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Chapter 4. Administrator tasks

4.1. Adding Operators to a cluster

Cluster administrators can install Operators to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster by subscribing Operators to namespaces with OperatorHub.

4.1.1. About Operator installation with OperatorHub

OperatorHub is a user interface for discovering Operators; it works in conjunction with Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM), which installs and manages Operators on a cluster.

As a user with the proper permissions, you can install an Operator from OperatorHub using the OpenShift Container Platform web console or CLI.

During installation, you must determine the following initial settings for the Operator:

Installation Mode
Choose a specific namespace in which to install the Operator.
Update Channel
If an Operator is available through multiple channels, you can choose which channel you want to subscribe to. For example, to deploy from the stable channel, if available, select it from the list.
Approval Strategy

You can choose automatic or manual updates.

If you choose automatic updates for an installed Operator, when a new version of that Operator is available in the selected channel, Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) automatically upgrades the running instance of your Operator without human intervention.

If you select manual updates, when a newer version of an Operator is available, OLM creates an update request. As a cluster administrator, you must then manually approve that update request to have the Operator updated to the new version.

4.1.2. Installing from OperatorHub using the web console

You can install and subscribe to an Operator from OperatorHub using the OpenShift Container Platform web console.

Prerequisites

  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with cluster-admin permissions.
  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with Operator installation permissions.

Procedure

  1. Navigate in the web console to the Operators → OperatorHub page.
  2. Scroll or type a keyword into the Filter by keyword box to find the Operator you want. For example, type advanced to find the Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes Operator.

    You can also filter options by Infrastructure Features. For example, select Disconnected if you want to see Operators that work in disconnected environments, also known as restricted network environments.

  3. Select the Operator to display additional information.

    Note

    Choosing a Community Operator warns that Red Hat does not certify Community Operators; you must acknowledge the warning before continuing.

  4. Read the information about the Operator and click Install.
  5. On the Install Operator page:

    1. Select one of the following:

      • All namespaces on the cluster (default) installs the Operator in the default openshift-operators namespace to watch and be made available to all namespaces in the cluster. This option is not always available.
      • A specific namespace on the cluster allows you to choose a specific, single namespace in which to install the Operator. The Operator will only watch and be made available for use in this single namespace.
    2. Choose a specific, single namespace in which to install the Operator. The Operator will only watch and be made available for use in this single namespace.
    3. Select an Update Channel (if more than one is available).
    4. Select Automatic or Manual approval strategy, as described earlier.
  6. Click Install to make the Operator available to the selected namespaces on this OpenShift Container Platform cluster.

    1. If you selected a Manual approval strategy, the upgrade status of the subscription remains Upgrading until you review and approve the install plan.

      After approving on the Install Plan page, the subscription upgrade status moves to Up to date.

    2. If you selected an Automatic approval strategy, the upgrade status should resolve to Up to date without intervention.
  7. After the upgrade status of the subscription is Up to date, select Operators → Installed Operators to verify that the cluster service version (CSV) of the installed Operator eventually shows up. The Status should ultimately resolve to InstallSucceeded in the relevant namespace.

    Note

    For the All namespaces…​ installation mode, the status resolves to InstallSucceeded in the openshift-operators namespace, but the status is Copied if you check in other namespaces.

    If it does not:

    1. Check the logs in any pods in the openshift-operators project (or other relevant namespace if A specific namespace…​ installation mode was selected) on the Workloads → Pods page that are reporting issues to troubleshoot further.

4.1.3. Installing from OperatorHub using the CLI

Instead of using the OpenShift Container Platform web console, you can install an Operator from OperatorHub using the CLI. Use the oc command to create or update a Subscription object.

Prerequisites

  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with Operator installation permissions.
  • Install the oc command to your local system.

Procedure

  1. View the list of Operators available to the cluster from OperatorHub:

    $ oc get packagemanifests -n openshift-marketplace

    Example output

    NAME                               CATALOG               AGE
    3scale-operator                    Red Hat Operators     91m
    advanced-cluster-management        Red Hat Operators     91m
    amq7-cert-manager                  Red Hat Operators     91m
    ...
    couchbase-enterprise-certified     Certified Operators   91m
    crunchy-postgres-operator          Certified Operators   91m
    mongodb-enterprise                 Certified Operators   91m
    ...
    etcd                               Community Operators   91m
    jaeger                             Community Operators   91m
    kubefed                            Community Operators   91m
    ...

    Note the catalog for your desired Operator.

  2. Inspect your desired Operator to verify its supported install modes and available channels:

    $ oc describe packagemanifests <operator_name> -n openshift-marketplace
  3. An Operator group, defined by an OperatorGroup object, selects target namespaces in which to generate required RBAC access for all Operators in the same namespace as the Operator group.

    The namespace to which you subscribe the Operator must have an Operator group that matches the install mode of the Operator, either the AllNamespaces or SingleNamespace mode. If the Operator you intend to install uses the AllNamespaces, then the openshift-operators namespace already has an appropriate Operator group in place.

    However, if the Operator uses the SingleNamespace mode and you do not already have an appropriate Operator group in place, you must create one.

    Note

    The web console version of this procedure handles the creation of the OperatorGroup and Subscription objects automatically behind the scenes for you when choosing SingleNamespace mode.

    1. Create an OperatorGroup object YAML file, for example operatorgroup.yaml:

      Example OperatorGroup object

      apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
      kind: OperatorGroup
      metadata:
        name: <operatorgroup_name>
        namespace: <namespace>
      spec:
        targetNamespaces:
        - <namespace>

    2. Create the OperatorGroup object:

      $ oc apply -f operatorgroup.yaml
  4. Create a Subscription object YAML file to subscribe a namespace to an Operator, for example sub.yaml:

    Example Subscription object

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: <subscription_name>
      namespace: openshift-operators 1
    spec:
      channel: <channel_name> 2
      name: <operator_name> 3
      source: redhat-operators 4
      sourceNamespace: openshift-marketplace 5
      config:
        env: 6
        - name: ARGS
          value: "-v=10"
        envFrom: 7
        - secretRef:
            name: license-secret
        volumes: 8
        - name: <volume_name>
          configMap:
            name: <configmap_name>
        volumeMounts: 9
        - mountPath: <directory_name>
          name: <volume_name>
        tolerations: 10
        - operator: "Exists"
        resources: 11
          requests:
            memory: "64Mi"
            cpu: "250m"
          limits:
            memory: "128Mi"
            cpu: "500m"
        nodeSelector: 12
          foo: bar

    1
    For AllNamespaces install mode usage, specify the openshift-operators namespace. Otherwise, specify the relevant single namespace for SingleNamespace install mode usage.
    2
    Name of the channel to subscribe to.
    3
    Name of the Operator to subscribe to.
    4
    Name of the catalog source that provides the Operator.
    5
    Namespace of the catalog source. Use openshift-marketplace for the default OperatorHub catalog sources.
    6
    The env parameter defines a list of Environment Variables that must exist in all containers in the pod created by OLM.
    7
    The envFrom parameter defines a list of sources to populate Environment Variables in the container.
    8
    The volumes parameter defines a list of Volumes that must exist on the pod created by OLM.
    9
    The volumeMounts parameter defines a list of VolumeMounts that must exist in all containers in the pod created by OLM. If a volumeMount references a volume that does not exist, OLM fails to deploy the Operator.
    10
    The tolerations parameter defines a list of Tolerations for the pod created by OLM.
    11
    The resources parameter defines resource constraints for all the containers in the pod created by OLM.
    12
    The nodeSelector parameter defines a NodeSelector for the pod created by OLM.
  5. Create the Subscription object:

    $ oc apply -f sub.yaml

    At this point, OLM is now aware of the selected Operator. A cluster service version (CSV) for the Operator should appear in the target namespace, and APIs provided by the Operator should be available for creation.

Additional resources

4.1.4. Installing a specific version of an Operator

You can install a specific version of an Operator by setting the cluster service version (CSV) in a Subscription object.

Prerequisites

  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with Operator installation permissions
  • OpenShift CLI (oc) installed

Procedure

  1. Create a Subscription object YAML file that subscribes a namespace to an Operator with a specific version by setting the startingCSV field. Set the installPlanApproval field to Manual to prevent the Operator from automatically upgrading if a later version exists in the catalog.

    For example, the following sub.yaml file can be used to install the Red Hat Quay Operator specifically to version 3.4.0:

    Subscription with a specific starting Operator version

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: quay-operator
      namespace: quay
    spec:
      channel: quay-v3.4
      installPlanApproval: Manual 1
      name: quay-operator
      source: redhat-operators
      sourceNamespace: openshift-marketplace
      startingCSV: quay-operator.v3.4.0 2

    1
    Set the approval strategy to Manual in case your specified version is superseded by a later version in the catalog. This plan prevents an automatic upgrade to a later version and requires manual approval before the starting CSV can complete the installation.
    2
    Set a specific version of an Operator CSV.
  2. Create the Subscription object:

    $ oc apply -f sub.yaml
  3. Manually approve the pending install plan to complete the Operator installation.

4.1.5. Pod placement of Operator workloads

By default, Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) places pods on arbitrary worker nodes when installing an Operator or deploying Operand workloads. As an administrator, you can use projects with a combination of node selectors, taints, and tolerations to control the placement of Operators and Operands to specific nodes.

Controlling pod placement of Operator and Operand workloads has the following prerequisites:

  1. Determine a node or set of nodes to target for the pods per your requirements. If available, note an existing label, such as node-role.kubernetes.io/app, that identifies the node or nodes. Otherwise, add a label, such as myoperator, by using a machine set or editing the node directly. You will use this label in a later step as the node selector on your project.
  2. If you want to ensure that only pods with a certain label are allowed to run on the nodes, while steering unrelated workloads to other nodes, add a taint to the node or nodes by using a machine set or editing the node directly. Use an effect that ensures that new pods that do not match the taint cannot be scheduled on the nodes. For example, a myoperator:NoSchedule taint ensures that new pods that do not match the taint are not scheduled onto that node, but existing pods on the node are allowed to remain.
  3. Create a project that is configured with a default node selector and, if you added a taint, a matching toleration.

At this point, the project you created can be used to steer pods towards the specified nodes in the following scenarios:

For Operator pods
Administrators can create a Subscription object in the project. As a result, the Operator pods are placed on the specified nodes.
For Operand pods
Using an installed Operator, users can create an application in the project, which places the custom resource (CR) owned by the Operator in the project. As a result, the Operand pods are placed on the specified nodes, unless the Operator is deploying cluster-wide objects or resources in other namespaces, in which case this customized pod placement does not apply.

4.2. Upgrading installed Operators

As a cluster administrator, you can upgrade Operators that have been previously installed using Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) on your OpenShift Container Platform cluster.

4.2.1. Changing the update channel for an Operator

The subscription of an installed Operator specifies an update channel, which is used to track and receive updates for the Operator. To upgrade the Operator to start tracking and receiving updates from a newer channel, you can change the update channel in the subscription.

The names of update channels in a subscription can differ between Operators, but the naming scheme should follow a common convention within a given Operator. For example, channel names might follow a minor release update stream for the application provided by the Operator (1.2, 1.3) or a release frequency (stable, fast).

Note

Installed Operators cannot change to a channel that is older than the current channel.

If the approval strategy in the subscription is set to Automatic, the upgrade process initiates as soon as a new Operator version is available in the selected channel. If the approval strategy is set to Manual, you must manually approve pending upgrades.

Prerequisites

  • An Operator previously installed using Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM).

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the OpenShift Container Platform web console, navigate to Operators → Installed Operators.
  2. Click the name of the Operator you want to change the update channel for.
  3. Click the Subscription tab.
  4. Click the name of the update channel under Channel.
  5. Click the newer update channel that you want to change to, then click Save.
  6. For subscriptions with an Automatic approval strategy, the upgrade begins automatically. Navigate back to the Operators → Installed Operators page to monitor the progress of the upgrade. When complete, the status changes to Succeeded and Up to date.

    For subscriptions with a Manual approval strategy, you can manually approve the upgrade from the Subscription tab.

4.2.2. Manually approving a pending Operator upgrade

If an installed Operator has the approval strategy in its subscription set to Manual, when new updates are released in its current update channel, the update must be manually approved before installation can begin.

Prerequisites

  • An Operator previously installed using Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM).

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the OpenShift Container Platform web console, navigate to Operators → Installed Operators.
  2. Operators that have a pending upgrade display a status with Upgrade available. Click the name of the Operator you want to upgrade.
  3. Click the Subscription tab. Any upgrades requiring approval are displayed next to Upgrade Status. For example, it might display 1 requires approval.
  4. Click 1 requires approval, then click Preview Install Plan.
  5. Review the resources that are listed as available for upgrade. When satisfied, click Approve.
  6. Navigate back to the Operators → Installed Operators page to monitor the progress of the upgrade. When complete, the status changes to Succeeded and Up to date.

4.3. Deleting Operators from a cluster

The following describes how to delete Operators that were previously installed using Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) on your OpenShift Container Platform cluster.

4.3.1. Deleting Operators from a cluster using the web console

Cluster administrators can delete installed Operators from a selected namespace by using the web console.

Prerequisites

  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster web console using an account with cluster-admin permissions.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the OperatorsInstalled Operators page.
  2. Scroll or enter a keyword into the Filter by name field to find the Operator that you want to remove. Then, click on it.
  3. On the right side of the Operator Details page, select Uninstall Operator from the Actions list.

    An Uninstall Operator? dialog box is displayed.

  4. Select Uninstall to remove the Operator, Operator deployments, and pods. Following this action, the Operator stops running and no longer receives updates.

    Note

    This action does not remove resources managed by the Operator, including custom resource definitions (CRDs) and custom resources (CRs). Dashboards and navigation items enabled by the web console and off-cluster resources that continue to run might need manual clean up. To remove these after uninstalling the Operator, you might need to manually delete the Operator CRDs.

4.3.2. Deleting Operators from a cluster using the CLI

Cluster administrators can delete installed Operators from a selected namespace by using the CLI.

Prerequisites

  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with cluster-admin permissions.
  • oc command installed on workstation.

Procedure

  1. Check the current version of the subscribed Operator (for example, jaeger) in the currentCSV field:

    $ oc get subscription jaeger -n openshift-operators -o yaml | grep currentCSV

    Example output

      currentCSV: jaeger-operator.v1.8.2

  2. Delete the subscription (for example, jaeger):

    $ oc delete subscription jaeger -n openshift-operators

    Example output

    subscription.operators.coreos.com "jaeger" deleted

  3. Delete the CSV for the Operator in the target namespace using the currentCSV value from the previous step:

    $ oc delete clusterserviceversion jaeger-operator.v1.8.2 -n openshift-operators

    Example output

    clusterserviceversion.operators.coreos.com "jaeger-operator.v1.8.2" deleted

4.3.3. Refreshing failing subscriptions

In Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM), if you subscribe to an Operator that references images that are not accessible on your network, you can find jobs in the openshift-marketplace namespace that are failing with the following errors:

Example output

ImagePullBackOff for
Back-off pulling image "example.com/openshift4/ose-elasticsearch-operator-bundle@sha256:6d2587129c846ec28d384540322b40b05833e7e00b25cca584e004af9a1d292e"

Example output

rpc error: code = Unknown desc = error pinging docker registry example.com: Get "https://example.com/v2/": dial tcp: lookup example.com on 10.0.0.1:53: no such host

As a result, the subscription is stuck in this failing state and the Operator is unable to install or upgrade.

You can refresh a failing subscription by deleting the subscription, cluster service version (CSV), and other related objects. After recreating the subscription, OLM then reinstalls the correct version of the Operator.

Prerequisites

  • You have a failing subscription that is unable to pull an inaccessible bundle image.
  • You have confirmed that the correct bundle image is accessible.

Procedure

  1. Get the names of the Subscription and ClusterServiceVersion objects from the namespace where the Operator is installed:

    $ oc get sub,csv -n <namespace>

    Example output

    NAME                                                       PACKAGE                  SOURCE             CHANNEL
    subscription.operators.coreos.com/elasticsearch-operator   elasticsearch-operator   redhat-operators   5.0
    
    NAME                                                                         DISPLAY                            VERSION    REPLACES   PHASE
    clusterserviceversion.operators.coreos.com/elasticsearch-operator.5.0.0-65   OpenShift Elasticsearch Operator   5.0.0-65              Succeeded

  2. Delete the subscription:

    $ oc delete subscription <subscription_name> -n <namespace>
  3. Delete the cluster service version:

    $ oc delete csv <csv_name> -n <namespace>
  4. Get the names of any failing jobs and related config maps in the openshift-marketplace namespace:

    $ oc get job,configmap -n openshift-marketplace

    Example output

    NAME                                                                        COMPLETIONS   DURATION   AGE
    job.batch/1de9443b6324e629ddf31fed0a853a121275806170e34c926d69e53a7fcbccb   1/1           26s        9m30s
    
    NAME                                                                        DATA   AGE
    configmap/1de9443b6324e629ddf31fed0a853a121275806170e34c926d69e53a7fcbccb   3      9m30s

  5. Delete the job:

    $ oc delete job <job_name> -n openshift-marketplace

    This ensures pods that try to pull the inaccessible image are not recreated.

  6. Delete the config map:

    $ oc delete configmap <configmap_name> -n openshift-marketplace
  7. Reinstall the Operator using OperatorHub in the web console.

Verification

  • Check that the Operator has been reinstalled successfully:

    $ oc get sub,csv,installplan -n <namespace>

4.4. Configuring Operator Lifecycle Manager features

The Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) controller is configured by an OLMConfig custom resource (CR) named cluster. Cluster administrators can modify this resource to enable or disable certain features.

This document outlines the features currently supported by OLM that are configured by the OLMConfig resource.

4.4.1. Disabling copied CSVs

When an Operator is installed by Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM), a simplified copy of its cluster service version (CSV) is created in every namespace that the Operator is configured to watch. These CSVs are known as copied CSVs and communicate to users which controllers are actively reconciling resource events in a given namespace.

When Operators are configured to use the AllNamespaces install mode, versus targeting a single or specified set of namespaces, a copied CSV is created in every namespace on the cluster. On especially large clusters, with namespaces and installed Operators potentially in the hundreds or thousands, copied CSVs consume an untenable amount of resources, such as OLM’s memory usage, cluster etcd limits, and networking.

To support these larger clusters, cluster administrators can disable copied CSVs for Operators installed with the AllNamespaces mode.

Procedure

  • Edit the OLMConfig object named cluster and set the spec.features.disableCopiedCSVs field to true:

    $ oc apply -f - <<EOF
    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
    kind: OLMConfig
    metadata:
      name: cluster
    spec:
      features:
        disableCopiedCSVs: true 1
    EOF
    1
    Disabled copied CSVs for AllNamespaces install mode Operators

Verification

  • When copied CSVs are disabled, OLM captures this information in an event in the Operator’s namespace:

    $ oc get events

    Example output

    LAST SEEN   TYPE      REASON               OBJECT                                MESSAGE
    85s         Warning   DisabledCopiedCSVs   clusterserviceversion/my-csv.v1.0.0   CSV copying disabled for operators/my-csv.v1.0.0

    When the spec.features.disableCopiedCSVs field is missing or set to false, OLM recreates the copied CSVs for all Operators installed with the AllNamespaces mode and deletes the previously mentioned events.

Additional resources

4.5. Configuring proxy support in Operator Lifecycle Manager

If a global proxy is configured on the OpenShift Container Platform cluster, Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) automatically configures Operators that it manages with the cluster-wide proxy. However, you can also configure installed Operators to override the global proxy or inject a custom CA certificate.

Additional resources

4.5.1. Overriding proxy settings of an Operator

If a cluster-wide egress proxy is configured, Operators running with Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) inherit the cluster-wide proxy settings on their deployments. Cluster administrators can also override these proxy settings by configuring the subscription of an Operator.

Important

Operators must handle setting environment variables for proxy settings in the pods for any managed Operands.

Prerequisites

  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with cluster-admin permissions.

Procedure

  1. Navigate in the web console to the Operators → OperatorHub page.
  2. Select the Operator and click Install.
  3. On the Install Operator page, modify the Subscription object to include one or more of the following environment variables in the spec section:

    • HTTP_PROXY
    • HTTPS_PROXY
    • NO_PROXY

    For example:

    Subscription object with proxy setting overrides

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: etcd-config-test
      namespace: openshift-operators
    spec:
      config:
        env:
        - name: HTTP_PROXY
          value: test_http
        - name: HTTPS_PROXY
          value: test_https
        - name: NO_PROXY
          value: test
      channel: clusterwide-alpha
      installPlanApproval: Automatic
      name: etcd
      source: community-operators
      sourceNamespace: openshift-marketplace
      startingCSV: etcdoperator.v0.9.4-clusterwide

    Note

    These environment variables can also be unset using an empty value to remove any previously set cluster-wide or custom proxy settings.

    OLM handles these environment variables as a unit; if at least one of them is set, all three are considered overridden and the cluster-wide defaults are not used for the deployments of the subscribed Operator.

  4. Click Install to make the Operator available to the selected namespaces.
  5. After the CSV for the Operator appears in the relevant namespace, you can verify that custom proxy environment variables are set in the deployment. For example, using the CLI:

    $ oc get deployment -n openshift-operators \
        etcd-operator -o yaml \
        | grep -i "PROXY" -A 2

    Example output

            - name: HTTP_PROXY
              value: test_http
            - name: HTTPS_PROXY
              value: test_https
            - name: NO_PROXY
              value: test
            image: quay.io/coreos/etcd-operator@sha256:66a37fd61a06a43969854ee6d3e21088a98b93838e284a6086b13917f96b0d9c
    ...

4.5.2. Injecting a custom CA certificate

When a cluster administrator adds a custom CA certificate to a cluster using a config map, the Cluster Network Operator merges the user-provided certificates and system CA certificates into a single bundle. You can inject this merged bundle into your Operator running on Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM), which is useful if you have a man-in-the-middle HTTPS proxy.

Prerequisites

  • Access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with cluster-admin permissions.
  • Custom CA certificate added to the cluster using a config map.
  • Desired Operator installed and running on OLM.

Procedure

  1. Create an empty config map in the namespace where the subscription for your Operator exists and include the following label:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ConfigMap
    metadata:
      name: trusted-ca 1
      labels:
        config.openshift.io/inject-trusted-cabundle: "true" 2
    1
    Name of the config map.
    2
    Requests the Cluster Network Operator to inject the merged bundle.

    After creating this config map, it is immediately populated with the certificate contents of the merged bundle.

  2. Update your the Subscription object to include a spec.config section that mounts the trusted-ca config map as a volume to each container within a pod that requires a custom CA:

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: my-operator
    spec:
      package: etcd
      channel: alpha
      config: 1
        selector:
          matchLabels:
            <labels_for_pods> 2
        volumes: 3
        - name: trusted-ca
          configMap:
            name: trusted-ca
            items:
              - key: ca-bundle.crt 4
                path: tls-ca-bundle.pem 5
        volumeMounts: 6
        - name: trusted-ca
          mountPath: /etc/pki/ca-trust/extracted/pem
          readOnly: true
    1
    Add a config section if it does not exist.
    2
    Specify labels to match pods that are owned by the Operator.
    3
    Create a trusted-ca volume.
    4
    ca-bundle.crt is required as the config map key.
    5
    tls-ca-bundle.pem is required as the config map path.
    6
    Create a trusted-ca volume mount.

4.6. Viewing Operator status

Understanding the state of the system in Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) is important for making decisions about and debugging problems with installed Operators. OLM provides insight into subscriptions and related catalog sources regarding their state and actions performed. This helps users better understand the healthiness of their Operators.

4.6.1. Operator subscription condition types

Subscriptions can report the following condition types:

Table 4.1. Subscription condition types

ConditionDescription

CatalogSourcesUnhealthy

Some or all of the catalog sources to be used in resolution are unhealthy.

InstallPlanMissing

An install plan for a subscription is missing.

InstallPlanPending

An install plan for a subscription is pending installation.

InstallPlanFailed

An install plan for a subscription has failed.

ResolutionFailed

The dependency resolution for a subscription has failed.

Note

Default OpenShift Container Platform cluster Operators are managed by the Cluster Version Operator (CVO) and they do not have a Subscription object. Application Operators are managed by Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) and they have a Subscription object.

Additional resources

4.6.2. Viewing Operator subscription status by using the CLI

You can view Operator subscription status by using the CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You have access to the cluster as a user with the cluster-admin role.
  • You have installed the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure

  1. List Operator subscriptions:

    $ oc get subs -n <operator_namespace>
  2. Use the oc describe command to inspect a Subscription resource:

    $ oc describe sub <subscription_name> -n <operator_namespace>
  3. In the command output, find the Conditions section for the status of Operator subscription condition types. In the following example, the CatalogSourcesUnhealthy condition type has a status of false because all available catalog sources are healthy:

    Example output

    Conditions:
       Last Transition Time:  2019-07-29T13:42:57Z
       Message:               all available catalogsources are healthy
       Reason:                AllCatalogSourcesHealthy
       Status:                False
       Type:                  CatalogSourcesUnhealthy

Note

Default OpenShift Container Platform cluster Operators are managed by the Cluster Version Operator (CVO) and they do not have a Subscription object. Application Operators are managed by Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) and they have a Subscription object.

4.6.3. Viewing Operator catalog source status by using the CLI

You can view the status of an Operator catalog source by using the CLI.

Prerequisites

  • You have access to the cluster as a user with the cluster-admin role.
  • You have installed the OpenShift CLI (oc).

Procedure

  1. List the catalog sources in a namespace. For example, you can check the openshift-marketplace namespace, which is used for cluster-wide catalog sources:

    $ oc get catalogsources -n openshift-marketplace

    Example output

    NAME                  DISPLAY               TYPE   PUBLISHER   AGE
    certified-operators   Certified Operators   grpc   Red Hat     55m
    community-operators   Community Operators   grpc   Red Hat     55m
    example-catalog       Example Catalog       grpc   Example Org 2m25s
    redhat-marketplace    Red Hat Marketplace   grpc   Red Hat     55m
    redhat-operators      Red Hat Operators     grpc   Red Hat     55m

  2. Use the oc describe command to get more details and status about a catalog source:

    $ oc describe catalogsource example-catalog -n openshift-marketplace

    Example output

    Name:         example-catalog
    Namespace:    openshift-marketplace
    ...
    Status:
      Connection State:
        Address:              example-catalog.openshift-marketplace.svc:50051
        Last Connect:         2021-09-09T17:07:35Z
        Last Observed State:  TRANSIENT_FAILURE
      Registry Service:
        Created At:         2021-09-09T17:05:45Z
        Port:               50051
        Protocol:           grpc
        Service Name:       example-catalog
        Service Namespace:  openshift-marketplace

    In the preceding example output, the last observed state is TRANSIENT_FAILURE. This state indicates that there is a problem establishing a connection for the catalog source.

  3. List the pods in the namespace where your catalog source was created:

    $ oc get pods -n openshift-marketplace

    Example output

    NAME                                    READY   STATUS             RESTARTS   AGE
    certified-operators-cv9nn               1/1     Running            0          36m
    community-operators-6v8lp               1/1     Running            0          36m
    marketplace-operator-86bfc75f9b-jkgbc   1/1     Running            0          42m
    example-catalog-bwt8z                   0/1     ImagePullBackOff   0          3m55s
    redhat-marketplace-57p8c                1/1     Running            0          36m
    redhat-operators-smxx8                  1/1     Running            0          36m

    When a catalog source is created in a namespace, a pod for the catalog source is created in that namespace. In the preceding example output, the status for the example-catalog-bwt8z pod is ImagePullBackOff. This status indicates that there is an issue pulling the catalog source’s index image.

  4. Use the oc describe command to inspect a pod for more detailed information:

    $ oc describe pod example-catalog-bwt8z -n openshift-marketplace

    Example output

    Name:         example-catalog-bwt8z
    Namespace:    openshift-marketplace
    Priority:     0
    Node:         ci-ln-jyryyg2-f76d1-ggdbq-worker-b-vsxjd/10.0.128.2
    ...
    Events:
      Type     Reason          Age                From               Message
      ----     ------          ----               ----               -------
      Normal   Scheduled       48s                default-scheduler  Successfully assigned openshift-marketplace/example-catalog-bwt8z to ci-ln-jyryyf2-f76d1-fgdbq-worker-b-vsxjd
      Normal   AddedInterface  47s                multus             Add eth0 [10.131.0.40/23] from openshift-sdn
      Normal   BackOff         20s (x2 over 46s)  kubelet            Back-off pulling image "quay.io/example-org/example-catalog:v1"
      Warning  Failed          20s (x2 over 46s)  kubelet            Error: ImagePullBackOff
      Normal   Pulling         8s (x3 over 47s)   kubelet            Pulling image "quay.io/example-org/example-catalog:v1"
      Warning  Failed          8s (x3 over 47s)   kubelet            Failed to pull image "quay.io/example-org/example-catalog:v1": rpc error: code = Unknown desc = reading manifest v1 in quay.io/example-org/example-catalog: unauthorized: access to the requested resource is not authorized
      Warning  Failed          8s (x3 over 47s)   kubelet            Error: ErrImagePull

    In the preceding example output, the error messages indicate that the catalog source’s index image is failing to pull successfully because of an authorization issue. For example, the index image might be stored in a registry that requires login credentials.

4.7. Managing Operator conditions

As a cluster administrator, you can manage Operator conditions by using Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM).

4.7.1. Overriding Operator conditions

As a cluster administrator, you might want to ignore a supported Operator condition reported by an Operator. When present, Operator conditions in the Spec.Overrides array override the conditions in the Spec.Conditions array, allowing cluster administrators to deal with situations where an Operator is incorrectly reporting a state to Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM).

Note

By default, the Spec.Overrides array is not present in an OperatorCondition object until it is added by a cluster administrator. The Spec.Conditions array is also not present until it is either added by a user or as a result of custom Operator logic.

For example, consider a known version of an Operator that always communicates that it is not upgradeable. In this instance, you might want to upgrade the Operator despite the Operator communicating that it is not upgradeable. This could be accomplished by overriding the Operator condition by adding the condition type and status to the Spec.Overrides array in the OperatorCondition object.

Prerequisites

  • An Operator with an OperatorCondition object, installed using OLM.

Procedure

  1. Edit the OperatorCondition object for the Operator:

    $ oc edit operatorcondition <name>
  2. Add a Spec.Overrides array to the object:

    Example Operator condition override

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
    kind: OperatorCondition
    metadata:
      name: my-operator
      namespace: operators
    spec:
      overrides:
      - type: Upgradeable 1
        status: "True"
        reason: "upgradeIsSafe"
        message: "This is a known issue with the Operator where it always reports that it cannot be upgraded."
      conditions:
      - type: Upgradeable
        status: "False"
        reason: "migration"
        message: "The operator is performing a migration."
        lastTransitionTime: "2020-08-24T23:15:55Z"

    1
    Allows the cluster administrator to change the upgrade readiness to True.

4.7.2. Updating your Operator to use Operator conditions

Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) automatically creates an OperatorCondition resource for each ClusterServiceVersion resource that it reconciles. All service accounts in the CSV are granted the RBAC to interact with the OperatorCondition owned by the Operator.

An Operator author can develop their Operator to use the operator-lib library such that, after the Operator has been deployed by OLM, it can set its own conditions. For more on writing logic to set Operator conditions as an Operator author, see the Operator SDK documentation.

4.7.2.1. Setting defaults

In an effort to remain backwards compatible, OLM treats the absence of an OperatorCondition resource as opting out of the condition. Therefore, an Operator that opts in to using Operator conditions should set default conditions before the ready probe for the pod is set to true. This provides the Operator with a grace period to update the condition to the correct state.

4.7.3. Additional resources

4.8. Allowing non-cluster administrators to install Operators

Operators can require wide privileges to run, and the required privileges can change between versions. Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) runs with cluster-admin privileges. By default, Operator authors can specify any set of permissions in the cluster service version (CSV) and OLM will consequently grant it to the Operator.

Cluster administrators should take measures to ensure that an Operator cannot achieve cluster-scoped privileges and that users cannot escalate privileges using OLM. One method for locking this down requires cluster administrators auditing Operators before they are added to the cluster. Cluster administrators are also provided tools for determining and constraining which actions are allowed during an Operator installation or upgrade using service accounts.

By associating an Operator group with a service account that has a set of privileges granted to it, cluster administrators can set policy on Operators to ensure they operate only within predetermined boundaries using RBAC rules. The Operator is unable to do anything that is not explicitly permitted by those rules.

This self-sufficient, limited scope installation of Operators by non-cluster administrators means that more of the Operator Framework tools can safely be made available to more users, providing a richer experience for building applications with Operators.

4.8.1. Understanding Operator installation policy

Using Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM), cluster administrators can choose to specify a service account for an Operator group so that all Operators associated with the group are deployed and run against the privileges granted to the service account.

The APIService and CustomResourceDefinition resources are always created by OLM using the cluster-admin role. A service account associated with an Operator group should never be granted privileges to write these resources.

If the specified service account does not have adequate permissions for an Operator that is being installed or upgraded, useful and contextual information is added to the status of the respective resource(s) so that it is easy for the cluster administrator to troubleshoot and resolve the issue.

Any Operator tied to this Operator group is now confined to the permissions granted to the specified service account. If the Operator asks for permissions that are outside the scope of the service account, the install fails with appropriate errors.

4.8.1.1. Installation scenarios

When determining whether an Operator can be installed or upgraded on a cluster, Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) considers the following scenarios:

  • A cluster administrator creates a new Operator group and specifies a service account. All Operator(s) associated with this Operator group are installed and run against the privileges granted to the service account.
  • A cluster administrator creates a new Operator group and does not specify any service account. OpenShift Container Platform maintains backward compatibility, so the default behavior remains and Operator installs and upgrades are permitted.
  • For existing Operator groups that do not specify a service account, the default behavior remains and Operator installs and upgrades are permitted.
  • A cluster administrator updates an existing Operator group and specifies a service account. OLM allows the existing Operator to continue to run with their current privileges. When such an existing Operator is going through an upgrade, it is reinstalled and run against the privileges granted to the service account like any new Operator.
  • A service account specified by an Operator group changes by adding or removing permissions, or the existing service account is swapped with a new one. When existing Operators go through an upgrade, it is reinstalled and run against the privileges granted to the updated service account like any new Operator.
  • A cluster administrator removes the service account from an Operator group. The default behavior remains and Operator installs and upgrades are permitted.

4.8.1.2. Installation workflow

When an Operator group is tied to a service account and an Operator is installed or upgraded, Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) uses the following workflow:

  1. The given Subscription object is picked up by OLM.
  2. OLM fetches the Operator group tied to this subscription.
  3. OLM determines that the Operator group has a service account specified.
  4. OLM creates a client scoped to the service account and uses the scoped client to install the Operator. This ensures that any permission requested by the Operator is always confined to that of the service account in the Operator group.
  5. OLM creates a new service account with the set of permissions specified in the CSV and assigns it to the Operator. The Operator runs as the assigned service account.

4.8.2. Scoping Operator installations

To provide scoping rules to Operator installations and upgrades on Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM), associate a service account with an Operator group.

Using this example, a cluster administrator can confine a set of Operators to a designated namespace.

Procedure

  1. Create a new namespace:

    $ cat <<EOF | oc create -f -
    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Namespace
    metadata:
      name: scoped
    EOF
  2. Allocate permissions that you want the Operator(s) to be confined to. This involves creating a new service account, relevant role(s), and role binding(s).

    $ cat <<EOF | oc create -f -
    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ServiceAccount
    metadata:
      name: scoped
      namespace: scoped
    EOF

    The following example grants the service account permissions to do anything in the designated namespace for simplicity. In a production environment, you should create a more fine-grained set of permissions:

    $ cat <<EOF | oc create -f -
    apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
    kind: Role
    metadata:
      name: scoped
      namespace: scoped
    rules:
    - apiGroups: ["*"]
      resources: ["*"]
      verbs: ["*"]
    ---
    apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
    kind: RoleBinding
    metadata:
      name: scoped-bindings
      namespace: scoped
    roleRef:
      apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
      kind: Role
      name: scoped
    subjects:
    - kind: ServiceAccount
      name: scoped
      namespace: scoped
    EOF
  3. Create an OperatorGroup object in the designated namespace. This Operator group targets the designated namespace to ensure that its tenancy is confined to it.

    In addition, Operator groups allow a user to specify a service account. Specify the service account created in the previous step:

    $ cat <<EOF | oc create -f -
    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
    kind: OperatorGroup
    metadata:
      name: scoped
      namespace: scoped
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: scoped
      targetNamespaces:
      - scoped
    EOF

    Any Operator installed in the designated namespace is tied to this Operator group and therefore to the service account specified.

  4. Create a Subscription object in the designated namespace to install an Operator:

    $ cat <<EOF | oc create -f -
    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: etcd
      namespace: scoped
    spec:
      channel: singlenamespace-alpha
      name: etcd
      source: <catalog_source_name> 1
      sourceNamespace: <catalog_source_namespace> 2
    EOF
    1
    Specify a catalog source that already exists in the designated namespace or one that is in the global catalog namespace.
    2
    Specify a namespace where the catalog source was created.

    Any Operator tied to this Operator group is confined to the permissions granted to the specified service account. If the Operator requests permissions that are outside the scope of the service account, the installation fails with relevant errors.

4.8.2.1. Fine-grained permissions

Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) uses the service account specified in an Operator group to create or update the following resources related to the Operator being installed:

  • ClusterServiceVersion
  • Subscription
  • Secret
  • ServiceAccount
  • Service
  • ClusterRole and ClusterRoleBinding
  • Role and RoleBinding

To confine Operators to a designated namespace, cluster administrators can start by granting the following permissions to the service account:

Note

The following role is a generic example and additional rules might be required based on the specific Operator.

kind: Role
rules:
- apiGroups: ["operators.coreos.com"]
  resources: ["subscriptions", "clusterserviceversions"]
  verbs: ["get", "create", "update", "patch"]
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources: ["services", "serviceaccounts"]
  verbs: ["get", "create", "update", "patch"]
- apiGroups: ["rbac.authorization.k8s.io"]
  resources: ["roles", "rolebindings"]
  verbs: ["get", "create", "update", "patch"]
- apiGroups: ["apps"] 1
  resources: ["deployments"]
  verbs: ["list", "watch", "get", "create", "update", "patch", "delete"]
- apiGroups: [""] 2
  resources: ["pods"]
  verbs: ["list", "watch", "get", "create", "update", "patch", "delete"]
1 2
Add permissions to create other resources, such as deployments and pods shown here.

In addition, if any Operator specifies a pull secret, the following permissions must also be added:

kind: ClusterRole 1
rules:
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources: ["secrets"]
  verbs: ["get"]
---
kind: Role
rules:
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources: ["secrets"]
  verbs: ["create", "update", "patch"]
1
Required to get the secret from the OLM namespace.

4.8.3. Troubleshooting permission failures

If an Operator installation fails due to lack of permissions, identify the errors using the following procedure.

Procedure

  1. Review the Subscription object. Its status has an object reference installPlanRef that points to the InstallPlan object that attempted to create the necessary [Cluster]Role[Binding] object(s) for the Operator:

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: etcd
      namespace: scoped
    status:
      installPlanRef:
        apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
        kind: InstallPlan
        name: install-4plp8
        namespace: scoped
        resourceVersion: "117359"
        uid: 2c1df80e-afea-11e9-bce3-5254009c9c23
  2. Check the status of the InstallPlan object for any errors:

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1
    kind: InstallPlan
    status:
      conditions:
      - lastTransitionTime: "2019-07-26T21:13:10Z"
        lastUpdateTime: "2019-07-26T21:13:10Z"
        message: 'error creating clusterrole etcdoperator.v0.9.4-clusterwide-dsfx4: clusterroles.rbac.authorization.k8s.io
          is forbidden: User "system:serviceaccount:scoped:scoped" cannot create resource
          "clusterroles" in API group "rbac.authorization.k8s.io" at the cluster scope'
        reason: InstallComponentFailed
        status: "False"
        type: Installed
      phase: Failed

    The error message tells you:

    • The type of resource it failed to create, including the API group of the resource. In this case, it was clusterroles in the rbac.authorization.k8s.io group.
    • The name of the resource.
    • The type of error: is forbidden tells you that the user does not have enough permission to do the operation.
    • The name of the user who attempted to create or update the resource. In this case, it refers to the service account specified in the Operator group.
    • The scope of the operation: cluster scope or not.

      The user can add the missing permission to the service account and then iterate.

      Note

      Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) does not currently provide the complete list of errors on the first try.

4.9. Managing custom catalogs

Cluster administrators and Operator catalog maintainers can create and managing custom catalogs packaged using the bundle format on Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) in OpenShift Container Platform.

Important

Kubernetes periodically deprecates certain APIs that are removed in subsequent releases. As a result, Operators are unable to use removed APIs starting with the version of OpenShift Container Platform that uses the Kubernetes version that removed the API.

If your cluster is using custom catalogs, see Controlling Operator compatibility with OpenShift Container Platform versions for more details about how Operator authors can update their projects to help avoid workload issues and prevent incompatible upgrades.

4.9.1. Prerequisites

4.9.2. File-based catalogs

File-based catalogs are the latest iteration of the catalog format in Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM). It is a plain text-based (JSON or YAML) and declarative config evolution of the earlier SQLite database format, and it is fully backwards compatible.

For more details about the file-based catalog specification, see Operator Framework packaging format.

4.9.2.1. Creating a file-based catalog image

You can create a catalog image that uses the plain text file-based catalog format (JSON or YAML), which replaces the deprecated SQLite database format. The opm CLI provides tooling that helps initialize a catalog in the file-based format, render new records into it, and validate that the catalog is valid.

Prerequisites

  • opm
  • podman version 1.9.3+
  • A bundle image built and pushed to a registry that supports Docker v2-2

Procedure

  1. Initialize a catalog for a file-based catalog:

    1. Create a directory for the catalog:

      $ mkdir <operator_name>-index
    2. Create a Dockerfile that can build a catalog image:

      Example <operator_name>-index.Dockerfile

      # The base image is expected to contain
      # /bin/opm (with a serve subcommand) and /bin/grpc_health_probe
      FROM registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-operator-registry:v4.9
      
      # Configure the entrypoint and command
      ENTRYPOINT ["/bin/opm"]
      CMD ["serve", "/configs"]
      
      # Copy declarative config root into image at /configs
      ADD <operator_name>-index /configs
      
      # Set DC-specific label for the location of the DC root directory
      # in the image
      LABEL operators.operatorframework.io.index.configs.v1=/configs

      The Dockerfile must be in the same parent directory as the catalog directory that you created in the previous step:

      Example directory structure

      .
      ├── <operator_name>-index
      └── <operator_name>-index.Dockerfile

    3. Populate the catalog with your package definition:

      $ opm init <operator_name> \ 1
          --default-channel=preview \ 2
          --description=./README.md \ 3
          --icon=./operator-icon.svg \ 4
          --output yaml \ 5
          > <operator_name>-index/index.yaml 6
      1
      Operator, or package, name.
      2
      Channel that subscription will default to if unspecified.
      3
      Path to the Operator’s README.md or other documentation.
      4
      Path to the Operator’s icon.
      5
      Output format: JSON or YAML.
      6
      Path for creating the catalog configuration file.

      This command generates an olm.package declarative config blob in the specified catalog configuration file.

  2. Add a bundle to the catalog:

    $ opm render <registry>/<namespace>/<bundle_image_name>:<tag> \ 1
        --output=yaml \
        >> <operator_name>-index/index.yaml 2
    1
    Pull spec for the bundle image.
    2
    Path to the catalog configuration file.

    The opm render command generates a declarative config blob from the provided catalog images and bundle images.

    Note

    Channels must contain at least one bundle.

  3. Add a channel entry for the bundle. For example, modify the following example to your specifications, and add it to your <operator_name>-index/index.yaml file:

    Example channel entry

    ---
    schema: olm.channel
    package: <operator_name>
    name: preview
    entries:
      - name: <operator_name>.v0.1.0 1

    1
    Ensure that you include the period (.) after <operator_name> but before the v in the version. Otherwise, the entry will fail to pass the opm validate command.
  4. Validate the file-based catalog:

    1. Run the opm validate command against the catalog directory:

      $ opm validate <operator_name>-index
    2. Check that the error code is 0:

      $ echo $?

      Example output

      0

  5. Build the catalog image:

    $ podman build . \
        -f <operator_name>-index.Dockerfile \
        -t <registry>/<namespace>/<catalog_image_name>:<tag>
  6. Push the catalog image to a registry:

    1. If required, authenticate with your target registry:

      $ podman login <registry>
    2. Push the catalog image:

      $ podman push <registry>/<namespace>/<catalog_image_name>:<tag>

4.9.3. SQLite-based catalogs

Important

The SQLite database format for Operator catalogs is a deprecated feature. Deprecated functionality is still included in OpenShift Container Platform and continues to be supported; however, it will be removed in a future release of this product and is not recommended for new deployments.

For the most recent list of major functionality that has been deprecated or removed within OpenShift Container Platform, refer to the Deprecated and removed features section of the OpenShift Container Platform release notes.

4.9.3.1. Creating a SQLite-based index image

You can create an index image based on the SQLite database format by using the opm CLI.

Prerequisites

  • opm
  • podman version 1.9.3+
  • A bundle image built and pushed to a registry that supports Docker v2-2

Procedure

  1. Start a new index:

    $ opm index add \
        --bundles <registry>/<namespace>/<bundle_image_name>:<tag> \1
        --tag <registry>/<namespace>/<index_image_name>:<tag> \2
        [--binary-image <registry_base_image>] 3
    1
    Comma-separated list of bundle images to add to the index.
    2
    The image tag that you want the index image to have.
    3
    Optional: An alternative registry base image to use for serving the catalog.
  2. Push the index image to a registry.

    1. If required, authenticate with your target registry:

      $ podman login <registry>
    2. Push the index image:

      $ podman push <registry>/<namespace>/<index_image_name>:<tag>

4.9.3.2. Updating a SQLite-based index image

After configuring OperatorHub to use a catalog source that references a custom index image, cluster administrators can keep the available Operators on their cluster up to date by adding bundle images to the index image.

You can update an existing index image using the opm index add command.

Prerequisites

  • opm
  • podman version 1.9.3+
  • An index image built and pushed to a registry.
  • An existing catalog source referencing the index image.

Procedure

  1. Update the existing index by adding bundle images:

    $ opm index add \
        --bundles <registry>/<namespace>/<new_bundle_image>@sha256:<digest> \1
        --from-index <registry>/<namespace>/<existing_index_image>:<existing_tag> \2
        --tag <registry>/<namespace>/<existing_index_image>:<updated_tag> \3
        --pull-tool podman 4
    1
    The --bundles flag specifies a comma-separated list of additional bundle images to add to the index.
    2
    The --from-index flag specifies the previously pushed index.
    3
    The --tag flag specifies the image tag to apply to the updated index image.
    4
    The --pull-tool flag specifies the tool used to pull container images.

    where:

    <registry>
    Specifies the hostname of the registry, such as quay.io or mirror.example.com.
    <namespace>
    Specifies the namespace of the registry, such as ocs-dev or abc.
    <new_bundle_image>
    Specifies the new bundle image to add to the registry, such as ocs-operator.
    <digest>
    Specifies the SHA image ID, or digest, of the bundle image, such as c7f11097a628f092d8bad148406aa0e0951094a03445fd4bc0775431ef683a41.
    <existing_index_image>
    Specifies the previously pushed image, such as abc-redhat-operator-index.
    <existing_tag>
    Specifies a previously pushed image tag, such as 4.10.
    <updated_tag>
    Specifies the image tag to apply to the updated index image, such as 4.10.1.

    Example command

    $ opm index add \
        --bundles quay.io/ocs-dev/ocs-operator@sha256:c7f11097a628f092d8bad148406aa0e0951094a03445fd4bc0775431ef683a41 \
        --from-index mirror.example.com/abc/abc-redhat-operator-index:4.10 \
        --tag mirror.example.com/abc/abc-redhat-operator-index:4.10.1 \
        --pull-tool podman

  2. Push the updated index image:

    $ podman push <registry>/<namespace>/<existing_index_image>:<updated_tag>
  3. After Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) automatically polls the index image referenced in the catalog source at its regular interval, verify that the new packages are successfully added:

    $ oc get packagemanifests -n openshift-marketplace

4.9.3.3. Filtering a SQLite-based index image

An index image, based on the Operator bundle format, is a containerized snapshot of an Operator catalog. You can filter, or prune, an index of all but a specified list of packages, which creates a copy of the source index containing only the Operators that you want.

Prerequisites

  • podman version 1.9.3+
  • grpcurl (third-party command-line tool)
  • opm
  • Access to a registry that supports Docker v2-2

Procedure

  1. Authenticate with your target registry:

    $ podman login <target_registry>
  2. Determine the list of packages you want to include in your pruned index.

    1. Run the source index image that you want to prune in a container. For example:

      $ podman run -p50051:50051 \
          -it registry.redhat.io/redhat/redhat-operator-index:v4.10

      Example output

      Trying to pull registry.redhat.io/redhat/redhat-operator-index:v4.10...
      Getting image source signatures
      Copying blob ae8a0c23f5b1 done
      ...
      INFO[0000] serving registry                              database=/database/index.db port=50051

    2. In a separate terminal session, use the grpcurl command to get a list of the packages provided by the index:

      $ grpcurl -plaintext localhost:50051 api.Registry/ListPackages > packages.out
    3. Inspect the packages.out file and identify which package names from this list you want to keep in your pruned index. For example:

      Example snippets of packages list

      ...
      {
        "name": "advanced-cluster-management"
      }
      ...
      {
        "name": "jaeger-product"
      }
      ...
      {
      {
        "name": "quay-operator"
      }
      ...

    4. In the terminal session where you executed the podman run command, press Ctrl and C to stop the container process.
  3. Run the following command to prune the source index of all but the specified packages:

    $ opm index prune \
        -f registry.redhat.io/redhat/redhat-operator-index:v4.10 \1
        -p advanced-cluster-management,jaeger-product,quay-operator \2
        [-i registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-operator-registry:v4.9] \3
        -t <target_registry>:<port>/<namespace>/redhat-operator-index:v4.10 4
    1
    Index to prune.
    2
    Comma-separated list of packages to keep.
    3
    Required only for IBM Power and IBM Z images: Operator Registry base image with the tag that matches the target OpenShift Container Platform cluster major and minor version.
    4
    Custom tag for new index image being built.
  4. Run the following command to push the new index image to your target registry:

    $ podman push <target_registry>:<port>/<namespace>/redhat-operator-index:v4.10

    where <namespace> is any existing namespace on the registry.

4.9.4. Adding a catalog source to a cluster

Adding a catalog source to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster enables the discovery and installation of Operators for users. Cluster administrators can create a CatalogSource object that references an index image. OperatorHub uses catalog sources to populate the user interface.

Prerequisites

  • An index image built and pushed to a registry.

Procedure

  1. Create a CatalogSource object that references your index image.

    1. Modify the following to your specifications and save it as a catalogSource.yaml file:

      apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
      kind: CatalogSource
      metadata:
        name: my-operator-catalog
        namespace: openshift-marketplace 1
        annotations:
          olm.catalogImageTemplate: 2
            "<registry>/<namespace>/<index_image_name>:v{kube_major_version}.{kube_minor_version}.{kube_patch_version}"
      spec:
        sourceType: grpc
        image: <registry>/<namespace>/<index_image_name>:<tag> 3
        displayName: My Operator Catalog
        publisher: <publisher_name> 4
        updateStrategy:
          registryPoll: 5
            interval: 30m
      1
      If you want the catalog source to be available globally to users in all namespaces, specify the openshift-marketplace namespace. Otherwise, you can specify a different namespace for the catalog to be scoped and available only for that namespace.
      2
      Optional: Set the olm.catalogImageTemplate annotation to your index image name and use one or more of the Kubernetes cluster version variables as shown when constructing the template for the image tag.
      3
      Specify your index image.
      4
      Specify your name or an organization name publishing the catalog.
      5
      Catalog sources can automatically check for new versions to keep up to date.
    2. Use the file to create the CatalogSource object:

      $ oc apply -f catalogSource.yaml
  2. Verify the following resources are created successfully.

    1. Check the pods:

      $ oc get pods -n openshift-marketplace

      Example output

      NAME                                    READY   STATUS    RESTARTS  AGE
      my-operator-catalog-6njx6               1/1     Running   0         28s
      marketplace-operator-d9f549946-96sgr    1/1     Running   0         26h

    2. Check the catalog source:

      $ oc get catalogsource -n openshift-marketplace

      Example output

      NAME                  DISPLAY               TYPE PUBLISHER  AGE
      my-operator-catalog   My Operator Catalog   grpc            5s

    3. Check the package manifest:

      $ oc get packagemanifest -n openshift-marketplace

      Example output

      NAME                          CATALOG               AGE
      jaeger-product                My Operator Catalog   93s

You can now install the Operators from the OperatorHub page on your OpenShift Container Platform web console.

Additional resources

4.9.5. Accessing images for Operators from private registries

If certain images relevant to Operators managed by Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) are hosted in an authenticated container image registry, also known as a private registry, OLM and OperatorHub are unable to pull the images by default. To enable access, you can create a pull secret that contains the authentication credentials for the registry. By referencing one or more pull secrets in a catalog source, OLM can handle placing the secrets in the Operator and catalog namespace to allow installation.

Other images required by an Operator or its Operands might require access to private registries as well. OLM does not handle placing the secrets in target tenant namespaces for this scenario, but authentication credentials can be added to the global cluster pull secret or individual namespace service accounts to enable the required access.

The following types of images should be considered when determining whether Operators managed by OLM have appropriate pull access:

Index images
A CatalogSource object can reference an index image, which use the Operator bundle format and are catalog sources packaged as container images hosted in images registries. If an index image is hosted in a private registry, a secret can be used to enable pull access.
Bundle images
Operator bundle images are metadata and manifests packaged as container images that represent a unique version of an Operator. If any bundle images referenced in a catalog source are hosted in one or more private registries, a secret can be used to enable pull access.
Operator and Operand images

If an Operator installed from a catalog source uses a private image, either for the Operator image itself or one of the Operand images it watches, the Operator will fail to install because the deployment will not have access to the required registry authentication. Referencing secrets in a catalog source does not enable OLM to place the secrets in target tenant namespaces in which Operands are installed.

Instead, the authentication details can be added to the global cluster pull secret in the openshift-config namespace, which provides access to all namespaces on the cluster. Alternatively, if providing access to the entire cluster is not permissible, the pull secret can be added to the default service accounts of the target tenant namespaces.

Prerequisites

  • At least one of the following hosted in a private registry:

    • An index image or catalog image.
    • An Operator bundle image.
    • An Operator or Operand image.

Procedure

  1. Create a secret for each required private registry.

    1. Log in to the private registry to create or update your registry credentials file:

      $ podman login <registry>:<port>
      Note

      The file path of your registry credentials can be different depending on the container tool used to log in to the registry. For the podman CLI, the default location is ${XDG_RUNTIME_DIR}/containers/auth.json. For the docker CLI, the default location is /root/.docker/config.json.

    2. It is recommended to include credentials for only one registry per secret, and manage credentials for multiple registries in separate secrets. Multiple secrets can be included in a CatalogSource object in later steps, and OpenShift Container Platform will merge the secrets into a single virtual credentials file for use during an image pull.

      A registry credentials file can, by default, store details for more than one registry or for multiple repositories in one registry. Verify the current contents of your file. For example:

      File storing credentials for multiple registries

      {
          "auths": {
              "registry.redhat.io": {
                  "auth": "FrNHNydQXdzclNqdg=="
              },
              "quay.io": {
                  "auth": "fegdsRib21iMQ=="
              },
              "https://quay.io/my-namespace/my-user/my-image": {
                  "auth": "eWfjwsDdfsa221=="
              },
              "https://quay.io/my-namespace/my-user": {
                  "auth": "feFweDdscw34rR=="
              },
              "https://quay.io/my-namespace": {
                  "auth": "frwEews4fescyq=="
              }
          }
      }

      Because this file is used to create secrets in later steps, ensure that you are storing details for only one registry per file. This can be accomplished by using either of the following methods:

      • Use the podman logout <registry> command to remove credentials for additional registries until only the one registry you want remains.
      • Edit your registry credentials file and separate the registry details to be stored in multiple files. For example:

        File storing credentials for one registry

        {
                "auths": {
                        "registry.redhat.io": {
                                "auth": "FrNHNydQXdzclNqdg=="
                        }
                }
        }

        File storing credentials for another registry

        {
                "auths": {
                        "quay.io": {
                                "auth": "Xd2lhdsbnRib21iMQ=="
                        }
                }
        }

    3. Create a secret in the openshift-marketplace namespace that contains the authentication credentials for a private registry:

      $ oc create secret generic <secret_name> \
          -n openshift-marketplace \
          --from-file=.dockerconfigjson=<path/to/registry/credentials> \
          --type=kubernetes.io/dockerconfigjson

      Repeat this step to create additional secrets for any other required private registries, updating the --from-file flag to specify another registry credentials file path.

  2. Create or update an existing CatalogSource object to reference one or more secrets:

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: CatalogSource
    metadata:
      name: my-operator-catalog
      namespace: openshift-marketplace
    spec:
      sourceType: grpc
      secrets: 1
      - "<secret_name_1>"
      - "<secret_name_2>"
      image: <registry>:<port>/<namespace>/<image>:<tag>
      displayName: My Operator Catalog
      publisher: <publisher_name>
      updateStrategy:
        registryPoll:
          interval: 30m
    1
    Add a spec.secrets section and specify any required secrets.
  3. If any Operator or Operand images that are referenced by a subscribed Operator require access to a private registry, you can either provide access to all namespaces in the cluster, or individual target tenant namespaces.

    • To provide access to all namespaces in the cluster, add authentication details to the global cluster pull secret in the openshift-config namespace.

      Warning

      Cluster resources must adjust to the new global pull secret, which can temporarily limit the usability of the cluster.

      1. Extract the .dockerconfigjson file from the global pull secret:

        $ oc extract secret/pull-secret -n openshift-config --confirm
      2. Update the .dockerconfigjson file with your authentication credentials for the required private registry or registries and save it as a new file:

        $ cat .dockerconfigjson | \
            jq --compact-output '.auths["<registry>:<port>/<namespace>/"] |= . + {"auth":"<token>"}' \1
            > new_dockerconfigjson
        1
        Replace <registry>:<port>/<namespace> with the private registry details and <token> with your authentication credentials.
      3. Update the global pull secret with the new file:

        $ oc set data secret/pull-secret -n openshift-config \
            --from-file=.dockerconfigjson=new_dockerconfigjson
    • To update an individual namespace, add a pull secret to the service account for the Operator that requires access in the target tenant namespace.

      1. Recreate the secret that you created for the openshift-marketplace in the tenant namespace:

        $ oc create secret generic <secret_name> \
            -n <tenant_namespace> \
            --from-file=.dockerconfigjson=<path/to/registry/credentials> \
            --type=kubernetes.io/dockerconfigjson
      2. Verify the name of the service account for the Operator by searching the tenant namespace:

        $ oc get sa -n <tenant_namespace> 1
        1
        If the Operator was installed in an individual namespace, search that namespace. If the Operator was installed for all namespaces, search the openshift-operators namespace.

        Example output

        NAME            SECRETS   AGE
        builder         2         6m1s
        default         2         6m1s
        deployer        2         6m1s
        etcd-operator   2         5m18s 1

        1
        Service account for an installed etcd Operator.
      3. Link the secret to the service account for the Operator:

        $ oc secrets link <operator_sa> \
            -n <tenant_namespace> \
             <secret_name> \
            --for=pull

Additional resources

4.9.6. Disabling the default OperatorHub sources

Operator catalogs that source content provided by Red Hat and community projects are configured for OperatorHub by default during an OpenShift Container Platform installation. As a cluster administrator, you can disable the set of default catalogs.

Procedure

  • Disable the sources for the default catalogs by adding disableAllDefaultSources: true to the OperatorHub object:

    $ oc patch OperatorHub cluster --type json \
        -p '[{"op": "add", "path": "/spec/disableAllDefaultSources", "value": true}]'
Tip

Alternatively, you can use the web console to manage catalog sources. From the AdministrationCluster SettingsConfigurationOperatorHub page, click the Sources tab, where you can create, delete, disable, and enable individual sources.

4.9.7. Removing custom catalogs

As a cluster administrator, you can remove custom Operator catalogs that have been previously added to your cluster by deleting the related catalog source.

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the web console, navigate to AdministrationCluster Settings.
  2. Click the Configuration tab, and then click OperatorHub.
  3. Click the Sources tab.
  4. Select the Options menu kebab for the catalog that you want to remove, and then click Delete CatalogSource.

4.10. Using Operator Lifecycle Manager on restricted networks

For OpenShift Container Platform clusters that are installed on restricted networks, also known as disconnected clusters, Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) by default cannot access the Red Hat-provided OperatorHub sources hosted on remote registries because those remote sources require full internet connectivity.

However, as a cluster administrator you can still enable your cluster to use OLM in a restricted network if you have a workstation that has full internet access. The workstation, which requires full internet access to pull the remote OperatorHub content, is used to prepare local mirrors of the remote sources, and push the content to a mirror registry.

The mirror registry can be located on a bastion host, which requires connectivity to both your workstation and the disconnected cluster, or a completely disconnected, or airgapped, host, which requires removable media to physically move the mirrored content to the disconnected environment.

This guide describes the following process that is required to enable OLM in restricted networks:

  • Disable the default remote OperatorHub sources for OLM.
  • Use a workstation with full internet access to create and push local mirrors of the OperatorHub content to a mirror registry.
  • Configure OLM to install and manage Operators from local sources on the mirror registry instead of the default remote sources.

After enabling OLM in a restricted network, you can continue to use your unrestricted workstation to keep your local OperatorHub sources updated as newer versions of Operators are released.

Important

While OLM can manage Operators from local sources, the ability for a given Operator to run successfully in a restricted network still depends on the Operator itself. The Operator must:

  • List any related images, or other container images that the Operator might require to perform their functions, in the relatedImages parameter of its ClusterServiceVersion (CSV) object.
  • Reference all specified images by a digest (SHA) and not by a tag.

See the following Red Hat Knowledgebase Article for a list of Red Hat Operators that support running in disconnected mode:

https://access.redhat.com/articles/4740011

4.10.1. Prerequisites

  • Log in to your OpenShift Container Platform cluster as a user with cluster-admin privileges.
  • If you want to prune the default catalog and selectively mirror only a subset of Operators, install the opm CLI.
Note

If you are using OLM in a restricted network on IBM Z, you must have at least 12 GB allocated to the directory where you place your registry.

4.10.2. Disabling the default OperatorHub sources

Operator catalogs that source content provided by Red Hat and community projects are configured for OperatorHub by default during an OpenShift Container Platform installation. In a restricted network environment, you must disable the default catalogs as a cluster administrator. You can then configure OperatorHub to use local catalog sources.

Procedure

  • Disable the sources for the default catalogs by adding disableAllDefaultSources: true to the OperatorHub object:

    $ oc patch OperatorHub cluster --type json \
        -p '[{"op": "add", "path": "/spec/disableAllDefaultSources", "value": true}]'
Tip

Alternatively, you can use the web console to manage catalog sources. From the AdministrationCluster SettingsConfigurationOperatorHub page, click the Sources tab, where you can create, delete, disable, and enable individual sources.

4.10.3. Filtering a SQLite-based index image

An index image, based on the Operator bundle format, is a containerized snapshot of an Operator catalog. You can filter, or prune, an index of all but a specified list of packages, which creates a copy of the source index containing only the Operators that you want.

When configuring Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) to use mirrored content on restricted network OpenShift Container Platform clusters, use this pruning method if you want to only mirror a subset of Operators from the default catalogs.

For the steps in this procedure, the target registry is an existing mirror registry that is accessible by your workstation with unrestricted network access. This example also shows pruning the index image for the default redhat-operators catalog, but the process is the same for any index image.

Prerequisites

  • Workstation with unrestricted network access
  • podman version 1.9.3+
  • grpcurl (third-party command-line tool)
  • opm
  • Access to a registry that supports Docker v2-2

Procedure

  1. Authenticate with registry.redhat.io:

    $ podman login registry.redhat.io
  2. Authenticate with your target registry:

    $ podman login <target_registry>
  3. Determine the list of packages you want to include in your pruned index.

    1. Run the source index image that you want to prune in a container. For example:

      $ podman run -p50051:50051 \
          -it registry.redhat.io/redhat/redhat-operator-index:v4.10

      Example output

      Trying to pull registry.redhat.io/redhat/redhat-operator-index:v4.10...
      Getting image source signatures
      Copying blob ae8a0c23f5b1 done
      ...
      INFO[0000] serving registry                              database=/database/index.db port=50051

    2. In a separate terminal session, use the grpcurl command to get a list of the packages provided by the index:

      $ grpcurl -plaintext localhost:50051 api.Registry/ListPackages > packages.out
    3. Inspect the packages.out file and identify which package names from this list you want to keep in your pruned index. For example:

      Example snippets of packages list

      ...
      {
        "name": "advanced-cluster-management"
      }
      ...
      {
        "name": "jaeger-product"
      }
      ...
      {
      {
        "name": "quay-operator"
      }
      ...

    4. In the terminal session where you executed the podman run command, press Ctrl and C to stop the container process.
  4. Run the following command to prune the source index of all but the specified packages:

    $ opm index prune \
        -f registry.redhat.io/redhat/redhat-operator-index:v4.10 \1
        -p advanced-cluster-management,jaeger-product,quay-operator \2
        [-i registry.redhat.io/openshift4/ose-operator-registry:v4.9] \3
        -t <target_registry>:<port>/<namespace>/redhat-operator-index:v4.10 4
    1
    Index to prune.
    2
    Comma-separated list of packages to keep.
    3
    Required only for IBM Power and IBM Z images: Operator Registry base image with the tag that matches the target OpenShift Container Platform cluster major and minor version.
    4
    Custom tag for new index image being built.
  5. Run the following command to push the new index image to your target registry:

    $ podman push <target_registry>:<port>/<namespace>/redhat-operator-index:v4.10

    where <namespace> is any existing namespace on the registry. For example, you might create an olm-mirror namespace to push all mirrored content to.

4.10.4. Mirroring an Operator catalog

For instructions about mirroring Operator catalogs for use with disconnected clusters, see Installing → Mirroring images for a disconnected installation.

4.10.5. Adding a catalog source to a cluster

Adding a catalog source to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster enables the discovery and installation of Operators for users. Cluster administrators can create a CatalogSource object that references an index image. OperatorHub uses catalog sources to populate the user interface.

Prerequisites

  • An index image built and pushed to a registry.

Procedure

  1. Create a CatalogSource object that references your index image. If you used the oc adm catalog mirror command to mirror your catalog to a target registry, you can use the generated catalogSource.yaml file in your manifests directory as a starting point.

    1. Modify the following to your specifications and save it as a catalogSource.yaml file:

      apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
      kind: CatalogSource
      metadata:
        name: my-operator-catalog 1
        namespace: openshift-marketplace 2
      spec:
        sourceType: grpc
        image: <registry>/<namespace>/redhat-operator-index:v4.10 3
        displayName: My Operator Catalog
        publisher: <publisher_name> 4
        updateStrategy:
          registryPoll: 5
            interval: 30m
      1
      If you mirrored content to local files before uploading to a registry, remove any backslash (/) characters from the metadata.name field to avoid an "invalid resource name" error when you create the object.
      2
      If you want the catalog source to be available globally to users in all namespaces, specify the openshift-marketplace namespace. Otherwise, you can specify a different namespace for the catalog to be scoped and available only for that namespace.
      3
      Specify your index image.
      4
      Specify your name or an organization name publishing the catalog.
      5
      Catalog sources can automatically check for new versions to keep up to date.
    2. Use the file to create the CatalogSource object:

      $ oc apply -f catalogSource.yaml
  2. Verify the following resources are created successfully.

    1. Check the pods:

      $ oc get pods -n openshift-marketplace

      Example output

      NAME                                    READY   STATUS    RESTARTS  AGE
      my-operator-catalog-6njx6               1/1     Running   0         28s
      marketplace-operator-d9f549946-96sgr    1/1     Running   0         26h

    2. Check the catalog source:

      $ oc get catalogsource -n openshift-marketplace

      Example output

      NAME                  DISPLAY               TYPE PUBLISHER  AGE
      my-operator-catalog   My Operator Catalog   grpc            5s

    3. Check the package manifest:

      $ oc get packagemanifest -n openshift-marketplace

      Example output

      NAME                          CATALOG               AGE
      jaeger-product                My Operator Catalog   93s

You can now install the Operators from the OperatorHub page on your OpenShift Container Platform web console.

Additional resources

4.10.6. Updating a SQLite-based index image

After configuring OperatorHub to use a catalog source that references a custom index image, cluster administrators can keep the available Operators on their cluster up to date by adding bundle images to the index image.

You can update an existing index image using the opm index add command. For restricted networks, the updated content must also be mirrored again to the cluster.

Prerequisites

  • opm
  • podman version 1.9.3+
  • An index image built and pushed to a registry.
  • An existing catalog source referencing the index image.

Procedure

  1. Update the existing index by adding bundle images:

    $ opm index add \
        --bundles <registry>/<namespace>/<new_bundle_image>@sha256:<digest> \1
        --from-index <registry>/<namespace>/<existing_index_image>:<existing_tag> \2
        --tag <registry>/<namespace>/<existing_index_image>:<updated_tag> \3
        --pull-tool podman 4
    1
    The --bundles flag specifies a comma-separated list of additional bundle images to add to the index.
    2
    The --from-index flag specifies the previously pushed index.
    3
    The --tag flag specifies the image tag to apply to the updated index image.
    4
    The --pull-tool flag specifies the tool used to pull container images.

    where:

    <registry>
    Specifies the hostname of the registry, such as quay.io or mirror.example.com.
    <namespace>
    Specifies the namespace of the registry, such as ocs-dev or abc.
    <new_bundle_image>
    Specifies the new bundle image to add to the registry, such as ocs-operator.
    <digest>
    Specifies the SHA image ID, or digest, of the bundle image, such as c7f11097a628f092d8bad148406aa0e0951094a03445fd4bc0775431ef683a41.
    <existing_index_image>
    Specifies the previously pushed image, such as abc-redhat-operator-index.
    <existing_tag>
    Specifies a previously pushed image tag, such as 4.10.
    <updated_tag>
    Specifies the image tag to apply to the updated index image, such as 4.10.1.

    Example command

    $ opm index add \
        --bundles quay.io/ocs-dev/ocs-operator@sha256:c7f11097a628f092d8bad148406aa0e0951094a03445fd4bc0775431ef683a41 \
        --from-index mirror.example.com/abc/abc-redhat-operator-index:4.10 \
        --tag mirror.example.com/abc/abc-redhat-operator-index:4.10.1 \
        --pull-tool podman

  2. Push the updated index image:

    $ podman push <registry>/<namespace>/<existing_index_image>:<updated_tag>
  3. Follow the steps in the Mirroring an Operator catalog procedure again to mirror the updated content. However, when you get to the step about creating the ImageContentSourcePolicy (ICSP) object, use the oc replace command instead of the oc create command. For example:

    $ oc replace -f ./manifests-redhat-operator-index-<random_number>/imageContentSourcePolicy.yaml

    This change is required because the object already exists and must be updated.

    Note

    Normally, the oc apply command can be used to update existing objects that were previously created using oc apply. However, due to a known issue regarding the size of the metadata.annotations field in ICSP objects, the oc replace command must be used for this step currently.

  4. After Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) automatically polls the index image referenced in the catalog source at its regular interval, verify that the new packages are successfully added:

    $ oc get packagemanifests -n openshift-marketplace

Additional resources