Release Notes for AMQ Online 1.3 on OpenShift

Red Hat AMQ 7.5

Release Notes for AMQ Online 1.3 on OpenShift Container Platform

Abstract

These release notes contain the latest information about new features, enhancements, fixes, and issues contained in the AMQ Online 1.3 on OpenShift Container Platform release.

Chapter 1. Features

1.1. Address federation

You can federate a standard address space type with another AMQP server, meaning that an address of the remote AMQP server is mapped into the address space.

To enable address federation, you need to create an address space connector. For more information see Address space connector examples.

1.2. Message forwarding

Message store-and-forward involves automatically forwarding messages from a local address to a remote AMQP server outside of AMQ Online, or forwarding messages from a remote AMQP server to a local address.

To enable message store-and-forward, you first need to create an address space connector, and then you need to create an address forwarder for each address. For more information see Address space connector examples and Address forwarding examples.

For message store-and-forward, with the queue address type, messages can be forwarded to a remote AMQP server or messages can be forwarded from a remote AMQP server to a local queue. With the subscription address type, you can create a forwarder to a remote AMQP address, but you cannot create a forwarder that copies messages to the subscription.

Note that when using the message store-and-forward method to move messages from a local address to an address of the remote AMQP server, the way that the remote AMQP server signals error conditions, such as space constraints or other transient issues, is important. If the remote server uses the AMQP 1.0 rejected delivery state, affected messages are placed into the global dead-letter queue (DLQ). Using the Red Hat AMQ Console, you can view the number of messages that have been rejected in this way. For more information about how to view these messages in the Red Hat AMQ Console, see Viewing message and connection statistics using the Red Hat AMQ Console.

1.3. Purge queues and subscriptions

Using the Red Hat AMQ Console, you can purge—​that is, clear all messages from—​queues and subscriptions. For more information see Purging queues and subscriptions.

Chapter 2. Enhancements

2.1. Later versions of AMQ Broker and AMQ Interconnect

AMQ Online on OpenShift Container Platform 1.3 is based on AMQ Broker 7.5 and AMQ Interconnect 1.6.

2.2. Improved performance with a large number of addresses

When creating a large number of addresses, performance is improved.

Chapter 3. Technology Preview

3.1. Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity

The Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity in AMQ Online provides remote service interfaces for connecting large numbers of IoT devices to a messaging back end. This Technology Preview feature includes the ability to use protocols common to IoT and to enable common IoT use cases, allowing you to register devices and credentials. For more information see Getting Started with Internet of Things (IoT) on AMQ Online.

For AMQ Online 1.3, two protocol adapters were added: LoRaWAN and SigFox. For more information, see IoT connectivity concepts.

In addition, a Red Hat DataGrid-based device registry was also added.

A simplified installation method is now available for IoT. Using the OpenShift Container Platform 4.x console, you can install the IoT components using the AMQ Online Operator.

Chapter 4. Resolved issues

4.1. Ability to install the AMQ Online Operator into a specific namespace

Using OpenShift Container Platform 4.x, you can install the AMQ Online Operator into a specific namespace. For more information, see Installing AMQ Online from the OperatorHub using the OpenShift web console.

Chapter 5. Known issues

  • ENTMQMAAS-1281: Resources not deleted when uninstalling AMQ Online using OLM on OpenShift Container Platform 4.1

    Workaround: For the workaround about how to remove all resources when uninstalling AMQ Online using the Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM), see Removing remaining resources after uninstalling AMQ Online using the Operator Lifecycle Manager.

  • ENTMQBR-2908: When using message store-and-forward, messages are forwarded to the remote AMQP server and are then removed from the local address. If the remote server rejects a message, the rejected message is placed into the global dead-letter queue (DLQ). Examples of when the server might reject a message include space constraints or other transient issues. If the remote AMQP server is an AMQ broker, be aware that it functions in this way.

    Workaround: To resolve this situation, you must connect to a client and consume from the global DLQ address, !!GLOBAL_DLQ.

  • ENTMQMAAS-1469: When installing AMQ Online using OLM, some permissions required for AMQ Online to function are missing.

    Workaround: To resolve this situation, you must perform the following steps:

    1. Log in as a user with cluster-admin privileges:

      oc login -u system:admin
    2. Save the following code as a file named permissions.yaml:

      apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
      kind: Role
      metadata:
        labels:
          app: enmasse
        name: enmasse.io:configmap-finalizer
      rules:
        - apiGroups: [ "" ]
          resources: [ "configmaps/finalizers" ]
          verbs: [ "create", "update", "patch", "get", "list", "watch", "delete" ]
      ---
      apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
      kind: RoleBinding
      metadata:
        name: "configmap-finalizer"
        labels:
          app: enmasse
      roleRef:
        apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
        kind: Role
        name: enmasse.io:configmap-finalizer
      subjects:
      - kind: Group
        name: system:serviceaccounts:amq-online-infra
    3. Run the following command to apply the change:

      oc apply -n amq-online-infra -f permissions.yaml

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