate's serial number. For example, to list certificates that contain the example user name in the certificate's subject:
      pki -d ~/.dogtag/pki-instance_name/ -c password -n caadmin ca-user-cert-find example
      -----------------
      1 entries matched
      -----------------
        Cert ID: 2;6;CN=CA Signing Certificate,O=EXAMPLE;CN=PKI Administrator,E=example@example.com,O=EXAMPLE
        Version: 2
        Serial Number: 0x6
        Issuer: CN=CA Signing Certificate,O=EXAMPLE
        Subject: CN=PKI Administrator,E=example@example.com,O=EXAMPLE
      ----------------------------
      Number of entries returned 1
      The serial number of the certificate is required in the next step.
    2. Add the certificate using its serial number from the certificate repository to the user account in the Certificate System database. For example, for a CA user:
      pki -c password -n caadmin ca-user-cert-add example --serial 0x6
14.3.2.1.2. Creating Users Using the Console
To create a user using the PKI Console:
  1. Log into the administrative console.
    pkiconsole https://server.example.com:8443/subsystem_type
  2. In the Configuration tab, select Users and Groups. Click Add.
  3. Fill in the information in the Edit User Information dialog.
    Most of the information is standard user information, such as the user's name, email address, and password. This window also contains a field called User State, which can contain any string, which is used to add additional information about the user; most basically, this field can show whether this is an active user.
  4. Select the group to which the user will belong. The user's group membership determines what privileges the user has. Assign agents, administrators, and auditors to the appropriate subsystem group.
  5. Store the user's certificate.
    1. Request a user certificate through the CA end-entities service page.
    2. If auto-enrollment is not configured for the user profile, then approve the certificate request.
    3. Retrieve the certificate using the URL provided in the notification email, and copy the base-64 encoded certificate to a local file or to the clipboard.
    4. Select the new user entry, and click Certificates.
    5. Click Import, and paste in the base-64 encoded certificate.

14.3.2.2. Changing a Certificate System User's Certificate

  1. Log into the administrative console.
  2. Select Users and Groups.
  3. Select the user to edit from the list of user IDs, and click Certificates.
  4. Click Import to add the new certificate.
  5. In the Import Certificate window, paste the new certificate in the text area. Include the -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE----- and -----END CERTIFICATE----- marker lines.

14.3.2.3. Renewing Administrator, Agent, and Auditor User Certificates

There are two methods of renewing a certificate. Regenerating the certificate takes its original key and its original profile and request, and recreates an identical key with a new validity period and expiration date. Re-keying a certificate resubmits the initial certificate request to the original profile, but generates a new key pair. Administrator certificates can be renewed by being re-keyed.
Each subsystem has a bootstrap user that was created at the time the subsystem was created. A new certificate can be requested for this user before their original one expires, using one of the default renewal profiles.
Certificates for administrative users can be renewed directly in the end user enrollment forms, using the serial number of the original certificate.
  1. Renew the admin user certificates in the CA's end users forms, as described in Section 5.5.1.1.2, “Certificate-Based Renewal”. This must be the same CA as first issued the certificate (or a clone of it).
    Agent certificates can be renewed by using the certificate-based renewal form in the end entities page. Self-renew user SSL client certificate. This form recognizes and updates the certificate stored in the browser's certificate store directly.

    Note

    It is also possible to renew the certificate using certutil, as described in Section 16.3.3, “Renewing Certificates Using certutil”. Rather than using the certificate stored in a browser to initiate renewal, certutil uses an input file with the original key.
  2. Add the renewed user certificate to the user entry in the internal LDAP database.
    1. Open the console for the subsystem.
      pkiconsole https://server.example.com:admin_port/subsystem_type
    2. Configuration | Users and Groups | Users | admin | Certificates | Import
    3. In the Configuration tab, select Users and Groups.
    4. In the Users tab, double-click the user entry with the renewed certificate, and click Certificates.
    5. Click Import, and paste in the base-64 encoded certificate.
    This can also be done by using ldapmodify to add the renewed certification directly to the user entry in the internal LDAP database, by replacing the userCertificate attribute in the user entry, such as uid=admin,ou=people,dc=subsystem-base-DN.

14.3.2.4. Deleting a Certificate System User

Users can be deleted from the internal database. Deleting a user from the internal database deletes that user from all groups to which the user belongs. To remove the user from specific groups, modify the group membership.
Delete a privileged user from the internal database by doing the following:
  1. Log into the administrative console.
  2. Select Users and Groups from the navigation menu on the left.
  3. Select the user from the list of user IDs, and click Delete.
  4. Confirm the delete when prompted.