Chapter 12. Using the partition reassignment tool

When scaling a Kafka cluster, you may need to add or remove brokers and update the distribution of partitions or the replication factor of topics. To update partitions and topics, you can use the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool.

Neither the AMQ Streams Cruise Control integration nor the Topic Operator support changing the replication factor of a topic. However, you can change the replication factor of a topic using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool.

The tool can also be used to reassign partitions and balance the distribution of partitions across brokers to improve performance. However, it is recommended to use Cruise Control for automated partition reassignments and cluster rebalancing. Cruise Control can move topics from one broker to another without any downtime, and it is the most efficient way to reassign partitions.

It is recommended to run the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool as a separate interactive pod rather than within the broker container. Running the Kafka bin/ scripts within the broker container may cause a JVM to start with the same settings as the Kafka broker, which can potentially cause disruptions. By running the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool in a separate pod, you can avoid this issue. Running a pod with the -ti option creates an interactive pod with a terminal for running shell commands inside the pod.

Running an interactive pod with a terminal

oc run helper-pod -ti --image=registry.redhat.io/amq-streams/kafka-34-rhel8:2.4.0 --rm=true --restart=Never -- bash

12.1. Partition reassignment tool overview

The partition reassignment tool provides the following capabilities for managing Kafka partitions and brokers:

Redistributing partition replicas
Scale your cluster up and down by adding or removing brokers, and move Kafka partitions from heavily loaded brokers to under-utilized brokers. To do this, you must create a partition reassignment plan that identifies which topics and partitions to move and where to move them. Cruise Control is recommended for this type of operation as it automates the cluster rebalancing process.
Scaling topic replication factor up and down
Increase or decrease the replication factor of your Kafka topics. To do this, you must create a partition reassignment plan that identifies the existing replication assignment across partitions and an updated assignment with the replication factor changes.
Changing the preferred leader
Change the preferred leader of a Kafka partition. This can be useful if the current preferred leader is unavailable or if you want to redistribute load across the brokers in the cluster. To do this, you must create a partition reassignment plan that specifies the new preferred leader for each partition by changing the order of replicas.
Changing the log directories to use a specific JBOD volume
Change the log directories of your Kafka brokers to use a specific JBOD volume. This can be useful if you want to move your Kafka data to a different disk or storage device. To do this, you must create a partition reassignment plan that specifies the new log directory for each topic.

12.1.1. Generating a partition reassignment plan

The partition reassignment tool (kafka-reassign-partitions.sh) works by generating a partition assignment plan that specifies which partitions should be moved from their current broker to a new broker.

If you are satisfied with the plan, you can execute it. The tool then does the following:

  • Migrates the partition data to the new broker
  • Updates the metadata on the Kafka brokers to reflect the new partition assignments
  • Triggers a rolling restart of the Kafka brokers to ensure that the new assignments take effect

The partition reassignment tool has three different modes:

--generate
Takes a set of topics and brokers and generates a reassignment JSON file which will result in the partitions of those topics being assigned to those brokers. Because this operates on whole topics, it cannot be used when you only want to reassign some partitions of some topics.
--execute
Takes a reassignment JSON file and applies it to the partitions and brokers in the cluster. Brokers that gain partitions as a result become followers of the partition leader. For a given partition, once the new broker has caught up and joined the ISR (in-sync replicas) the old broker will stop being a follower and will delete its replica.
--verify
Using the same reassignment JSON file as the --execute step, --verify checks whether all the partitions in the file have been moved to their intended brokers. If the reassignment is complete, --verify also removes any traffic throttles (--throttle) that are in effect. Unless removed, throttles will continue to affect the cluster even after the reassignment has finished.

It is only possible to have one reassignment running in a cluster at any given time, and it is not possible to cancel a running reassignment. If you must cancel a reassignment, wait for it to complete and then perform another reassignment to revert the effects of the first reassignment. The kafka-reassign-partitions.sh will print the reassignment JSON for this reversion as part of its output. Very large reassignments should be broken down into a number of smaller reassignments in case there is a need to stop in-progress reassignment.

12.1.2. Specifying topics in a partition reassignment JSON file

The tool uses a reassignment JSON file that specifies the topics to reassign. You can generate a reassignment JSON file or create a file manually if you want to move specific partitions.

The reassignment JSON file has the following structure:

{
  "version": 1,
  "partitions": [
    <PartitionObjects>
  ]
}

Where <PartitionObjects> is a comma-separated list of objects like:

{
  "topic": <TopicName>,
  "partition": <Partition>,
  "replicas": [ <AssignedBrokerIds> ]
}

The following is an example reassignment JSON file that assigns partition 4 of topic topic-a to brokers 2, 4 and 7, and partition 2 of topic topic-b to brokers 1, 5 and 7:

Example partition reassignment file

{
  "version": 1,
  "partitions": [
    {
      "topic": "topic-a",
      "partition": 4,
      "replicas": [2,4,7]
    },
    {
      "topic": "topic-b",
      "partition": 2,
      "replicas": [1,5,7]
    }
  ]
}

Partitions not included in the JSON are not changed.

12.1.3. Reassigning partitions between JBOD volumes

When using JBOD storage in your Kafka cluster, you can choose to reassign the partitions between specific volumes and their log directories (each volume has a single log directory). To reassign a partition to a specific volume, add the log_dirs option to <PartitionObjects> in the reassignment JSON file.

{
  "topic": <TopicName>,
  "partition": <Partition>,
  "replicas": [ <AssignedBrokerIds> ],
  "log_dirs": [ <AssignedLogDirs> ]
}

The log_dirs object should contain the same number of log directories as the number of replicas specified in the replicas object. The value should be either an absolute path to the log directory, or the any keyword.

Example partition reassignment file specifying log directories

{
      "topic": "topic-a",
      "partition": 4,
      "replicas": [2,4,7].
      "log_dirs": [ "/var/lib/kafka/data-0/kafka-log2", "/var/lib/kafka/data-0/kafka-log4", "/var/lib/kafka/data-0/kafka-log7" ]
}

12.1.4. Throttling partition reassignment

Partition reassignment can be a slow process because it involves transferring large amounts of data between brokers. To avoid a detrimental impact on clients, you can throttle the reassignment process. Use the --throttle parameter with the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool to throttle a reassignment. You specify a maximum threshold in bytes per second for the movement of partitions between brokers. For example, --throttle 5000000 sets a maximum threshold for moving partitions of 50 MBps.

Throttling might cause the reassignment to take longer to complete.

  • If the throttle is too low, the newly assigned brokers will not be able to keep up with records being published and the reassignment will never complete.
  • If the throttle is too high, clients will be impacted.

For example, for producers, this could manifest as higher than normal latency waiting for acknowledgment. For consumers, this could manifest as a drop in throughput caused by higher latency between polls.

12.2. Generating a reassignment JSON file to reassign partitions

Generate a reassignment JSON file with the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool to reassign partitions after scaling a Kafka cluster. Adding or removing brokers does not automatically redistribute the existing partitions. To balance the partition distribution and take full advantage of the new brokers, you can reassign the partitions using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool.

You run the tool from an interactive pod container connected to the Kafka cluster.

The following procedure describes a secure reassignment process that uses mTLS. You’ll need a Kafka cluster that uses TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.

You’ll need the following to establish a connection:

  • The cluster CA certificate and password generated by the Cluster Operator when the Kafka cluster is created
  • The user CA certificate and password generated by the User Operator when a user is created for client access to the Kafka cluster

In this procedure, the CA certificates and corresponding passwords are extracted from the cluster and user secrets that contain them in PKCS #12 (.p12 and .password) format. The passwords allow access to the .p12 stores that contain the certificates. You use the .p12 stores to specify a truststore and keystore to authenticate connection to the Kafka cluster.

Prerequisites

  • You have a running Cluster Operator.
  • You have a running Kafka cluster based on a Kafka resource configured with internal TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.

    Kafka configuration with TLS encryption and mTLS authentication

    apiVersion: kafka.strimzi.io/v1beta2
    kind: Kafka
    metadata:
      name: my-cluster
    spec:
      kafka:
        # ...
        listeners:
          # ...
          - name: tls
            port: 9093
            type: internal
            tls: true 1
            authentication:
              type: tls 2
        # ...

    1
    Enables TLS encryption for the internal listener.
    2
    Listener authentication mechanism specified as mutual tls.
  • The running Kafka cluster contains a set of topics and partitions to reassign.

    Example topic configuration for my-topic

    apiVersion: kafka.strimzi.io/v1beta2
    kind: KafkaTopic
    metadata:
      name: my-topic
      labels:
        strimzi.io/cluster: my-cluster
    spec:
      partitions: 10
      replicas: 3
      config:
        retention.ms: 7200000
        segment.bytes: 1073741824
        # ...

  • You have a KafkaUser configured with ACL rules that specify permission to produce and consume topics from the Kafka brokers.

    Example Kafka user configuration with ACL rules to allow operations on my-topic and my-cluster

    apiVersion: kafka.strimzi.io/v1beta2
    kind: KafkaUser
    metadata:
      name: my-user
      labels:
        strimzi.io/cluster: my-cluster
    spec:
      authentication: 1
        type: tls
      authorization:
        type: simple 2
        acls:
          # access to the topic
          - resource:
              type: topic
              name: my-topic
            operations:
              - Create
              - Describe
              - Read
              - AlterConfigs
            host: "*"
          # access to the cluster
          - resource:
              type: cluster
            operations:
              - Alter
              - AlterConfigs
            host: "*"
          # ...
      # ...

    1
    User authentication mechanism defined as mutual tls.
    2
    Simple authorization and accompanying list of ACL rules.

Procedure

  1. Extract the cluster CA certificate and password from the <cluster_name>-cluster-ca-cert secret of the Kafka cluster.

    oc get secret <cluster_name>-cluster-ca-cert -o jsonpath='{.data.ca\.p12}' | base64 -d > ca.p12
    oc get secret <cluster_name>-cluster-ca-cert -o jsonpath='{.data.ca\.password}' | base64 -d > ca.password

    Replace <cluster_name> with the name of the Kafka cluster. When you deploy Kafka using the Kafka resource, a secret with the cluster CA certificate is created with the Kafka cluster name (<cluster_name>-cluster-ca-cert). For example, my-cluster-cluster-ca-cert.

  2. Run a new interactive pod container using the AMQ Streams Kafka image to connect to a running Kafka broker.

    oc run --restart=Never --image=registry.redhat.io/amq-streams/kafka-34-rhel8:2.4.0 <interactive_pod_name> -- /bin/sh -c "sleep 3600"

    Replace <interactive_pod_name> with the name of the pod.

  3. Copy the cluster CA certificate to the interactive pod container.

    oc cp ca.p12 <interactive_pod_name>:/tmp
  4. Extract the user CA certificate and password from the secret of the Kafka user that has permission to access the Kafka brokers.

    oc get secret <kafka_user> -o jsonpath='{.data.user\.p12}' | base64 -d > user.p12
    oc get secret <kafka_user> -o jsonpath='{.data.user\.password}' | base64 -d > user.password

    Replace <kafka_user> with the name of the Kafka user. When you create a Kafka user using the KafkaUser resource, a secret with the user CA certificate is created with the Kafka user name. For example, my-user.

  5. Copy the user CA certificate to the interactive pod container.

    oc cp user.p12 <interactive_pod_name>:/tmp

    The CA certificates allow the interactive pod container to connect to the Kafka broker using TLS.

  6. Create a config.properties file to specify the truststore and keystore used to authenticate connection to the Kafka cluster.

    Use the certificates and passwords you extracted in the previous steps.

    bootstrap.servers=<kafka_cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 1
    security.protocol=SSL 2
    ssl.truststore.location=/tmp/ca.p12 3
    ssl.truststore.password=<truststore_password> 4
    ssl.keystore.location=/tmp/user.p12 5
    ssl.keystore.password=<keystore_password> 6
    1
    The bootstrap server address to connect to the Kafka cluster. Use your own Kafka cluster name to replace <kafka_cluster_name>.
    2
    The security protocol option when using TLS for encryption.
    3
    The truststore location contains the public key certificate (ca.p12) for the Kafka cluster.
    4
    The password (ca.password) for accessing the truststore.
    5
    The keystore location contains the public key certificate (user.p12) for the Kafka user.
    6
    The password (user.password) for accessing the keystore.
  7. Copy the config.properties file to the interactive pod container.

    oc cp config.properties <interactive_pod_name>:/tmp/config.properties
  8. Prepare a JSON file named topics.json that specifies the topics to move.

    Specify topic names as a comma-separated list.

    Example JSON file to reassign all the partitions of my-topic

    {
      "version": 1,
      "topics": [
        { "topic": "my-topic"}
      ]
    }

    You can also use this file to change the replication factor of a topic.

  9. Copy the topics.json file to the interactive pod container.

    oc cp topics.json <interactive_pod_name>:/tmp/topics.json
  10. Start a shell process in the interactive pod container.

    oc exec -n <namespace> -ti <interactive_pod_name> /bin/bash

    Replace <namespace> with the OpenShift namespace where the pod is running.

  11. Use the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh command to generate the reassignment JSON.

    Example command to move the partitions of my-topic to specified brokers

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server my-cluster-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --topics-to-move-json-file /tmp/topics.json \
      --broker-list 0,1,2,3,4 \
      --generate

12.3. Reassigning partitions after adding brokers

Use a reassignment file generated by the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool to reassign partitions after increasing the number of brokers in a Kafka cluster. The reassignment file should describe how partitions are reassigned to brokers in the enlarged Kafka cluster. You apply the reassignment specified in the file to the brokers and then verify the new partition assignments.

This procedure describes a secure scaling process that uses TLS. You’ll need a Kafka cluster that uses TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.

Note

Though you can use the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool, Cruise Control is recommended for automated partition reassignments and cluster rebalancing. Cruise Control can move topics from one broker to another without any downtime, and it is the most efficient way to reassign partitions.

Prerequisites

  • You have a running Kafka cluster based on a Kafka resource configured with internal TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.
  • You have generated a reassignment JSON file named reassignment.json.
  • You are running an interactive pod container that is connected to the running Kafka broker.
  • You are connected as a KafkaUser configured with ACL rules that specify permission to manage the Kafka cluster and its topics.

See Generating reassignment JSON files.

Procedure

  1. Add as many new brokers as you need by increasing the Kafka.spec.kafka.replicas configuration option.
  2. Verify that the new broker pods have started.
  3. If you haven’t done so, run an interactive pod container to generate a reassignment JSON file named reassignment.json.
  4. Copy the reassignment.json file to the interactive pod container.

    oc cp reassignment.json <interactive_pod_name>:/tmp/reassignment.json

    Replace <interactive_pod_name> with the name of the pod.

  5. Start a shell process in the interactive pod container.

    oc exec -n <namespace> -ti <interactive_pod_name> /bin/bash

    Replace <namespace> with the OpenShift namespace where the pod is running.

  6. Run the partition reassignment using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh script from the interactive pod container.

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
     <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
     --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
     --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
     --execute

    Replace <cluster_name> with the name of your Kafka cluster. For example, my-cluster-kafka-bootstrap:9093

    If you are going to throttle replication, you can also pass the --throttle option with an inter-broker throttled rate in bytes per second. For example:

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
      --throttle 5000000 \
      --execute

    This command will print out two reassignment JSON objects. The first records the current assignment for the partitions being moved. You should save this to a local file (not a file in the pod) in case you need to revert the reassignment later on. The second JSON object is the target reassignment you have passed in your reassignment JSON file.

    If you need to change the throttle during reassignment, you can use the same command with a different throttled rate. For example:

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
      --throttle 10000000 \
      --execute
  7. Verify that the reassignment has completed using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh command line tool from any of the broker pods. This is the same command as the previous step, but with the --verify option instead of the --execute option.

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
      --verify

    The reassignment has finished when the --verify command reports that each of the partitions being moved has completed successfully. This final --verify will also have the effect of removing any reassignment throttles.

  8. You can now delete the revert file if you saved the JSON for reverting the assignment to their original brokers.

12.4. Reassigning partitions before removing brokers

Use a reassignment file generated by the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool to reassign partitions before decreasing the number of brokers in a Kafka cluster. The reassignment file must describe how partitions are reassigned to the remaining brokers in the Kafka cluster. You apply the reassignment specified in the file to the brokers and then verify the new partition assignments. Brokers in the highest numbered pods are removed first.

This procedure describes a secure scaling process that uses TLS. You’ll need a Kafka cluster that uses TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.

Note

Though you can use the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool, Cruise Control is recommended for automated partition reassignments and cluster rebalancing. Cruise Control can move topics from one broker to another without any downtime, and it is the most efficient way to reassign partitions.

Prerequisites

  • You have a running Kafka cluster based on a Kafka resource configured with internal TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.
  • You have generated a reassignment JSON file named reassignment.json.
  • You are running an interactive pod container that is connected to the running Kafka broker.
  • You are connected as a KafkaUser configured with ACL rules that specify permission to manage the Kafka cluster and its topics.

See Generating reassignment JSON files.

Procedure

  1. If you haven’t done so, run an interactive pod container to generate a reassignment JSON file named reassignment.json.
  2. Copy the reassignment.json file to the interactive pod container.

    oc cp reassignment.json <interactive_pod_name>:/tmp/reassignment.json

    Replace <interactive_pod_name> with the name of the pod.

  3. Start a shell process in the interactive pod container.

    oc exec -n <namespace> -ti <interactive_pod_name> /bin/bash

    Replace <namespace> with the OpenShift namespace where the pod is running.

  4. Run the partition reassignment using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh script from the interactive pod container.

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
     <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
     --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
     --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
     --execute

    Replace <cluster_name> with the name of your Kafka cluster. For example, my-cluster-kafka-bootstrap:9093

    If you are going to throttle replication, you can also pass the --throttle option with an inter-broker throttled rate in bytes per second. For example:

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
      --throttle 5000000 \
      --execute

    This command will print out two reassignment JSON objects. The first records the current assignment for the partitions being moved. You should save this to a local file (not a file in the pod) in case you need to revert the reassignment later on. The second JSON object is the target reassignment you have passed in your reassignment JSON file.

    If you need to change the throttle during reassignment, you can use the same command with a different throttled rate. For example:

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
      --throttle 10000000 \
      --execute
  5. Verify that the reassignment has completed using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh command line tool from any of the broker pods. This is the same command as the previous step, but with the --verify option instead of the --execute option.

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
      --verify

    The reassignment has finished when the --verify command reports that each of the partitions being moved has completed successfully. This final --verify will also have the effect of removing any reassignment throttles.

  6. You can now delete the revert file if you saved the JSON for reverting the assignment to their original brokers.
  7. When all the partition reassignments have finished, the brokers being removed should not have responsibility for any of the partitions in the cluster. You can verify this by checking that the broker’s data log directory does not contain any live partition logs. If the log directory on the broker contains a directory that does not match the extended regular expression \.[a-z0-9]-delete$, the broker still has live partitions and should not be stopped.

    You can check this by executing the command:

    oc exec my-cluster-kafka-0 -c kafka -it -- \
      /bin/bash -c \
      "ls -l /var/lib/kafka/kafka-log_<n>_ | grep -E '^d' | grep -vE '[a-zA-Z0-9.-]+\.[a-z0-9]+-delete$'"

    where n is the number of the pods being deleted.

    If the above command prints any output then the broker still has live partitions. In this case, either the reassignment has not finished or the reassignment JSON file was incorrect.

  8. When you have confirmed that the broker has no live partitions, you can edit the Kafka.spec.kafka.replicas property of your Kafka resource to reduce the number of brokers.

12.5. Changing the replication factor of topics

To change the replication factor of topics in a Kafka cluster, use the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh tool. This can be done by running the tool from an interactive pod container that is connected to the Kafka cluster, and using a reassignment file to describe how the topic replicas should be changed.

This procedure describes a secure process that uses TLS. You’ll need a Kafka cluster that uses TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.

Prerequisites

  • You have a running Kafka cluster based on a Kafka resource configured with internal TLS encryption and mTLS authentication.
  • You are running an interactive pod container that is connected to the running Kafka broker.
  • You have generated a reassignment JSON file named reassignment.json.
  • You are connected as a KafkaUser configured with ACL rules that specify permission to manage the Kafka cluster and its topics.

See Generating reassignment JSON files.

In this procedure, a topic called my-topic has 4 replicas and we want to reduce it to 3. A JSON file named topics.json specifies the topic, and was used to generate the reassignment.json file.

Example JSON file specifies my-topic

{
  "version": 1,
  "topics": [
    { "topic": "my-topic"}
  ]
}

Procedure

  1. If you haven’t done so, run an interactive pod container to generate a reassignment JSON file named reassignment.json.

    Example reassignment JSON file showing the current and proposed replica assignment

    Current partition replica assignment
    {"version":1,"partitions":[{"topic":"my-topic","partition":0,"replicas":[3,4,2,0],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]},{"topic":"my-topic","partition":1,"replicas":[0,2,3,1],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]},{"topic":"my-topic","partition":2,"replicas":[1,3,0,4],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]}]}
    
    Proposed partition reassignment configuration
    {"version":1,"partitions":[{"topic":"my-topic","partition":0,"replicas":[0,1,2,3],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]},{"topic":"my-topic","partition":1,"replicas":[1,2,3,4],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]},{"topic":"my-topic","partition":2,"replicas":[2,3,4,0],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]}]}

    Save a copy of this file locally in case you need to revert the changes later on.

  2. Edit the reassignment.json to remove a replica from each partition.

    For example use jq to remove the last replica in the list for each partition of the topic:

    Removing the last topic replica for each partition

    jq '.partitions[].replicas |= del(.[-1])' reassignment.json > reassignment.json

    Example reassignment file showing the updated replicas

    {"version":1,"partitions":[{"topic":"my-topic","partition":0,"replicas":[0,1,2],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]},{"topic":"my-topic","partition":1,"replicas":[1,2,3],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]},{"topic":"my-topic","partition":2,"replicas":[2,3,4],"log_dirs":["any","any","any","any"]}]}

  3. Copy the reassignment.json file to the interactive pod container.

    oc cp reassignment.json <interactive_pod_name>:/tmp/reassignment.json

    Replace <interactive_pod_name> with the name of the pod.

  4. Start a shell process in the interactive pod container.

    oc exec -n <namespace> -ti <interactive_pod_name> /bin/bash

    Replace <namespace> with the OpenShift namespace where the pod is running.

  5. Make the topic replica change using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh script from the interactive pod container.

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
     <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
     --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
     --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
     --execute
    Note

    Removing replicas from a broker does not require any inter-broker data movement, so there is no need to throttle replication. If you are adding replicas, then you may want to change the throttle rate.

  6. Verify that the change to the topic replicas has completed using the kafka-reassign-partitions.sh command line tool from any of the broker pods. This is the same command as the previous step, but with the --verify option instead of the --execute option.

    bin/kafka-reassign-partitions.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --reassignment-json-file /tmp/reassignment.json \
      --verify

    The reassignment has finished when the --verify command reports that each of the partitions being moved has completed successfully. This final --verify will also have the effect of removing any reassignment throttles.

  7. Run the bin/kafka-topics.sh command with the --describe option to see the results of the change to the topics.

    bin/kafka-topics.sh --bootstrap-server
      <cluster_name>-kafka-bootstrap:9093 \
      --command-config /tmp/config.properties \
      --describe

    Results of reducing the number of replicas for a topic

    my-topic  Partition: 0  Leader: 0  Replicas: 0,1,2 Isr: 0,1,2
    my-topic  Partition: 1  Leader: 2  Replicas: 1,2,3 Isr: 1,2,3
    my-topic  Partition: 2  Leader: 3  Replicas: 2,3,4 Isr: 2,3,4