Chapter 4. Automating API lifecycle with 3scale toolbox

This topic explains the concepts of the API lifecycle with Red Hat 3scale API Management and shows how API providers can automate the deployment stage using Jenkins Continuous Integration/Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) pipelines with 3scale toolbox commands. It describes how to deploy the sample Jenkins CI/CD pipelines, how to create a custom Jenkins pipeline using the 3scale shared library, and how create a custom pipeline from scratch:

4.1. Overview of the API lifecycle stages

The API lifecycle describes all the required activities from when an API is created until it is deprecated. 3scale enables API providers to perform full API lifecycle management. This section explains each stage in the API lifecycle and describes its goal and expected outcome.

The following diagram shows the API provider-based stages on the left, and the API consumer-based stages on the right:

API lifecycle stages
Note

Red Hat currently supports the design, implement, deploy, secure, and manage phases of the API provider cycle, and all phases of the API consumer cycle.

4.1.1. API provider cycle

The API provider cycle stages are based on specifying, developing, and deploying your APIs. The following describes the goal and outcome of each stage:

Table 4.1. API provider lifecycle stages

StageGoalOutcome

1. Strategy

Determine the corporate strategy for the APIs, including goals, resources, target market, timeframe, and make a plan.

The corporate strategy is defined with a clear plan to achieve the goals.

2. Design

Create the API contract early to break dependencies between projects, gather feedback, and reduce risks and time to market (for example, using Apicurio Studio).

A consumer-focused API contract defines the messages that can be exchanged with the API. The API consumers have provided feedback.

3. Mock

Further specify the API contract with real-world examples and payloads that can be used by API consumers to start their implementation.

A mock API is live and returns real-world examples. The API contract is complete with examples.

4. Test

Further specify the API contract with business expectations that can be used to test the developed API.

A set of acceptance tests is created. The API documentation is complete with business expectations.

5. Implement

Implement the API, using an integration framework such as Red Hat Fuse or a development language of your choice. Ensure that the implementation matches the API contract.

The API is implemented. If custom API management features are required, 3scale APIcast policies are also developed.

6. Deploy

Automate the API integration, tests, deployment, and management using a CI/CD pipeline with 3scale toolbox.

A CI/CD pipeline integrates, tests, deploys, and manages the API to the production environment in an automated way.

7. Secure

Ensure that the API is secure (for example, using secure development practices and automated security testing).

Security guidelines, processes, and gates are in place.

8. Manage

Manage API promotion between environments, versioning, deprecation, and retirement at scale.

Processes and tools are in place to manage APIs at scale (for example, semantic versioning to prevent breaking changes to the API).

4.1.2. API consumer cycle

The API consumer cycle stages are based on promoting, distributing, and refining your APIs for consumption. The following describes the goal and outcome of each stage:

Table 4.2. API consumer lifecycle stages

StageGoalOutcome

9. Discover

Promote the API to third-party developers, partners, and internal users.

A developer portal is live and up-to-date documentation is continuously pushed to this developer portal (for example, using 3scale ActiveDocs).

10. Develop

Guide and enable third-party developers, partners, and internal users to develop applications based on the API.

The developer portal includes best practices, guides, and recommendations. API developers have access to a mock and test endpoint to develop their software.

11. Consume

Handle the growing API consumption and manage the API consumers at scale.

Staged application plans are available for consumption, and up-to-date prices and limits are continuously pushed. API consumers can integrate API key or client ID/secret generation from their CI/CD pipeline.

12. Monitor

Gather factual and quantified feedback about API health, quality, and developer engagement (for example, a metric for Time to first Hello World!).

A monitoring system is in place. Dashboards show KPIs for the API (for example, uptime, requests per minute, latency, and so on).

13. Monetize

Drive new incomes at scale (this stage is optional).

For example, when targeting a large number of small API consumers, monetization is enabled and consumers are billed based on usage in an automated way.

4.2. Deploying the sample Jenkins CI/CD pipelines

API lifecycle automation with 3scale toolbox focuses on the deployment stage of the API lifecycle and enables you to use CI/CD pipelines to automate your API management solution. This topic explains how to deploy the sample Jenkins pipelines that call the 3scale toolbox:

4.2.1. Sample Jenkins CI/CD pipelines

The following samples are provided in the Red Hat Integration repository as examples of how to create and deploy your Jenkins pipelines for API lifecycle automation:

Table 4.3. Sample Jenkins shared library pipelines

Sample pipelineTarget environmentSecurity

SaaS - API key

3scale Hosted

API key

Hybrid - open

3scale Hosted and 3scale On-premises with APIcast self-managed

None

Hybrid - OpenID Connect

3scale Hosted and 3scale On-premises with APIcast self-managed

OpenID Connect (OIDC)

Multi-environment

3scale Hosted on development, test and production, with APIcast self-managed

API key

Semantic versioning

3scale Hosted on development, test and production, with APIcast self-managed

API key, none, OIDC

These samples use a 3scale Jenkins shared library that calls the 3scale toolbox to demonstrate key API management capabilities. After you have performed the setup steps in this topic, you can install the pipelines using the OpenShift templates provided for each of the sample use cases in the Red Hat Integration repository.

Important

The sample pipelines and applications are provided as examples only. The underlying APIs, CLIs, and other interfaces leveraged by the sample pipelines are fully supported by Red Hat. Any modifications that you make to the pipelines are not directly supported by Red Hat.

4.2.2. Setting up your 3scale Hosted environment

Setting up a 3scale Hosted environment is required by all of the sample Jenkins CI/CD pipelines.

Note

The SaaS - API key, Multi-environment, and Semantic versioning sample pipelines use 3scale Hosted only. The Hybrid - open and Hybrid - OIDC pipelines also use 3scale On-premises. See also Setting up your 3scale On-premises environment.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Log in to your 3scale Hosted Admin Portal console.
  2. Generate a new access token with write access to the Account Management API.
  3. Save the generated access token for later use. For example:

    export SAAS_ACCESS_TOKEN=123...456
  4. Save the name of your 3scale tenant for later use. This is the string before -admin.3scale.net in your Admin Portal URL. For example:

    export SAAS_TENANT=my_username
  5. Navigate to Audience > Accounts > Listing in the Admin Portal.
  6. Click Developer.
  7. Save the Developer Account ID. This is the last part of the URL after /buyers/accounts/. For example:

    export SAAS_DEVELOPER_ACCOUNT_ID=123...456

4.2.3. Setting up your 3scale On-premises environment

Setting up a 3scale on-premises environment is required by the Hybrid - open and Hybrid - OIDC sample Jenkins CI/CD pipelines only.

Note

If you wish to use these Hybrid sample pipelines, you must set up a 3scale On-premises environment and a 3scale Hosted environment. See also Setting up your 3scale Hosted environment.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Log in to your 3scale On-premises Admin Portal console.
  2. Generate a new access token with write access to the Account Management API.
  3. Save the generated access token for later use. For example:

    export SAAS_ACCESS_TOKEN=123...456
  4. Save the name of your 3scale tenant for later use:

    export ONPREM_ADMIN_PORTAL_HOSTNAME="$(oc get route system-provider-admin -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')"
  5. Define your wildcard routes:

    export OPENSHIFT_ROUTER_SUFFIX=app.openshift.test # Replace me!
    
    export APICAST_ONPREM_STAGING_WILDCARD_DOMAIN=onprem-staging.$OPENSHIFT_ROUTER_SUFFIX
    
    export APICAST_ONPREM_PRODUCTION_WILDCARD_DOMAIN=onprem-production.$OPENSHIFT_ROUTER_SUFFIX
    Note

    You must set the value of OPENSHIFT_ROUTER_SUFFIX to the suffix of your OpenShift router (for example, app.openshift.test).

  6. Add the wildcard routes to your existing 3scale on-premises instance:

    oc create route edge apicast-wildcard-staging --service=apicast-staging --hostname="wildcard.$APICAST_ONPREM_STAGING_WILDCARD_DOMAIN" --insecure-policy=Allow --wildcard-policy=Subdomain
    
    oc create route edge apicast-wildcard-production --service=apicast-production --hostname="wildcard.$APICAST_ONPREM_PRODUCTION_WILDCARD_DOMAIN" --insecure-policy=Allow --wildcard-policy=Subdomain
  7. Navigate to Audience > Accounts > Listing in the Admin Portal.
  8. Click Developer.
  9. Save the Developer Account ID. This is the last part of the URL after /buyers/accounts/:

    export ONPREM_DEVELOPER_ACCOUNT_ID=5

4.2.4. Deploying Red Hat Single Sign-On for OpenID Connect

If you are using the Hybrid - OpenID Connect (OIDC) or Semantic versioning sample pipelines, perform the steps in this section to deploy Red Hat Single Sign-On (RH-SSO) with 3scale. This is required for OIDC authentication, which is used in both samples.

Procedure

  1. Deploy RH-SSO 7.3 as explained in the RH-SSO documentation.

    The following example commands provide a short summary:

    oc replace -n openshift --force -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/jboss-container-images/redhat-sso-7-openshift-image/sso73-dev/templates/sso73-image-stream.json
    
    oc replace -n openshift --force -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/jboss-container-images/redhat-sso-7-openshift-image/sso73-dev/templates/sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent.json
    
    oc -n openshift import-image redhat-sso73-openshift:1.0
    
    oc policy add-role-to-user view system:serviceaccount:$(oc project -q):default
    
    oc new-app --template=sso73-x509-postgresql-persistent --name=sso -p DB_USERNAME=sso -p SSO_ADMIN_USERNAME=admin -p DB_DATABASE=sso
  2. Save the host name of your RH-SSO installation for later use:

    export SSO_HOSTNAME="$(oc get route sso -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')"
  3. Configure RH-SSO for 3scale as explained in the 3scale Developer Portal documentation.
  4. Save the realm name, client ID, and client secret for later use:

    export REALM=3scale
    
    export CLIENT_ID=3scale-admin
    
    export CLIENT_SECRET=123...456

4.2.5. Installing the 3scale toolbox and enabling access

This section describes how to install the toolbox, create your remote 3scale instance, and provision the secret used to access the Admin Portal.

Procedure

  1. Install the 3scale toolbox locally as explained in The 3scale toolbox.
  2. Run the appropriate toolbox command to create your 3scale remote instance:

    3scale Hosted

    3scale remote add 3scale-saas "https://$SAAS_ACCESS_TOKEN@$SAAS_TENANT-admin.3scale.net/"

    3scale On-premises

    3scale remote add 3scale-onprem "https://$ONPREM_ACCESS_TOKEN@$ONPREM_ADMIN_PORTAL_HOSTNAME/"

  3. Run the following OpenShift command to provision the secret containing your 3scale Admin Portal and access token:

    oc create secret generic 3scale-toolbox -n "$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" --from-file="$HOME/.3scalerc.yaml"

4.2.6. Deploying the API backends

This section shows how to deploy the example API backends provided with the sample pipelines. You can substitute your own API backends as needed when creating and deploying your own pipelines

Procedure

  1. Deploy the example Beer Catalog API backend for use with the following samples:

    • SaaS - API key
    • Hybrid - open
    • Hybrid - OIDC

      oc new-app -n "$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" -i openshift/redhat-openjdk18-openshift:1.4 https://github.com/microcks/api-lifecycle.git --context-dir=/beer-catalog-demo/api-implementation --name=beer-catalog
      
      oc expose -n "$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" svc/beer-catalog
  2. Save the Beer Catalog API host name for later use:

    export BEER_CATALOG_HOSTNAME="$(oc get route -n "$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" beer-catalog -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')"
  3. Deploy the example Red Hat Event API backend for use with the following samples:

    • Multi-environment
    • Semantic versioning

      oc new-app -n "$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" -i openshift/nodejs:10 'https://github.com/nmasse-itix/rhte-api.git#085b015' --name=event-api
      
      oc expose -n "$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" svc/event-api
  4. Save the Event API host name for later use:

    export EVENT_API_HOSTNAME="$(oc get route -n "$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" event-api -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')"

4.2.7. Deploying self-managed APIcast instances

This section is for use with APIcast self-managed instances in 3scale Hosted environments. It applies to all of the sample pipelines except SaaS - API key.

Procedure

  1. Define your wildcard routes:

    export APICAST_SELF_MANAGED_STAGING_WILDCARD_DOMAIN=saas-staging.$OPENSHIFT_ROUTER_SUFFIX
    
    export APICAST_SELF_MANAGED_PRODUCTION_WILDCARD_DOMAIN=saas-production.$OPENSHIFT_ROUTER_SUFFIX
  2. Deploy the APIcast self-managed instances in your project:

    oc create secret generic 3scale-tenant --from-literal=password=https://$SAAS_ACCESS_TOKEN@$SAAS_TENANT-admin.3scale.net
    
    oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/3scale/apicast/v3.5.0/openshift/apicast-template.yml
    
    oc new-app --template=3scale-gateway --name=apicast-staging -p CONFIGURATION_URL_SECRET=3scale-tenant -p CONFIGURATION_CACHE=0 -p RESPONSE_CODES=true -p LOG_LEVEL=info -p CONFIGURATION_LOADER=lazy -p APICAST_NAME=apicast-staging -p DEPLOYMENT_ENVIRONMENT=sandbox -p IMAGE_NAME=registry.redhat.io/3scale-amp2/apicast-gateway-rhel8:3scale2.10
    
    oc new-app --template=3scale-gateway --name=apicast-production -p CONFIGURATION_URL_SECRET=3scale-tenant -p CONFIGURATION_CACHE=60 -p RESPONSE_CODES=true -p LOG_LEVEL=info -p CONFIGURATION_LOADER=boot -p APICAST_NAME=apicast-production -p DEPLOYMENT_ENVIRONMENT=production -p IMAGE_NAME=registry.redhat.io/3scale-amp2/apicast-gateway-rhel8:3scale2.10
    
    oc scale dc/apicast-staging --replicas=1
    
    oc scale dc/apicast-production --replicas=1
    
    oc create route edge apicast-staging --service=apicast-staging --hostname="wildcard.$APICAST_SELF_MANAGED_STAGING_WILDCARD_DOMAIN" --insecure-policy=Allow --wildcard-policy=Subdomain
    
    oc create route edge apicast-production --service=apicast-production --hostname="wildcard.$APICAST_SELF_MANAGED_PRODUCTION_WILDCARD_DOMAIN" --insecure-policy=Allow --wildcard-policy=Subdomain

4.2.8. Installing and deploying the sample pipelines

After you have set up the required environments, you can install and deploy the sample pipelines using the OpenShift templates provided for each of the sample use cases in the Red Hat Integration repository. For example, this section shows the SaaS - API Key sample only.

Procedure

  1. Use the provided OpenShift template to install the Jenkins pipeline:

    oc process -f saas-usecase-apikey/setup.yaml \
               -p DEVELOPER_ACCOUNT_ID="$SAAS_DEVELOPER_ACCOUNT_ID" \
               -p PRIVATE_BASE_URL="http://$BEER_CATALOG_HOSTNAME" \
               -p NAMESPACE="$TOOLBOX_NAMESPACE" |oc create -f -
  2. Deploy the sample as follows:

    oc start-build saas-usecase-apikey

4.2.9. Limitations of API lifecycle automation with 3scale toolbox

The following limitations apply in this release:

OpenShift support
The sample pipelines are supported on OpenShift 3.11 only. OpenShift 4 is currently not supported. For more information about supported configurations, see the Red Hat 3scale API Management Supported Configurations page.
Updating applications
  • You can use the 3scale application apply toolbox command for applications to both create and update applications. Create commands support account, plan, service, and application key.
  • Update commands do not support changes to account, plan, or service. If changes are passed, the pipelines will be triggered, no errors will be shown, but those fields will not be updated.
Copying services
When using the 3scale copy service toolbox command to copy a service with custom policies, you must copy the custom policies first and separately.
API as a Product
The 3scale toolbox does not support all API as a Product (APIaaP) features. For more details, see the Known issues in the 3scale Release Notes.

4.3. Creating pipelines using the 3scale Jenkins shared library

This section provides best practices for creating a custom Jenkins pipeline that uses the 3scale toolbox. It explains how to write a Jenkins pipeline in Groovy that uses the 3scale Jenkins shared library to call the toolbox based on an example application. For more details, see Jenkins shared libraries.

Important

Red Hat supports the Jenkins pipeline samples provided in the Red Hat Integration repository.

Any modifications made to these pipelines are not directly supported by Red Hat. Custom pipelines that you create for your environment are not supported.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Add the following to the beginning of your Jenkins pipeline to reference the 3scale shared library from your pipeline:

    #!groovy
    
    library identifier: '3scale-toolbox-jenkins@master',
       retriever: modernSCM([$class: 'GitSCMSource',
         remote: 'https://github.com/rh-integration/3scale-toolbox-jenkins.git'])
  2. Declare a global variable to hold the ThreescaleService object so that you can use it from the different stages of your pipeline.

    def service = null
  3. Create the ThreescaleService with all the relevant information:

    stage("Prepare") {
      service = toolbox.prepareThreescaleService(
         openapi: [ filename: "swagger.json" ],
         environment: [ baseSystemName: "my_service" ],
         toolbox: [ openshiftProject: "toolbox",
                       destination: "3scale-tenant",
                       secretName: "3scale-toolbox" ],
         service: [:],
         applications: [
            [ name: "my-test-app", description: "This is used for tests", plan: "test", account: "<CHANGE_ME>" ]
            ],
         applicationPlans: [
           [ systemName: "test", name: "Test", defaultPlan: true, published: true ],
           [ systemName: "silver", name: "Silver" ],
           [ artefactFile: "https://raw.githubusercontent.com/my_username/API-Lifecycle-Mockup/master/testcase-01/plan.yaml"],
         ]
        )
    
      echo "toolbox version = " + service.toolbox.getToolboxVersion()
     }
    • openapi.filename is the path to the file containing the OpenAPI specification.
    • environment.baseSystemName is used to compute the final system_name, based on environment.environmentName and the API major version from the OpenAPI specification info.version.
    • toolbox.openshiftProject is the OpenShift project in which Kubernetes jobs will be created.
    • toolbox.secretName is the name of the Kubernetes secret containing the 3scale toolbox configuration file, as shown in Installing the 3scale toolbox and enabling access.
    • toolbox.destination is the name of the 3scale toolbox remote instance.
    • applicationPlans is a list of application plans to create by using a .yaml file or by providing application plan property details.
  4. Add a pipeline stage to provision the service in 3scale:

    stage("Import OpenAPI") {
      service.importOpenAPI()
      echo "Service with system_name ${service.environment.targetSystemName} created !"
    }
  5. Add a stage to create the application plans:

    stage("Create an Application Plan") {
      service.applyApplicationPlans()
    }
  6. Add a global variable and a stage to create the test application:

    stage("Create an Application") {
      service.applyApplication()
    }
  7. Add a stage to run your integration tests. When using APIcast Hosted instances, you must fetch the proxy definition to extract the staging public URL:

    stage("Run integration tests") {
      def proxy = service.readProxy("sandbox")
      sh """set -e +x
      curl -f -w "ListBeers: %{http_code}\n" -o /dev/null -s ${proxy.sandbox_endpoint}/api/beer -H 'api-key: ${service.applications[0].userkey}'
      curl -f -w "GetBeer: %{http_code}\n" -o /dev/null -s ${proxy.sandbox_endpoint}/api/beer/Weissbier -H 'api-key: ${service.applications[0].userkey}'
      curl -f -w "FindBeersByStatus: %{http_code}\n" -o /dev/null -s ${proxy.sandbox_endpoint}/api/beer/findByStatus/   available -H 'api-key: ${service.applications[0].userkey}'
      """
    }
  8. Add a stage to promote your API to production:

    stage("Promote to production") {
      service.promoteToProduction()
    }

4.4. Creating pipelines using a Jenkinsfile

This section provides best practices for writing a custom Jenkinsfile from scratch in Groovy that uses the 3scale toolbox.

Important

Red Hat supports the Jenkins pipeline samples provided in the Red Hat Integration repository.

Any modifications made to these pipelines are not directly supported by Red Hat. Custom pipelines that you create for your environment are not supported. This section is provided for reference only.

Prerequisites

Procedure

  1. Write a utility function to call the 3scale toolbox. The following creates a Kubernetes job that runs the 3scale toolbox:

    #!groovy
    
    def runToolbox(args) {
      def kubernetesJob = [
        "apiVersion": "batch/v1",
        "kind": "Job",
        "metadata": [
          "name": "toolbox"
        ],
        "spec": [
          "backoffLimit": 0,
          "activeDeadlineSeconds": 300,
          "template": [
            "spec": [
              "restartPolicy": "Never",
              "containers": [
                [
                 "name": "job",
                 "image": "registry.redhat.io/3scale-amp2/toolbox-rhel7:3scale2.10",
                 "imagePullPolicy": "Always",
                 "args": [ "3scale", "version" ],
                 "env": [
                   [ "name": "HOME", "value": "/config" ]
                 ],
                 "volumeMounts": [
                   [ "mountPath": "/config", "name": "toolbox-config" ],
                   [ "mountPath": "/artifacts", "name": "artifacts" ]
                  ]
                ]
              ],
              "volumes": [
                [ "name": "toolbox-config", "secret": [ "secretName": "3scale-toolbox" ] ],
                [ "name": "artifacts", "configMap": [ "name": "openapi" ] ]
              ]
            ]
          ]
        ]
      ]
    
      kubernetesJob.spec.template.spec.containers[0].args = args
    
      sh "rm -f -- job.yaml"
      writeYaml file: "job.yaml", data: kubernetesJob
    
      sh """set -e
      oc delete job toolbox --ignore-not-found
      sleep 2
      oc create -f job.yaml
      sleep 20 # Adjust the sleep duration to your server velocity
      """
    
      def logs = sh(script: "set -e; oc logs -f job/toolbox", returnStdout: true)
      echo logs
      return logs
    }

    Kubernetes object template

    This function uses a Kubernetes object template to run the 3scale toolbox, which you can adjust to your needs. It sets the 3scale toolbox CLI arguments and writes the resulting Kubernetes job definition to a YAML file, cleans up any previous run of the toolbox, creates the Kubernetes job, and waits:

    • You can adjust the wait duration to your server velocity to match the time that a pod needs to transition between the Created and the Running state. You can refine this step using a polling loop.
    • The OpenAPI specification file is fetched from a ConfigMap named openapi.
    • The 3scale Admin Portal hostname and access token are fetched from a secret named 3scale-toolbox, as shown in Installing the 3scale toolbox and enabling access.
    • The ConfigMap will be created by the pipeline in step 3. However, the secret was already provisioned outside the pipeline and is subject to Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) for enhanced security.
  2. Define the global environment variables to use with 3scale toolbox in your Jenkins pipeline stages. For example:

    3scale Hosted

    def targetSystemName = "saas-apikey-usecase"
    def targetInstance = "3scale-saas"
    def privateBaseURL = "http://echo-api.3scale.net"
    def testUserKey = "abcdef1234567890"
    def developerAccountId = "john"

    3scale On-premises

    When using self-managed APIcast or an on-premises installation of 3scale, you must declare two more variables:

    def publicStagingBaseURL = "http://my-staging-api.example.test"
    def publicProductionBaseURL = "http://my-production-api.example.test"

    The variables are described as follows:

    • targetSystemName: The name of the service to be created.
    • targetInstance: This matches the name of the 3scale remote instance created in Installing the 3scale toolbox and enabling access.
    • privateBaseURL: The endpoint host of your API backend.
    • testUserKey: The user API key used to run the integration tests. It can be hardcoded as shown or generated from an HMAC function.
    • developerAccountId: The ID of the target account in which the test application will be created.
    • publicStagingBaseURL: The public staging base URL of the service to be created.
    • publicProductionBaseURL: The public production base URL of the service to be created.
  3. Add a pipeline stage to fetch the OpenAPI specification file and provision it as a ConfigMap on OpenShift as follows:

    node() {
     stage("Fetch OpenAPI") {
       sh """set -e
       curl -sfk -o swagger.json https://raw.githubusercontent.com/microcks/api-lifecycle/master/beer-catalog-demo/api-contracts/beer-catalog-api-swagger.json
       oc delete configmap openapi --ignore-not-found
       oc create configmap openapi --from-file="swagger.json"
       """
     }
  4. Add a pipeline stage that uses the 3scale toolbox to import the API into 3scale:

    3scale Hosted

    stage("Import OpenAPI") {
      runToolbox([ "3scale", "import", "openapi", "-d", targetInstance, "/artifacts/swagger.json", "--override-private-base-url=${privateBaseURL}", "-t", targetSystemName ])
    }

    3scale On-premises

    When using self-managed APIcast or an on-premises installation of 3scale, you must also specify the options for the public staging and production base URLs:

    stage("Import OpenAPI") {
      runToolbox([ "3scale", "import", "openapi", "-d", targetInstance, "/artifacts/swagger.json", "--override-private-base-url=${privateBaseURL}", "-t", targetSystemName, "--production-public-base-url=${publicProductionBaseURL}", "--staging-public-base-url=${publicStagingBaseURL}" ])
    }
  5. Add pipeline stages that use the toolbox to create a 3scale application plan and an application:

    stage("Create an Application Plan") {
      runToolbox([ "3scale", "application-plan", "apply", targetInstance, targetSystemName, "test", "-n", "Test Plan", "--default" ])
    }
    
    stage("Create an Application") {
      runToolbox([ "3scale", "application", "apply", targetInstance, testUserKey, "--account=${developerAccountId}", "--name=Test Application", "--description=Created by Jenkins", "--plan=test", "--service=${targetSystemName}" ])
    }
    stage("Run integration tests") {
      def proxyDefinition = runToolbox([ "3scale", "proxy", "show", targetInstance, targetSystemName, "sandbox" ])
      def proxy = readJSON text: proxyDefinition
      proxy = proxy.content.proxy
    
      sh """set -e
      echo "Public Staging Base URL is ${proxy.sandbox_endpoint}"
      echo "userkey is ${testUserKey}"
      curl -vfk ${proxy.sandbox_endpoint}/beer -H 'api-key: ${testUserKey}'
      curl -vfk ${proxy.sandbox_endpoint}/beer/Weissbier -H 'api-key: ${testUserKey}'
      curl -vfk ${proxy.sandbox_endpoint}/beer/findByStatus/available -H 'api-key: ${testUserKey}'
      """
    }
  6. Add a stage that uses the toolbox to promote the API to your production environment.

    stage("Promote to production") {
      runToolbox([ "3scale", "proxy", "promote", targetInstance,  targetSystemName ])
    }