Chapter 24. AWS Load Balancer Operator

24.1. AWS Load Balancer Operator release notes

The AWS Load Balancer (ALB) Operator deploys and manages an instance of the AWSLoadBalancerController resource.

These release notes track the development of the AWS Load Balancer Operator in OpenShift Container Platform.

For an overview of the AWS Load Balancer Operator, see AWS Load Balancer Operator in OpenShift Container Platform.

Note

AWS Load Balancer Operator currently does not support AWS GovCloud.

24.1.1. AWS Load Balancer Operator 1.0.0

The AWS Load Balancer Operator is now generally available with this release. The AWS Load Balancer Operator version 1.0.0 supports the AWS Load Balancer Controller version 2.4.4.

The following advisory is available for the AWS Load Balancer Operator version 1.0.0:

24.1.1.1. Notable changes

  • This release uses the new v1 API version.

24.1.1.2. Bug fixes

  • Previously, the controller provisioned by the AWS Load Balancer Operator did not properly use the configuration for the cluster-wide proxy. These settings are now applied appropriately to the controller. (OCPBUGS-4052, OCPBUGS-5295)

24.1.2. Earlier versions

The two earliest versions of the AWS Load Balancer Operator are available as a Technology Preview. These versions should not be used in a production cluster. For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

The following advisory is available for the AWS Load Balancer Operator version 0.2.0:

The following advisory is available for the AWS Load Balancer Operator version 0.0.1:

24.2. AWS Load Balancer Operator in OpenShift Container Platform

The AWS Load Balancer Operator deploys and manages the AWS Load Balancer Controller. You can install the AWS Load Balancer Operator from OperatorHub by using OpenShift Container Platform web console or CLI.

24.2.1. AWS Load Balancer Operator considerations

Review the following limitations before installing and using the AWS Load Balancer Operator:

  • The IP traffic mode only works on AWS Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS). The AWS Load Balancer Operator disables the IP traffic mode for the AWS Load Balancer Controller. As a result of disabling the IP traffic mode, the AWS Load Balancer Controller cannot use the pod readiness gate.
  • The AWS Load Balancer Operator adds command-line flags such as --disable-ingress-class-annotation and --disable-ingress-group-name-annotation to the AWS Load Balancer Controller. Therefore, the AWS Load Balancer Operator does not allow using the kubernetes.io/ingress.class and alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/group.name annotations in the Ingress resource.

24.2.2. AWS Load Balancer Operator

The AWS Load Balancer Operator can tag the public subnets if the kubernetes.io/role/elb tag is missing. Also, the AWS Load Balancer Operator detects the following information from the underlying AWS cloud:

  • The ID of the virtual private cloud (VPC) on which the cluster hosting the Operator is deployed in.
  • Public and private subnets of the discovered VPC.

The AWS Load Balancer Operator supports the Kubernetes service resource of type LoadBalancer by using Network Load Balancer (NLB) with the instance target type only.

Prerequisites

  • You must have the AWS credentials secret. The credentials are used to provide subnet tagging and VPC discovery.

Procedure

  1. You can deploy the AWS Load Balancer Operator on demand from OperatorHub, by creating a Subscription object by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator get sub aws-load-balancer-operator --template='{{.status.installplan.name}}{{"\n"}}'

    Example output

    install-zlfbt

  2. Check if the status of an install plan is Complete by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator get ip <install_plan_name> --template='{{.status.phase}}{{"\n"}}'

    Example output

    Complete

  3. View the status of the aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager deployment by running the following command:

    $ oc get -n aws-load-balancer-operator deployment/aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager

    Example output

    NAME                                           READY     UP-TO-DATE   AVAILABLE   AGE
    aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager  1/1       1            1           23h

24.2.3. AWS Load Balancer Operator logs

You can view the AWS Load Balancer Operator logs by using the oc logs command.

Procedure

  • View the logs of the AWS Load Balancer Operator by running the following command:

    $ oc logs -n aws-load-balancer-operator deployment/aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager -c manager

24.3. Installing the AWS Load Balancer Operator

The AWS Load Balancer Operator deploys and manages the AWS Load Balancer Controller. You can install the AWS Load Balancer Operator from the OperatorHub by using OpenShift Container Platform web console or CLI.

24.3.1. Installing the AWS Load Balancer Operator by using the web console

You can install the AWS Load Balancer Operator by using the web console.

Prerequisites

  • You have logged in to the OpenShift Container Platform web console as a user with cluster-admin permissions.
  • Your cluster is configured with AWS as the platform type and cloud provider.
  • If you are using a security token service (STS) or user-provisioned infrastructure, follow the related preparation steps. For example, if you are using AWS Security Token Service, see "Preparing for the AWS Load Balancer Operator on a cluster using the AWS Security Token Service (STS)".

Procedure

  1. Navigate to OperatorsOperatorHub in the OpenShift Container Platform web console.
  2. Select the AWS Load Balancer Operator. You can use the Filter by keyword text box or use the filter list to search for the AWS Load Balancer Operator from the list of Operators.
  3. Select the aws-load-balancer-operator namespace.
  4. On the Install Operator page, select the following options:

    1. Update the channel as stable-v1.
    2. Installation mode as All namespaces on the cluster (default).
    3. Installed Namespace as aws-load-balancer-operator. If the aws-load-balancer-operator namespace does not exist, it gets created during the Operator installation.
    4. Select Update approval as Automatic or Manual. By default, the Update approval is set to Automatic. If you select automatic updates, the Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) automatically upgrades the running instance of your Operator without any intervention. If you select manual updates, the OLM creates an update request. As a cluster administrator, you must then manually approve that update request to update the Operator updated to the new version.
  5. Click Install.

Verification

  • Verify that the AWS Load Balancer Operator shows the Status as Succeeded on the Installed Operators dashboard.

24.3.2. Installing the AWS Load Balancer Operator by using the CLI

You can install the AWS Load Balancer Operator by using the CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You are logged in to the OpenShift Container Platform web console as a user with cluster-admin permissions.
  • Your cluster is configured with AWS as the platform type and cloud provider.
  • You are logged into the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure

  1. Create a Namespace object:

    1. Create a YAML file that defines the Namespace object:

      Example namespace.yaml file

      apiVersion: v1
      kind: Namespace
      metadata:
        name: aws-load-balancer-operator

    2. Create the Namespace object by running the following command:

      $ oc apply -f namespace.yaml
  2. Create a CredentialsRequest object:

    1. Create a YAML file that defines the CredentialsRequest object:

      Example credentialsrequest.yaml file

      apiVersion: cloudcredential.openshift.io/v1
      kind: CredentialsRequest
      metadata:
        name: aws-load-balancer-operator
        namespace: openshift-cloud-credential-operator
      spec:
        providerSpec:
          apiVersion: cloudcredential.openshift.io/v1
          kind: AWSProviderSpec
          statementEntries:
            - action:
                - ec2:DescribeSubnets
              effect: Allow
              resource: "*"
            - action:
                - ec2:CreateTags
                - ec2:DeleteTags
              effect: Allow
              resource: arn:aws:ec2:*:*:subnet/*
            - action:
                - ec2:DescribeVpcs
              effect: Allow
              resource: "*"
        secretRef:
          name: aws-load-balancer-operator
          namespace: aws-load-balancer-operator
        serviceAccountNames:
          - aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager

    2. Create the CredentialsRequest object by running the following command:

      $ oc apply -f credentialsrequest.yaml
  3. Create an OperatorGroup object:

    1. Create a YAML file that defines the OperatorGroup object:

      Example operatorgroup.yaml file

      apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
      kind: OperatorGroup
      metadata:
        name: aws-lb-operatorgroup
        namespace: aws-load-balancer-operator
      spec:
        upgradeStrategy: Default

    2. Create the OperatorGroup object by running the following command:

      $ oc apply -f operatorgroup.yaml
  4. Create a Subscription object:

    1. Create a YAML file that defines the Subscription object:

      Example subscription.yaml file

      apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
      kind: Subscription
      metadata:
        name: aws-load-balancer-operator
        namespace: aws-load-balancer-operator
      spec:
        channel: stable-v1
        installPlanApproval: Automatic
        name: aws-load-balancer-operator
        source: qe-app-registry
        sourceNamespace: openshift-marketplace

    2. Create the Subscription object by running the following command:

      $ oc apply -f subscription.yaml

Verification

  1. Get the name of the install plan from the subscription:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator \
        get subscription aws-load-balancer-operator \
        --template='{{.status.installplan.name}}{{"\n"}}'
  2. Check the status of the install plan:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator \
        get ip <install_plan_name> \
        --template='{{.status.phase}}{{"\n"}}'

    The output must be Complete.

24.4. Preparing for the AWS Load Balancer Operator on a cluster using the AWS Security Token Service

You can install the AWS Load Balancer Operator on a cluster that uses STS. Follow these steps to prepare your cluster before installing the Operator.

The AWS Load Balancer Operator relies on the CredentialsRequest object to bootstrap the Operator and the AWS Load Balancer Controller. The AWS Load Balancer Operator waits until the required secrets are created and available. The Cloud Credential Operator does not provision the secrets automatically in the STS cluster. You must set the credentials secrets manually by using the ccoctl binary.

If you do not want to provision credential secret by using the Cloud Credential Operator, you can configure the AWSLoadBalancerController instance on the STS cluster by specifying the credential secret in the AWS load Balancer Controller custom resource (CR).

24.4.1. Bootstrapping AWS Load Balancer Operator on Security Token Service cluster

Prerequisites

  • You must extract and prepare the ccoctl binary.

Procedure

  1. Create the aws-load-balancer-operator namespace by running the following command:

    $ oc create namespace aws-load-balancer-operator
  2. Download the CredentialsRequest custom resource (CR) of the AWS Load Balancer Operator, and create a directory to store it by running the following command:

    $ curl --create-dirs -o <path-to-credrequests-dir>/cr.yaml https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/aws-load-balancer-operator/main/hack/operator-credentials-request.yaml
  3. Use the ccoctl tool to process CredentialsRequest objects of the AWS Load Balancer Operator, by running the following command:

    $ ccoctl aws create-iam-roles \
        --name <name> --region=<aws_region> \
        --credentials-requests-dir=<path-to-credrequests-dir> \
        --identity-provider-arn <oidc-arn>
  4. Apply the secrets generated in the manifests directory of your cluster by running the following command:

    $ ls manifests/*-credentials.yaml | xargs -I{} oc apply -f {}
  5. Verify that the credentials secret of the AWS Load Balancer Operator is created by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator get secret aws-load-balancer-operator --template='{{index .data "credentials"}}' | base64 -d

    Example output

    [default]
    sts_regional_endpoints = regional
    role_arn = arn:aws:iam::999999999999:role/aws-load-balancer-operator-aws-load-balancer-operator
    web_identity_token_file = /var/run/secrets/openshift/serviceaccount/token

24.4.2. Configuring AWS Load Balancer Operator on Security Token Service cluster by using managed CredentialsRequest objects

Prerequisites

  • You must extract and prepare the ccoctl binary.

Procedure

  1. The AWS Load Balancer Operator creates the CredentialsRequest object in the openshift-cloud-credential-operator namespace for each AWSLoadBalancerController custom resource (CR). You can extract and save the created CredentialsRequest object in a directory by running the following command:

    $ oc get credentialsrequest -n openshift-cloud-credential-operator  \
        aws-load-balancer-controller-<cr-name> -o yaml > <path-to-credrequests-dir>/cr.yaml 1
    1
    The aws-load-balancer-controller-<cr-name> parameter specifies the credential request name created by the AWS Load Balancer Operator. The cr-name specifies the name of the AWS Load Balancer Controller instance.
  2. Use the ccoctl tool to process all CredentialsRequest objects in the credrequests directory by running the following command:

    $ ccoctl aws create-iam-roles \
        --name <name> --region=<aws_region> \
        --credentials-requests-dir=<path-to-credrequests-dir> \
        --identity-provider-arn <oidc-arn>
  3. Apply the secrets generated in manifests directory to your cluster, by running the following command:

    $ ls manifests/*-credentials.yaml | xargs -I{} oc apply -f {}
  4. Verify that the aws-load-balancer-controller pod is created:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator get pods
    NAME                                                            READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
    aws-load-balancer-controller-cluster-9b766d6-gg82c              1/1     Running   0          137m
    aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager-b55ff68cc-85jzg   2/2     Running   0          3h26m

24.4.3. Configuring the AWS Load Balancer Operator on Security Token Service cluster by using specific credentials

You can specify the credential secret by using the spec.credentials field in the AWS Load Balancer Controller custom resource (CR). You can use the predefined CredentialsRequest object of the controller to know which roles are required.

Prerequisites

  • You must extract and prepare the ccoctl binary.

Procedure

  1. Download the CredentialsRequest custom resource (CR) of the AWS Load Balancer Controller, and create a directory to store it by running the following command:

    $ curl --create-dirs -o <path-to-credrequests-dir>/cr.yaml https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/aws-load-balancer-operator/main/hack/controller/controller-credentials-request.yaml
  2. Use the ccoctl tool to process the CredentialsRequest object of the controller:

    $ ccoctl aws create-iam-roles \
            --name <name> --region=<aws_region> \
            --credentials-requests-dir=<path-to-credrequests-dir> \
            --identity-provider-arn <oidc-arn>
  3. Apply the secrets to your cluster:

    $ ls manifests/*-credentials.yaml | xargs -I{} oc apply -f {}
  4. Verify the credentials secret has been created for use by the controller:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator get secret aws-load-balancer-controller-manual-cluster --template='{{index .data "credentials"}}' | base64 -d

    Example output

    [default]
        sts_regional_endpoints = regional
        role_arn = arn:aws:iam::999999999999:role/aws-load-balancer-operator-aws-load-balancer-controller
        web_identity_token_file = /var/run/secrets/openshift/serviceaccount/token

  5. Create the AWSLoadBalancerController resource YAML file, for example, sample-aws-lb-manual-creds.yaml, as follows:

    apiVersion: networking.olm.openshift.io/v1
    kind: AWSLoadBalancerController 1
    metadata:
      name: cluster 2
    spec:
      credentials:
        name: <secret-name> 3
    1
    Defines the AWSLoadBalancerController resource.
    2
    Defines the AWS Load Balancer Controller instance name. This instance name gets added as a suffix to all related resources.
    3
    Specifies the secret name containing AWS credentials that the controller uses.

24.4.4. Additional resources

24.5. Creating an instance of the AWS Load Balancer Controller

After installing the AWS Load Balancer Operator, you can create the AWS Load Balancer Controller.

24.5.1. Creating the AWS Load Balancer Controller

You can install only a single instance of the AWSLoadBalancerController object in a cluster. You can create the AWS Load Balancer Controller by using CLI. The AWS Load Balancer Operator reconciles only the cluster named resource.

Prerequisites

  • You have created the echoserver namespace.
  • You have access to the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure

  1. Create a YAML file that defines the AWSLoadBalancerController object:

    Example sample-aws-lb.yaml file

    apiVersion: networking.olm.openshift.io/v1
    kind: AWSLoadBalancerController 1
    metadata:
      name: cluster 2
    spec:
      subnetTagging: Auto 3
      additionalResourceTags: 4
      - key: example.org/security-scope
        value: staging
      ingressClass: alb 5
      config:
        replicas: 2 6
      enabledAddons: 7
        - AWSWAFv2 8

    1
    Defines the AWSLoadBalancerController object.
    2
    Defines the AWS Load Balancer Controller name. This instance name gets added as a suffix to all related resources.
    3
    Configures the subnet tagging method for the AWS Load Balancer Controller. The following values are valid:
    • Auto: The AWS Load Balancer Operator determines the subnets that belong to the cluster and tags them appropriately. The Operator cannot determine the role correctly if the internal subnet tags are not present on internal subnet.
    • Manual: You manually tag the subnets that belong to the cluster with the appropriate role tags. Use this option if you installed your cluster on user-provided infrastructure.
    4
    Defines the tags used by the AWS Load Balancer Controller when it provisions AWS resources.
    5
    Defines the ingress class name. The default value is alb.
    6
    Specifies the number of replicas of the AWS Load Balancer Controller.
    7
    Specifies annotations as an add-on for the AWS Load Balancer Controller.
    8
    Enables the alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/wafv2-acl-arn annotation.
  2. Create the AWSLoadBalancerController object by running the following command:

    $ oc create -f sample-aws-lb.yaml
  3. Create a YAML file that defines the Deployment resource:

    Example sample-aws-lb.yaml file

    apiVersion: apps/v1
    kind: Deployment 1
    metadata:
      name: <echoserver> 2
      namespace: echoserver
    spec:
      selector:
        matchLabels:
          app: echoserver
      replicas: 3 3
      template:
        metadata:
          labels:
            app: echoserver
        spec:
          containers:
            - image: openshift/origin-node
              command:
               - "/bin/socat"
              args:
                - TCP4-LISTEN:8080,reuseaddr,fork
                - EXEC:'/bin/bash -c \"printf \\\"HTTP/1.0 200 OK\r\n\r\n\\\"; sed -e \\\"/^\r/q\\\"\"'
              imagePullPolicy: Always
              name: echoserver
              ports:
                - containerPort: 8080

    1
    Defines the deployment resource.
    2
    Specifies the deployment name.
    3
    Specifies the number of replicas of the deployment.
  4. Create a YAML file that defines the Service resource:

    Example service-albo.yaml file:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Service 1
    metadata:
      name: <echoserver> 2
      namespace: echoserver
    spec:
      ports:
        - port: 80
          targetPort: 8080
          protocol: TCP
      type: NodePort
      selector:
        app: echoserver

    1
    Defines the service resource.
    2
    Specifies the service name.
  5. Create a YAML file that defines the Ingress resource:

    Example ingress-albo.yaml file:

    apiVersion: networking.k8s.io/v1
    kind: Ingress
    metadata:
      name: <name> 1
      namespace: echoserver
      annotations:
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/scheme: internet-facing
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/target-type: instance
    spec:
      ingressClassName: alb
      rules:
        - http:
            paths:
              - path: /
                pathType: Exact
                backend:
                  service:
                    name: <echoserver> 2
                    port:
                      number: 80

    1
    Specify a name for the Ingress resource.
    2
    Specifies the service name.

Verification

  • Save the status of the Ingress resource in the HOST variable by running the following command:

    $ HOST=$(oc get ingress -n echoserver echoserver --template='{{(index .status.loadBalancer.ingress 0).hostname}}')
  • Verify the status of the Ingress resource by running the following command:

    $ curl $HOST

24.6. Serving multiple ingress resources through a single AWS Load Balancer

You can route the traffic to different services that are part of a single domain through a single AWS Load Balancer. Each Ingress resource provides different endpoints of the domain.

24.6.1. Creating multiple ingress resources through a single AWS Load Balancer

You can route the traffic to multiple ingress resources through a single AWS Load Balancer by using the CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You have an access to the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure

  1. Create an IngressClassParams resource YAML file, for example, sample-single-lb-params.yaml, as follows:

    apiVersion: elbv2.k8s.aws/v1beta1 1
    kind: IngressClassParams
    metadata:
      name: single-lb-params 2
    spec:
      group:
        name: single-lb 3
    1
    Defines the API group and version of the IngressClassParams resource.
    2
    Specifies the IngressClassParams resource name.
    3
    Specifies the IngressGroup resource name. All of the Ingress resources of this class belong to this IngressGroup.
  2. Create the IngressClassParams resource by running the following command:

    $ oc create -f sample-single-lb-params.yaml
  3. Create the IngressClass resource YAML file, for example, sample-single-lb-class.yaml, as follows:

    apiVersion: networking.k8s.io/v1 1
    kind: IngressClass
    metadata:
      name: single-lb 2
    spec:
      controller: ingress.k8s.aws/alb 3
      parameters:
        apiGroup: elbv2.k8s.aws 4
        kind: IngressClassParams 5
        name: single-lb-params 6
    1
    Defines the API group and version of the IngressClass resource.
    2
    Specifies the ingress class name.
    3
    Defines the controller name. The ingress.k8s.aws/alb value denotes that all ingress resources of this class should be managed by the AWS Load Balancer Controller.
    4
    Defines the API group of the IngressClassParams resource.
    5
    Defines the resource type of the IngressClassParams resource.
    6
    Defines the IngressClassParams resource name.
  4. Create the IngressClass resource by running the following command:

    $ oc create -f sample-single-lb-class.yaml
  5. Create the AWSLoadBalancerController resource YAML file, for example, sample-single-lb.yaml, as follows:

    apiVersion: networking.olm.openshift.io/v1
    kind: AWSLoadBalancerController
    metadata:
      name: cluster
    spec:
      subnetTagging: Auto
      ingressClass: single-lb 1
    1
    Defines the name of the IngressClass resource.
  6. Create the AWSLoadBalancerController resource by running the following command:

    $ oc create -f sample-single-lb.yaml
  7. Create the Ingress resource YAML file, for example, sample-multiple-ingress.yaml, as follows:

    apiVersion: networking.k8s.io/v1
    kind: Ingress
    metadata:
      name: example-1 1
      annotations:
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/scheme: internet-facing 2
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/group.order: "1" 3
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/target-type: instance 4
    spec:
      ingressClassName: single-lb 5
      rules:
      - host: example.com 6
        http:
            paths:
            - path: /blog 7
              pathType: Prefix
              backend:
                service:
                  name: example-1 8
                  port:
                    number: 80 9
    ---
    apiVersion: networking.k8s.io/v1
    kind: Ingress
    metadata:
      name: example-2
      annotations:
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/scheme: internet-facing
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/group.order: "2"
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/target-type: instance
    spec:
      ingressClassName: single-lb
      rules:
      - host: example.com
        http:
            paths:
            - path: /store
              pathType: Prefix
              backend:
                service:
                  name: example-2
                  port:
                    number: 80
    ---
    apiVersion: networking.k8s.io/v1
    kind: Ingress
    metadata:
      name: example-3
      annotations:
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/scheme: internet-facing
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/group.order: "3"
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/target-type: instance
    spec:
      ingressClassName: single-lb
      rules:
      - host: example.com
        http:
            paths:
            - path: /
              pathType: Prefix
              backend:
                service:
                  name: example-3
                  port:
                    number: 80
    1
    Specifies the ingress name.
    2
    Indicates the load balancer to provision in the public subnet to access the internet.
    3
    Specifies the order in which the rules from the multiple ingress resources are matched when the request is received at the load balancer.
    4
    Indicates that the load balancer will target OpenShift Container Platform nodes to reach the service.
    5
    Specifies the ingress class that belongs to this ingress.
    6
    Defines a domain name used for request routing.
    7
    Defines the path that must route to the service.
    8
    Defines the service name that serves the endpoint configured in the Ingress resource.
    9
    Defines the port on the service that serves the endpoint.
  8. Create the Ingress resource by running the following command:

    $ oc create -f sample-multiple-ingress.yaml

24.7. Adding TLS termination

You can add TLS termination on the AWS Load Balancer.

24.7.1. Adding TLS termination on the AWS Load Balancer

You can route the traffic for the domain to pods of a service and add TLS termination on the AWS Load Balancer.

Prerequisites

  • You have an access to the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure

  1. Create a YAML file that defines the AWSLoadBalancerController resource:

    Example add-tls-termination-albc.yaml file

    apiVersion: networking.olm.openshift.io/v1
    kind: AWSLoadBalancerController
    metadata:
      name: cluster
    spec:
      subnetTagging: Auto
      ingressClass: tls-termination 1

    1
    Defines the ingress class name. If the ingress class is not present in your cluster the AWS Load Balancer Controller creates one. The AWS Load Balancer Controller reconciles the additional ingress class values if spec.controller is set to ingress.k8s.aws/alb.
  2. Create a YAML file that defines the Ingress resource:

    Example add-tls-termination-ingress.yaml file

    apiVersion: networking.k8s.io/v1
    kind: Ingress
    metadata:
      name: <example> 1
      annotations:
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/scheme: internet-facing 2
        alb.ingress.kubernetes.io/certificate-arn: arn:aws:acm:us-west-2:xxxxx 3
    spec:
      ingressClassName: tls-termination 4
      rules:
      - host: <example.com> 5
        http:
            paths:
              - path: /
                pathType: Exact
                backend:
                  service:
                    name: <example-service> 6
                    port:
                      number: 80

    1
    Specifies the ingress name.
    2
    The controller provisions the load balancer for ingress in a public subnet to access the load balancer over the internet.
    3
    The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the certificate that you attach to the load balancer.
    4
    Defines the ingress class name.
    5
    Defines the domain for traffic routing.
    6
    Defines the service for traffic routing.

24.8. Configuring cluster-wide proxy

You can configure the cluster-wide proxy in the AWS Load Balancer Operator. After configuring the cluster-wide proxy, Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) automatically updates all the deployments of the Operators with the environment variables such as HTTP_PROXY, HTTPS_PROXY, and NO_PROXY. These variables are populated to the managed controller by the AWS Load Balancer Operator.

24.8.1. Trusting the certificate authority of the cluster-wide proxy

  1. Create the config map to contain the certificate authority (CA) bundle in the aws-load-balancer-operator namespace by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator create configmap trusted-ca
  2. To inject the trusted CA bundle into the config map, add the config.openshift.io/inject-trusted-cabundle=true label to the config map by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator label cm trusted-ca config.openshift.io/inject-trusted-cabundle=true
  3. Update the AWS Load Balancer Operator subscription to access the config map in the AWS Load Balancer Operator deployment by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator patch subscription aws-load-balancer-operator --type='merge' -p '{"spec":{"config":{"env":[{"name":"TRUSTED_CA_CONFIGMAP_NAME","value":"trusted-ca"}],"volumes":[{"name":"trusted-ca","configMap":{"name":"trusted-ca"}}],"volumeMounts":[{"name":"trusted-ca","mountPath":"/etc/pki/tls/certs/albo-tls-ca-bundle.crt","subPath":"ca-bundle.crt"}]}}}'
  4. After the AWS Load Balancer Operator is deployed, verify that the CA bundle is added to the aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager deployment by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator exec deploy/aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager -c manager -- bash -c "ls -l /etc/pki/tls/certs/albo-tls-ca-bundle.crt; printenv TRUSTED_CA_CONFIGMAP_NAME"

    Example output

    -rw-r--r--. 1 root 1000690000 5875 Jan 11 12:25 /etc/pki/tls/certs/albo-tls-ca-bundle.crt
    trusted-ca

  5. Optional: Restart deployment of the AWS Load Balancer Operator every time the config map changes by running the following command:

    $ oc -n aws-load-balancer-operator rollout restart deployment/aws-load-balancer-operator-controller-manager

24.8.2. Additional resources