Chapter 4. Pipelines

4.1. Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines release notes

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines is a cloud-native CI/CD experience based on the Tekton project which provides:

  • Standard Kubernetes-native pipeline definitions (CRDs).
  • Serverless pipelines with no CI server management overhead.
  • Extensibility to build images using any Kubernetes tool, such as S2I, Buildah, JIB, and Kaniko.
  • Portability across any Kubernetes distribution.
  • Powerful CLI for interacting with pipelines.
  • Integrated user experience with the Developer perspective of the OpenShift Container Platform web console.

For an overview of Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, see Understanding OpenShift Pipelines.

4.1.1. Compatibility and support matrix

Some features in this release are currently in Technology Preview. These experimental features are not intended for production use.

In the table, features are marked with the following statuses:

TP

Technology Preview

GA

General Availability

Table 4.1. Compatibility and support matrix

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines VersionComponent VersionOpenShift VersionSupport Status

Operator

Pipelines

Triggers

CLI

Catalog

Chains

Hub

Pipelines as Code

  

1.10

0.44.x

0.23.x

0.30.x

NA

0.15.x (TP)

1.12.x (TP)

0.17.x (GA)

4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.13

GA

1.9

0.41.x

0.22.x

0.28.x

NA

0.13.x (TP)

1.11.x (TP)

0.15.x (GA)

4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.13

GA

1.8

0.37.x

0.20.x

0.24.x

NA

0.9.0 (TP)

1.8.x (TP)

0.10.x (TP)

4.10, 4.11, 4.12

GA

1.7

0.33.x

0.19.x

0.23.x

0.33

0.8.0 (TP)

1.7.0 (TP)

0.5.x (TP)

4.9, 4.10, 4.11

GA

1.6

0.28.x

0.16.x

0.21.x

0.28

N/A

N/A

N/A

4.9

GA

1.5

0.24.x

0.14.x (TP)

0.19.x

0.24

N/A

N/A

N/A

4.8

GA

1.4

0.22.x

0.12.x (TP)

0.17.x

0.22

N/A

N/A

N/A

4.7

GA

Additionally, support for running Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines on ARM hardware is in Technology Preview.

For questions and feedback, you can send an email to the product team at pipelines-interest@redhat.com.

4.1.2. Making open source more inclusive

Red Hat is committed to replacing problematic language in our code, documentation, and web properties. We are beginning with these four terms: master, slave, blacklist, and whitelist. Because of the enormity of this endeavor, these changes will be implemented gradually over several upcoming releases. For more details, see our CTO Chris Wright’s message.

4.1.3. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.10

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.10 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.3.1. New features

In addition to fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.10.

4.1.3.1.1. Pipelines
  • With this update, you can specify environment variables in a PipelineRun or TaskRun pod template to override or append the variables that are configured in a task or step. Also, you can specify environment variables in a default pod template to use those variables globally for all PipelineRuns and TaskRuns. This update also adds a new default configuration named forbidden-envs to filter environment variables while propagating from pod templates.
  • With this update, custom tasks in pipelines are enabled by default.

    Note

    To disable this update, set the enable-custom-tasks flag to false in the feature-flags config custom resource.

  • This update supports the v1beta1.CustomRun API version for custom tasks.
  • This update adds support for the PipelineRun reconciler to create a custom run. For example, custom TaskRuns created from PipelineRuns can now use the v1beta1.CustomRun API version instead of v1alpha1.Run, if the custom-task-version feature flag is set to v1beta1, instead of the default value v1alpha1.

    Note

    You need to update the custom task controller to listen for the *v1beta1.CustomRun API version instead of *v1alpha1.Run in order to respond to v1beta1.CustomRun requests.

  • This update adds a new retries field to the v1beta1.TaskRun and v1.TaskRun specifications.
4.1.3.1.2. Triggers
  • With this update, triggers support the creation of Pipelines, Tasks, PipelineRuns, and TaskRuns objects of the v1 API version along with CustomRun objects of the v1beta1 API version.
  • With this update, GitHub Interceptor blocks a pull request trigger from being executed unless invoked by an owner or with a configurable comment by an owner.

    Note

    To enable or disable this update, set the value of the githubOwners parameter to true or false in the GitHub Interceptor configuration file.

  • With this update, GitHub Interceptor has the ability to add a comma delimited list of all files that have changed for the push and pull request events. The list of changed files is added to the changed_files property of the event payload in the top-level extensions field.
  • This update changes the MinVersion of TLS to tls.VersionTLS12 so that triggers run on OpenShift Container Platform when the Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) mode is enabled.
4.1.3.1.3. CLI
  • This update adds support to pass a Container Storage Interface (CSI) file as a workspace at the time of starting a Task, ClusterTask or Pipeline.
  • This update adds v1 API support to all CLI commands associated with task, pipeline, pipeline run, and task run resources. Tekton CLI works with both v1beta1 and v1 APIs for these resources.
  • This update adds support for an object type parameter in the start and describe commands.
4.1.3.1.4. Operator
  • This update adds a default-forbidden-env parameter in optional pipeline properties. The parameter includes forbidden environment variables that should not be propagated if provided through pod templates.
  • This update adds support for custom logos in Tekton Hub UI. To add a custom logo, set the value of the customLogo parameter to base64 encoded URI of logo in the Tekton Hub CR.
  • This update increments the version number of the git-clone task to 0.9.
4.1.3.1.5. Tekton Chains
Important

Tekton Chains is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • This update adds annotations and labels to the PipelineRun and TaskRun attestations.
  • This update adds a new format named slsa/v1, which generates the same provenance as the one generated when requesting in the in-toto format.
  • With this update, Sigstore features are moved out from the experimental features.
  • With this update, the predicate.materials function includes image URI and digest information from all steps and sidecars for a TaskRun object.
4.1.3.1.6. Tekton Hub
Important

Tekton Hub is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • This update supports installing, upgrading, or downgrading Tekton resources of the v1 API version on the cluster.
  • This update supports adding a custom logo in place of the Tekton Hub logo in UI.
  • This update extends the tkn hub install command functionality by adding a --type artifact flag, which fetches resources from the Artifact Hub and installs them on your cluster.
  • This update adds support tier, catalog, and org information as labels to the resources being installed from Artifact Hub to your cluster.
4.1.3.1.7. Pipelines as Code
  • This update enhances incoming webhook support. For a GitHub application installed on the OpenShift Container Platform cluster, you do not need to provide the git_provider specification for an incoming webhook. Instead, Pipelines as Code detects the secret and use it for the incoming webhook.
  • With this update, you can use the same token to fetch remote tasks from the same host on GitHub with a non-default branch.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code supports Tekton v1 templates. You can have v1 and v1beta1 templates, which Pipelines as Code reads for PR generation. The PR is created as v1 on cluster.
  • Before this update, OpenShift console UI would use a hardcoded pipeline run template as a fallback template when a runtime template was not found in the OpenShift namespace. This update in the pipelines-as-code config map provides a new default pipeline run template named, pipelines-as-code-template-default for the console to use.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code supports Tekton Pipelines 0.44.0 minimal status.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code supports Tekton v1 API, which means Pipelines as Code is now compatible with Tekton v0.44 and later.
  • With this update, you can configure custom console dashboards in addition to configuring a console for OpenShift and Tekton dashboards for k8s.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code detects the installation of a GitHub application initiated using the tkn pac create repo command and does not require a GitHub webhook if it was installed globally.
  • Before this update, if there was an error on a PipelineRun execution and not on the tasks attached to PipelineRun, Pipelines as Code would not report the failure properly. With this update, Pipelines as Code reports the error properly on the GitHub checks when a PipelineRun could not be created.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code includes a target_namespace variable, which expands to the currently running namespace where the PipelineRun is executed.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code lets you bypass GitHub enterprise questions in the CLI bootstrap GitHub application.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code does not report errors when the repository CR was not found.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code reports an error if multiple pipeline runs with the same name were found.

4.1.3.2. Breaking changes

  • With this update, the prior version of the tkn command is not compatible with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.10.
  • This update removes support for Cluster and CloudEvent pipeline resources from Tekton CLI. You cannot create pipeline resources by using the tkn pipelineresource create command. Also, pipeline resources are no longer supported in the start command of a task, cluster task, or pipeline.
  • This update removes tekton as a provenance format from Tekton Chains.

4.1.3.3. Deprecated and removed features

  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.10, the ClusterTask commands are now deprecated and are planned to be removed in a future release. The tkn task create command is also deprecated with this update.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.10, the flags -i and -o that were used with the tkn task start command are now deprecated because the v1 API does not support pipeline resources.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.10, the flag -r that was used with the tkn pipeline start command is deprecated because the v1 API does not support pipeline resources.
  • The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.10 update sets the openshiftDefaultEmbeddedStatus parameter to both with full and minimal embedded status. The flag to change the default embedded status is also deprecated and will be removed. In addition, the pipeline default embedded status will be changed to minimal in a future release.

4.1.3.4. Known issues

  • This update includes the following backward incompatible changes:

    • Removal of the PipelineResources cluster
    • Removal of the PipelineResources cloud event
  • If the pipelines metrics feature does not work after a cluster upgrade, run the following command as a workaround:

    $ oc get tektoninstallersets.operator.tekton.dev | awk '/pipeline-main-static/ {print $1}' | xargs oc delete tektoninstallersets
  • With this update, usage of external databases, such as the Crunchy PostgreSQL is not supported on IBM Power, IBM Z, and {linuxoneProductName}. Instead, use the default Tekton Hub database.

4.1.3.5. Fixed issues

  • Before this update, the opc pac command generated a runtime error instead of showing any help. This update fixes the opc pac command to show the help message.
  • Before this update, running the tkn pac create repo command needed the webhook details for creating a repository. With this update, the tkn-pac create repo command does not configure a webhook when your GitHub application is installed.
  • Before this update, Pipelines as Code would not report a pipeline run creation error when Tekton Pipelines had issues creating the PipelineRun resource. For example, a non-existing task in a pipeline run would show no status. With this update, Pipelines as Code shows the proper error message coming from Tekton Pipelines along with the task that is missing.
  • This update fixes UI page redirection after a successful authentication. Now, you are redirected to the same page where you had attempted to log in to Tekton Hub.
  • This update fixes the list command with these flags, --all-namespaces and --output=yaml, for a cluster task, an individual task, and a pipeline.
  • This update removes the forward slash in the end of the repo.spec.url URL so that it matches the URL coming from GitHub.
  • Before this update, the marshalJSON function would not marshal a list of objects. With this update, the marshalJSON function marshals the list of objects.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code lets you bypass GitHub enterprise questions in the CLI bootstrap GitHub application.
  • This update fixes the GitHub collaborator check when your repository has more than 100 users.
  • With this update, the sign and verify commands for a task or pipeline now work without a kubernetes configuration file.
  • With this update, Tekton Operator cleans leftover pruner cron jobs if pruner has been skipped on a namespace.
  • Before this update, the API ConfigMap object would not be updated with a user configured value for a catalog refresh interval. This update fixes the CATALOG_REFRESH_INTERVAL API in the Tekon Hub CR.
  • This update fixes reconciling of PipelineRunStatus when changing the EmbeddedStatus feature flag. This update resets the following parameters:

    • The status.runs and status.taskruns parameters to nil with minimal EmbeddedStatus
    • The status.childReferences parameter to nil with full EmbeddedStatus
  • This update adds a conversion configuration to the ResolutionRequest CRD. This update properly configures conversion from the v1alpha1.ResolutionRequest request to the v1beta1.ResolutionRequest request.
  • This update checks for duplicate workspaces associated with a pipeline task.
  • This update fixes the default value for enabling resolvers in the code.
  • This update fixes TaskRef and PipelineRef names conversion by using a resolver.

4.1.3.6. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.10.1

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.10.1 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.3.6.1. Fixed issues for Pipelines as Code
  • Before this update, if the source branch information coming from payload included refs/heads/ but the user-configured target branch only included the branch name, main, in a CEL expression, the push request would fail. With this update, Pipelines as Code passes the push request and triggers a pipeline if either the base branch or target branch has refs/heads/ in the payload.
  • Before this update, when a PipelineRun object could not be created, the error received from the Tekton controller was not reported to the user. With this update, Pipelines as Code reports the error messages to the GitHub interface so that users can troubleshoot the errors. Pipelines as Code also reports the errors that occurred during pipeline execution.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code does not echo a secret to the GitHub checks interface when it failed to create the secret on the OpenShift Container Platform cluster because of an infrastructure issue.
  • This update removes the deprecated APIs that are no longer in use from Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines.

4.1.3.7. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.10.2

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.10.2 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.3.7.1. Fixed issues

Before this update, an issue in the Tekton Operator prevented the user from setting the value of the enable-api-fields flag to beta. This update fixes the issue. Now, you can set the value of the enable-api-fields flag to beta in the TektonConfig CR.

4.1.3.8. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.10.3

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.10.3 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.3.8.1. Fixed issues

Before this update, the Tekton Operator did not expose the performance configuration fields for any customizations. With this update, as a cluster administrator, you can customize the following performance configuration fields in the TektonConfig CR based on your needs:

  • disable-ha
  • buckets
  • kube-api-qps
  • kube-api-burst
  • threads-per-controller

4.1.3.9. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.10.4

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.10.4 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.3.9.1. Fixed issues
  • This update fixes the bundle resolver conversion issue for the PipelineRef field in a pipeline run. Now, the conversion feature sets the value of the kind field to Pipeline after conversion.
  • Before this update, the pipelinerun.timeouts field was reset to the timeouts.pipeline value, ignoring the timeouts.tasks and timeouts.finally values. This update fixes the issue and sets the correct default timeout value for a PipelineRun resource.
  • Before this update, the controller logs contained unnecessary data. This update fixes the issue.

4.1.3.10. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.10.5

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.10.5 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.10 in addition to 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

Important

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.10.5 is only available in the pipelines-1.10 channel on OpenShift Container Platform 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13. It is not available in the latest channel for any OpenShift Container Platform version.

4.1.3.10.1. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, huge pipeline runs were not getting listed or deleted using the oc and tkn commands. This update mitigates this issue by compressing the huge annotations that were causing this problem. Remember that if the pipeline runs are still too huge after compression, then the same error still recurs.
  • Before this update, only the pod template specified in the pipelineRun.spec.taskRunSpecs[].podTemplate object would be considered for a pipeline run. With this update, the pod template specified in the pipelineRun.spec.podTemplate object is also considered and merged with the template specified in the pipelineRun.spec.taskRunSpecs[].podTemplate object.

4.1.4. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.9

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.9 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.4.1. New features

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.9.

4.1.4.1.1. Pipelines
  • With this update, you can specify pipeline parameters and results in arrays and object dictionary forms.
  • This update provides support for Container Storage Interface (CSI) and projected volumes for your workspace.
  • With this update, you can specify the stdoutConfig and stderrConfig parameters when defining pipeline steps. Defining these parameters helps to capture standard output and standard error, associated with steps, to local files.
  • With this update, you can add variables in the steps[].onError event handler, for example, $(params.CONTINUE).
  • With this update, you can use the output from the finally task in the PipelineResults definition. For example, $(finally.<pipelinetask-name>.result.<result-name>), where <pipelinetask-name> denotes the pipeline task name and <result-name> denotes the result name.
  • This update supports task-level resource requirements for a task run.
  • With this update, you do not need to recreate parameters that are shared, based on their names, between a pipeline and the defined tasks. This update is part of a developer preview feature.
  • This update adds support for remote resolution, such as built-in git, cluster, bundle, and hub resolvers.
4.1.4.1.2. Triggers
  • This update adds the Interceptor CRD to define NamespacedInterceptor. You can use NamespacedInterceptor in the kind section of interceptors reference in triggers or in the EventListener specification.
  • This update enables CloudEvents.
  • With this update, you can configure the webhook port number when defining a trigger.
  • This update supports using trigger eventID as input to TriggerBinding.
  • This update supports validation and rotation of certificates for the ClusterInterceptor server. 

    • Triggers perform certificate validation for core interceptors and rotate a new certificate to ClusterInterceptor when its certificate expires.
4.1.4.1.3. CLI 
  • This update supports showing annotations in the describe command.
  • This update supports showing pipeline, tasks, and timeout in the pr describe command.
  • This update adds flags to provide pipeline, tasks, and timeout in the pipeline start command.
  • This update supports showing the presence of workspace, optional or mandatory, in the describe command of a task and pipeline.
  • This update adds the timestamps flag to show logs with a timestamp.
  • This update adds a new flag --ignore-running-pipelinerun, which ignores the deletion of TaskRun associated with PipelineRun.
  • This update adds support for experimental commands. This update also adds experimental subcommands, sign and verify to the tkn CLI tool.
  • This update makes the Z shell (Zsh) completion feature usable without generating any files.
  • This update introduces a new CLI tool called opc. It is anticipated that an upcoming release will replace the tkn CLI tool with opc.

    Important
    • The new CLI tool opc is a Technology Preview feature.
    • opc will be a replacement for tkn with additional Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines specific features, which do not necessarily fit in tkn.
4.1.4.1.4. Operator
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code is installed by default. You can disable Pipelines as Code by using the -p flag:

    $ oc patch tektonconfig config --type="merge" -p '{"spec": {"platforms": {"openshift":{"pipelinesAsCode": {"enable": false}}}}}'
  • With this update, you can also modify Pipelines as Code configurations in the TektonConfig CRD.
  • With this update, if you disable the developer perspective, the Operator does not install developer console related custom resources.
  • This update includes ClusterTriggerBinding support for Bitbucket Server and Bitbucket Cloud and helps you to reuse a TriggerBinding across your entire cluster.
4.1.4.1.5. Resolvers
Important

Resolvers is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • With this update, you can configure pipeline resolvers in the TektonConfig CRD. You can enable or disable these pipeline resolvers:  enable-bundles-resolver, enable-cluster-resolver, enable-git-resolver, and enable-hub-resolver.

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: TektonConfig
    metadata:
      name: config
    spec:
      pipeline:
        enable-bundles-resolver: true
        enable-cluster-resolver: true
        enable-git-resolver: true
        enable-hub-resolver: true
    ...

    You can also provide resolver specific configurations in TektonConfig. For example, you can define the following fields in the map[string]string format to set configurations for individual resolvers:

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: TektonConfig
    metadata:
      name: config
    spec:
      pipeline:
        bundles-resolver-config:
          default-service-account: pipelines
        cluster-resolver-config:
          default-namespace: test
        git-resolver-config:
          server-url: localhost.com
        hub-resolver-config:
          default-tekton-hub-catalog: tekton
    ...
4.1.4.1.6. Tekton Chains
Important

Tekton Chains is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • Before this update, only Open Container Initiative (OCI) images were supported as outputs of TaskRun in the in-toto provenance agent. This update adds in-toto provenance metadata as outputs with these suffixes, ARTIFACT_URI and ARTIFACT_DIGEST.
  • Before this update, only TaskRun attestations were supported. This update adds support for PipelineRun attestations as well.
  • This update adds support for Tekton Chains to get the imgPullSecret parameter from the pod template. This update helps you to configure repository authentication based on each pipeline run or task run without modifying the service account.
4.1.4.1.7. Tekton Hub
Important

Tekton Hub is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • With this update, as an administrator, you can use an external database, such as Crunchy PostgreSQL with Tekton Hub, instead of using the default Tekton Hub database. This update helps you to perform the following actions:

    • Specify the coordinates of an external database to be used with Tekton Hub
    • Disable the default Tekton Hub database deployed by the Operator
  • This update removes the dependency of config.yaml from external Git repositories and moves the complete configuration data into the API ConfigMap. This update helps an administrator to perform the following actions:

    • Add the configuration data, such as categories, catalogs, scopes, and defaultScopes in the Tekton Hub custom resource.
    • Modify Tekton Hub configuration data on the cluster. All modifications are preserved upon Operator upgrades.
    • Update the list of catalogs for Tekton Hub
    • Change the categories for Tekton Hub

      Note

      If you do not add any configuration data, you can use the default data in the API ConfigMap for Tekton Hub configurations.

4.1.4.1.8. Pipelines as Code
  • This update adds support for concurrency limit in the Repository CRD to define the maximum number of PipelineRuns running for a repository at a time. The PipelineRuns from a pull request or a push event are queued in alphabetical order.
  • This update adds a new command tkn pac logs for showing the logs of the latest pipeline run for a repository.
  • This update supports advanced event matching on file path for push and pull requests to GitHub and GitLab. For example, you can use the Common Expression Language (CEL) to run a pipeline only if a path has changed for any markdown file in the docs directory.

      ...
      annotations:
         pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-cel-expression: |
          event == "pull_request" && "docs/*.md".pathChanged()
  • With this update, you can reference a remote pipeline in the pipelineRef: object using annotations.
  • With this update, you can auto-configure new GitHub repositories with Pipelines as Code, which sets up a namespace and creates a Repository CRD for your GitHub repository.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code generates metrics for PipelineRuns with provider information.
  • This update provides the following enhancements for the tkn-pac plugin:

    • Detects running pipelines correctly
    • Fixes showing duration when there is no failure completion time
    • Shows an error snippet and highlights the error regular expression pattern in the tkn-pac describe command
    • Adds the use-real-time switch to the tkn-pac ls and tkn-pac describe commands
    • Imports the tkn-pac logs documentation
    • Shows pipelineruntimeout as a failure in the tkn-pac ls and tkn-pac describe commands.
    • Show a specific pipeline run failure with the --target-pipelinerun option.
  • With this update, you can view the errors for your pipeline run in the form of a version control system (VCS) comment or a small snippet in the GitHub checks.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code optionally can detect errors inside the tasks if they are of a simple format and add those tasks as annotations in GitHub. This update is part of a developer preview feature.
  • This update adds the following new commands:

    • tkn-pac webhook add: Adds a webhook to project repository settings and updates the webhook.secret key in the existing k8s Secret object without updating the repository.
    • tkn-pac webhook update-token: Updates provider token for an existing k8s Secret object without updating the repository.
  • This update enhances functionality of the tkn-pac create repo command, which creates and configures webhooks for GitHub, GitLab, and BitbucketCloud along with creating repositories.
  • With this update, the tkn-pac describe command shows the latest fifty events in a sorted order.
  • This update adds the --last option to the tkn-pac logs command.
  • With this update, the tkn-pac resolve command prompts for a token on detecting a git_auth_secret in the file template.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code hides secrets from log snippets to avoid exposing secrets in the GitHub interface.
  • With this update, the secrets automatically generated for git_auth_secret are an owner reference with PipelineRun. The secrets get cleaned with the PipelineRun, not after the pipeline run execution.
  • This update adds support to cancel a pipeline run with the /cancel comment.
  • Before this update, the GitHub apps token scoping was not defined and tokens would be used on every repository installation. With this update, you can scope the GitHub apps token to the target repository using the following parameters:

    • secret-github-app-token-scoped: Scopes the app token to the target repository, not to every repository the app installation has access to.
    • secret-github-app-scope-extra-repos: Customizes the scoping of the app token with an additional owner or repository.
  • With this update, you can use Pipelines as Code with your own Git repositories that are hosted on GitLab.
  • With this update, you can access pipeline execution details in the form of kubernetes events in your namespace. These details help you to troubleshoot pipeline errors without needing access to admin namespaces.
  • This update supports authentication of URLs in the Pipelines as Code resolver with the Git provider.
  • With this update, you can set the name of the hub catalog by using a setting in the pipelines-as-code config map.
  • With this update, you can set the maximum and default limits for the max-keep-run parameter.
  • This update adds documents on how to inject custom Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificates in Pipelines as Code to let you connect to provider instance with custom certificates.
  • With this update, the PipelineRun resource definition has the log URL included as an annotation. For example, the tkn-pac describe command shows the log link when describing a PipelineRun.
  • With this update, tkn-pac logs show repository name, instead of PipelineRun name.

4.1.4.2. Breaking changes

  • With this update, the Conditions custom resource definition (CRD) type has been removed. As an alternative, use the WhenExpressions instead.
  • With this update, support for tekton.dev/v1alpha1 API pipeline resources, such as Pipeline, PipelineRun, Task, Clustertask, and TaskRun has been removed.
  • With this update, the tkn-pac setup command has been removed. Instead, use the tkn-pac webhook add command to re-add a webhook to an existing Git repository. And use the tkn-pac webhook update-token command to update the personal provider access token for an existing Secret object in the Git repository.
  • With this update, a namespace that runs a pipeline with default settings does not apply the pod-security.kubernetes.io/enforce:privileged label to a workload.

4.1.4.3. Deprecated and removed features

  • In the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.9.0 release, ClusterTasks are deprecated and planned to be removed in a future release. As an alternative, you can use Cluster Resolver.
  • In the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.9.0 release, the use of the triggers and the namespaceSelector fields in a single EventListener specification is deprecated and planned to be removed in a future release. You can use these fields in different EventListener specifications successfully.
  • In the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.9.0 release, the tkn pipelinerun describe command does not display timeouts for the PipelineRun resource.
  • In the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.9.0 release, the PipelineResource` custom resource (CR) is deprecated. The PipelineResource CR was a Tech Preview feature and part of the tekton.dev/v1alpha1 API.
  • In the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.9.0 release, custom image parameters from cluster tasks are deprecated. As an alternative, you can copy a cluster task and use your custom image in it.

4.1.4.4. Known issues

  • The chains-secret and chains-config config maps are removed after you uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. As they contain user data, they should be preserved and not deleted.
  • When running the tkn pac set of commands on Windows, you may receive the following error message: Command finished with error: not supported by Windows.

    Workaround: Set the NO_COLOR environment variable to true.

  • Running the tkn pac resolve -f <filename> | oc create -f command may not provide expected results, if the tkn pac resolve command uses a templated parameter value to function.

    Workaround: To mitigate this issue, save the output of tkn pac resolve in a temporary file by running the tkn pac resolve -f <filename> -o tempfile.yaml command and then run the oc create -f tempfile.yaml command. For example, tkn pac resolve -f <filename> -o /tmp/pull-request-resolved.yaml && oc create -f /tmp/pull-request-resolved.yaml.

4.1.4.5. Fixed issues

  • Before this update, after replacing an empty array, the original array returned an empty string rendering the paramaters inside it invalid. With this update, this issue is resolved and the original array returns as empty.
  • Before this update, if duplicate secrets were present in a service account for a pipelines run, it resulted in failure in task pod creation. With this update, this issue is resolved and the task pod is created successfully even if duplicate secrets are present in a service account.
  • Before this update, by looking at the TaskRun’s spec.StatusMessage field, users could not distinguish whether the TaskRun had been cancelled by the user or by a PipelineRun that was part of it. With this update, this issue is resolved and users can distinguish the status of the TaskRun by looking at the TaskRun’s spec.StatusMessage field.
  • Before this update, webhook validation was removed on deletion of old versions of invalid objects. With this update, this issue is resolved.
  • Before this update, if you set the timeouts.pipeline parameter to 0, you could not set the timeouts.tasks parameter or the timeouts.finally parameters. This update resolves the issue. Now, when you set the timeouts.pipeline parameter value, you can set the value of either the`timeouts.tasks` parameter or the timeouts.finally parameter. For example:

    yaml
    kind: PipelineRun
    spec:
      timeouts:
        pipeline: "0"  # No timeout
        tasks: "0h3m0s"
  • Before this update, a race condition could occur if another tool updated labels or annotations on a PipelineRun or TaskRun. With this update, this issue is resolved and you can merge labels or annotations.
  • Before this update, log keys did not have the same keys as in pipelines controllers. With this update, this issue has been resolved and the log keys have been updated to match the log stream of pipeline controllers. The keys in logs have been changed from "ts" to "timestamp", from "level" to "severity", and from "message" to "msg".
  • Before this update, if a PipelineRun was deleted with an unknown status, an error message was not generated. With this update, this issue is resolved and an error message is generated.
  • Before this update, to access bundle commands like list and push, it was required to use the kubeconfig file . With this update, this issue has been resolved and the kubeconfig file is not required to access bundle commands.
  • Before this update, if the parent PipelineRun was running while deleting TaskRuns, then TaskRuns would be deleted. With this update, this issue is resolved and TaskRuns are not getting deleted if the parent PipelineRun is running.
  • Before this update, if the user attempted to build a bundle with more objects than the pipeline controller permitted, the Tekton CLI did not display an error message. With this update, this issue is resolved and the Tekton CLI displays an error message if the user attempts to build a bundle with more objects than the limit permitted in the pipeline controller.
  • Before this update, if namespaces were removed from the cluster, then the operator did not remove namespaces from the ClusterInterceptor ClusterRoleBinding subjects. With this update, this issue has been resolved, and the operator removes the namespaces from the ClusterInterceptor ClusterRoleBinding subjects.
  • Before this update, the default installation of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator resulted in the pipelines-scc-rolebinding security context constraint (SCC) role binding resource remaining in the cluster. With this update, the default installation of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator results in the pipelines-scc-rolebinding security context constraint (SCC) role binding resource resource being removed from the cluster.
  • Before this update, Pipelines as Code did not get updated values from the Pipelines as Code ConfigMap object. With this update, this issue is fixed and the Pipelines as Code ConfigMap object looks for any new changes.
  • Before this update, Pipelines as Code controller did not wait for the tekton.dev/pipeline label to be updated and added the checkrun id label, which would cause race conditions. With this update, the Pipelines as Code controller waits for the tekton.dev/pipeline label to be updated and then adds the checkrun id label, which helps to avoid race conditions.
  • Before this update, the tkn-pac create repo command did not override a PipelineRun if it already existed in the git repository. With this update, tkn-pac create command is fixed to override a PipelineRun if it exists in the git repository and this resolves the issue successfully.
  • Before this update, the tkn pac describe command did not display reasons for every message. With this update, this issue is fixed and the tkn pac describe command displays reasons for every message.
  • Before this update, a pull request failed if the user in the annotation provided values by using a regex form, for example, refs/head/rel-*. The pull request failed because it was missing refs/heads in its base branch. With this update, the prefix is added and checked that it matches. This resolves the issue and the pull request is successful.

4.1.4.6. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.9.1

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.9.1 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.4.7. Fixed issues

  • Before this update, the tkn pac repo list command did not run on Microsoft Windows. This update fixes the issue, and now you can run the tkn pac repo list command on Microsoft Windows.
  • Before this update, Pipelines as Code watcher did not receive all the configuration change events. With this update, the Pipelines as Code watcher is updated, and now the Pipelines as Code watcher does not miss the configuration change events.
  • Before this update, the pods created by Pipelines as Code, such as TaskRuns or PipelineRuns could not access custom certificates exposed by the user in the cluster. This update fixes the issue, and you can now access custom certificates from the TaskRuns or PipelineRuns pods in the cluster.
  • Before this update, on a cluster enabled with FIPS, the tekton-triggers-core-interceptors core interceptor used in the Trigger resource did not function after the Pipelines Operator was upgraded to version 1.9. This update resolves the issue. Now, OpenShift uses MInTLS 1.2 for all its components. As a result, the tekton-triggers-core-interceptors core interceptor updates to TLS version 1.2and its functionality runs accurately.
  • Before this update, when using a pipeline run with an internal OpenShift image registry, the URL to the image had to be hardcoded in the pipeline run definition. For example:

    ...
      - name: IMAGE_NAME
        value: 'image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/<test_namespace>/<test_pipelinerun>'
    ...

    When using a pipeline run in the context of Pipelines as Code, such hardcoded values prevented the pipeline run definitions from being used in different clusters and namespaces.

    With this update, you can use the dynamic template variables instead of hardcoding the values for namespaces and pipeline run names to generalize pipeline run definitions. For example:

    ...
      - name: IMAGE_NAME
        value: 'image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/{{ target_namespace }}/$(context.pipelineRun.name)'
    ...
  • Before this update, Pipelines as Code used the same GitHub token to fetch a remote task available in the same host only on the default GitHub branch. This update resolves the issue. Now Pipelines as Code uses the same GitHub token to fetch a remote task from any GitHub branch.

4.1.4.8. Known issues

  • The value for CATALOG_REFRESH_INTERVAL, a field in the Hub API ConfigMap object used in the Tekton Hub CR, is not getting updated with a custom value provided by the user.

    Workaround: None. You can track the issue SRVKP-2854.

4.1.4.9. Breaking changes

  • With this update, an OLM misconfiguration issue has been introduced, which prevents the upgrade of the OpenShift Container Platform. This issue will be fixed in a future release.

4.1.4.10. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.9.2

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.9.2 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.4.11. Fixed issues

  • Before this update, an OLM misconfiguration issue had been introduced in the previous version of the release, which prevented the upgrade of OpenShift Container Platform. With this update, this misconfiguration issue has been fixed.

4.1.4.12. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.9.3

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.9.3 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.10 in addition to 4.11, 4.12, and 4.13.

4.1.4.13. Fixed issues

  • This update fixes the performance issues for huge pipelines. Now, the CPU usage is reduced by 61% and the memory usage is reduced by 44%.
  • Before this update, a pipeline run would fail if a task did not run because of its when expression. This update fixes the issue by preventing the validation of a skipped task result in pipeline results. Now, the pipeline result is not emitted and the pipeline run does not fail because of a missing result.
  • This update fixes the pipelineref.bundle conversion to the bundle resolver for the v1beta1 API. Now, the conversion feature sets the value of the kind field to Pipeline after conversion.
  • Before this update, an issue in the Pipelines Operator prevented the user from setting the value of the spec.pipeline.enable-api-fields field to beta. This update fixes the issue. Now, you can set the value to beta along with alpha and stable in the TektonConfig custom resource.
  • Before this update, when Pipelines as Code could not create a secret due to a cluster error, it would show the temporary token on the GitHub check run, which is public. This update fixes the issue. Now, the token is no longer displayed on the GitHub checks interface when the creation of the secret fails.

4.1.4.14. Known issues

  • There is currently a known issue with the stop option for pipeline runs in the OpenShift Container Platform web console. The stop option in the Actions drop-down list is not working as expected and does not cancel the pipeline run.
  • There is currently a known issue with upgrading to Pipelines version 1.9.x due to a failing custom resource definition conversion.

    Workaround: Before upgrading to Pipelines version 1.9.x, perform the step mentioned in the solution on the Red Hat Customer Portal.

4.1.5. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.8

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.8 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.10, 4.11, and 4.12.

4.1.5.1. New features

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8.

4.1.5.1.1. Pipelines
  • With this update, you can run Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines GA 1.8 and later on an OpenShift Container Platform cluster that is running on ARM hardware. This includes support for ClusterTask resources and the tkn CLI tool.
Important

Running Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines on ARM hardware is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • This update implements Step and Sidecar overrides for TaskRun resources.
  • This update adds minimal TaskRun and Run statuses within PipelineRun statuses.

    To enable this feature, in the TektonConfig custom resource definition, in the pipeline section, you must set the enable-api-fields field to alpha.

  • With this update, the graceful termination of pipeline runs feature is promoted from an alpha feature to a stable feature. As a result, the previously deprecated PipelineRunCancelled status remains deprecated and is planned to be removed in a future release.

    Because this feature is available by default, you no longer need to set the pipeline.enable-api-fields field to alpha in the TektonConfig custom resource definition.

  • With this update, you can specify the workspace for a pipeline task by using the name of the workspace. This change makes it easier to specify a shared workspace for a pair of Pipeline and PipelineTask resources. You can also continue to map workspaces explicitly.

    To enable this feature, in the TektonConfig custom resource definition, in the pipeline section, you must set the enable-api-fields field to alpha.

  • With this update, parameters in embedded specifications are propagated without mutations.
  • With this update, you can specify the required metadata of a Task resource referenced by a PipelineRun resource by using annotations and labels. This way, Task metadata that depends on the execution context is available during the pipeline run.
  • This update adds support for object or dictionary types in params and results values. This change affects backward compatibility and sometimes breaks forward compatibility, such as using an earlier client with a later Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines version. This update changes the ArrayOrStruct structure, which affects projects that use the Go language API as a library.
  • This update adds a SkippingReason value to the SkippedTasks field of the PipelineRun status fields so that users know why a given PipelineTask was skipped.
  • This update supports an alpha feature in which you can use an array type for emitting results from a Task object. The result type is changed from string to ArrayOrString. For example, a task can specify a type to produce an array result:

    kind: Task
    apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
    metadata:
      name: write-array
      annotations:
        description: |
          A simple task that writes array
    spec:
      results:
        - name: array-results
          type: array
          description: The array results
    ...

    Additionally, you can run a task script to populate the results with an array:

    $ echo -n "[\"hello\",\"world\"]" | tee $(results.array-results.path)

    To enable this feature, in the TektonConfig custom resource definition, in the pipeline section, you must set the enable-api-fields field to alpha.

    This feature is in progress and is part of TEP-0076.

4.1.5.1.2. Triggers
  • This update transitions the TriggerGroups field in the EventListener specification from an alpha feature to a stable feature. Using this field, you can specify a set of interceptors before selecting and running a group of triggers.

    Because this feature is available by default, you no longer need to set the pipeline.enable-api-fields field to alpha in the TektonConfig custom resource definition.

  • With this update, the Trigger resource supports end-to-end secure connections by running the ClusterInterceptor server using HTTPS.
4.1.5.1.3. CLI
  • With this update, you can use the tkn taskrun export command to export a live task run from a cluster to a YAML file, which you can use to import the task run to another cluster.
  • With this update, you can add the -o name flag to the tkn pipeline start command to print the name of the pipeline run right after it starts.
  • This update adds a list of available plug-ins to the output of the tkn --help command.
  • With this update, while deleting a pipeline run or task run, you can use both the --keep and --keep-since flags together.
  • With this update, you can use Cancelled as the value of the spec.status field rather than the deprecated PipelineRunCancelled value.
4.1.5.1.4. Operator
  • With this update, as an administrator, you can configure your local Tekton Hub instance to use a custom database rather than the default database.
  • With this update, as a cluster administrator, if you enable your local Tekton Hub instance, it periodically refreshes the database so that changes in the catalog appear in the Tekton Hub web console. You can adjust the period between refreshes.

    Previously, to add the tasks and pipelines in the catalog to the database, you performed that task manually or set up a cron job to do it for you.

  • With this update, you can install and run a Tekton Hub instance with minimal configuration. This way, you can start working with your teams to decide which additional customizations they might want.
  • This update adds GIT_SSL_CAINFO to the git-clone task so you can clone secured repositories.
4.1.5.1.5. Tekton Chains
Important

Tekton Chains is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • With this update, you can log in to a vault by using OIDC rather than a static token. This change means that Spire can generate the OIDC credential so that only trusted workloads are allowed to log in to the vault. Additionally, you can pass the vault address as a configuration value rather than inject it as an environment variable.
  • The chains-config config map for Tekton Chains in the openshift-pipelines namespace is automatically reset to default after upgrading the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator because directly updating the config map is not supported when installed by using the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. However, with this update, you can configure Tekton Chains by using the TektonChain custom resource. This feature enables your configuration to persist after upgrading, unlike the chains-config config map, which gets overwritten during upgrades.
4.1.5.1.6. Tekton Hub
Important

Tekton Hub is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • With this update, if you install a fresh instance of Tekton Hub by using the Operator, the Tekton Hub login is disabled by default. To enable the login and rating features, you must create the Hub API secret while installing Tekton Hub.

    Note

    Because Tekton Hub login was enabled by default in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7, if you upgrade the Operator, the login is enabled by default in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8. To disable this login, see Disabling Tekton Hub login after upgrading from OpenShift Pipelines 1.7.x -→ 1.8.x

  • With this update, as an administrator, you can configure your local Tekton Hub instance to use a custom PostgreSQL 13 database rather than the default database. To do so, create a Secret resource named tekton-hub-db. For example:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Secret
    metadata:
      name: tekton-hub-db
      labels:
        app: tekton-hub-db
    type: Opaque
    stringData:
      POSTGRES_HOST: <hostname>
      POSTGRES_DB: <database_name>
      POSTGRES_USER: <username>
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: <password>
      POSTGRES_PORT: <listening_port_number>
  • With this update, you no longer need to log in to the Tekton Hub web console to add resources from the catalog to the database. Now, these resources are automatically added when the Tekton Hub API starts running for the first time.
  • This update automatically refreshes the catalog every 30 minutes by calling the catalog refresh API job. This interval is user-configurable.
4.1.5.1.7. Pipelines as Code
Important

Pipelines as Code (PAC) is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

  • With this update, as a developer, you get a notification from the tkn-pac CLI tool if you try to add a duplicate repository to a Pipelines as Code run. When you enter tkn pac create repository, each repository must have a unique URL. This notification also helps prevent hijacking exploits.
  • With this update, as a developer, you can use the new tkn-pac setup cli command to add a Git repository to Pipelines as Code by using the webhook mechanism. This way, you can use Pipelines as Code even when using GitHub Apps is not feasible. This capability includes support for repositories on GitHub, GitLab, and BitBucket.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code supports GitLab integration with features such as the following:

    • ACL (Access Control List) on project or group
    • /ok-to-test support from allowed users
    • /retest support.
  • With this update, you can perform advanced pipeline filtering with Common Expression Language (CEL). With CEL, you can match pipeline runs with different Git provider events by using annotations in the PipelineRun resource. For example:

      ...
      annotations:
         pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-cel-expression: |
          event == "pull_request" && target_branch == "main" && source_branch == "wip"
  • Previously, as a developer, you could have only one pipeline run in your .tekton directory for each Git event, such as a pull request. With this update, you can have multiple pipeline runs in your .tekton directory. The web console displays the status and reports of the runs. The pipeline runs operate in parallel and report back to the Git provider interface.
  • With this update, you can test or retest a pipeline run by commenting /test or /retest on a pull request. You can also specify the pipeline run by name. For example, you can enter /test <pipelinerun_name> or /retest <pipelinerun-name>.
  • With this update, you can delete a repository custom resource and its associated secrets by using the new tkn-pac delete repository command.

4.1.5.2. Breaking changes

  • This update changes the default metrics level of TaskRun and PipelineRun resources to the following values:

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ConfigMap
    metadata:
      name: config-observability
      namespace: tekton-pipelines
      labels:
        app.kubernetes.io/instance: default
        app.kubernetes.io/part-of: tekton-pipelines
    data:
      _example: |
      ...
        metrics.taskrun.level: "task"
        metrics.taskrun.duration-type: "histogram"
        metrics.pipelinerun.level: "pipeline"
        metrics.pipelinerun.duration-type: "histogram"
  • With this update, if an annotation or label is present in both Pipeline and PipelineRun resources, the value in the Run type takes precedence. The same is true if an annotation or label is present in Task and TaskRun resources.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the previously deprecated PipelineRun.Spec.ServiceAccountNames field has been removed. Use the PipelineRun.Spec.TaskRunSpecs field instead.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the previously deprecated TaskRun.Status.ResourceResults.ResourceRef field has been removed. Use the TaskRun.Status.ResourceResults.ResourceName field instead.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the previously deprecated Conditions resource type has been removed. Remove the Conditions resource from Pipeline resource definitions that include it. Use when expressions in PipelineRun definitions instead.
  • For Tekton Chains, the tekton-provenance format has been removed in this release. Use the in-toto format by setting "artifacts.taskrun.format": "in-toto" in the TektonChain custom resource instead.
  • Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7.x shipped with Pipelines as Code 0.5.x. The current update ships with Pipelines as Code 0.10.x. This change creates a new route in the openshift-pipelines namespace for the new controller. You must update this route in GitHub Apps or webhooks that use Pipelines as Code. To fetch the route, use the following command:

    $ oc get route -n openshift-pipelines pipelines-as-code-controller \
      --template='https://{{ .spec.host }}'
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code renames the default secret keys for the Repository custom resource definition (CRD). In your CRD, replace token with provider.token, and replace secret with webhook.secret.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code replaces a special template variable with one that supports multiple pipeline runs for private repositories. In your pipeline runs, replace secret: pac-git-basic-auth-{{repo_owner}}-{{repo_name}} with secret: {{ git_auth_secret }}.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code updates the following commands in the tkn-pac CLI tool:

    • Replace tkn pac repository create with tkn pac create repository.
    • Replace tkn pac repository delete with tkn pac delete repository.
    • Replace tkn pac repository list with tkn pac list.

4.1.5.3. Deprecated and removed features

  • Starting with OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, the preview and stable channels for installing and upgrading the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator are removed. To install and upgrade the Operator, use the appropriate pipelines-<version> channel, or the latest channel for the most recent stable version. For example, to install the Pipelines Operator version 1.8.x, use the pipelines-1.8 channel.

    Note

    In OpenShift Container Platform 4.10 and earlier versions, you can use the preview and stable channels for installing and upgrading the Operator.

  • Support for the tekton.dev/v1alpha1 API version, which was deprecated in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines GA 1.6, is planned to be removed in the upcoming Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines GA 1.9 release.

    This change affects the pipeline component, which includes the TaskRun, PipelineRun, Task, Pipeline, and similar tekton.dev/v1alpha1 resources. As an alternative, update existing resources to use apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1 as described in Migrating From Tekton v1alpha1 to Tekton v1beta1.

    Bug fixes and support for the tekton.dev/v1alpha1 API version are provided only through the end of the current GA 1.8 lifecycle.

    Important

    For the Tekton Operator, the operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1 API version is not deprecated. You do not need to make changes to this value.

  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the PipelineResource custom resource (CR) is available but no longer supported. The PipelineResource CR was a Tech Preview feature and part of the tekton.dev/v1alpha1 API, which had been deprecated and planned to be removed in the upcoming Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines GA 1.9 release.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the Condition custom resource (CR) is removed. The Condition CR was part of the tekton.dev/v1alpha1 API, which has been deprecated and is planned to be removed in the upcoming Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines GA 1.9 release.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the gcr.io image for gsutil has been removed. This removal might break clusters with Pipeline resources that depend on this image. Bug fixes and support are provided only through the end of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7 lifecycle.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the PipelineRun.Status.TaskRuns and PipelineRun.Status.Runs fields are deprecated and are planned to be removed in a future release. See TEP-0100: Embedded TaskRuns and Runs Status in PipelineRuns.
  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the pipelineRunCancelled state is deprecated and planned to be removed in a future release. Graceful termination of PipelineRun objects is now promoted from an alpha feature to a stable feature. (See TEP-0058: Graceful Pipeline Run Termination.) As an alternative, you can use the Cancelled state, which replaces the pipelineRunCancelled state.

    You do not need to make changes to your Pipeline and Task resources. If you have tools that cancel pipeline runs, you must update tools in the next release. This change also affects tools such as the CLI, IDE extensions, and so on, so that they support the new PipelineRun statuses.

    Because this feature is available by default, you no longer need to set the pipeline.enable-api-fields field to alpha in the TektonConfig custom resource definition.

  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, the timeout field in PipelineRun has been deprecated. Instead, use the PipelineRun.Timeouts field, which is now promoted from an alpha feature to a stable feature.

    Because this feature is available by default, you no longer need to set the pipeline.enable-api-fields field to alpha in the TektonConfig custom resource definition.

  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.8, init containers are omitted from the LimitRange object’s default request calculations.

4.1.5.4. Known issues

  • The s2i-nodejs pipeline cannot use the nodejs:14-ubi8-minimal image stream to perform source-to-image (S2I) builds. Using that image stream produces an error building at STEP "RUN /usr/libexec/s2i/assemble": exit status 127 message.

    Workaround: Use nodejs:14-ubi8 rather than the nodejs:14-ubi8-minimal image stream.

  • When you run Maven and Jib-Maven cluster tasks, the default container image is supported only on Intel (x86) architecture. Therefore, tasks will fail on ARM, IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) clusters.

    Workaround: Specify a custom image by setting the MAVEN_IMAGE parameter value to maven:3.6.3-adoptopenjdk-11.

    Tip

    Before you install tasks that are based on the Tekton Catalog on ARM, IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) using tkn hub, verify if the task can be executed on these platforms. To check if ppc64le and s390x are listed in the "Platforms" section of the task information, you can run the following command: tkn hub info task <name>

  • On ARM, IBM Power Systems, IBM Z, and LinuxONE, the s2i-dotnet cluster task is unsupported.
  • Implicit parameter mapping incorrectly passes parameters from the top-level Pipeline or PipelineRun definitions to the taskRef tasks. Mapping should only occur from a top-level resource to tasks with in-line taskSpec specifications. This issue only affects clusters where this feature was enabled by setting the enable-api-fields field to alpha in the pipeline section of the TektonConfig custom resource definition.

4.1.5.5. Fixed issues

  • Before this update, the metrics for pipeline runs in the Developer view of the web console were incomplete and outdated. With this update, the issue has been fixed so that the metrics are correct.
  • Before this update, if a pipeline had two parallel tasks that failed and one of them had retries=2, the final tasks never ran, and the pipeline timed out and failed to run. For example, the pipelines-operator-subscription task failed intermittently with the following error message: Unable to connect to the server: EOF. With this update, the issue has been fixed so that the final tasks always run.
  • Before this update, if a pipeline run stopped because a task run failed, other task runs might not complete their retries. As a result, no finally tasks were scheduled, which caused the pipeline to hang. This update resolves the issue. TaskRuns and Run objects can retry when a pipeline run has stopped, even by graceful stopping, so that pipeline runs can complete.
  • This update changes how resource requirements are calculated when one or more LimitRange objects are present in the namespace where a TaskRun object exists. The scheduler now considers step containers and excludes all other app containers, such as sidecar containers, when factoring requests from LimitRange objects.
  • Before this update, under specific conditions, the flag package might incorrectly parse a subcommand immediately following a double dash flag terminator, --. In that case, it ran the entrypoint subcommand rather than the actual command. This update fixes this flag-parsing issue so that the entrypoint runs the correct command.
  • Before this update, the controller might generate multiple panics if pulling an image failed, or its pull status was incomplete. This update fixes the issue by checking the step.ImageID value rather than the status.TaskSpec value.
  • Before this update, canceling a pipeline run that contained an unscheduled custom task produced a PipelineRunCouldntCancel error. This update fixes the issue. You can cancel a pipeline run that contains an unscheduled custom task without producing that error.
  • Before this update, if the <NAME> in $params["<NAME>"] or $params['<NAME>'] contained a dot character (.), any part of the name to the right of the dot was not extracted. For example, from $params["org.ipsum.lorem"], only org was extracted.

    This update fixes the issue so that $params fetches the complete value. For example, $params["org.ipsum.lorem"] and $params['org.ipsum.lorem'] are valid and the entire value of <NAME>, org.ipsum.lorem, is extracted.

    It also throws an error if <NAME> is not enclosed in single or double quotes. For example, $params.org.ipsum.lorem is not valid and generates a validation error.

  • With this update, Trigger resources support custom interceptors and ensure that the port of the custom interceptor service is the same as the port in the ClusterInterceptor definition file.
  • Before this update, the tkn version command for Tekton Chains and Operator components did not work correctly. This update fixes the issue so that the command works correctly and returns version information for those components.
  • Before this update, if you ran a tkn pr delete --ignore-running command and a pipeline run did not have a status.condition value, the tkn CLI tool produced a null-pointer error (NPE). This update fixes the issue so that the CLI tool now generates an error and correctly ignores pipeline runs that are still running.
  • Before this update, if you used the tkn pr delete --keep <value> or tkn tr delete --keep <value> commands, and the number of pipeline runs or task runs was less than the value, the command did not return an error as expected. This update fixes the issue so that the command correctly returns an error under those conditions.
  • Before this update, if you used the tkn pr delete or tkn tr delete commands with the -p or -t flags together with the --ignore-running flag, the commands incorrectly deleted running or pending resources. This update fixes the issue so that these commands correctly ignore running or pending resources.
  • With this update, you can configure Tekton Chains by using the TektonChain custom resource. This feature enables your configuration to persist after upgrading, unlike the chains-config config map, which gets overwritten during upgrades.
  • With this update, ClusterTask resources no longer run as root by default, except for the buildah and s2i cluster tasks.
  • Before this update, tasks on Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7.1 failed when using init as a first argument followed by two or more arguments. With this update, the flags are parsed correctly, and the task runs are successful.
  • Before this update, installation of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator on OpenShift Container Platform 4.9 and 4.10 failed due to an invalid role binding, with the following error message:

    error updating rolebinding openshift-operators-prometheus-k8s-read-binding: RoleBinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io
    "openshift-operators-prometheus-k8s-read-binding" is invalid:
    roleRef: Invalid value: rbac.RoleRef{APIGroup:"rbac.authorization.k8s.io", Kind:"Role", Name:"openshift-operator-read"}: cannot change roleRef

    This update fixes the issue so that the failure no longer occurs.

  • Previously, upgrading the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator caused the pipeline service account to be recreated, which meant that the secrets linked to the service account were lost. This update fixes the issue. During upgrades, the Operator no longer recreates the pipeline service account. As a result, secrets attached to the pipeline service account persist after upgrades, and the resources (tasks and pipelines) continue to work correctly.
  • With this update, Pipelines as Code pods run on infrastructure nodes if infrastructure node settings are configured in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR).
  • Previously, with the resource pruner, each namespace Operator created a command that ran in a separate container. This design consumed too many resources in clusters with a high number of namespaces. For example, to run a single command, a cluster with 1000 namespaces produced 1000 containers in a pod.

    This update fixes the issue. It passes the namespace-based configuration to the job so that all the commands run in one container in a loop.

  • In Tekton Chains, you must define a secret called signing-secrets to hold the key used for signing tasks and images. However, before this update, updating the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator reset or overwrote this secret, and the key was lost. This update fixes the issue. Now, if the secret is configured after installing Tekton Chains through the Operator, the secret persists, and it is not overwritten by upgrades.
  • Before this update, all S2I build tasks failed with an error similar to the following message:

    Error: error writing "0 0 4294967295\n" to /proc/22/uid_map: write /proc/22/uid_map: operation not permitted
    time="2022-03-04T09:47:57Z" level=error msg="error writing \"0 0 4294967295\\n\" to /proc/22/uid_map: write /proc/22/uid_map: operation not permitted"
    time="2022-03-04T09:47:57Z" level=error msg="(unable to determine exit status)"

    With this update, the pipelines-scc security context constraint (SCC) is compatible with the SETFCAP capability necessary for Buildah and S2I cluster tasks. As a result, the Buildah and S2I build tasks can run successfully.

    To successfully run the Buildah cluster task and S2I build tasks for applications written in various languages and frameworks, add the following snippet for appropriate steps objects such as build and push:

    securityContext:
      capabilities:
        add: ["SETFCAP"]
  • Before this update, installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator took longer than expected. This update optimizes some settings to speed up the installation process.
  • With this update, Buildah and S2I cluster tasks have fewer steps than in previous versions. Some steps have been combined into a single step so that they work better with ResourceQuota and LimitRange objects and do not require more resources than necessary.
  • This update upgrades the Buildah, tkn CLI tool, and skopeo CLI tool versions in cluster tasks.
  • Before this update, the Operator failed when creating RBAC resources if any namespace was in a Terminating state. With this update, the Operator ignores namespaces in a Terminating state and creates the RBAC resources.
  • Before this update, pods for the prune cronjobs were not scheduled on infrastructure nodes, as expected. Instead, they were scheduled on worker nodes or not scheduled at all. With this update, these types of pods can now be scheduled on infrastructure nodes if configured in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR).

4.1.5.6. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.8.1

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.8.1 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.10, 4.11, and 4.12.

4.1.5.6.1. Known issues
  • By default, the containers have restricted permissions for enhanced security. The restricted permissions apply to all controller pods in the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, and to some cluster tasks. Due to restricted permissions, the git-clone cluster task fails under certain configurations.

    Workaround: None. You can track the issue SRVKP-2634.

  • When installer sets are in a failed state, the status of the TektonConfig custom resource is incorrectly displayed as True instead of False.

    Example: Failed installer sets

    $ oc get tektoninstallerset
    NAME                                     READY   REASON
    addon-clustertasks-nx5xz                 False   Error
    addon-communityclustertasks-cfb2p        True
    addon-consolecli-ftrb8                   True
    addon-openshift-67dj2                    True
    addon-pac-cf7pz                          True
    addon-pipelines-fvllm                    True
    addon-triggers-b2wtt                     True
    addon-versioned-clustertasks-1-8-hqhnw   False   Error
    pipeline-w75ww                           True
    postpipeline-lrs22                       True
    prepipeline-ldlhw                        True
    rhosp-rbac-4dmgb                         True
    trigger-hfg64                            True
    validating-mutating-webhoook-28rf7       True

    Example: Incorrect TektonConfig status

    $ oc get tektonconfig config
    NAME     VERSION   READY   REASON
    config   1.8.1     True

4.1.5.6.2. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, the pruner deleted task runs of running pipelines and displayed the following warning: some tasks were indicated completed without ancestors being done. With this update, the pruner retains the task runs that are part of running pipelines.
  • Before this update, pipeline-1.8 was the default channel for installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator 1.8.x. With this update, latest is the default channel.
  • Before this update, the Pipelines as Code controller pods did not have access to certificates exposed by the user. With this update, Pipelines as Code can now access routes and Git repositories guarded by a self-signed or a custom certificate.
  • Before this update, the task failed with RBAC errors after upgrading from Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7.2 to 1.8.0. With this update, the tasks run successfully without any RBAC errors.
  • Before this update, using the tkn CLI tool, you could not remove task runs and pipeline runs that contained a result object whose type was array. With this update, you can use the tkn CLI tool to remove task runs and pipeline runs that contain a result object whose type is array.
  • Before this update, if a pipeline specification contained a task with an ENV_VARS parameter of array type, the pipeline run failed with the following error: invalid input params for task func-buildpacks: param types don’t match the user-specified type: [ENV_VARS]. With this update, pipeline runs with such pipeline and task specifications do not fail.
  • Before this update, cluster administrators could not provide a config.json file to the Buildah cluster task for accessing a container registry. With this update, cluster administrators can provide the Buildah cluster task with a config.json file by using the dockerconfig workspace.

4.1.5.7. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.8.2

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.8.2 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.10, 4.11, and 4.12.

4.1.5.7.1. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, the git-clone task failed when cloning a repository using SSH keys. With this update, the role of the non-root user in the git-init task is removed, and the SSH program looks in the $HOME/.ssh/ directory for the correct keys.

4.1.6. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.7

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.7 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.9, 4.10, and 4.11.

4.1.6.1. New features

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7.

4.1.6.1.1. Pipelines
  • With this update, pipelines-<version> is the default channel to install the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. For example, the default channel to install the Pipelines Operator version 1.7 is pipelines-1.7. Cluster administrators can also use the latest channel to install the most recent stable version of the Operator.

    Note

    The preview and stable channels will be deprecated and removed in a future release.

  • When you run a command in a user namespace, your container runs as root (user id 0) but has user privileges on the host. With this update, to run pods in the user namespace, you must pass the annotations that CRI-O expects.

    • To add these annotations for all users, run the oc edit clustertask buildah command and edit the buildah cluster task.
    • To add the annotations to a specific namespace, export the cluster task as a task to that namespace.
  • Before this update, if certain conditions were not met, the when expression skipped a Task object and its dependent tasks. With this update, you can scope the when expression to guard the Task object only, not its dependent tasks. To enable this update, set the scope-when-expressions-to-task flag to true in the TektonConfig CRD.

    Note

    The scope-when-expressions-to-task flag is deprecated and will be removed in a future release. As a best practice for Pipelines, use when expressions scoped to the guarded Task only.

  • With this update, you can use variable substitution in the subPath field of a workspace within a task.
  • With this update, you can reference parameters and results by using a bracket notation with single or double quotes. Prior to this update, you could only use the dot notation. For example, the following are now equivalent:

    • $(param.myparam), $(param['myparam']), and $(param["myparam"]).

      You can use single or double quotes to enclose parameter names that contain problematic characters, such as ".". For example, $(param['my.param']) and $(param["my.param"]).

  • With this update, you can include the onError parameter of a step in the task definition without enabling the enable-api-fields flag.
4.1.6.1.2. Triggers
  • With this update, the feature-flag-triggers config map has a new field labels-exclusion-pattern. You can set the value of this field to a regular expression (regex) pattern. The controller filters out labels that match the regex pattern from propagating from the event listener to the resources created for the event listener.
  • With this update, the TriggerGroups field is added to the EventListener specification. Using this field, you can specify a set of interceptors to run before selecting and running a group of triggers. To enable this feature, in the TektonConfig custom resource definition, in the pipeline section, you must set the enable-api-fields field to alpha.
  • With this update, Trigger resources support custom runs defined by a TriggerTemplate template.
  • With this update, Triggers support emitting Kubernetes events from an EventListener pod.
  • With this update, count metrics are available for the following objects: ClusterInteceptor, EventListener, TriggerTemplate, ClusterTriggerBinding, and TriggerBinding.
  • This update adds the ServicePort specification to Kubernetes resource. You can use this specification to modify which port exposes the event listener service. The default port is 8080.
  • With this update, you can use the targetURI field in the EventListener specification to send cloud events during trigger processing. To enable this feature, in the TektonConfig custom resource definition, in the pipeline section, you must set the enable-api-fields field to alpha.
  • With this update, the tekton-triggers-eventlistener-roles object now has a patch verb, in addition to the create verb that already exists.
  • With this update, the securityContext.runAsUser parameter is removed from event listener deployment.
4.1.6.1.3. CLI
  • With this update, the tkn [pipeline | pipelinerun] export command exports a pipeline or pipeline run as a YAML file. For example:

    • Export a pipeline named test_pipeline in the openshift-pipelines namespace:

      $ tkn pipeline export test_pipeline -n openshift-pipelines
    • Export a pipeline run named test_pipeline_run in the openshift-pipelines namespace:

      $ tkn pipelinerun export test_pipeline_run -n openshift-pipelines
  • With this update, the --grace option is added to the tkn pipelinerun cancel. Use the --grace option to terminate a pipeline run gracefully instead of forcing the termination. To enable this feature, in the TektonConfig custom resource definition, in the pipeline section, you must set the enable-api-fields field to alpha.
  • This update adds the Operator and Chains versions to the output of the tkn version command.

    Important

    Tekton Chains is a Technology Preview feature.

  • With this update, the tkn pipelinerun describe command displays all canceled task runs, when you cancel a pipeline run. Before this fix, only one task run was displayed.
  • With this update, you can skip supplying the asking specifications for optional workspace when you run the tkn [t | p | ct] start command skips with the --skip-optional-workspace flag. You can also skip it when running in interactive mode.
  • With this update, you can use the tkn chains command to manage Tekton Chains. You can also use the --chains-namespace option to specify the namespace where you want to install Tekton Chains.

    Important

    Tekton Chains is a Technology Preview feature.

4.1.6.1.4. Operator
  • With this update, you can use the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator to install and deploy Tekton Hub and Tekton Chains.

    Important

    Tekton Chains and deployment of Tekton Hub on a cluster are Technology Preview features.

  • With this update, you can find and use Pipelines as Code (PAC) as an add-on option.

    Important

    Pipelines as Code is a Technology Preview feature.

  • With this update, you can now disable the installation of community cluster tasks by setting the communityClusterTasks parameter to false. For example:

    ...
    spec:
      profile: all
      targetNamespace: openshift-pipelines
      addon:
        params:
        - name: clusterTasks
          value: "true"
        - name: pipelineTemplates
          value: "true"
        - name: communityClusterTasks
          value: "false"
    ...
  • With this update, you can disable the integration of Tekton Hub with the Developer perspective by setting the enable-devconsole-integration flag in the TektonConfig custom resource to false. For example:

    ...
    hub:
      params:
        - name: enable-devconsole-integration
          value: "true"
    ...
  • With this update, the operator-config.yaml config map enables the output of the tkn version command to display of the Operator version.
  • With this update, the version of the argocd-task-sync-and-wait tasks is modified to v0.2.
  • With this update to the TektonConfig CRD, the oc get tektonconfig command displays the OPerator version.
  • With this update, service monitor is added to the Triggers metrics.
4.1.6.1.5. Hub
Important

Deploying Tekton Hub on a cluster is a Technology Preview feature.

Tekton Hub helps you discover, search, and share reusable tasks and pipelines for your CI/CD workflows. A public instance of Tekton Hub is available at hub.tekton.dev.

Staring with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7, cluster administrators can also install and deploy a custom instance of Tekton Hub on enterprise clusters. You can curate a catalog with reusable tasks and pipelines specific to your organization.

4.1.6.1.6. Chains
Important

Tekton Chains is a Technology Preview feature.

Tekton Chains is a Kubernetes Custom Resource Definition (CRD) controller. You can use it to manage the supply chain security of the tasks and pipelines created using Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines.

By default, Tekton Chains monitors the task runs in your OpenShift Container Platform cluster. Chains takes snapshots of completed task runs, converts them to one or more standard payload formats, and signs and stores all artifacts.

Tekton Chains supports the following features:

  • You can sign task runs, task run results, and OCI registry images with cryptographic key types and services such as cosign.
  • You can use attestation formats such as in-toto.
  • You can securely store signatures and signed artifacts using OCI repository as a storage backend.
4.1.6.1.7. Pipelines as Code (PAC)
Important

Pipelines as Code is a Technology Preview feature.

With Pipelines as Code, cluster administrators and users with the required privileges can define pipeline templates as part of source code Git repositories. When triggered by a source code push or a pull request for the configured Git repository, the feature runs the pipeline and reports status.

Pipelines as Code supports the following features:

  • Pull request status. When iterating over a pull request, the status and control of the pull request is exercised on the platform hosting the Git repository.
  • GitHub checks the API to set the status of a pipeline run, including rechecks.
  • GitHub pull request and commit events.
  • Pull request actions in comments, such as /retest.
  • Git events filtering, and a separate pipeline for each event.
  • Automatic task resolution in Pipelines for local tasks, Tekton Hub, and remote URLs.
  • Use of GitHub blobs and objects API for retrieving configurations.
  • Access Control List (ACL) over a GitHub organization, or using a Prow-style OWNER file.
  • The tkn pac plugin for the tkn CLI tool, which you can use to manage Pipelines as Code repositories and bootstrapping.
  • Support for GitHub Application, GitHub Webhook, Bitbucket Server, and Bitbucket Cloud.

4.1.6.2. Deprecated features

  • Breaking change: This update removes the disable-working-directory-overwrite and disable-home-env-overwrite fields from the TektonConfig custom resource (CR). As a result, the TektonConfig CR no longer automatically sets the $HOME environment variable and workingDir parameter. You can still set the $HOME environment variable and workingDir parameter by using the env and workingDir fields in the Task custom resource definition (CRD).
  • The Conditions custom resource definition (CRD) type is deprecated and planned to be removed in a future release. Instead, use the recommended When expression.
  • Breaking change: The Triggers resource validates the templates and generates an error if you do not specify the EventListener and TriggerBinding values.

4.1.6.3. Known issues

  • When you run Maven and Jib-Maven cluster tasks, the default container image is supported only on Intel (x86) architecture. Therefore, tasks will fail on ARM, IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) clusters. As a workaround, you can specify a custom image by setting the MAVEN_IMAGE parameter value to maven:3.6.3-adoptopenjdk-11.

    Tip

    Before you install tasks that are based on the Tekton Catalog on ARM, IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) using tkn hub, verify if the task can be executed on these platforms. To check if ppc64le and s390x are listed in the "Platforms" section of the task information, you can run the following command: tkn hub info task <name>

  • On IBM Power Systems, IBM Z, and LinuxONE, the s2i-dotnet cluster task is unsupported.
  • You cannot use the nodejs:14-ubi8-minimal image stream because doing so generates the following errors:

    STEP 7: RUN /usr/libexec/s2i/assemble
    /bin/sh: /usr/libexec/s2i/assemble: No such file or directory
    subprocess exited with status 127
    subprocess exited with status 127
    error building at STEP "RUN /usr/libexec/s2i/assemble": exit status 127
    time="2021-11-04T13:05:26Z" level=error msg="exit status 127"
  • Implicit parameter mapping incorrectly passes parameters from the top-level Pipeline or PipelineRun definitions to the taskRef tasks. Mapping should only occur from a top-level resource to tasks with in-line taskSpec specifications. This issue only affects clusters where this feature was enabled by setting the enable-api-fields field to alpha in the pipeline section of the TektonConfig custom resource definition.

4.1.6.4. Fixed issues

  • With this update, if metadata such as labels and annotations are present in both Pipeline and PipelineRun object definitions, the values in the PipelineRun type takes precedence. You can observe similar behavior for Task and TaskRun objects.
  • With this update, if the timeouts.tasks field or the timeouts.finally field is set to 0, then the timeouts.pipeline is also set to 0.
  • With this update, the -x set flag is removed from scripts that do not use a shebang. The fix reduces potential data leak from script execution.
  • With this update, any backslash character present in the usernames in Git credentials is escaped with an additional backslash in the .gitconfig file.
  • With this update, the finalizer property of the EventListener object is not necessary for cleaning up logging and config maps.
  • With this update, the default HTTP client associated with the event listener server is removed, and a custom HTTP client added. As a result, the timeouts have improved.
  • With this update, the Triggers cluster role now works with owner references.
  • With this update, the race condition in the event listener does not happen when multiple interceptors return extensions.
  • With this update, the tkn pr delete command does not delete the pipeline runs with the ignore-running flag.
  • With this update, the Operator pods do not continue restarting when you modify any add-on parameters.
  • With this update, the tkn serve CLI pod is scheduled on infra nodes, if not configured in the subscription and config custom resources.
  • With this update, cluster tasks with specified versions are not deleted during upgrade.

4.1.6.5. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.7.1

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.7.1 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.9, 4.10, and 4.11.

4.1.6.5.1. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, upgrading the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator deleted the data in the database associated with Tekton Hub and installed a new database. With this update, an Operator upgrade preserves the data.
  • Before this update, only cluster administrators could access pipeline metrics in the OpenShift Container Platform console. With this update, users with other cluster roles also can access the pipeline metrics.
  • Before this update, pipeline runs failed for pipelines containing tasks that emit large termination messages. The pipeline runs failed because the total size of termination messages of all containers in a pod cannot exceed 12 KB. With this update, the place-tools and step-init initialization containers that uses the same image are merged to reduce the number of containers running in each tasks’s pod. The solution reduces the chance of failed pipeline runs by minimizing the number of containers running in a task’s pod. However, it does not remove the limitation of the maximum allowed size of a termination message.
  • Before this update, attempts to access resource URLs directly from the Tekton Hub web console resulted in an Nginx 404 error. With this update, the Tekton Hub web console image is fixed to allow accessing resource URLs directly from the Tekton Hub web console.
  • Before this update, for each namespace the resource pruner job created a separate container to prune resources. With this update, the resource pruner job runs commands for all namespaces as a loop in one container.

4.1.6.6. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.7.2

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.7.2 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.9, 4.10, and the upcoming version.

4.1.6.6.1. Known issues
  • The chains-config config map for Tekton Chains in the openshift-pipelines namespace is automatically reset to default after upgrading the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. Currently, there is no workaround for this issue.
4.1.6.6.2. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, tasks on Pipelines 1.7.1 failed on using init as the first argument, followed by two or more arguments. With this update, the flags are parsed correctly and the task runs are successful.
  • Before this update, installation of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator on OpenShift Container Platform 4.9 and 4.10 failed due to invalid role binding, with the following error message:

    error updating rolebinding openshift-operators-prometheus-k8s-read-binding: RoleBinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io "openshift-operators-prometheus-k8s-read-binding" is invalid: roleRef: Invalid value: rbac.RoleRef{APIGroup:"rbac.authorization.k8s.io", Kind:"Role", Name:"openshift-operator-read"}: cannot change roleRef

    With this update, the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator installs with distinct role binding namespaces to avoid conflict with installation of other Operators.

  • Before this update, upgrading the Operator triggered a reset of the signing-secrets secret key for Tekton Chains to its default value. With this update, the custom secret key persists after you upgrade the Operator.

    Note

    Upgrading to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.7.2 resets the key. However, when you upgrade to future releases, the key is expected to persist.

  • Before this update, all S2I build tasks failed with an error similar to the following message:

    Error: error writing "0 0 4294967295\n" to /proc/22/uid_map: write /proc/22/uid_map: operation not permitted
    time="2022-03-04T09:47:57Z" level=error msg="error writing \"0 0 4294967295\\n\" to /proc/22/uid_map: write /proc/22/uid_map: operation not permitted"
    time="2022-03-04T09:47:57Z" level=error msg="(unable to determine exit status)"

    With this update, the pipelines-scc security context constraint (SCC) is compatible with the SETFCAP capability necessary for Buildah and S2I cluster tasks. As a result, the Buildah and S2I build tasks can run successfully.

    To successfully run the Buildah cluster task and S2I build tasks for applications written in various languages and frameworks, add the following snippet for appropriate steps objects such as build and push:

    securityContext:
      capabilities:
        add: ["SETFCAP"]

4.1.6.7. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.7.3

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.7.3 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.9, 4.10, and 4.11.

4.1.6.7.1. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, the Operator failed when creating RBAC resources if any namespace was in a Terminating state. With this update, the Operator ignores namespaces in a Terminating state and creates the RBAC resources.
  • Previously, upgrading the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator caused the pipeline service account to be recreated, which meant that the secrets linked to the service account were lost. This update fixes the issue. During upgrades, the Operator no longer recreates the pipeline service account. As a result, secrets attached to the pipeline service account persist after upgrades, and the resources (tasks and pipelines) continue to work correctly.

4.1.7. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.6

With this update, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.6 is available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.9.

4.1.7.1. New features

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.6.

  • With this update, you can configure a pipeline or task start command to return a YAML or JSON-formatted string by using the --output <string>, where <string> is yaml or json. Otherwise, without the --output option, the start command returns a human-friendly message that is hard for other programs to parse. Returning a YAML or JSON-formatted string is useful for continuous integration (CI) environments. For example, after a resource is created, you can use yq or jq to parse the YAML or JSON-formatted message about the resource and wait until that resource is terminated without using the showlog option.
  • With this update, you can authenticate to a registry using the auth.json authentication file of Podman. For example, you can use tkn bundle push to push to a remote registry using Podman instead of Docker CLI.
  • With this update, if you use the tkn [taskrun | pipelinerun] delete --all command, you can preserve runs that are younger than a specified number of minutes by using the new --keep-since <minutes> option. For example, to keep runs that are less than five minutes old, you enter tkn [taskrun | pipelinerun] delete -all --keep-since 5.
  • With this update, when you delete task runs or pipeline runs, you can use the --parent-resource and --keep-since options together. For example, the tkn pipelinerun delete --pipeline pipelinename --keep-since 5 command preserves pipeline runs whose parent resource is named pipelinename and whose age is five minutes or less. The tkn tr delete -t <taskname> --keep-since 5 and tkn tr delete --clustertask <taskname> --keep-since 5 commands work similarly for task runs.
  • This update adds support for the triggers resources to work with v1beta1 resources.
  • This update adds an ignore-running option to the tkn pipelinerun delete and tkn taskrun delete commands.
  • This update adds a create subcommand to the tkn task and tkn clustertask commands.
  • With this update, when you use the tkn pipelinerun delete --all command, you can use the new --label <string> option to filter the pipeline runs by label. Optionally, you can use the --label option with = and == as equality operators, or != as an inequality operator. For example, the tkn pipelinerun delete --all --label asdf and tkn pipelinerun delete --all --label==asdf commands both delete all the pipeline runs that have the asdf label.
  • With this update, you can fetch the version of installed Tekton components from the config map or, if the config map is not present, from the deployment controller.
  • With this update, triggers support the feature-flags and config-defaults config map to configure feature flags and to set default values respectively.
  • This update adds a new metric, eventlistener_event_count, that you can use to count events received by the EventListener resource.
  • This update adds v1beta1 Go API types. With this update, triggers now support the v1beta1 API version.

    With the current release, the v1alpha1 features are now deprecated and will be removed in a future release. Begin using the v1beta1 features instead.

  • In the current release, auto-prunning of resources is enabled by default. In addition, you can configure auto-prunning of task run and pipeline run for each namespace separately, by using the following new annotations:

    • operator.tekton.dev/prune.schedule: If the value of this annotation is different from the value specified at the TektonConfig custom resource definition, a new cron job in that namespace is created.
    • operator.tekton.dev/prune.skip: When set to true, the namespace for which it is configured will not be prunned.
    • operator.tekton.dev/prune.resources: This annotation accepts a comma-separated list of resources. To prune a single resource such as a pipeline run, set this annotation to "pipelinerun". To prune multiple resources, such as task run and pipeline run, set this annotation to "taskrun, pipelinerun".
    • operator.tekton.dev/prune.keep: Use this annotation to retain a resource without prunning.
    • operator.tekton.dev/prune.keep-since: Use this annotation to retain resources based on their age. The value for this annotation must be equal to the age of the resource in minutes. For example, to retain resources which were created not more than five days ago, set keep-since to 7200.

      Note

      The keep and keep-since annotations are mutually exclusive. For any resource, you must configure only one of them.

    • operator.tekton.dev/prune.strategy: Set the value of this annotation to either keep or keep-since.
  • Administrators can disable the creation of the pipeline service account for the entire cluster, and prevent privilege escalation by misusing the associated SCC, which is very similar to anyuid.
  • You can now configure feature flags and components by using the TektonConfig custom resource (CR) and the CRs for individual components, such as TektonPipeline and TektonTriggers. This level of granularity helps customize and test alpha features such as the Tekton OCI bundle for individual components.
  • You can now configure optional Timeouts field for the PipelineRun resource. For example, you can configure timeouts separately for a pipeline run, each task run, and the finally tasks.
  • The pods generated by the TaskRun resource now sets the activeDeadlineSeconds field of the pods. This enables OpenShift to consider them as terminating, and allows you to use specifically scoped ResourceQuota object for the pods.
  • You can use configmaps to eliminate metrics tags or labels type on a task run, pipeline run, task, and pipeline. In addition, you can configure different types of metrics for measuring duration, such as a histogram, gauge, or last value.
  • You can define requests and limits on a pod coherently, as Tekton now fully supports the LimitRange object by considering the Min, Max, Default, and DefaultRequest fields.
  • The following alpha features are introduced:

    • A pipeline run can now stop after running the finally tasks, rather than the previous behavior of stopping the execution of all task run directly. This update adds the following spec.status values:

      • StoppedRunFinally will stop the currently running tasks after they are completed, and then run the finally tasks.
      • CancelledRunFinally will immediately cancel the running tasks, and then run the finally tasks.
      • Cancelled will retain the previous behavior provided by the PipelineRunCancelled status.

        Note

        The Cancelled status replaces the deprecated PipelineRunCancelled status, which will be removed in the v1 version.

    • You can now use the oc debug command to put a task run into debug mode, which pauses the execution and allows you to inspect specific steps in a pod.
    • When you set the onError field of a step to continue, the exit code for the step is recorded and passed on to subsequent steps. However, the task run does not fail and the execution of the rest of the steps in the task continues. To retain the existing behavior, you can set the value of the onError field to stopAndFail.
    • Tasks can now accept more parameters than are actually used. When the alpha feature flag is enabled, the parameters can implicitly propagate to inlined specs. For example, an inlined task can access parameters of its parent pipeline run, without explicitly defining each parameter for the task.
    • If you enable the flag for the alpha features, the conditions under When expressions will only apply to the task with which it is directly associated, and not the dependents of the task. To apply the When expressions to the associated task and its dependents, you must associate the expression with each dependent task separately. Note that, going forward, this will be the default behavior of the When expressions in any new API versions of Tekton. The existing default behavior will be deprecated in favor of this update.
  • The current release enables you to configure node selection by specifying the nodeSelector and tolerations values in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR). The Operator adds these values to all the deployments that it creates.

    • To configure node selection for the Operator’s controller and webhook deployment, you edit the config.nodeSelector and config.tolerations fields in the specification for the Subscription CR, after installing the Operator.
    • To deploy the rest of the control plane pods of OpenShift Pipelines on an infrastructure node, update the TektonConfig CR with the nodeSelector and tolerations fields. The modifications are then applied to all the pods created by Operator.

4.1.7.2. Deprecated features

  • In CLI 0.21.0, support for all v1alpha1 resources for clustertask, task, taskrun, pipeline, and pipelinerun commands are deprecated. These resources are now deprecated and will be removed in a future release.
  • In Tekton Triggers v0.16.0, the redundant status label is removed from the metrics for the EventListener resource.

    Important

    Breaking change: The status label has been removed from the eventlistener_http_duration_seconds_* metric. Remove queries that are based on the status label.

  • With the current release, the v1alpha1 features are now deprecated and will be removed in a future release. With this update, you can begin using the v1beta1 Go API types instead. Triggers now supports the v1beta1 API version.
  • With the current release, the EventListener resource sends a response before the triggers finish processing.

    Important

    Breaking change: With this change, the EventListener resource stops responding with a 201 Created status code when it creates resources. Instead, it responds with a 202 Accepted response code.

  • The current release removes the podTemplate field from the EventListener resource.

    Important

    Breaking change: The podTemplate field, which was deprecated as part of #1100, has been removed.

  • The current release removes the deprecated replicas field from the specification for the EventListener resource.

    Important

    Breaking change: The deprecated replicas field has been removed.

  • In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.6, the values of HOME="/tekton/home" and workingDir="/workspace" are removed from the specification of the Step objects.

    Instead, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines sets HOME and workingDir to the values defined by the containers running the Step objects. You can override these values in the specification of your Step objects.

    To use the older behavior, you can change the disable-working-directory-overwrite and disable-home-env-overwrite fields in the TektonConfig CR to false:

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
      kind: TektonConfig
      metadata:
        name: config
      spec:
        pipeline:
          disable-working-directory-overwrite: false
          disable-home-env-overwrite: false
      ...
    Important

    The disable-working-directory-overwrite and disable-home-env-overwrite fields in the TektonConfig CR are now deprecated and will be removed in a future release.

4.1.7.3. Known issues

  • When you run Maven and Jib-Maven cluster tasks, the default container image is supported only on Intel (x86) architecture. Therefore, tasks will fail on IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) clusters. As a workaround, you can specify a custom image by setting the MAVEN_IMAGE parameter value to maven:3.6.3-adoptopenjdk-11.
  • On IBM Power Systems, IBM Z, and LinuxONE, the s2i-dotnet cluster task is unsupported.
  • Before you install tasks based on the Tekton Catalog on IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) using tkn hub, verify if the task can be executed on these platforms. To check if ppc64le and s390x are listed in the "Platforms" section of the task information, you can run the following command: tkn hub info task <name>
  • You cannot use the nodejs:14-ubi8-minimal image stream because doing so generates the following errors:

    STEP 7: RUN /usr/libexec/s2i/assemble
    /bin/sh: /usr/libexec/s2i/assemble: No such file or directory
    subprocess exited with status 127
    subprocess exited with status 127
    error building at STEP "RUN /usr/libexec/s2i/assemble": exit status 127
    time="2021-11-04T13:05:26Z" level=error msg="exit status 127"

4.1.7.4. Fixed issues

  • The tkn hub command is now supported on IBM Power Systems, IBM Z, and LinuxONE.
  • Before this update, the terminal was not available after the user ran a tkn command, and the pipeline run was done, even if retries were specified. Specifying a timeout in the task run or pipeline run had no effect. This update fixes the issue so that the terminal is available after running the command.
  • Before this update, running tkn pipelinerun delete --all would delete all resources. This update prevents the resources in the running state from getting deleted.
  • Before this update, using the tkn version --component=<component> command did not return the component version. This update fixes the issue so that this command returns the component version.
  • Before this update, when you used the tkn pr logs command, it displayed the pipelines output logs in the wrong task order. This update resolves the issue so that logs of completed PipelineRuns are listed in the appropriate TaskRun execution order.
  • Before this update, editing the specification of a running pipeline might prevent the pipeline run from stopping when it was complete. This update fixes the issue by fetching the definition only once and then using the specification stored in the status for verification. This change reduces the probability of a race condition when a PipelineRun or a TaskRun refers to a Pipeline or Task that changes while it is running.
  • When expression values can now have array parameter references, such as: values: [$(params.arrayParam[*])].

4.1.7.5. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.6.1

4.1.7.5.1. Known issues
  • After upgrading to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.6.1 from an older version, Pipelines might enter an inconsistent state where you are unable to perform any operations (create/delete/apply) on Tekton resources (tasks and pipelines). For example, while deleting a resource, you might encounter the following error:

    Error from server (InternalError): Internal error occurred: failed calling webhook "validation.webhook.pipeline.tekton.dev": Post "https://tekton-pipelines-webhook.openshift-pipelines.svc:443/resource-validation?timeout=10s": service "tekton-pipelines-webhook" not found.
4.1.7.5.2. Fixed issues
  • The SSL_CERT_DIR environment variable (/tekton-custom-certs) set by Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines will not override the following default system directories with certificate files:

    • /etc/pki/tls/certs
    • /etc/ssl/certs
    • /system/etc/security/cacerts
  • The Horizontal Pod Autoscaler can manage the replica count of deployments controlled by the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. From this release onward, if the count is changed by an end user or an on-cluster agent, the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator will not reset the replica count of deployments managed by it. However, the replicas will be reset when you upgrade the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
  • The pod serving the tkn CLI will now be scheduled on nodes, based on the node selector and toleration limits specified in the TektonConfig custom resource.

4.1.7.6. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.6.2

4.1.7.6.1. Known issues
  • When you create a new project, the creation of the pipeline service account is delayed, and removal of existing cluster tasks and pipeline templates takes more than 10 minutes.
4.1.7.6.2. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, multiple instances of Tekton installer sets were created for a pipeline after upgrading to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.6.1 from an older version. With this update, the Operator ensures that only one instance of each type of TektonInstallerSet exists after an upgrade.
  • Before this update, all the reconcilers in the Operator used the component version to decide resource recreation during an upgrade to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.6.1 from an older version. As a result, those resources were not recreated whose component versions did not change in the upgrade. With this update, the Operator uses the Operator version instead of the component version to decide resource recreation during an upgrade.
  • Before this update, the pipelines webhook service was missing in the cluster after an upgrade. This was due to an upgrade deadlock on the config maps. With this update, a mechanism is added to disable webhook validation if the config maps are absent in the cluster. As a result, the pipelines webhook service persists in the cluster after an upgrade.
  • Before this update, cron jobs for auto-pruning got recreated after any configuration change to the namespace. With this update, cron jobs for auto-pruning get recreated only if there is a relevant annotation change in the namespace.
  • The upstream version of Tekton Pipelines is revised to v0.28.3, which has the following fixes:

    • Fix PipelineRun or TaskRun objects to allow label or annotation propagation.
    • For implicit params:

      • Do not apply the PipelineSpec parameters to the TaskRefs object.
      • Disable implicit param behavior for the Pipeline objects.

4.1.7.7. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.6.3

4.1.7.7.1. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator installed pod security policies from components such as Pipelines and Triggers. However, the pod security policies shipped as part of the components were deprecated in an earlier release. With this update, the Operator stops installing pod security policies from components. As a result, the following upgrade paths are affected:

    • Upgrading from Pipelines 1.6.1 or 1.6.2 to Pipelines 1.6.3 deletes the pod security policies, including those from the Pipelines and Triggers components.
    • Upgrading from Pipelines 1.5.x to 1.6.3 retains the pod security policies installed from components. As a cluster administrator, you can delete them manually.

      Note

      When you upgrade to future releases, the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator will automatically delete all obsolete pod security policies.

  • Before this update, only cluster administrators could access pipeline metrics in the OpenShift Container Platform console. With this update, users with other cluster roles also can access the pipeline metrics.
  • Before this update, role-based access control (RBAC) issues with the Pipelines Operator caused problems upgrading or installing components. This update improves the reliability and consistency of installing various Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components.
  • Before this update, setting the clusterTasks and pipelineTemplates fields to false in the TektonConfig CR slowed the removal of cluster tasks and pipeline templates. This update improves the speed of lifecycle management of Tekton resources such as cluster tasks and pipeline templates.

4.1.7.8. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.6.4

4.1.7.8.1. Known issues
  • After upgrading from Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.5.2 to 1.6.4, accessing the event listener routes returns a 503 error.

    Workaround: Modify the target port in the YAML file for the event listener’s route.

    1. Extract the route name for the relevant namespace.

      $ oc get route -n <namespace>
    2. Edit the route to modify the value of the targetPort field.

      $ oc edit route -n <namespace> <el-route_name>

      Example: Existing event listener route

      ...
      spec:
        host: el-event-listener-q8c3w5-test-upgrade1.apps.ve49aws.aws.ospqa.com
        port:
          targetPort: 8000
        to:
          kind: Service
          name: el-event-listener-q8c3w5
          weight: 100
        wildcardPolicy: None
      ...

      Example: Modified event listener route

      ...
      spec:
        host: el-event-listener-q8c3w5-test-upgrade1.apps.ve49aws.aws.ospqa.com
        port:
          targetPort: http-listener
        to:
          kind: Service
          name: el-event-listener-q8c3w5
          weight: 100
        wildcardPolicy: None
      ...

4.1.7.8.2. Fixed issues
  • Before this update, the Operator failed when creating RBAC resources if any namespace was in a Terminating state. With this update, the Operator ignores namespaces in a Terminating state and creates the RBAC resources.
  • Before this update, the task runs failed or restarted due to absence of annotation specifying the release version of the associated Tekton controller. With this update, the inclusion of the appropriate annotations are automated, and the tasks run without failure or restarts.

4.1.8. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.5

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.5 is now available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.8.

4.1.8.1. Compatibility and support matrix

Some features in this release are currently in Technology Preview. These experimental features are not intended for production use.

In the table, features are marked with the following statuses:

TP

Technology Preview

GA

General Availability

Note the following scope of support on the Red Hat Customer Portal for these features:

Table 4.2. Compatibility and support matrix

FeatureVersionSupport Status

Pipelines

0.24

GA

CLI

0.19

GA

Catalog

0.24

GA

Triggers

0.14

TP

Pipeline resources

-

TP

For questions and feedback, you can send an email to the product team at pipelines-interest@redhat.com.

4.1.8.2. New features

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.5.

  • Pipeline run and task runs will be automatically pruned by a cron job in the target namespace. The cron job uses the IMAGE_JOB_PRUNER_TKN environment variable to get the value of tkn image. With this enhancement, the following fields are introduced to the TektonConfig custom resource:

    ...
    pruner:
      resources:
        - pipelinerun
        - taskrun
      schedule: "*/5 * * * *" # cron schedule
      keep: 2 # delete all keeping n
    ...
  • In OpenShift Container Platform, you can customize the installation of the Tekton Add-ons component by modifying the values of the new parameters clusterTasks and pipelinesTemplates in the TektonConfig custom resource:

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: TektonConfig
    metadata:
      name: config
    spec:
      profile: all
      targetNamespace: openshift-pipelines
      addon:
        params:
        - name: clusterTasks
          value: "true"
        - name: pipelineTemplates
          value: "true"
    ...

    The customization is allowed if you create the add-on using TektonConfig, or directly by using Tekton Add-ons. However, if the parameters are not passed, the controller adds parameters with default values.

    Note
    • If add-on is created using the TektonConfig custom resource, and you change the parameter values later in the Addon custom resource, then the values in the TektonConfig custom resource overwrites the changes.
    • You can set the value of the pipelinesTemplates parameter to true only when the value of the clusterTasks parameter is true.
  • The enableMetrics parameter is added to the TektonConfig custom resource. You can use it to disable the service monitor, which is part of Tekton Pipelines for OpenShift Container Platform.

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: TektonConfig
    metadata:
      name: config
    spec:
      profile: all
      targetNamespace: openshift-pipelines
      pipeline:
        params:
        - name: enableMetrics
          value: "true"
    ...
  • Eventlistener OpenCensus metrics, which captures metrics at process level, is added.
  • Triggers now has label selector; you can configure triggers for an event listener using labels.
  • The ClusterInterceptor custom resource definition for registering interceptors is added, which allows you to register new Interceptor types that you can plug in. In addition, the following relevant changes are made:

    • In the trigger specifications, you can configure interceptors using a new API that includes a ref field to refer to a cluster interceptor. In addition, you can use the params field to add parameters that pass on to the interceptors for processing.
    • The bundled interceptors CEL, GitHub, GitLab, and BitBucket, have been migrated. They are implemented using the new ClusterInterceptor custom resource definition.
    • Core interceptors are migrated to the new format, and any new triggers created using the old syntax automatically switch to the new ref or params based syntax.
  • To disable prefixing the name of the task or step while displaying logs, use the --prefix option for log commands.
  • To display the version of a specific component, use the new --component flag in the tkn version command.
  • The tkn hub check-upgrade command is added, and other commands are revised to be based on the pipeline version. In addition, catalog names are displayed in the search command output.
  • Support for optional workspaces are added to the start command.
  • If the plugins are not present in the plugins directory, they are searched in the current path.
  • The tkn start [task | clustertask | pipeline] command starts interactively and ask for the params value, even when you specify the default parameters are specified. To stop the interactive prompts, pass the --use-param-defaults flag at the time of invoking the command. For example:

    $ tkn pipeline start build-and-deploy \
        -w name=shared-workspace,volumeClaimTemplateFile=https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/01_pipeline/03_persistent_volume_claim.yaml \
        -p deployment-name=pipelines-vote-api \
        -p git-url=https://github.com/openshift/pipelines-vote-api.git \
        -p IMAGE=image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-vote-api \
        --use-param-defaults
  • The version field is added in the tkn task describe command.
  • The option to automatically select resources such as TriggerTemplate, or TriggerBinding, or ClusterTriggerBinding, or Eventlistener, is added in the describe command, if only one is present.
  • In the tkn pr describe command, a section for skipped tasks is added.
  • Support for the tkn clustertask logs is added.
  • The YAML merge and variable from config.yaml is removed. In addition, the release.yaml file can now be more easily consumed by tools such as kustomize and ytt.
  • The support for resource names to contain the dot character (".") is added.
  • The hostAliases array in the PodTemplate specification is added to the pod-level override of hostname resolution. It is achieved by modifying the /etc/hosts file.
  • A variable $(tasks.status) is introduced to access the aggregate execution status of tasks.
  • An entry-point binary build for Windows is added.

4.1.8.3. Deprecated features

  • In the when expressions, support for fields written is PascalCase is removed. The when expressions only support fields written in lowercase.

    Note

    If you had applied a pipeline with when expressions in Tekton Pipelines v0.16 (Operator v1.2.x), you have to reapply it.

  • When you upgrade the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator to v1.5, the openshift-client and the openshift-client-v-1-5-0 cluster tasks have the SCRIPT parameter. However, the ARGS parameter and the git resource are removed from the specification of the openshift-client cluster task. This is a breaking change, and only those cluster tasks that do not have a specific version in the name field of the ClusterTask resource upgrade seamlessly.

    To prevent the pipeline runs from breaking, use the SCRIPT parameter after the upgrade because it moves the values previously specified in the ARGS parameter into the SCRIPT parameter of the cluster task. For example:

    ...
    - name: deploy
      params:
      - name: SCRIPT
        value: oc rollout status <deployment-name>
      runAfter:
        - build
      taskRef:
        kind: ClusterTask
        name: openshift-client
    ...
  • When you upgrade from Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator v1.4 to v1.5, the profile names in which the TektonConfig custom resource is installed now change.

    Table 4.3. Profiles for TektonConfig custom resource

    Profiles in Pipelines 1.5Corresponding profile in Pipelines 1.4Installed Tekton components

    All (default profile)

    All (default profile)

    Pipelines, Triggers, Add-ons

    Basic

    Default

    Pipelines, Triggers

    Lite

    Basic

    Pipelines

    Note

    If you used profile: all in the config instance of the TektonConfig custom resource, no change is necessary in the resource specification.

    However, if the installed Operator is either in the Default or the Basic profile before the upgrade, you must edit the config instance of the TektonConfig custom resource after the upgrade. For example, if the configuration was profile: basic before the upgrade, ensure that it is profile: lite after upgrading to Pipelines 1.5.

  • The disable-home-env-overwrite and disable-working-dir-overwrite fields are now deprecated and will be removed in a future release. For this release, the default value of these flags is set to true for backward compatibility.

    Note

    In the next release (Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.6), the HOME environment variable will not be automatically set to /tekton/home, and the default working directory will not be set to /workspace for task runs. These defaults collide with any value set by image Dockerfile of the step.

  • The ServiceType and podTemplate fields are removed from the EventListener spec.
  • The controller service account no longer requests cluster-wide permission to list and watch namespaces.
  • The status of the EventListener resource has a new condition called Ready.

    Note

    In the future, the other status conditions for the EventListener resource will be deprecated in favor of the Ready status condition.

  • The eventListener and namespace fields in the EventListener response are deprecated. Use the eventListenerUID field instead.
  • The replicas field is deprecated from the EventListener spec. Instead, the spec.replicas field is moved to spec.resources.kubernetesResource.replicas in the KubernetesResource spec.

    Note

    The replicas field will be removed in a future release.

  • The old method of configuring the core interceptors is deprecated. However, it continues to work until it is removed in a future release. Instead, interceptors in a Trigger resource are now configured using a new ref and params based syntax. The resulting default webhook automatically switch the usages of the old syntax to the new syntax for new triggers.
  • Use rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1 instead of the deprecated rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1beta1 for the ClusterRoleBinding resource.
  • In cluster roles, the cluster-wide write access to resources such as serviceaccounts, secrets, configmaps, and limitranges are removed. In addition, cluster-wide access to resources such as deployments, statefulsets, and deployment/finalizers are removed.
  • The image custom resource definition in the caching.internal.knative.dev group is not used by Tekton anymore, and is excluded in this release.

4.1.8.4. Known issues

  • The git-cli cluster task is built off the alpine/git base image, which expects /root as the user’s home directory. However, this is not explicitly set in the git-cli cluster task.

    In Tekton, the default home directory is overwritten with /tekton/home for every step of a task, unless otherwise specified. This overwriting of the $HOME environment variable of the base image causes the git-cli cluster task to fail.

    This issue is expected to be fixed in the upcoming releases. For Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.5 and earlier versions, you can use any one of the following workarounds to avoid the failure of the git-cli cluster task:

    • Set the $HOME environment variable in the steps, so that it is not overwritten.

      1. [OPTIONAL] If you installed Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines using the Operator, then clone the git-cli cluster task into a separate task. This approach ensures that the Operator does not overwrite the changes made to the cluster task.
      2. Execute the oc edit clustertasks git-cli command.
      3. Add the expected HOME environment variable to the YAML of the step:

        ...
        steps:
          - name: git
            env:
            - name: HOME
              value: /root
            image: $(params.BASE_IMAGE)
            workingDir: $(workspaces.source.path)
        ...
        Warning

        For Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines installed by the Operator, if you do not clone the git-cli cluster task into a separate task before changing the HOME environment variable, then the changes are overwritten during Operator reconciliation.

    • Disable overwriting the HOME environment variable in the feature-flags config map.

      1. Execute the oc edit -n openshift-pipelines configmap feature-flags command.
      2. Set the value of the disable-home-env-overwrite flag to true.

        Warning
        • If you installed Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines using the Operator, then the changes are overwritten during Operator reconciliation.
        • Modifying the default value of the disable-home-env-overwrite flag can break other tasks and cluster tasks, as it changes the default behavior for all tasks.
    • Use a different service account for the git-cli cluster task, as the overwriting of the HOME environment variable happens when the default service account for pipelines is used.

      1. Create a new service account.
      2. Link your Git secret to the service account you just created.
      3. Use the service account while executing a task or a pipeline.
  • On IBM Power Systems, IBM Z, and LinuxONE, the s2i-dotnet cluster task and the tkn hub command are unsupported.
  • When you run Maven and Jib-Maven cluster tasks, the default container image is supported only on Intel (x86) architecture. Therefore, tasks will fail on IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) clusters. As a workaround, you can specify a custom image by setting the MAVEN_IMAGE parameter value to maven:3.6.3-adoptopenjdk-11.

4.1.8.5. Fixed issues

  • The when expressions in dag tasks are not allowed to specify the context variable accessing the execution status ($(tasks.<pipelineTask>.status)) of any other task.
  • Use Owner UIDs instead of Owner names, as it helps avoid race conditions created by deleting a volumeClaimTemplate PVC, in situations where a PipelineRun resource is quickly deleted and then recreated.
  • A new Dockerfile is added for pullrequest-init for build-base image triggered by non-root users.
  • When a pipeline or task is executed with the -f option and the param in its definition does not have a type defined, a validation error is generated instead of the pipeline or task run failing silently.
  • For the tkn start [task | pipeline | clustertask] commands, the description of the --workspace flag is now consistent.
  • While parsing the parameters, if an empty array is encountered, the corresponding interactive help is displayed as an empty string now.

4.1.9. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability 1.4

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines General Availability (GA) 1.4 is now available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.7.

Note

In addition to the stable and preview Operator channels, the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator 1.4.0 comes with the ocp-4.6, ocp-4.5, and ocp-4.4 deprecated channels. These deprecated channels and support for them will be removed in the following release of Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines.

4.1.9.1. Compatibility and support matrix

Some features in this release are currently in Technology Preview. These experimental features are not intended for production use.

In the table, features are marked with the following statuses:

TP

Technology Preview

GA

General Availability

Note the following scope of support on the Red Hat Customer Portal for these features:

Table 4.4. Compatibility and support matrix

FeatureVersionSupport Status

Pipelines

0.22

GA

CLI

0.17

GA

Catalog

0.22

GA

Triggers

0.12

TP

Pipeline resources

-

TP

For questions and feedback, you can send an email to the product team at pipelines-interest@redhat.com.

4.1.9.2. New features

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.4.

  • The custom tasks have the following enhancements:

    • Pipeline results can now refer to results produced by custom tasks.
    • Custom tasks can now use workspaces, service accounts, and pod templates to build more complex custom tasks.
  • The finally task has the following enhancements:

    • The when expressions are supported in finally tasks, which provides efficient guarded execution and improved reusability of tasks.
    • A finally task can be configured to consume the results of any task within the same pipeline.

      Note

      Support for when expressions and finally tasks are unavailable in the OpenShift Container Platform 4.7 web console.

  • Support for multiple secrets of the type dockercfg or dockerconfigjson is added for authentication at runtime.
  • Functionality to support sparse-checkout with the git-clone task is added. This enables you to clone only a subset of the repository as your local copy, and helps you to restrict the size of the cloned repositories.
  • You can create pipeline runs in a pending state without actually starting them. In clusters that are under heavy load, this allows Operators to have control over the start time of the pipeline runs.
  • Ensure that you set the SYSTEM_NAMESPACE environment variable manually for the controller; this was previously set by default.
  • A non-root user is now added to the build-base image of pipelines so that git-init can clone repositories as a non-root user.
  • Support to validate dependencies between resolved resources before a pipeline run starts is added. All result variables in the pipeline must be valid, and optional workspaces from a pipeline can only be passed to tasks expecting it for the pipeline to start running.
  • The controller and webhook runs as a non-root group, and their superfluous capabilities have been removed to make them more secure.
  • You can use the tkn pr logs command to see the log streams for retried task runs.
  • You can use the --clustertask option in the tkn tr delete command to delete all the task runs associated with a particular cluster task.
  • Support for using Knative service with the EventListener resource is added by introducing a new customResource field.
  • An error message is displayed when an event payload does not use the JSON format.
  • The source control interceptors such as GitLab, BitBucket, and GitHub, now use the new InterceptorRequest or InterceptorResponse type interface.
  • A new CEL function marshalJSON is implemented so that you can encode a JSON object or an array to a string.
  • An HTTP handler for serving the CEL and the source control core interceptors is added. It packages four core interceptors into a single HTTP server that is deployed in the tekton-pipelines namespace. The EventListener object forwards events over the HTTP server to the interceptor. Each interceptor is available at a different path. For example, the CEL interceptor is available on the /cel path.
  • The pipelines-scc Security Context Constraint (SCC) is used with the default pipeline service account for pipelines. This new service account is similar to anyuid, but with a minor difference as defined in the YAML for SCC of OpenShift Container Platform 4.7:

    fsGroup:
      type: MustRunAs

4.1.9.3. Deprecated features

  • The build-gcs sub-type in the pipeline resource storage, and the gcs-fetcher image, are not supported.
  • In the taskRun field of cluster tasks, the label tekton.dev/task is removed.
  • For webhooks, the value v1beta1 corresponding to the field admissionReviewVersions is removed.
  • The creds-init helper image for building and deploying is removed.
  • In the triggers spec and binding, the deprecated field template.name is removed in favor of template.ref. You should update all eventListener definitions to use the ref field.

    Note

    Upgrade from Pipelines 1.3.x and earlier versions to Pipelines 1.4.0 breaks event listeners because of the unavailability of the template.name field. For such cases, use Pipelines 1.4.1 to avail the restored template.name field.

  • For EventListener custom resources/objects, the fields PodTemplate and ServiceType are deprecated in favor of Resource.
  • The deprecated spec style embedded bindings is removed.
  • The spec field is removed from the triggerSpecBinding.
  • The event ID representation is changed from a five-character random string to a UUID.

4.1.9.4. Known issues

  • In the Developer perspective, the pipeline metrics and triggers features are available only on OpenShift Container Platform 4.7.6 or later versions.
  • On IBM Power Systems, IBM Z, and LinuxONE, the tkn hub command is not supported.
  • When you run Maven and Jib Maven cluster tasks on an IBM Power Systems (ppc64le), IBM Z, and LinuxONE (s390x) clusters, set the MAVEN_IMAGE parameter value to maven:3.6.3-adoptopenjdk-11.
  • Triggers throw error resulting from bad handling of the JSON format, if you have the following configuration in the trigger binding:

    params:
      - name: github_json
        value: $(body)

    To resolve the issue:

    • If you are using triggers v0.11.0 and above, use the marshalJSON CEL function, which takes a JSON object or array and returns the JSON encoding of that object or array as a string.
    • If you are using older triggers version, add the following annotation in the trigger template:

      annotations:
        triggers.tekton.dev/old-escape-quotes: "true"
  • When upgrading from Pipelines 1.3.x to 1.4.x, you must recreate the routes.

4.1.9.5. Fixed issues

  • Previously, the tekton.dev/task label was removed from the task runs of cluster tasks, and the tekton.dev/clusterTask label was introduced. The problems resulting from that change is resolved by fixing the clustertask describe and delete commands. In addition, the lastrun function for tasks is modified, to fix the issue of the tekton.dev/task label being applied to the task runs of both tasks and cluster tasks in older versions of pipelines.
  • When doing an interactive tkn pipeline start pipelinename, a PipelineResource is created interactively. The tkn p start command prints the resource status if the resource status is not nil.
  • Previously, the tekton.dev/task=name label was removed from the task runs created from cluster tasks. This fix modifies the tkn clustertask start command with the --last flag to check for the tekton.dev/task=name label in the created task runs.
  • When a task uses an inline task specification, the corresponding task run now gets embedded in the pipeline when you run the tkn pipeline describe command, and the task name is returned as embedded.
  • The tkn version command is fixed to display the version of the installed Tekton CLI tool, without a configured kubeConfiguration namespace or access to a cluster.
  • If an argument is unexpected or more than one arguments are used, the tkn completion command gives an error.
  • Previously, pipeline runs with the finally tasks nested in a pipeline specification would lose those finally tasks, when converted to the v1alpha1 version and restored back to the v1beta1 version. This error occurring during conversion is fixed to avoid potential data loss. Pipeline runs with the finally tasks nested in a pipeline specification is now serialized and stored on the alpha version, only to be deserialized later.
  • Previously, there was an error in the pod generation when a service account had the secrets field as {}. The task runs failed with CouldntGetTask because the GET request with an empty secret name returned an error, indicating that the resource name may not be empty. This issue is fixed by avoiding an empty secret name in the kubeclient GET request.
  • Pipelines with the v1beta1 API versions can now be requested along with the v1alpha1 version, without losing the finally tasks. Applying the returned v1alpha1 version will store the resource as v1beta1, with the finally section restored to its original state.
  • Previously, an unset selfLink field in the controller caused an error in the Kubernetes v1.20 clusters. As a temporary fix, the CloudEvent source field is set to a value that matches the current source URI, without the value of the auto-populated selfLink field.
  • Previously, a secret name with dots such as gcr.io led to a task run creation failure. This happened because of the secret name being used internally as part of a volume mount name. The volume mount name conforms to the RFC1123 DNS label and disallows dots as part of the name. This issue is fixed by replacing the dot with a dash that results in a readable name.
  • Context variables are now validated in the finally tasks.
  • Previously, when the task run reconciler was passed a task run that did not have a previous status update containing the name of the pod it created, the task run reconciler listed the pods associated with the task run. The task run reconciler used the labels of the task run, which were propagated to the pod, to find the pod. Changing these labels while the task run was running, caused the code to not find the existing pod. As a result, duplicate pods were created. This issue is fixed by changing the task run reconciler to only use the tekton.dev/taskRun Tekton-controlled label when finding the pod.
  • Previously, when a pipeline accepted an optional workspace and passed it to a pipeline task, the pipeline run reconciler stopped with an error if the workspace was not provided, even if a missing workspace binding is a valid state for an optional workspace. This issue is fixed by ensuring that the pipeline run reconciler does not fail to create a task run, even if an optional workspace is not provided.
  • The sorted order of step statuses matches the order of step containers.
  • Previously, the task run status was set to unknown when a pod encountered the CreateContainerConfigError reason, which meant that the task and the pipeline ran until the pod timed out. This issue is fixed by setting the task run status to false, so that the task is set as failed when the pod encounters the CreateContainerConfigError reason.
  • Previously, pipeline results were resolved on the first reconciliation, after a pipeline run was completed. This could fail the resolution resulting in the Succeeded condition of the pipeline run being overwritten. As a result, the final status information was lost, potentially confusing any services watching the pipeline run conditions. This issue is fixed by moving the resolution of pipeline results to the end of a reconciliation, when the pipeline run is put into a Succeeded or True condition.
  • Execution status variable is now validated. This avoids validating task results while validating context variables to access execution status.
  • Previously, a pipeline result that contained an invalid variable would be added to the pipeline run with the literal expression of the variable intact. Therefore, it was difficult to assess whether the results were populated correctly. This issue is fixed by filtering out the pipeline run results that reference failed task runs. Now, a pipeline result that contains an invalid variable will not be emitted by the pipeline run at all.
  • The tkn eventlistener describe command is fixed to avoid crashing without a template. It also displays the details about trigger references.
  • Upgrades from Pipelines 1.3.x and earlier versions to Pipelines 1.4.0 breaks event listeners because of the unavailability of template.name. In Pipelines 1.4.1, the template.name has been restored to avoid breaking event listeners in triggers.
  • In Pipelines 1.4.1, the ConsoleQuickStart custom resource has been updated to align with OpenShift Container Platform 4.7 capabilities and behavior.

4.1.10. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview 1.3

4.1.10.1. New features

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview (TP) 1.3 is now available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.7. Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines TP 1.3 is updated to support:

  • Tekton Pipelines 0.19.0
  • Tekton tkn CLI 0.15.0
  • Tekton Triggers 0.10.2
  • cluster tasks based on Tekton Catalog 0.19.0
  • IBM Power Systems on OpenShift Container Platform 4.7
  • IBM Z and LinuxONE on OpenShift Container Platform 4.7

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.3.

4.1.10.1.1. Pipelines
  • Tasks that build images, such as S2I and Buildah tasks, now emit a URL of the image built that includes the image SHA.
  • Conditions in pipeline tasks that reference custom tasks are disallowed because the Condition custom resource definition (CRD) has been deprecated.
  • Variable expansion is now added in the Task CRD for the following fields: spec.steps[].imagePullPolicy and spec.sidecar[].imagePullPolicy.
  • You can disable the built-in credential mechanism in Tekton by setting the disable-creds-init feature-flag to true.
  • Resolved when expressions are now listed in the Skipped Tasks and the Task Runs sections in the Status field of the PipelineRun configuration.
  • The git init command can now clone recursive submodules.
  • A Task CR author can now specify a timeout for a step in the Task spec.
  • You can now base the entry point image on the distroless/static:nonroot image and give it a mode to copy itself to the destination, without relying on the cp command being present in the base image.
  • You can now use the configuration flag require-git-ssh-secret-known-hosts to disallow omitting known hosts in the Git SSH secret. When the flag value is set to true, you must include the known_host field in the Git SSH secret. The default value for the flag is false.
  • The concept of optional workspaces is now introduced. A task or pipeline might declare a workspace optional and conditionally change their behavior based on its presence. A task run or pipeline run might also omit that workspace, thereby modifying the task or pipeline behavior. The default task run workspaces are not added in place of an omitted optional workspace.
  • Credentials initialization in Tekton now detects an SSH credential that is used with a non-SSH URL, and vice versa in Git pipeline resources, and logs a warning in the step containers.
  • The task run controller emits a warning event if the affinity specified by the pod template is overwritten by the affinity assistant.
  • The task run reconciler now records metrics for cloud events that are emitted once a task run is completed. This includes retries.
4.1.10.1.2. Pipelines CLI
  • Support for --no-headers flag is now added to the following commands: tkn condition list,tkn triggerbinding list,tkn eventlistener list,tkn clustertask list, tkn clustertriggerbinding list.
  • When used together, the --last or --use options override the --prefix-name and --timeout options.
  • The tkn eventlistener logs command is now added to view the EventListener logs.
  • The tekton hub commands are now integrated into the tkn CLI.
  • The --nocolour option is now changed to --no-color.
  • The --all-namespaces flag is added to the following commands: tkn triggertemplate list, tkn condition list, tkn triggerbinding list, tkn eventlistener list.
4.1.10.1.3. Triggers
  • You can now specify your resource information in the EventListener template.
  • It is now mandatory for EventListener service accounts to have the list and watch verbs, in addition to the get verb for all the triggers resources. This enables you to use Listers to fetch data from EventListener, Trigger, TriggerBinding, TriggerTemplate, and ClusterTriggerBinding resources. You can use this feature to create a Sink object rather than specifying multiple informers, and directly make calls to the API server.
  • A new Interceptor interface is added to support immutable input event bodies. Interceptors can now add data or fields to a new extensions field, and cannot modify the input bodies making them immutable. The CEL interceptor uses this new Interceptor interface.
  • A namespaceSelector field is added to the EventListener resource. Use it to specify the namespaces from where the EventListener resource can fetch the Trigger object for processing events. To use the namespaceSelector field, the service account for the EventListener resource must have a cluster role.
  • The triggers EventListener resource now supports end-to-end secure connection to the eventlistener pod.
  • The escaping parameters behavior in the TriggerTemplates resource by replacing " with \" is now removed.
  • A new resources field, supporting Kubernetes resources, is introduced as part of the EventListener spec.
  • A new functionality for the CEL interceptor, with support for upper and lower-casing of ASCII strings, is added.
  • You can embed TriggerBinding resources by using the name and value fields in a trigger, or an event listener.
  • The PodSecurityPolicy configuration is updated to run in restricted environments. It ensures that containers must run as non-root. In addition, the role-based access control for using the pod security policy is moved from cluster-scoped to namespace-scoped. This ensures that the triggers cannot use other pod security policies that are unrelated to a namespace.
  • Support for embedded trigger templates is now added. You can either use the name field to refer to an embedded template or embed the template inside the spec field.

4.1.10.2. Deprecated features

  • Pipeline templates that use PipelineResources CRDs are now deprecated and will be removed in a future release.
  • The template.name field is deprecated in favor of the template.ref field and will be removed in a future release.
  • The -c shorthand for the --check command has been removed. In addition, global tkn flags are added to the version command.

4.1.10.3. Known issues

  • CEL overlays add fields to a new top-level extensions function, instead of modifying the incoming event body. TriggerBinding resources can access values within this new extensions function using the $(extensions.<key>) syntax. Update your binding to use the $(extensions.<key>) syntax instead of the $(body.<overlay-key>) syntax.
  • The escaping parameters behavior by replacing " with \" is now removed. If you need to retain the old escaping parameters behavior add the tekton.dev/old-escape-quotes: true" annotation to your TriggerTemplate specification.
  • You can embed TriggerBinding resources by using the name and value fields inside a trigger or an event listener. However, you cannot specify both name and ref fields for a single binding. Use the ref field to refer to a TriggerBinding resource and the name field for embedded bindings.
  • An interceptor cannot attempt to reference a secret outside the namespace of an EventListener resource. You must include secrets in the namespace of the `EventListener`resource.
  • In Triggers 0.9.0 and later, if a body or header based TriggerBinding parameter is missing or malformed in an event payload, the default values are used instead of displaying an error.
  • Tasks and pipelines created with WhenExpression objects using Tekton Pipelines 0.16.x must be reapplied to fix their JSON annotations.
  • When a pipeline accepts an optional workspace and gives it to a task, the pipeline run stalls if the workspace is not provided.
  • To use the Buildah cluster task in a disconnected environment, ensure that the Dockerfile uses an internal image stream as the base image, and then use it in the same manner as any S2I cluster task.

4.1.10.4. Fixed issues

  • Extensions added by a CEL Interceptor are passed on to webhook interceptors by adding the Extensions field within the event body.
  • The activity timeout for log readers is now configurable using the LogOptions field. However, the default behavior of timeout in 10 seconds is retained.
  • The log command ignores the --follow flag when a task run or pipeline run is complete, and reads available logs instead of live logs.
  • References to the following Tekton resources: EventListener, TriggerBinding, ClusterTriggerBinding, Condition, and TriggerTemplate are now standardized and made consistent across all user-facing messages in tkn commands.
  • Previously, if you started a canceled task run or pipeline run with the --use-taskrun <canceled-task-run-name>, --use-pipelinerun <canceled-pipeline-run-name> or --last flags, the new run would be canceled. This bug is now fixed.
  • The tkn pr desc command is now enhanced to ensure that it does not fail in case of pipeline runs with conditions.
  • When you delete a task run using the tkn tr delete command with the --task option, and a cluster task exists with the same name, the task runs for the cluster task also get deleted. As a workaround, filter the task runs by using the TaskRefKind field.
  • The tkn triggertemplate describe command would display only part of the apiVersion value in the output. For example, only triggers.tekton.dev was displayed instead of triggers.tekton.dev/v1alpha1. This bug is now fixed.
  • The webhook, under certain conditions, would fail to acquire a lease and not function correctly. This bug is now fixed.
  • Pipelines with when expressions created in v0.16.3 can now be run in v0.17.1 and later. After an upgrade, you do not need to reapply pipeline definitions created in previous versions because both the uppercase and lowercase first letters for the annotations are now supported.
  • By default, the leader-election-ha field is now enabled for high availability. When the disable-ha controller flag is set to true, it disables high availability support.
  • Issues with duplicate cloud events are now fixed. Cloud events are now sent only when a condition changes the state, reason, or message.
  • When a service account name is missing from a PipelineRun or TaskRun spec, the controller uses the service account name from the config-defaults config map. If the service account name is also missing in the config-defaults config map, the controller now sets it to default in the spec.
  • Validation for compatibility with the affinity assistant is now supported when the same persistent volume claim is used for multiple workspaces, but with different subpaths.

4.1.11. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview 1.2

4.1.11.1. New features

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview (TP) 1.2 is now available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.6. Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines TP 1.2 is updated to support:

  • Tekton Pipelines 0.16.3
  • Tekton tkn CLI 0.13.1
  • Tekton Triggers 0.8.1
  • cluster tasks based on Tekton Catalog 0.16
  • IBM Power Systems on OpenShift Container Platform 4.6
  • IBM Z and LinuxONE on OpenShift Container Platform 4.6

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.2.

4.1.11.1.1. Pipelines
  • This release of Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines adds support for a disconnected installation.

    Note

    Installations in restricted environments are currently not supported on IBM Power Systems, IBM Z, and LinuxONE.

  • You can now use the when field, instead of conditions resource, to run a task only when certain criteria are met. The key components of WhenExpression resources are Input, Operator, and Values. If all the when expressions evaluate to True, then the task is run. If any of the when expressions evaluate to False, the task is skipped.
  • Step statuses are now updated if a task run is canceled or times out.
  • Support for Git Large File Storage (LFS) is now available to build the base image used by git-init.
  • You can now use the taskSpec field to specify metadata, such as labels and annotations, when a task is embedded in a pipeline.
  • Cloud events are now supported by pipeline runs. Retries with backoff are now enabled for cloud events sent by the cloud event pipeline resource.
  • You can now set a default Workspace configuration for any workspace that a Task resource declares, but that a TaskRun resource does not explicitly provide.
  • Support is available for namespace variable interpolation for the PipelineRun namespace and TaskRun namespace.
  • Validation for TaskRun objects is now added to check that not more than one persistent volume claim workspace is used when a TaskRun resource is associated with an Affinity Assistant. If more than one persistent volume claim workspace is used, the task run fails with a TaskRunValidationFailed condition. Note that by default, the Affinity Assistant is disabled in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, so you will need to enable the assistant to use it.
4.1.11.1.2. Pipelines CLI
  • The tkn task describe, tkn taskrun describe, tkn clustertask describe, tkn pipeline describe, and tkn pipelinerun describe commands now:

    • Automatically select the Task, TaskRun, ClusterTask, Pipeline and PipelineRun resource, respectively, if only one of them is present.
    • Display the results of the Task, TaskRun, ClusterTask, Pipeline and PipelineRun resource in their outputs, respectively.
    • Display workspaces declared in the Task, TaskRun, ClusterTask, Pipeline and PipelineRun resource in their outputs, respectively.
  • You can now use the --prefix-name option with the tkn clustertask start command to specify a prefix for the name of a task run.
  • Interactive mode support has now been provided to the tkn clustertask start command.
  • You can now specify PodTemplate properties supported by pipelines using local or remote file definitions for TaskRun and PipelineRun objects.
  • You can now use the --use-params-defaults option with the tkn clustertask start command to use the default values set in the ClusterTask configuration and create the task run.
  • The --use-param-defaults flag for the tkn pipeline start command now prompts the interactive mode if the default values have not been specified for some of the parameters.
4.1.11.1.3. Triggers
  • The Common Expression Language (CEL) function named parseYAML has been added to parse a YAML string into a map of strings.
  • Error messages for parsing CEL expressions have been improved to make them more granular while evaluating expressions and when parsing the hook body for creating the evaluation environment.
  • Support is now available for marshaling boolean values and maps if they are used as the values of expressions in a CEL overlay mechanism.
  • The following fields have been added to the EventListener object:

    • The replicas field enables the event listener to run more than one pod by specifying the number of replicas in the YAML file.
    • The NodeSelector field enables the EventListener object to schedule the event listener pod to a specific node.
  • Webhook interceptors can now parse the EventListener-Request-URL header to extract parameters from the original request URL being handled by the event listener.
  • Annotations from the event listener can now be propagated to the deployment, services, and other pods. Note that custom annotations on services or deployment are overwritten, and hence, must be added to the event listener annotations so that they are propagated.
  • Proper validation for replicas in the EventListener specification is now available for cases when a user specifies the spec.replicas values as negative or zero.
  • You can now specify the TriggerCRD object inside the EventListener spec as a reference using the TriggerRef field to create the TriggerCRD object separately and then bind it inside the EventListener spec.
  • Validation and defaults for the TriggerCRD object are now available.

4.1.11.2. Deprecated features

  • $(params) parameters are now removed from the triggertemplate resource and replaced by $(tt.params) to avoid confusion between the resourcetemplate and triggertemplate resource parameters.
  • The ServiceAccount reference of the optional EventListenerTrigger-based authentication level has changed from an object reference to a ServiceAccountName string. This ensures that the ServiceAccount reference is in the same namespace as the EventListenerTrigger object.
  • The Conditions custom resource definition (CRD) is now deprecated; use the WhenExpressions CRD instead.
  • The PipelineRun.Spec.ServiceAccountNames object is being deprecated and replaced by the PipelineRun.Spec.TaskRunSpec[].ServiceAccountName object.

4.1.11.3. Known issues

  • This release of Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines adds support for a disconnected installation. However, some images used by the cluster tasks must be mirrored for them to work in disconnected clusters.
  • Pipelines in the openshift namespace are not deleted after you uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. Use the oc delete pipelines -n openshift --all command to delete the pipelines.
  • Uninstalling the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator does not remove the event listeners.

    As a workaround, to remove the EventListener and Pod CRDs:

    1. Edit the EventListener object with the foregroundDeletion finalizers:

      $ oc patch el/<eventlistener_name> -p '{"metadata":{"finalizers":["foregroundDeletion"]}}' --type=merge

      For example:

      $ oc patch el/github-listener-interceptor -p '{"metadata":{"finalizers":["foregroundDeletion"]}}' --type=merge
    2. Delete the EventListener CRD:

      $ oc patch crd/eventlisteners.triggers.tekton.dev -p '{"metadata":{"finalizers":[]}}' --type=merge
  • When you run a multi-arch container image task without command specification on an IBM Power Systems (ppc64le) or IBM Z (s390x) cluster, the TaskRun resource fails with the following error:

    Error executing command: fork/exec /bin/bash: exec format error

    As a workaround, use an architecture specific container image or specify the sha256 digest to point to the correct architecture. To get the sha256 digest enter:

    $ skopeo inspect --raw <image_name>| jq '.manifests[] | select(.platform.architecture == "<architecture>") | .digest'

4.1.11.4. Fixed issues

  • A simple syntax validation to check the CEL filter, overlays in the Webhook validator, and the expressions in the interceptor has now been added.
  • Triggers no longer overwrite annotations set on the underlying deployment and service objects.
  • Previously, an event listener would stop accepting events. This fix adds an idle timeout of 120 seconds for the EventListener sink to resolve this issue.
  • Previously, canceling a pipeline run with a Failed(Canceled) state gave a success message. This has been fixed to display an error instead.
  • The tkn eventlistener list command now provides the status of the listed event listeners, thus enabling you to easily identify the available ones.
  • Consistent error messages are now displayed for the triggers list and triggers describe commands when triggers are not installed or when a resource cannot be found.
  • Previously, a large number of idle connections would build up during cloud event delivery. The DisableKeepAlives: true parameter was added to the cloudeventclient config to fix this issue. Thus, a new connection is set up for every cloud event.
  • Previously, the creds-init code would write empty files to the disk even if credentials of a given type were not provided. This fix modifies the creds-init code to write files for only those credentials that have actually been mounted from correctly annotated secrets.

4.1.12. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview 1.1

4.1.12.1. New features

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview (TP) 1.1 is now available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.5. Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines TP 1.1 is updated to support:

  • Tekton Pipelines 0.14.3
  • Tekton tkn CLI 0.11.0
  • Tekton Triggers 0.6.1
  • cluster tasks based on Tekton Catalog 0.14

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.1.

4.1.12.1.1. Pipelines
  • Workspaces can now be used instead of pipeline resources. It is recommended that you use workspaces in OpenShift Pipelines, as pipeline resources are difficult to debug, limited in scope, and make tasks less reusable. For more details on workspaces, see the Understanding OpenShift Pipelines section.
  • Workspace support for volume claim templates has been added:

    • The volume claim template for a pipeline run and task run can now be added as a volume source for workspaces. The tekton-controller then creates a persistent volume claim (PVC) using the template that is seen as a PVC for all task runs in the pipeline. Thus you do not need to define the PVC configuration every time it binds a workspace that spans multiple tasks.
    • Support to find the name of the PVC when a volume claim template is used as a volume source is now available using variable substitution.
  • Support for improving audits:

    • The PipelineRun.Status field now contains the status of every task run in the pipeline and the pipeline specification used to instantiate a pipeline run to monitor the progress of the pipeline run.
    • Pipeline results have been added to the pipeline specification and PipelineRun status.
    • The TaskRun.Status field now contains the exact task specification used to instantiate the TaskRun resource.
  • Support to apply the default parameter to conditions.
  • A task run created by referencing a cluster task now adds the tekton.dev/clusterTask label instead of the tekton.dev/task label.
  • The kube config writer now adds the ClientKeyData and the ClientCertificateData configurations in the resource structure to enable replacement of the pipeline resource type cluster with the kubeconfig-creator task.
  • The names of the feature-flags and the config-defaults config maps are now customizable.
  • Support for the host network in the pod template used by the task run is now available.
  • An Affinity Assistant is now available to support node affinity in task runs that share workspace volume. By default, this is disabled on OpenShift Pipelines.
  • The pod template has been updated to specify imagePullSecrets to identify secrets that the container runtime should use to authorize container image pulls when starting a pod.
  • Support for emitting warning events from the task run controller if the controller fails to update the task run.
  • Standard or recommended k8s labels have been added to all resources to identify resources belonging to an application or component.
  • The Entrypoint process is now notified for signals and these signals are then propagated using a dedicated PID Group of the Entrypoint process.
  • The pod template can now be set on a task level at runtime using task run specs.
  • Support for emitting Kubernetes events:

    • The controller now emits events for additional task run lifecycle events - taskrun started and taskrun running.
    • The pipeline run controller now emits an event every time a pipeline starts.
  • In addition to the default Kubernetes events, support for cloud events for task runs is now available. The controller can be configured to send any task run events, such as create, started, and failed, as cloud events.
  • Support for using the $context.<task|taskRun|pipeline|pipelineRun>.name variable to reference the appropriate name when in pipeline runs and task runs.
  • Validation for pipeline run parameters is now available to ensure that all the parameters required by the pipeline are provided by the pipeline run. This also allows pipeline runs to provide extra parameters in addition to the required parameters.
  • You can now specify tasks within a pipeline that will always execute before the pipeline exits, either after finishing all tasks successfully or after a task in the pipeline failed, using the finally field in the pipeline YAML file.
  • The git-clone cluster task is now available.
4.1.12.1.2. Pipelines CLI
  • Support for embedded trigger binding is now available to the tkn evenlistener describe command.
  • Support to recommend subcommands and make suggestions if an incorrect subcommand is used.
  • The tkn task describe command now auto selects the task if only one task is present in the pipeline.
  • You can now start a task using default parameter values by specifying the --use-param-defaults flag in the tkn task start command.
  • You can now specify a volume claim template for pipeline runs or task runs using the --workspace option with the tkn pipeline start or tkn task start commands.
  • The tkn pipelinerun logs command now displays logs for the final tasks listed in the finally section.
  • Interactive mode support has now been provided to the tkn task start command and the describe subcommand for the following tkn resources: pipeline, pipelinerun, task, taskrun, clustertask, and pipelineresource.
  • The tkn version command now displays the version of the triggers installed in the cluster.
  • The tkn pipeline describe command now displays parameter values and timeouts specified for tasks used in the pipeline.
  • Support added for the --last option for the tkn pipelinerun describe and the tkn taskrun describe commands to describe the most recent pipeline run or task run, respectively.
  • The tkn pipeline describe command now displays the conditions applicable to the tasks in the pipeline.
  • You can now use the --no-headers and --all-namespaces flags with the tkn resource list command.
4.1.12.1.3. Triggers
  • The following Common Expression Language (CEL) functions are now available:

    • parseURL to parse and extract portions of a URL
    • parseJSON to parse JSON value types embedded in a string in the payload field of the deployment webhook
  • A new interceptor for webhooks from Bitbucket has been added.
  • Event listeners now display the Address URL and the Available status as additional fields when listed with the kubectl get command.
  • trigger template params now use the $(tt.params.<paramName>) syntax instead of $(params.<paramName>) to reduce the confusion between trigger template and resource templates params.
  • You can now add tolerations in the EventListener CRD to ensure that event listeners are deployed with the same configuration even if all nodes are tainted due to security or management issues.
  • You can now add a Readiness Probe for event listener Deployment at URL/live.
  • Support for embedding TriggerBinding specifications in event listener triggers is now added.
  • Trigger resources are now annotated with the recommended app.kubernetes.io labels.

4.1.12.2. Deprecated features

The following items are deprecated in this release:

  • The --namespace or -n flags for all cluster-wide commands, including the clustertask and clustertriggerbinding commands, are deprecated. It will be removed in a future release.
  • The name field in triggers.bindings within an event listener has been deprecated in favor of the ref field and will be removed in a future release.
  • Variable interpolation in trigger templates using $(params) has been deprecated in favor of using $(tt.params) to reduce confusion with the pipeline variable interpolation syntax. The $(params.<paramName>) syntax will be removed in a future release.
  • The tekton.dev/task label is deprecated on cluster tasks.
  • The TaskRun.Status.ResourceResults.ResourceRef field is deprecated and will be removed.
  • The tkn pipeline create, tkn task create, and tkn resource create -f subcommands have been removed.
  • Namespace validation has been removed from tkn commands.
  • The default timeout of 1h and the -t flag for the tkn ct start command have been removed.
  • The s2i cluster task has been deprecated.

4.1.12.3. Known issues

  • Conditions do not support workspaces.
  • The --workspace option and the interactive mode is not supported for the tkn clustertask start command.
  • Support of backward compatibility for $(params.<paramName>) syntax forces you to use trigger templates with pipeline specific params as the trigger s webhook is unable to differentiate trigger params from pipelines params.
  • Pipeline metrics report incorrect values when you run a promQL query for tekton_taskrun_count and tekton_taskrun_duration_seconds_count.
  • pipeline runs and task runs continue to be in the Running and Running(Pending) states respectively even when a non existing PVC name is given to a workspace.

4.1.12.4. Fixed issues

  • Previously, the tkn task delete <name> --trs command would delete both the task and cluster task if the name of the task and cluster task were the same. With this fix, the command deletes only the task runs that are created by the task <name>.
  • Previously the tkn pr delete -p <name> --keep 2 command would disregard the -p flag when used with the --keep flag and would delete all the pipeline runs except the latest two. With this fix, the command deletes only the pipeline runs that are created by the pipeline <name>, except for the latest two.
  • The tkn triggertemplate describe output now displays resource templates in a table format instead of YAML format.
  • Previously the buildah cluster task failed when a new user was added to a container. With this fix, the issue has been resolved.

4.1.13. Release notes for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview 1.0

4.1.13.1. New features

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Technology Preview (TP) 1.0 is now available on OpenShift Container Platform 4.4. Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines TP 1.0 is updated to support:

  • Tekton Pipelines 0.11.3
  • Tekton tkn CLI 0.9.0
  • Tekton Triggers 0.4.0
  • cluster tasks based on Tekton Catalog 0.11

In addition to the fixes and stability improvements, the following sections highlight what is new in Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.0.

4.1.13.1.1. Pipelines
  • Support for v1beta1 API Version.
  • Support for an improved limit range. Previously, limit range was specified exclusively for the task run and the pipeline run. Now there is no need to explicitly specify the limit range. The minimum limit range across the namespace is used.
  • Support for sharing data between tasks using task results and task params.
  • Pipelines can now be configured to not overwrite the HOME environment variable and the working directory of steps.
  • Similar to task steps, sidecars now support script mode.
  • You can now specify a different scheduler name in task run podTemplate resource.
  • Support for variable substitution using Star Array Notation.
  • Tekton controller can now be configured to monitor an individual namespace.
  • A new description field is now added to the specification of pipelines, tasks, cluster tasks, resources, and conditions.
  • Addition of proxy parameters to Git pipeline resources.
4.1.13.1.2. Pipelines CLI
  • The describe subcommand is now added for the following tkn resources: EventListener, Condition, TriggerTemplate, ClusterTask, and TriggerSBinding.
  • Support added for v1beta1 to the following resources along with backward compatibility for v1alpha1: ClusterTask, Task, Pipeline, PipelineRun, and TaskRun.
  • The following commands can now list output from all namespaces using the --all-namespaces flag option: tkn task list, tkn pipeline list, tkn taskrun list, tkn pipelinerun list

    The output of these commands is also enhanced to display information without headers using the --no-headers flag option.

  • You can now start a pipeline using default parameter values by specifying --use-param-defaults flag in the tkn pipelines start command.
  • Support for workspace is now added to tkn pipeline start and tkn task start commands.
  • A new clustertriggerbinding command is now added with the following subcommands: describe, delete, and list.
  • You can now directly start a pipeline run using a local or remote yaml file.
  • The describe subcommand now displays an enhanced and detailed output. With the addition of new fields, such as description, timeout, param description, and sidecar status, the command output now provides more detailed information about a specific tkn resource.
  • The tkn task log command now displays logs directly if only one task is present in the namespace.
4.1.13.1.3. Triggers
  • Triggers can now create both v1alpha1 and v1beta1 pipeline resources.
  • Support for new Common Expression Language (CEL) interceptor function - compareSecret. This function securely compares strings to secrets in CEL expressions.
  • Support for authentication and authorization at the event listener trigger level.

4.1.13.2. Deprecated features

The following items are deprecated in this release:

  • The environment variable $HOME, and variable workingDir in the Steps specification are deprecated and might be changed in a future release. Currently in a Step container, the HOME and workingDir variables are overwritten to /tekton/home and /workspace variables, respectively.

    In a later release, these two fields will not be modified, and will be set to values defined in the container image and the Task YAML. For this release, use the disable-home-env-overwrite and disable-working-directory-overwrite flags to disable overwriting of the HOME and workingDir variables.

  • The following commands are deprecated and might be removed in the future release: tkn pipeline create, tkn task create.
  • The -f flag with the tkn resource create command is now deprecated. It might be removed in the future release.
  • The -t flag and the --timeout flag (with seconds format) for the tkn clustertask create command are now deprecated. Only duration timeout format is now supported, for example 1h30s. These deprecated flags might be removed in the future release.

4.1.13.3. Known issues

  • If you are upgrading from an older version of Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, you must delete your existing deployments before upgrading to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines version 1.0. To delete an existing deployment, you must first delete Custom Resources and then uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. For more details, see the uninstalling Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines section.
  • Submitting the same v1alpha1 tasks more than once results in an error. Use the oc replace command instead of oc apply when re-submitting a v1alpha1 task.
  • The buildah cluster task does not work when a new user is added to a container.

    When the Operator is installed, the --storage-driver flag for the buildah cluster task is not specified, therefore the flag is set to its default value. In some cases, this causes the storage driver to be set incorrectly. When a new user is added, the incorrect storage-driver results in the failure of the buildah cluster task with the following error:

    useradd: /etc/passwd.8: lock file already used
    useradd: cannot lock /etc/passwd; try again later.

    As a workaround, manually set the --storage-driver flag value to overlay in the buildah-task.yaml file:

    1. Login to your cluster as a cluster-admin:

      $ oc login -u <login> -p <password> https://openshift.example.com:6443
    2. Use the oc edit command to edit buildah cluster task:

      $ oc edit clustertask buildah

      The current version of the buildah clustertask YAML file opens in the editor set by your EDITOR environment variable.

    3. Under the Steps field, locate the following command field:

       command: ['buildah', 'bud', '--format=$(params.FORMAT)', '--tls-verify=$(params.TLSVERIFY)', '--layers', '-f', '$(params.DOCKERFILE)', '-t', '$(resources.outputs.image.url)', '$(params.CONTEXT)']
    4. Replace the command field with the following:

       command: ['buildah', '--storage-driver=overlay', 'bud', '--format=$(params.FORMAT)', '--tls-verify=$(params.TLSVERIFY)', '--no-cache', '-f', '$(params.DOCKERFILE)', '-t', '$(params.IMAGE)', '$(params.CONTEXT)']
    5. Save the file and exit.

    Alternatively, you can also modify the buildah cluster task YAML file directly on the web console by navigating to PipelinesCluster Tasksbuildah. Select Edit Cluster Task from the Actions menu and replace the command field as shown in the previous procedure.

4.1.13.4. Fixed issues

  • Previously, the DeploymentConfig task triggered a new deployment build even when an image build was already in progress. This caused the deployment of the pipeline to fail. With this fix, the deploy task command is now replaced with the oc rollout status command which waits for the in-progress deployment to finish.
  • Support for APP_NAME parameter is now added in pipeline templates.
  • Previously, the pipeline template for Java S2I failed to look up the image in the registry. With this fix, the image is looked up using the existing image pipeline resources instead of the user provided IMAGE_NAME parameter.
  • All the OpenShift Pipelines images are now based on the Red Hat Universal Base Images (UBI).
  • Previously, when the pipeline was installed in a namespace other than tekton-pipelines, the tkn version command displayed the pipeline version as unknown. With this fix, the tkn version command now displays the correct pipeline version in any namespace.
  • The -c flag is no longer supported for the tkn version command.
  • Non-admin users can now list the cluster trigger bindings.
  • The event listener CompareSecret function is now fixed for the CEL Interceptor.
  • The list, describe, and start subcommands for tasks and cluster tasks now correctly display the output in case a task and cluster task have the same name.
  • Previously, the OpenShift Pipelines Operator modified the privileged security context constraints (SCCs), which caused an error during cluster upgrade. This error is now fixed.
  • In the tekton-pipelines namespace, the timeouts of all task runs and pipeline runs are now set to the value of default-timeout-minutes field using the config map.
  • Previously, the pipelines section in the web console was not displayed for non-admin users. This issue is now resolved.

4.2. Understanding OpenShift Pipelines

Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines is a cloud-native, continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) solution based on Kubernetes resources. It uses Tekton building blocks to automate deployments across multiple platforms by abstracting away the underlying implementation details. Tekton introduces a number of standard custom resource definitions (CRDs) for defining CI/CD pipelines that are portable across Kubernetes distributions.

4.2.1. Key features

  • Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines is a serverless CI/CD system that runs pipelines with all the required dependencies in isolated containers.
  • Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines are designed for decentralized teams that work on microservice-based architecture.
  • Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines use standard CI/CD pipeline definitions that are easy to extend and integrate with the existing Kubernetes tools, enabling you to scale on-demand.
  • You can use Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines to build images with Kubernetes tools such as Source-to-Image (S2I), Buildah, Buildpacks, and Kaniko that are portable across any Kubernetes platform.
  • You can use the OpenShift Container Platform web console Developer perspective to create Tekton resources, view logs of pipeline runs, and manage pipelines in your OpenShift Container Platform namespaces.

4.2.2. OpenShift Pipeline Concepts

This guide provides a detailed view of the various pipeline concepts.

4.2.2.1. Tasks

Tasks are the building blocks of a pipeline and consists of sequentially executed steps. It is essentially a function of inputs and outputs. A task can run individually or as a part of the pipeline. Tasks are reusable and can be used in multiple Pipelines.

Steps are a series of commands that are sequentially executed by the task and achieve a specific goal, such as building an image. Every task runs as a pod, and each step runs as a container within that pod. Because steps run within the same pod, they can access the same volumes for caching files, config maps, and secrets.

The following example shows the apply-manifests task.

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
kind: Task 2
metadata:
  name: apply-manifests 3
spec: 4
  workspaces:
  - name: source
  params:
    - name: manifest_dir
      description: The directory in source that contains yaml manifests
      type: string
      default: "k8s"
  steps:
    - name: apply
      image: image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/openshift/cli:latest
      workingDir: /workspace/source
      command: ["/bin/bash", "-c"]
      args:
        - |-
          echo Applying manifests in $(params.manifest_dir) directory
          oc apply -f $(params.manifest_dir)
          echo -----------------------------------
1
The task API version, v1beta1.
2
The type of Kubernetes object, Task.
3
The unique name of this task.
4
The list of parameters and steps in the task and the workspace used by the task.

This task starts the pod and runs a container inside that pod using the specified image to run the specified commands.

Note

Starting with Pipelines 1.6, the following defaults from the step YAML file are removed:

  • The HOME environment variable does not default to the /tekton/home directory
  • The workingDir field does not default to the /workspace directory

Instead, the container for the step defines the HOME environment variable and the workingDir field. However, you can override the default values by specifying the custom values in the YAML file for the step.

As a temporary measure, to maintain backward compatibility with the older Pipelines versions, you can set the following fields in the TektonConfig custom resource definition to false:

spec:
  pipeline:
    disable-working-directory-overwrite: false
    disable-home-env-overwrite: false

4.2.2.2. When expression

When expressions guard task execution by setting criteria for the execution of tasks within a pipeline. They contain a list of components that allows a task to run only when certain criteria are met. When expressions are also supported in the final set of tasks that are specified using the finally field in the pipeline YAML file.

The key components of a when expression are as follows:

  • input: Specifies static inputs or variables such as a parameter, task result, and execution status. You must enter a valid input. If you do not enter a valid input, its value defaults to an empty string.
  • operator: Specifies the relationship of an input to a set of values. Enter in or notin as your operator values.
  • values: Specifies an array of string values. Enter a non-empty array of static values or variables such as parameters, results, and a bound state of a workspace.

The declared when expressions are evaluated before the task is run. If the value of a when expression is True, the task is run. If the value of a when expression is False, the task is skipped.

You can use the when expressions in various use cases. For example, whether:

  • The result of a previous task is as expected.
  • A file in a Git repository has changed in the previous commits.
  • An image exists in the registry.
  • An optional workspace is available.

The following example shows the when expressions for a pipeline run. The pipeline run will execute the create-file task only if the following criteria are met: the path parameter is README.md, and the echo-file-exists task executed only if the exists result from the check-file task is yes.

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
kind: PipelineRun 1
metadata:
  generateName: guarded-pr-
spec:
  serviceAccountName: 'pipeline'
  pipelineSpec:
    params:
      - name: path
        type: string
        description: The path of the file to be created
    workspaces:
      - name: source
        description: |
          This workspace is shared among all the pipeline tasks to read/write common resources
    tasks:
      - name: create-file 2
        when:
          - input: "$(params.path)"
            operator: in
            values: ["README.md"]
        workspaces:
          - name: source
            workspace: source
        taskSpec:
          workspaces:
            - name: source
              description: The workspace to create the readme file in
          steps:
            - name: write-new-stuff
              image: ubuntu
              script: 'touch $(workspaces.source.path)/README.md'
      - name: check-file
        params:
          - name: path
            value: "$(params.path)"
        workspaces:
          - name: source
            workspace: source
        runAfter:
          - create-file
        taskSpec:
          params:
            - name: path
          workspaces:
            - name: source
              description: The workspace to check for the file
          results:
            - name: exists
              description: indicates whether the file exists or is missing
          steps:
            - name: check-file
              image: alpine
              script: |
                if test -f $(workspaces.source.path)/$(params.path); then
                  printf yes | tee /tekton/results/exists
                else
                  printf no | tee /tekton/results/exists
                fi
      - name: echo-file-exists
        when: 3
          - input: "$(tasks.check-file.results.exists)"
            operator: in
            values: ["yes"]
        taskSpec:
          steps:
            - name: echo
              image: ubuntu
              script: 'echo file exists'
...
      - name: task-should-be-skipped-1
        when: 4
          - input: "$(params.path)"
            operator: notin
            values: ["README.md"]
        taskSpec:
          steps:
            - name: echo
              image: ubuntu
              script: exit 1
...
    finally:
      - name: finally-task-should-be-executed
        when: 5
          - input: "$(tasks.echo-file-exists.status)"
            operator: in
            values: ["Succeeded"]
          - input: "$(tasks.status)"
            operator: in
            values: ["Succeeded"]
          - input: "$(tasks.check-file.results.exists)"
            operator: in
            values: ["yes"]
          - input: "$(params.path)"
            operator: in
            values: ["README.md"]
        taskSpec:
          steps:
            - name: echo
              image: ubuntu
              script: 'echo finally done'
  params:
    - name: path
      value: README.md
  workspaces:
    - name: source
      volumeClaimTemplate:
        spec:
          accessModes:
            - ReadWriteOnce
          resources:
            requests:
              storage: 16Mi
1
Specifies the type of Kubernetes object. In this example, PipelineRun.
2
Task create-file used in the Pipeline.
3
when expression that specifies to execute the echo-file-exists task only if the exists result from the check-file task is yes.
4
when expression that specifies to skip the task-should-be-skipped-1 task only if the path parameter is README.md.
5
when expression that specifies to execute the finally-task-should-be-executed task only if the execution status of the echo-file-exists task and the task status is Succeeded, the exists result from the check-file task is yes, and the path parameter is README.md.

The Pipeline Run details page of the OpenShift Container Platform web console shows the status of the tasks and when expressions as follows:

  • All the criteria are met: Tasks and the when expression symbol, which is represented by a diamond shape are green.
  • Any one of the criteria are not met: Task is skipped. Skipped tasks and the when expression symbol are grey.
  • None of the criteria are met: Task is skipped. Skipped tasks and the when expression symbol are grey.
  • Task run fails: Failed tasks and the when expression symbol are red.

4.2.2.3. Finally tasks

The finally tasks are the final set of tasks specified using the finally field in the pipeline YAML file. A finally task always executes the tasks within the pipeline, irrespective of whether the pipeline runs are executed successfully. The finally tasks are executed in parallel after all the pipeline tasks are run, before the corresponding pipeline exits.

You can configure a finally task to consume the results of any task within the same pipeline. This approach does not change the order in which this final task is run. It is executed in parallel with other final tasks after all the non-final tasks are executed.

The following example shows a code snippet of the clone-cleanup-workspace pipeline. This code clones the repository into a shared workspace and cleans up the workspace. After executing the pipeline tasks, the cleanup task specified in the finally section of the pipeline YAML file cleans up the workspace.

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
kind: Pipeline
metadata:
  name: clone-cleanup-workspace 1
spec:
  workspaces:
    - name: git-source 2
  tasks:
    - name: clone-app-repo 3
      taskRef:
        name: git-clone-from-catalog
      params:
        - name: url
          value: https://github.com/tektoncd/community.git
        - name: subdirectory
          value: application
      workspaces:
        - name: output
          workspace: git-source
  finally:
    - name: cleanup 4
      taskRef: 5
        name: cleanup-workspace
      workspaces: 6
        - name: source
          workspace: git-source
    - name: check-git-commit
      params: 7
        - name: commit
          value: $(tasks.clone-app-repo.results.commit)
      taskSpec: 8
        params:
          - name: commit
        steps:
          - name: check-commit-initialized
            image: alpine
            script: |
              if [[ ! $(params.commit) ]]; then
                exit 1
              fi
1
Unique name of the Pipeline.
2
The shared workspace where the git repository is cloned.
3
The task to clone the application repository to the shared workspace.
4
The task to clean-up the shared workspace.
5
A reference to the task that is to be executed in the TaskRun.
6
A shared storage volume that a Task in a Pipeline needs at runtime to receive input or provide output.
7
A list of parameters required for a task. If a parameter does not have an implicit default value, you must explicitly set its value.
8
Embedded task definition.

4.2.2.4. TaskRun

A TaskRun instantiates a Task for execution with specific inputs, outputs, and execution parameters on a cluster. It can be invoked on its own or as part of a PipelineRun for each Task in a pipeline.

A Task consists of one or more Steps that execute container images, and each container image performs a specific piece of build work. A TaskRun executes the Steps in a Task in the specified order, until all Steps execute successfully or a failure occurs. A TaskRun is automatically created by a PipelineRun for each Task in a Pipeline.

The following example shows a TaskRun that runs the apply-manifests Task with the relevant input parameters:

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
kind: TaskRun 2
metadata:
  name: apply-manifests-taskrun 3
spec: 4
  serviceAccountName: pipeline
  taskRef: 5
    kind: Task
    name: apply-manifests
  workspaces: 6
  - name: source
    persistentVolumeClaim:
      claimName: source-pvc
1
TaskRun API version v1beta1.
2
Specifies the type of Kubernetes object. In this example, TaskRun.
3
Unique name to identify this TaskRun.
4
Definition of the TaskRun. For this TaskRun, the Task and the required workspace are specified.
5
Name of the Task reference used for this TaskRun. This TaskRun executes the apply-manifests Task.
6
Workspace used by the TaskRun.

4.2.2.5. Pipelines

A Pipeline is a collection of Task resources arranged in a specific order of execution. They are executed to construct complex workflows that automate the build, deployment and delivery of applications. You can define a CI/CD workflow for your application using pipelines containing one or more tasks.

A Pipeline resource definition consists of a number of fields or attributes, which together enable the pipeline to accomplish a specific goal. Each Pipeline resource definition must contain at least one Task resource, which ingests specific inputs and produces specific outputs. The pipeline definition can also optionally include Conditions, Workspaces, Parameters, or Resources depending on the application requirements.

The following example shows the build-and-deploy pipeline, which builds an application image from a Git repository using the buildah ClusterTask resource:

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
kind: Pipeline 2
metadata:
  name: build-and-deploy 3
spec: 4
  workspaces: 5
  - name: shared-workspace
  params: 6
  - name: deployment-name
    type: string
    description: name of the deployment to be patched
  - name: git-url
    type: string
    description: url of the git repo for the code of deployment
  - name: git-revision
    type: string
    description: revision to be used from repo of the code for deployment
    default: "pipelines-1.10"
  - name: IMAGE
    type: string
    description: image to be built from the code
  tasks: 7
  - name: fetch-repository
    taskRef:
      name: git-clone
      kind: ClusterTask
    workspaces:
    - name: output
      workspace: shared-workspace
    params:
    - name: url
      value: $(params.git-url)
    - name: subdirectory
      value: ""
    - name: deleteExisting
      value: "true"
    - name: revision
      value: $(params.git-revision)
  - name: build-image 8
    taskRef:
      name: buildah
      kind: ClusterTask
    params:
    - name: TLSVERIFY
      value: "false"
    - name: IMAGE
      value: $(params.IMAGE)
    workspaces:
    - name: source
      workspace: shared-workspace
    runAfter:
    - fetch-repository
  - name: apply-manifests 9
    taskRef:
      name: apply-manifests
    workspaces:
    - name: source
      workspace: shared-workspace
    runAfter: 10
    - build-image
  - name: update-deployment
    taskRef:
      name: update-deployment
    workspaces:
    - name: source
      workspace: shared-workspace
    params:
    - name: deployment
      value: $(params.deployment-name)
    - name: IMAGE
      value: $(params.IMAGE)
    runAfter:
    - apply-manifests
1
Pipeline API version v1beta1.
2
Specifies the type of Kubernetes object. In this example, Pipeline.
3
Unique name of this Pipeline.
4
Specifies the definition and structure of the Pipeline.
5
Workspaces used across all the Tasks in the Pipeline.
6
Parameters used across all the Tasks in the Pipeline.
7
Specifies the list of Tasks used in the Pipeline.
8
Task build-image, which uses the buildah ClusterTask to build application images from a given Git repository.
9
Task apply-manifests, which uses a user-defined Task with the same name.
10
Specifies the sequence in which Tasks are run in a Pipeline. In this example, the apply-manifests Task is run only after the build-image Task is completed.
Note

The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator installs the Buildah cluster task and creates the pipeline service account with sufficient permission to build and push an image. The Buildah cluster task can fail when associated with a different service account with insufficient permissions.

4.2.2.6. PipelineRun

A PipelineRun is a type of resource that binds a pipeline, workspaces, credentials, and a set of parameter values specific to a scenario to run the CI/CD workflow.

A pipeline run is the running instance of a pipeline. It instantiates a pipeline for execution with specific inputs, outputs, and execution parameters on a cluster. It also creates a task run for each task in the pipeline run.

The pipeline runs the tasks sequentially until they are complete or a task fails. The status field tracks and the progress of each task run and stores it for monitoring and auditing purposes.

The following example runs the build-and-deploy pipeline with relevant resources and parameters:

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
kind: PipelineRun 2
metadata:
  name: build-deploy-api-pipelinerun 3
spec:
  pipelineRef:
    name: build-and-deploy 4
  params: 5
  - name: deployment-name
    value: vote-api
  - name: git-url
    value: https://github.com/openshift-pipelines/vote-api.git
  - name: IMAGE
    value: image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/pipelines-tutorial/vote-api
  workspaces: 6
  - name: shared-workspace
    volumeClaimTemplate:
      spec:
        accessModes:
          - ReadWriteOnce
        resources:
          requests:
            storage: 500Mi
1
Pipeline run API version v1beta1.
2
The type of Kubernetes object. In this example, PipelineRun.
3
Unique name to identify this pipeline run.
4
Name of the pipeline to be run. In this example, build-and-deploy.
5
The list of parameters required to run the pipeline.
6
Workspace used by the pipeline run.

4.2.2.7. Workspaces

Note

It is recommended that you use Workspaces instead of PipelineResources in OpenShift Pipelines, as PipelineResources are difficult to debug, limited in scope, and make Tasks less reusable.

Workspaces declare shared storage volumes that a Task in a Pipeline needs at runtime to receive input or provide output. Instead of specifying the actual location of the volumes, Workspaces enable you to declare the filesystem or parts of the filesystem that would be required at runtime. A Task or Pipeline declares the Workspace and you must provide the specific location details of the volume. It is then mounted into that Workspace in a TaskRun or a PipelineRun. This separation of volume declaration from runtime storage volumes makes the Tasks reusable, flexible, and independent of the user environment.

With Workspaces, you can:

  • Store Task inputs and outputs
  • Share data among Tasks
  • Use it as a mount point for credentials held in Secrets
  • Use it as a mount point for configurations held in ConfigMaps
  • Use it as a mount point for common tools shared by an organization
  • Create a cache of build artifacts that speed up jobs

You can specify Workspaces in the TaskRun or PipelineRun using:

  • A read-only ConfigMaps or Secret
  • An existing PersistentVolumeClaim shared with other Tasks
  • A PersistentVolumeClaim from a provided VolumeClaimTemplate
  • An emptyDir that is discarded when the TaskRun completes

The following example shows a code snippet of the build-and-deploy Pipeline, which declares a shared-workspace Workspace for the build-image and apply-manifests Tasks as defined in the Pipeline.

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
kind: Pipeline
metadata:
  name: build-and-deploy
spec:
  workspaces: 1
  - name: shared-workspace
  params:
...
  tasks: 2
  - name: build-image
    taskRef:
      name: buildah
      kind: ClusterTask
    params:
    - name: TLSVERIFY
      value: "false"
    - name: IMAGE
      value: $(params.IMAGE)
    workspaces: 3
    - name: source 4
      workspace: shared-workspace 5
    runAfter:
    - fetch-repository
  - name: apply-manifests
    taskRef:
      name: apply-manifests
    workspaces: 6
    - name: source
      workspace: shared-workspace
    runAfter:
      - build-image
...
1
List of Workspaces shared between the Tasks defined in the Pipeline. A Pipeline can define as many Workspaces as required. In this example, only one Workspace named shared-workspace is declared.
2
Definition of Tasks used in the Pipeline. This snippet defines two Tasks, build-image and apply-manifests, which share a common Workspace.
3
List of Workspaces used in the build-image Task. A Task definition can include as many Workspaces as it requires. However, it is recommended that a Task uses at most one writable Workspace.
4
Name that uniquely identifies the Workspace used in the Task. This Task uses one Workspace named source.
5
Name of the Pipeline Workspace used by the Task. Note that the Workspace source in turn uses the Pipeline Workspace named shared-workspace.
6
List of Workspaces used in the apply-manifests Task. Note that this Task shares the source Workspace with the build-image Task.

Workspaces help tasks share data, and allow you to specify one or more volumes that each task in the pipeline requires during execution. You can create a persistent volume claim or provide a volume claim template that creates a persistent volume claim for you.

The following code snippet of the build-deploy-api-pipelinerun PipelineRun uses a volume claim template to create a persistent volume claim for defining the storage volume for the shared-workspace Workspace used in the build-and-deploy Pipeline.

apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
kind: PipelineRun
metadata:
  name: build-deploy-api-pipelinerun
spec:
  pipelineRef:
    name: build-and-deploy
  params:
...

  workspaces: 1
  - name: shared-workspace 2
    volumeClaimTemplate: 3
      spec:
        accessModes:
          - ReadWriteOnce
        resources:
          requests:
            storage: 500Mi
1
Specifies the list of Pipeline Workspaces for which volume binding will be provided in the PipelineRun.
2
The name of the Workspace in the Pipeline for which the volume is being provided.
3
Specifies a volume claim template that creates a persistent volume claim to define the storage volume for the workspace.

4.2.2.8. Triggers

Use Triggers in conjunction with pipelines to create a full-fledged CI/CD system where Kubernetes resources define the entire CI/CD execution. Triggers capture the external events, such as a Git pull request, and process them to extract key pieces of information. Mapping this event data to a set of predefined parameters triggers a series of tasks that can then create and deploy Kubernetes resources and instantiate the pipeline.

For example, you define a CI/CD workflow using Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines for your application. The pipeline must start for any new changes to take effect in the application repository. Triggers automate this process by capturing and processing any change event and by triggering a pipeline run that deploys the new image with the latest changes.

Triggers consist of the following main resources that work together to form a reusable, decoupled, and self-sustaining CI/CD system:

  • The TriggerBinding resource extracts the fields from an event payload and stores them as parameters.

    The following example shows a code snippet of the TriggerBinding resource, which extracts the Git repository information from the received event payload:

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
    kind: TriggerBinding 2
    metadata:
      name: vote-app 3
    spec:
      params: 4
      - name: git-repo-url
        value: $(body.repository.url)
      - name: git-repo-name
        value: $(body.repository.name)
      - name: git-revision
        value: $(body.head_commit.id)
    1
    The API version of the TriggerBinding resource. In this example, v1beta1.
    2
    Specifies the type of Kubernetes object. In this example, TriggerBinding.
    3
    Unique name to identify the TriggerBinding resource.
    4
    List of parameters which will be extracted from the received event payload and passed to the TriggerTemplate resource. In this example, the Git repository URL, name, and revision are extracted from the body of the event payload.
  • The TriggerTemplate resource acts as a standard for the way resources must be created. It specifies the way parameterized data from the TriggerBinding resource should be used. A trigger template receives input from the trigger binding, and then performs a series of actions that results in creation of new pipeline resources, and initiation of a new pipeline run.

    The following example shows a code snippet of a TriggerTemplate resource, which creates a pipeline run using the Git repository information received from the TriggerBinding resource you just created:

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
    kind: TriggerTemplate 2
    metadata:
      name: vote-app 3
    spec:
      params: 4
      - name: git-repo-url
        description: The git repository url
      - name: git-revision
        description: The git revision
        default: pipelines-1.10
      - name: git-repo-name
        description: The name of the deployment to be created / patched
    
      resourcetemplates: 5
      - apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
        kind: PipelineRun
        metadata:
          name: build-deploy-$(tt.params.git-repo-name)-$(uid)
        spec:
          serviceAccountName: pipeline
          pipelineRef:
            name: build-and-deploy
          params:
          - name: deployment-name
            value: $(tt.params.git-repo-name)
          - name: git-url
            value: $(tt.params.git-repo-url)
          - name: git-revision
            value: $(tt.params.git-revision)
          - name: IMAGE
            value: image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/pipelines-tutorial/$(tt.params.git-repo-name)
          workspaces:
          - name: shared-workspace
            volumeClaimTemplate:
             spec:
              accessModes:
               - ReadWriteOnce
              resources:
                requests:
                  storage: 500Mi
    1
    The API version of the TriggerTemplate resource. In this example, v1beta1.
    2
    Specifies the type of Kubernetes object. In this example, TriggerTemplate.
    3
    Unique name to identify the TriggerTemplate resource.
    4
    Parameters supplied by the TriggerBinding resource.
    5
    List of templates that specify the way resources must be created using the parameters received through the TriggerBinding or EventListener resources.
  • The Trigger resource combines the TriggerBinding and TriggerTemplate resources, and optionally, the interceptors event processor.

    Interceptors process all the events for a specific platform that runs before the TriggerBinding resource. You can use interceptors to filter the payload, verify events, define and test trigger conditions, and implement other useful processing. Interceptors use secret for event verification. Once the event data passes through an interceptor, it then goes to the trigger before you pass the payload data to the trigger binding. You can also use an interceptor to modify the behavior of the associated trigger referenced in the EventListener specification.

    The following example shows a code snippet of a Trigger resource, named vote-trigger that connects the TriggerBinding and TriggerTemplate resources, and the interceptors event processor.

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
    kind: Trigger 2
    metadata:
      name: vote-trigger 3
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: pipeline 4
      interceptors:
        - ref:
            name: "github" 5
          params: 6
            - name: "secretRef"
              value:
                secretName: github-secret
                secretKey: secretToken
            - name: "eventTypes"
              value: ["push"]
      bindings:
        - ref: vote-app 7
      template: 8
         ref: vote-app
    ---
    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Secret 9
    metadata:
      name: github-secret
    type: Opaque
    stringData:
      secretToken: "1234567"
    1
    The API version of the Trigger resource. In this example, v1beta1.
    2
    Specifies the type of Kubernetes object. In this example, Trigger.
    3
    Unique name to identify the Trigger resource.
    4
    Service account name to be used.
    5
    Interceptor name to be referenced. In this example, github.
    6
    Desired parameters to be specified.
    7
    Name of the TriggerBinding resource to be connected to the TriggerTemplate resource.
    8
    Name of the TriggerTemplate resource to be connected to the TriggerBinding resource.
    9
    Secret to be used to verify events.
  • The EventListener resource provides an endpoint, or an event sink, that listens for incoming HTTP-based events with a JSON payload. It extracts event parameters from each TriggerBinding resource, and then processes this data to create Kubernetes resources as specified by the corresponding TriggerTemplate resource. The EventListener resource also performs lightweight event processing or basic filtering on the payload using event interceptors, which identify the type of payload and optionally modify it. Currently, pipeline triggers support five types of interceptors: Webhook Interceptors, GitHub Interceptors, GitLab Interceptors, Bitbucket Interceptors, and Common Expression Language (CEL) Interceptors.

    The following example shows an EventListener resource, which references the Trigger resource named vote-trigger.

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1 1
    kind: EventListener 2
    metadata:
      name: vote-app 3
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: pipeline 4
      triggers:
        - triggerRef: vote-trigger 5
    1
    The API version of the EventListener resource. In this example, v1beta1.
    2
    Specifies the type of Kubernetes object. In this example, EventListener.
    3
    Unique name to identify the EventListener resource.
    4
    Service account name to be used.
    5
    Name of the Trigger resource referenced by the EventListener resource.

4.2.3. Additional resources

4.3. Installing OpenShift Pipelines

This guide walks cluster administrators through the process of installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster.

Prerequisites

  • You have access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with cluster-admin permissions.
  • You have installed oc CLI.
  • You have installed OpenShift Pipelines (tkn) CLI on your local system.

4.3.1. Installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator in web console

You can install Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines using the Operator listed in the OpenShift Container Platform OperatorHub. When you install the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, the custom resources (CRs) required for the pipelines configuration are automatically installed along with the Operator.

The default Operator custom resource definition (CRD) config.operator.tekton.dev is now replaced by tektonconfigs.operator.tekton.dev. In addition, the Operator provides the following additional CRDs to individually manage OpenShift Pipelines components: tektonpipelines.operator.tekton.dev, tektontriggers.operator.tekton.dev and tektonaddons.operator.tekton.dev.

If you have OpenShift Pipelines already installed on your cluster, the existing installation is seamlessly upgraded. The Operator will replace the instance of config.operator.tekton.dev on your cluster with an instance of tektonconfigs.operator.tekton.dev and additional objects of the other CRDs as necessary.

Warning

If you manually changed your existing installation, such as, changing the target namespace in the config.operator.tekton.dev CRD instance by making changes to the resource name - cluster field, then the upgrade path is not smooth. In such cases, the recommended workflow is to uninstall your installation and reinstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator now provides the option to choose the components that you want to install by specifying profiles as part of the TektonConfig CR. The TektonConfig CR is automatically installed when the Operator is installed. The supported profiles are:

  • Lite: This installs only Tekton Pipelines.
  • Basic: This installs Tekton Pipelines and Tekton Triggers.
  • All: This is the default profile used when the TektonConfig CR is installed. This profile installs all of the Tekton components: Tekton Pipelines, Tekton Triggers, Tekton Addons (which include ClusterTasks, ClusterTriggerBindings, ConsoleCLIDownload, ConsoleQuickStart and ConsoleYAMLSample resources).

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the web console, navigate to OperatorsOperatorHub.
  2. Use the Filter by keyword box to search for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator in the catalog. Click the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator tile.
  3. Read the brief description about the Operator on the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator page. Click Install.
  4. On the Install Operator page:

    1. Select All namespaces on the cluster (default) for the Installation Mode. This mode installs the Operator in the default openshift-operators namespace, which enables the Operator to watch and be made available to all namespaces in the cluster.
    2. Select Automatic for the Approval Strategy. This ensures that the future upgrades to the Operator are handled automatically by the Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM). If you select the Manual approval strategy, OLM creates an update request. As a cluster administrator, you must then manually approve the OLM update request to update the Operator to the new version.
    3. Select an Update Channel.

      • The pipelines-<version> channel is the default channel to install the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. For example, the default channel to install the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator version 1.7 is pipelines-1.7.
      • The latest channel enables installation of the most recent stable version of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

        Note

        The preview and stable channels will be deprecated and removed in a future release.

  5. Click Install. You will see the Operator listed on the Installed Operators page.

    Note

    The Operator is installed automatically into the openshift-operators namespace.

  6. Verify that the Status is set to Succeeded Up to date to confirm successful installation of Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

    Warning

    The success status may show as Succeeded Up to date even if installation of other components is in-progress. Therefore, it is important to verify the installation manually in the terminal.

  7. Verify that all components of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator were installed successfully. Login to the cluster on the terminal, and run the following command:

    $ oc get tektonconfig config

    Example output

    NAME     VERSION   READY   REASON
    config   1.9.2     True

    If the READY condition is True, the Operator and its components have been installed successfully.

    Additonally, check the components' versions by running the following command:

    $ oc get tektonpipeline,tektontrigger,tektonaddon,pac

    Example output

    NAME                                          VERSION   READY   REASON
    tektonpipeline.operator.tekton.dev/pipeline   v0.41.1   True
    NAME                                        VERSION   READY   REASON
    tektontrigger.operator.tekton.dev/trigger   v0.22.2   True
    NAME                                    VERSION   READY   REASON
    tektonaddon.operator.tekton.dev/addon   1.9.2     True
    NAME                                                             VERSION   READY   REASON
    openshiftpipelinesascode.operator.tekton.dev/pipelines-as-code   v0.15.5   True

4.3.2. Installing the OpenShift Pipelines Operator using the CLI

You can install Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator from the OperatorHub using the CLI.

Procedure

  1. Create a Subscription object YAML file to subscribe a namespace to the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, for example, sub.yaml:

    Example Subscription

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: openshift-pipelines-operator
      namespace: openshift-operators
    spec:
      channel:  <channel name> 1
      name: openshift-pipelines-operator-rh 2
      source: redhat-operators 3
      sourceNamespace: openshift-marketplace 4

    1
    The channel name of the Operator. The pipelines-<version> channel is the default channel. For example, the default channel for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator version 1.7 is pipelines-1.7. The latest channel enables installation of the most recent stable version of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
    2
    Name of the Operator to subscribe to.
    3
    Name of the CatalogSource that provides the Operator.
    4
    Namespace of the CatalogSource. Use openshift-marketplace for the default OperatorHub CatalogSources.
  2. Create the Subscription object:

    $ oc apply -f sub.yaml

    The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator is now installed in the default target namespace openshift-operators.

4.3.3. Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator in a restricted environment

The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator enables support for installation of pipelines in a restricted network environment.

The Operator installs a proxy webhook that sets the proxy environment variables in the containers of the pod created by tekton-controllers based on the cluster proxy object. It also sets the proxy environment variables in the TektonPipelines, TektonTriggers, Controllers, Webhooks, and Operator Proxy Webhook resources.

By default, the proxy webhook is disabled for the openshift-pipelines namespace. To disable it for any other namespace, you can add the operator.tekton.dev/disable-proxy: true label to the namespace object.

4.3.4. Additional resources

4.4. Uninstalling OpenShift Pipelines

Cluster administrators can uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator by performing the following steps:

  1. Delete the Custom Resources (CRs) that were added by default when you installed the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
  2. Delete the CRs of the optional components such as Tekton Hub that depend on the Operator.

    Caution

    If you uninstall the Operator without removing the CRs of optional components, you cannot remove them later.

  3. Uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

Uninstalling only the Operator will not remove the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components created by default when the Operator is installed.

4.4.1. Deleting the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components and Custom Resources

Delete the Custom Resources (CRs) created by default during installation of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the web console, navigate to AdministrationCustom Resource Definition.
  2. Type config.operator.tekton.dev in the Filter by name box to search for the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator CRs.
  3. Click CRD Config to see the Custom Resource Definition Details page.
  4. Click the Actions drop-down menu and select Delete Custom Resource Definition.

    Note

    Deleting the CRs will delete the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components, and all the Tasks and Pipelines on the cluster will be lost.

  5. Click Delete to confirm the deletion of the CRs.
Important

Repeat the procedure to find and remove CRs of optional components such as Tekton Hub before uninstalling the Operator. If you uninstall the Operator without removing the CRs of optional components, you cannot remove them later.

4.4.2. Uninstalling the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator

You can uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator by using the Administrator perspective in the web console.

Procedure

  1. From the OperatorsOperatorHub page, use the Filter by keyword box to search for the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
  2. Click the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator tile. The Operator tile indicates that the Operator is installed.
  3. In the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator description page, click Uninstall.

Additional resources

4.5. Creating CI/CD solutions for applications using OpenShift Pipelines

With Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, you can create a customized CI/CD solution to build, test, and deploy your application.

To create a full-fledged, self-serving CI/CD pipeline for an application, perform the following tasks:

  • Create custom tasks, or install existing reusable tasks.
  • Create and define the delivery pipeline for your application.
  • Provide a storage volume or filesystem that is attached to a workspace for the pipeline execution, using one of the following approaches:

    • Specify a volume claim template that creates a persistent volume claim
    • Specify a persistent volume claim
  • Create a PipelineRun object to instantiate and invoke the pipeline.
  • Add triggers to capture events in the source repository.

This section uses the pipelines-tutorial example to demonstrate the preceding tasks. The example uses a simple application which consists of:

  • A front-end interface, pipelines-vote-ui, with the source code in the pipelines-vote-ui Git repository.
  • A back-end interface, pipelines-vote-api, with the source code in the pipelines-vote-api Git repository.
  • The apply-manifests and update-deployment tasks in the pipelines-tutorial Git repository.

4.5.1. Prerequisites

  • You have access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster.
  • You have installed OpenShift Pipelines using the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator listed in the OpenShift OperatorHub. After it is installed, it is applicable to the entire cluster.
  • You have installed OpenShift Pipelines CLI.
  • You have forked the front-end pipelines-vote-ui and back-end pipelines-vote-api Git repositories using your GitHub ID, and have administrator access to these repositories.
  • Optional: You have cloned the pipelines-tutorial Git repository.

4.5.2. Creating a project and checking your pipeline service account

Procedure

  1. Log in to your OpenShift Container Platform cluster:

    $ oc login -u <login> -p <password> https://openshift.example.com:6443
  2. Create a project for the sample application. For this example workflow, create the pipelines-tutorial project:

    $ oc new-project pipelines-tutorial
    Note

    If you create a project with a different name, be sure to update the resource URLs used in the example with your project name.

  3. View the pipeline service account:

    Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator adds and configures a service account named pipeline that has sufficient permissions to build and push an image. This service account is used by the PipelineRun object.

    $ oc get serviceaccount pipeline

4.5.3. Creating pipeline tasks

Procedure

  1. Install the apply-manifests and update-deployment task resources from the pipelines-tutorial repository, which contains a list of reusable tasks for pipelines:

    $ oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/01_pipeline/01_apply_manifest_task.yaml
    $ oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/01_pipeline/02_update_deployment_task.yaml
  2. Use the tkn task list command to list the tasks you created:

    $ tkn task list

    The output verifies that the apply-manifests and update-deployment task resources were created:

    NAME                DESCRIPTION   AGE
    apply-manifests                   1 minute ago
    update-deployment                 48 seconds ago
  3. Use the tkn clustertasks list command to list the Operator-installed additional cluster tasks such as buildah and s2i-python:

    Note

    To use the buildah cluster task in a restricted environment, you must ensure that the Dockerfile uses an internal image stream as the base image.

    $ tkn clustertasks list

    The output lists the Operator-installed ClusterTask resources:

    NAME                       DESCRIPTION   AGE
    buildah                                  1 day ago
    git-clone                                1 day ago
    s2i-python                               1 day ago
    tkn                                      1 day ago

4.5.4. Assembling a pipeline

A pipeline represents a CI/CD flow and is defined by the tasks to be executed. It is designed to be generic and reusable in multiple applications and environments.

A pipeline specifies how the tasks interact with each other and their order of execution using the from and runAfter parameters. It uses the workspaces field to specify one or more volumes that each task in the pipeline requires during execution.

In this section, you will create a pipeline that takes the source code of the application from GitHub, and then builds and deploys it on OpenShift Container Platform.

The pipeline performs the following tasks for the back-end application pipelines-vote-api and front-end application pipelines-vote-ui:

  • Clones the source code of the application from the Git repository by referring to the git-url and git-revision parameters.
  • Builds the container image using the buildah cluster task.
  • Pushes the image to the OpenShift image registry by referring to the image parameter.
  • Deploys the new image on OpenShift Container Platform by using the apply-manifests and update-deployment tasks.

Procedure

  1. Copy the contents of the following sample pipeline YAML file and save it:

    apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: Pipeline
    metadata:
      name: build-and-deploy
    spec:
      workspaces:
      - name: shared-workspace
      params:
      - name: deployment-name
        type: string
        description: name of the deployment to be patched
      - name: git-url
        type: string
        description: url of the git repo for the code of deployment
      - name: git-revision
        type: string
        description: revision to be used from repo of the code for deployment
        default: "pipelines-1.10"
      - name: IMAGE
        type: string
        description: image to be built from the code
      tasks:
      - name: fetch-repository
        taskRef:
          name: git-clone
          kind: ClusterTask
        workspaces:
        - name: output
          workspace: shared-workspace
        params:
        - name: url
          value: $(params.git-url)
        - name: subdirectory
          value: ""
        - name: deleteExisting
          value: "true"
        - name: revision
          value: $(params.git-revision)
      - name: build-image
        taskRef:
          name: buildah
          kind: ClusterTask
        params:
        - name: IMAGE
          value: $(params.IMAGE)
        workspaces:
        - name: source
          workspace: shared-workspace
        runAfter:
        - fetch-repository
      - name: apply-manifests
        taskRef:
          name: apply-manifests
        workspaces:
        - name: source
          workspace: shared-workspace
        runAfter:
        - build-image
      - name: update-deployment
        taskRef:
          name: update-deployment
        params:
        - name: deployment
          value: $(params.deployment-name)
        - name: IMAGE
          value: $(params.IMAGE)
        runAfter:
        - apply-manifests

    The pipeline definition abstracts away the specifics of the Git source repository and image registries. These details are added as params when a pipeline is triggered and executed.

  2. Create the pipeline:

    $ oc create -f <pipeline-yaml-file-name.yaml>

    Alternatively, you can also execute the YAML file directly from the Git repository:

    $ oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/01_pipeline/04_pipeline.yaml
  3. Use the tkn pipeline list command to verify that the pipeline is added to the application:

    $ tkn pipeline list

    The output verifies that the build-and-deploy pipeline was created:

    NAME               AGE            LAST RUN   STARTED   DURATION   STATUS
    build-and-deploy   1 minute ago   ---        ---       ---        ---

4.5.5. Mirroring images to run pipelines in a restricted environment

To run OpenShift Pipelines in a disconnected cluster or a cluster provisioned in a restricted environment, ensure that either the Samples Operator is configured for a restricted network, or a cluster administrator has created a cluster with a mirrored registry.

The following procedure uses the pipelines-tutorial example to create a pipeline for an application in a restricted environment using a cluster with a mirrored registry. To ensure that the pipelines-tutorial example works in a restricted environment, you must mirror the respective builder images from the mirror registry for the front-end interface, pipelines-vote-ui; back-end interface, pipelines-vote-api; and the cli.

Procedure

  1. Mirror the builder image from the mirror registry for the front-end interface, pipelines-vote-ui.

    1. Verify that the required images tag is not imported:

      $ oc describe imagestream python -n openshift

      Example output

      Name:			python
      Namespace:		openshift
      [...]
      
      3.8-ubi8 (latest)
        tagged from registry.redhat.io/ubi8/python-38:latest
          prefer registry pullthrough when referencing this tag
      
        Build and run Python 3.8 applications on UBI 8. For more information about using this builder image, including OpenShift considerations, see https://github.com/sclorg/s2i-python-container/blob/master/3.8/README.md.
        Tags: builder, python
        Supports: python:3.8, python
        Example Repo: https://github.com/sclorg/django-ex.git
      
      [...]

    2. Mirror the supported image tag to the private registry:

      $ oc image mirror registry.redhat.io/ubi8/python-38:latest <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/python-38
    3. Import the image:

      $ oc tag <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/python-38 python:latest --scheduled -n openshift

      You must periodically re-import the image. The --scheduled flag enables automatic re-import of the image.

    4. Verify that the images with the given tag have been imported:

      $ oc describe imagestream python -n openshift

      Example output

      Name:			python
      Namespace:		openshift
      [...]
      
      latest
        updates automatically from registry <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/python-38
      
        * <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/python-38@sha256:3ee3c2e70251e75bfeac25c0c33356add9cc4abcbc9c51d858f39e4dc29c5f58
      
      [...]

  2. Mirror the builder image from the mirror registry for the back-end interface, pipelines-vote-api.

    1. Verify that the required images tag is not imported:

      $ oc describe imagestream golang -n openshift

      Example output

      Name:			golang
      Namespace:		openshift
      [...]
      
      1.14.7-ubi8 (latest)
        tagged from registry.redhat.io/ubi8/go-toolset:1.14.7
          prefer registry pullthrough when referencing this tag
      
        Build and run Go applications on UBI 8. For more information about using this builder image, including OpenShift considerations, see https://github.com/sclorg/golang-container/blob/master/README.md.
        Tags: builder, golang, go
        Supports: golang
        Example Repo: https://github.com/sclorg/golang-ex.git
      
      [...]

    2. Mirror the supported image tag to the private registry:

      $ oc image mirror registry.redhat.io/ubi8/go-toolset:1.14.7 <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/go-toolset
    3. Import the image:

      $ oc tag <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/go-toolset golang:latest --scheduled -n openshift

      You must periodically re-import the image. The --scheduled flag enables automatic re-import of the image.

    4. Verify that the images with the given tag have been imported:

      $ oc describe imagestream golang -n openshift

      Example output

      Name:			golang
      Namespace:		openshift
      [...]
      
      latest
        updates automatically from registry <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/go-toolset
      
        * <mirror-registry>:<port>/ubi8/go-toolset@sha256:59a74d581df3a2bd63ab55f7ac106677694bf612a1fe9e7e3e1487f55c421b37
      
      [...]

  3. Mirror the builder image from the mirror registry for the cli.

    1. Verify that the required images tag is not imported:

      $ oc describe imagestream cli -n openshift

      Example output

      Name:                   cli
      Namespace:              openshift
      [...]
      
      latest
        updates automatically from registry quay.io/openshift-release-dev/ocp-v4.0-art-dev@sha256:65c68e8c22487375c4c6ce6f18ed5485915f2bf612e41fef6d41cbfcdb143551
      
        * quay.io/openshift-release-dev/ocp-v4.0-art-dev@sha256:65c68e8c22487375c4c6ce6f18ed5485915f2bf612e41fef6d41cbfcdb143551
      
      [...]

    2. Mirror the supported image tag to the private registry:

      $ oc image mirror quay.io/openshift-release-dev/ocp-v4.0-art-dev@sha256:65c68e8c22487375c4c6ce6f18ed5485915f2bf612e41fef6d41cbfcdb143551 <mirror-registry>:<port>/openshift-release-dev/ocp-v4.0-art-dev:latest
    3. Import the image:

      $ oc tag <mirror-registry>:<port>/openshift-release-dev/ocp-v4.0-art-dev cli:latest --scheduled -n openshift

      You must periodically re-import the image. The --scheduled flag enables automatic re-import of the image.

    4. Verify that the images with the given tag have been imported:

      $ oc describe imagestream cli -n openshift

      Example output

      Name:                   cli
      Namespace:              openshift
      [...]
      
      latest
        updates automatically from registry <mirror-registry>:<port>/openshift-release-dev/ocp-v4.0-art-dev
      
        * <mirror-registry>:<port>/openshift-release-dev/ocp-v4.0-art-dev@sha256:65c68e8c22487375c4c6ce6f18ed5485915f2bf612e41fef6d41cbfcdb143551
      
      [...]

4.5.6. Running a pipeline

A PipelineRun resource starts a pipeline and ties it to the Git and image resources that should be used for the specific invocation. It automatically creates and starts the TaskRun resources for each task in the pipeline.

Procedure

  1. Start the pipeline for the back-end application:

    $ tkn pipeline start build-and-deploy \
        -w name=shared-workspace,volumeClaimTemplateFile=https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/01_pipeline/03_persistent_volume_claim.yaml \
        -p deployment-name=pipelines-vote-api \
        -p git-url=https://github.com/openshift/pipelines-vote-api.git \
        -p IMAGE='image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/$(context.pipelineRun.namespace)/pipelines-vote-api' \
        --use-param-defaults

    The previous command uses a volume claim template, which creates a persistent volume claim for the pipeline execution.

  2. To track the progress of the pipeline run, enter the following command::

    $ tkn pipelinerun logs <pipelinerun_id> -f

    The <pipelinerun_id> in the above command is the ID for the PipelineRun that was returned in the output of the previous command.

  3. Start the pipeline for the front-end application:

    $ tkn pipeline start build-and-deploy \
        -w name=shared-workspace,volumeClaimTemplateFile=https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/01_pipeline/03_persistent_volume_claim.yaml \
        -p deployment-name=pipelines-vote-ui \
        -p git-url=https://github.com/openshift/pipelines-vote-ui.git \
        -p IMAGE='image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/$(context.pipelineRun.namespace)/pipelines-vote-ui' \
        --use-param-defaults
  4. To track the progress of the pipeline run, enter the following command:

    $ tkn pipelinerun logs <pipelinerun_id> -f

    The <pipelinerun_id> in the above command is the ID for the PipelineRun that was returned in the output of the previous command.

  5. After a few minutes, use tkn pipelinerun list command to verify that the pipeline ran successfully by listing all the pipeline runs:

    $ tkn pipelinerun list

    The output lists the pipeline runs:

     NAME                         STARTED      DURATION     STATUS
     build-and-deploy-run-xy7rw   1 hour ago   2 minutes    Succeeded
     build-and-deploy-run-z2rz8   1 hour ago   19 minutes   Succeeded
  6. Get the application route:

    $ oc get route pipelines-vote-ui --template='http://{{.spec.host}}'

    Note the output of the previous command. You can access the application using this route.

  7. To rerun the last pipeline run, using the pipeline resources and service account of the previous pipeline, run:

    $ tkn pipeline start build-and-deploy --last

4.5.7. Adding triggers to a pipeline

Triggers enable pipelines to respond to external GitHub events, such as push events and pull requests. After you assemble and start a pipeline for the application, add the TriggerBinding, TriggerTemplate, Trigger, and EventListener resources to capture the GitHub events.

Procedure

  1. Copy the content of the following sample TriggerBinding YAML file and save it:

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: TriggerBinding
    metadata:
      name: vote-app
    spec:
      params:
      - name: git-repo-url
        value: $(body.repository.url)
      - name: git-repo-name
        value: $(body.repository.name)
      - name: git-revision
        value: $(body.head_commit.id)
  2. Create the TriggerBinding resource:

    $ oc create -f <triggerbinding-yaml-file-name.yaml>

    Alternatively, you can create the TriggerBinding resource directly from the pipelines-tutorial Git repository:

    $ oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/03_triggers/01_binding.yaml
  3. Copy the content of the following sample TriggerTemplate YAML file and save it:

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: TriggerTemplate
    metadata:
      name: vote-app
    spec:
      params:
      - name: git-repo-url
        description: The git repository url
      - name: git-revision
        description: The git revision
        default: pipelines-1.10
      - name: git-repo-name
        description: The name of the deployment to be created / patched
    
      resourcetemplates:
      - apiVersion: tekton.dev/v1beta1
        kind: PipelineRun
        metadata:
          generateName: build-deploy-$(tt.params.git-repo-name)-
        spec:
          serviceAccountName: pipeline
          pipelineRef:
            name: build-and-deploy
          params:
          - name: deployment-name
            value: $(tt.params.git-repo-name)
          - name: git-url
            value: $(tt.params.git-repo-url)
          - name: git-revision
            value: $(tt.params.git-revision)
          - name: IMAGE
            value: image-registry.openshift-image-registry.svc:5000/$(context.pipelineRun.namespace)/$(tt.params.git-repo-name)
          workspaces:
          - name: shared-workspace
            volumeClaimTemplate:
              spec:
                accessModes:
                  - ReadWriteOnce
                resources:
                  requests:
                    storage: 500Mi

    The template specifies a volume claim template to create a persistent volume claim for defining the storage volume for the workspace. Therefore, you do not need to create a persistent volume claim to provide data storage.

  4. Create the TriggerTemplate resource:

    $ oc create -f <triggertemplate-yaml-file-name.yaml>

    Alternatively, you can create the TriggerTemplate resource directly from the pipelines-tutorial Git repository:

    $ oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/03_triggers/02_template.yaml
  5. Copy the contents of the following sample Trigger YAML file and save it:

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: Trigger
    metadata:
      name: vote-trigger
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: pipeline
      bindings:
        - ref: vote-app
      template:
        ref: vote-app
  6. Create the Trigger resource:

    $ oc create -f <trigger-yaml-file-name.yaml>

    Alternatively, you can create the Trigger resource directly from the pipelines-tutorial Git repository:

    $ oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/03_triggers/03_trigger.yaml
  7. Copy the contents of the following sample EventListener YAML file and save it:

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: EventListener
    metadata:
      name: vote-app
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: pipeline
      triggers:
        - triggerRef: vote-trigger

    Alternatively, if you have not defined a trigger custom resource, add the binding and template spec to the EventListener YAML file, instead of referring to the name of the trigger:

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: EventListener
    metadata:
      name: vote-app
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: pipeline
      triggers:
      - bindings:
        - ref: vote-app
        template:
          ref: vote-app
  8. Create the EventListener resource by performing the following steps:

    • To create an EventListener resource using a secure HTTPS connection:

      1. Add a label to enable the secure HTTPS connection to the Eventlistener resource:

        $ oc label namespace <ns-name> operator.tekton.dev/enable-annotation=enabled
      2. Create the EventListener resource:

        $ oc create -f <eventlistener-yaml-file-name.yaml>

        Alternatively, you can create the EvenListener resource directly from the pipelines-tutorial Git repository:

        $ oc create -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/pipelines-tutorial/pipelines-1.10/03_triggers/04_event_listener.yaml
      3. Create a route with the re-encrypt TLS termination:

        $ oc create route reencrypt --service=<svc-name> --cert=tls.crt --key=tls.key --ca-cert=ca.crt --hostname=<hostname>

        Alternatively, you can create a re-encrypt TLS termination YAML file to create a secured route.

        Example Re-encrypt TLS Termination YAML of the Secured Route

        apiVersion: route.openshift.io/v1
        kind: Route
        metadata:
          name: route-passthrough-secured 1
        spec:
          host: <hostname>
          to:
            kind: Service
            name: frontend 2
          tls:
            termination: reencrypt         3
            key: [as in edge termination]
            certificate: [as in edge termination]
            caCertificate: [as in edge termination]
            destinationCACertificate: |-   4
              -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
              [...]
              -----END CERTIFICATE-----

        1 2
        The name of the object, which is limited to 63 characters.
        3
        The termination field is set to reencrypt. This is the only required tls field.
        4
        Required for re-encryption. destinationCACertificate specifies a CA certificate to validate the endpoint certificate, securing the connection from the router to the destination pods. If the service is using a service signing certificate, or the administrator has specified a default CA certificate for the router and the service has a certificate signed by that CA, this field can be omitted.

        See oc create route reencrypt --help for more options.

    • To create an EventListener resource using an insecure HTTP connection:

      1. Create the EventListener resource.
      2. Expose the EventListener service as an OpenShift Container Platform route to make it publicly accessible:

        $ oc expose svc el-vote-app

4.5.8. Configuring event listeners to serve multiple namespaces

Note

You can skip this section if you want to create a basic CI/CD pipeline. However, if your deployment strategy involves multiple namespaces, you can configure event listeners to serve multiple namespaces.

To increase reusability of EvenListener objects, cluster administrators can configure and deploy them as multi-tenant event listeners that serve multiple namespaces.

Procedure

  1. Configure cluster-wide fetch permission for the event listener.

    1. Set a service account name to be used in the ClusterRoleBinding and EventListener objects. For example, el-sa.

      Example ServiceAccount.yaml

      apiVersion: v1
      kind: ServiceAccount
      metadata:
        name: el-sa
      ---

    2. In the rules section of the ClusterRole.yaml file, set appropriate permissions for every event listener deployment to function cluster-wide.

      Example ClusterRole.yaml

      kind: ClusterRole
      apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
      metadata:
        name: el-sel-clusterrole
      rules:
      - apiGroups: ["triggers.tekton.dev"]
        resources: ["eventlisteners", "clustertriggerbindings", "clusterinterceptors", "triggerbindings", "triggertemplates", "triggers"]
        verbs: ["get", "list", "watch"]
      - apiGroups: [""]
        resources: ["configmaps", "secrets"]
        verbs: ["get", "list", "watch"]
      - apiGroups: [""]
        resources: ["serviceaccounts"]
        verbs: ["impersonate"]
      ...

    3. Configure cluster role binding with the appropriate service account name and cluster role name.

      Example ClusterRoleBinding.yaml

      apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
      kind: ClusterRoleBinding
      metadata:
        name: el-mul-clusterrolebinding
      subjects:
      - kind: ServiceAccount
        name: el-sa
        namespace: default
      roleRef:
        apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
        kind: ClusterRole
        name: el-sel-clusterrole
      ...

  2. In the spec parameter of the event listener, add the service account name, for example el-sa. Fill the namespaceSelector parameter with names of namespaces where event listener is intended to serve.

    Example EventListener.yaml

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: EventListener
    metadata:
      name: namespace-selector-listener
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: el-sa
      namespaceSelector:
        matchNames:
        - default
        - foo
    ...

  3. Create a service account with the necessary permissions, for example foo-trigger-sa. Use it for role binding the triggers.

    Example ServiceAccount.yaml

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: ServiceAccount
    metadata:
      name: foo-trigger-sa
      namespace: foo
    ...

    Example RoleBinding.yaml

    apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
    kind: RoleBinding
    metadata:
      name: triggercr-rolebinding
      namespace: foo
    subjects:
    - kind: ServiceAccount
      name: foo-trigger-sa
      namespace: foo
    roleRef:
      apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
      kind: ClusterRole
      name: tekton-triggers-eventlistener-roles
    ...

  4. Create a trigger with the appropriate trigger template, trigger binding, and service account name.

    Example Trigger.yaml

    apiVersion: triggers.tekton.dev/v1beta1
    kind: Trigger
    metadata:
      name: trigger
      namespace: foo
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: foo-trigger-sa
      interceptors:
        - ref:
            name: "github"
          params:
            - name: "secretRef"
              value:
                secretName: github-secret
                secretKey: secretToken
            - name: "eventTypes"
              value: ["push"]
      bindings:
        - ref: vote-app
      template:
        ref: vote-app
    ...

4.5.9. Creating webhooks

Webhooks are HTTP POST messages that are received by the event listeners whenever a configured event occurs in your repository. The event payload is then mapped to trigger bindings, and processed by trigger templates. The trigger templates eventually start one or more pipeline runs, leading to the creation and deployment of Kubernetes resources.

In this section, you will configure a webhook URL on your forked Git repositories pipelines-vote-ui and pipelines-vote-api. This URL points to the publicly accessible EventListener service route.

Note

Adding webhooks requires administrative privileges to the repository. If you do not have administrative access to your repository, contact your system administrator for adding webhooks.

Procedure

  1. Get the webhook URL:

    • For a secure HTTPS connection:

      $ echo "URL: $(oc  get route el-vote-app --template='https://{{.spec.host}}')"
    • For an HTTP (insecure) connection:

      $ echo "URL: $(oc  get route el-vote-app --template='http://{{.spec.host}}')"

      Note the URL obtained in the output.

  2. Configure webhooks manually on the front-end repository:

    1. Open the front-end Git repository pipelines-vote-ui in your browser.
    2. Click SettingsWebhooksAdd Webhook
    3. On the Webhooks/Add Webhook page:

      1. Enter the webhook URL from step 1 in Payload URL field
      2. Select application/json for the Content type
      3. Specify the secret in the Secret field
      4. Ensure that the Just the push event is selected
      5. Select Active
      6. Click Add Webhook
  3. Repeat step 2 for the back-end repository pipelines-vote-api.

4.5.10. Triggering a pipeline run

Whenever a push event occurs in the Git repository, the configured webhook sends an event payload to the publicly exposed EventListener service route. The EventListener service of the application processes the payload, and passes it to the relevant TriggerBinding and TriggerTemplate resource pairs. The TriggerBinding resource extracts the parameters, and the TriggerTemplate resource uses these parameters and specifies the way the resources must be created. This may rebuild and redeploy the application.

In this section, you push an empty commit to the front-end pipelines-vote-ui repository, which then triggers the pipeline run.

Procedure

  1. From the terminal, clone your forked Git repository pipelines-vote-ui:

    $ git clone git@github.com:<your GitHub ID>/pipelines-vote-ui.git -b pipelines-1.10
  2. Push an empty commit:

    $ git commit -m "empty-commit" --allow-empty && git push origin pipelines-1.10
  3. Check if the pipeline run was triggered:

    $ tkn pipelinerun list

    Notice that a new pipeline run was initiated.

4.5.11. Enabling monitoring of event listeners for Triggers for user-defined projects

As a cluster administrator, to gather event listener metrics for the Triggers service in a user-defined project and display them in the OpenShift Container Platform web console, you can create a service monitor for each event listener. On receiving an HTTP request, event listeners for the Triggers service return three metrics — eventlistener_http_duration_seconds, eventlistener_event_count, and eventlistener_triggered_resources.

Prerequisites

  • You have logged in to the OpenShift Container Platform web console.
  • You have installed the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
  • You have enabled monitoring for user-defined projects.

Procedure

  1. For each event listener, create a service monitor. For example, to view the metrics for the github-listener event listener in the test namespace, create the following service monitor:

    apiVersion: monitoring.coreos.com/v1
    kind: ServiceMonitor
    metadata:
      labels:
        app.kubernetes.io/managed-by: EventListener
        app.kubernetes.io/part-of: Triggers
        eventlistener: github-listener
      annotations:
        networkoperator.openshift.io/ignore-errors: ""
      name: el-monitor
      namespace: test
    spec:
      endpoints:
        - interval: 10s
          port: http-metrics
      jobLabel: name
      namespaceSelector:
        matchNames:
          - test
      selector:
        matchLabels:
          app.kubernetes.io/managed-by: EventListener
          app.kubernetes.io/part-of: Triggers
          eventlistener: github-listener
    ...
  2. Test the service monitor by sending a request to the event listener. For example, push an empty commit:

    $ git commit -m "empty-commit" --allow-empty && git push origin main
  3. On the OpenShift Container Platform web console, navigate to AdministratorObserveMetrics.
  4. To view a metric, search by its name. For example, to view the details of the eventlistener_http_resources metric for the github-listener event listener, search using the eventlistener_http_resources keyword.

4.5.12. Additional resources

4.6. Managing non-versioned and versioned cluster tasks

As a cluster administrator, installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator creates variants of each default cluster task known as versioned cluster tasks (VCT) and non-versioned cluster tasks (NVCT). For example, installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator v1.7 creates a buildah-1-7-0 VCT and a buildah NVCT.

Both NVCT and VCT have the same metadata, behavior, and specifications, including params, workspaces, and steps. However, they behave differently when you disable them or upgrade the Operator.

4.6.1. Differences between non-versioned and versioned cluster tasks

Non-versioned and versioned cluster tasks have different naming conventions. And, the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator upgrades them differently.

Table 4.5. Differences between non-versioned and versioned cluster tasks

 Non-versioned cluster taskVersioned cluster task

Nomenclature

The NVCT only contains the name of the cluster task. For example, the name of the NVCT of Buildah installed with Operator v1.7 is buildah.

The VCT contains the name of the cluster task, followed by the version as a suffix. For example, the name of the VCT of Buildah installed with Operator v1.7 is buildah-1-7-0.

Upgrade

When you upgrade the Operator, it updates the non-versioned cluster task with the latest changes. The name of the NVCT remains unchanged.

Upgrading the Operator installs the latest version of the VCT and retains the earlier version. The latest version of a VCT corresponds to the upgraded Operator. For example, installing Operator 1.7 installs buildah-1-7-0 and retains buildah-1-6-0.

4.6.2. Advantages and disadvantages of non-versioned and versioned cluster tasks

Before adopting non-versioned or versioned cluster tasks as a standard in production environments, cluster administrators might consider their advantages and disadvantages.

Table 4.6. Advantages and disadvantages of non-versioned and versioned cluster tasks

Cluster taskAdvantagesDisadvantages

Non-versioned cluster task (NVCT)

  • If you prefer deploying pipelines with the latest updates and bug fixes, use the NVCT.
  • Upgrading the Operator upgrades the non-versioned cluster tasks, which consume fewer resources than multiple versioned cluster tasks.

If you deploy pipelines that use NVCT, they might break after an Operator upgrade if the automatically upgraded cluster tasks are not backward-compatible.

Versioned cluster task (VCT)

  • If you prefer stable pipelines in production, use the VCT.
  • The earlier version is retained on the cluster even after the later version of a cluster task is installed. You can continue using the earlier cluster tasks.
  • If you continue using an earlier version of a cluster task, you might miss the latest features and critical security updates.
  • The earlier versions of cluster tasks that are not operational consume cluster resources.
  • * After it is upgraded, the Operator cannot manage the earlier VCT. You can delete the earlier VCT manually by using the oc delete clustertask command, but you cannot restore it.

4.6.3. Disabling non-versioned and versioned cluster tasks

As a cluster administrator, you can disable cluster tasks that the Pipelines Operator installed.

Procedure

  1. To delete all non-versioned cluster tasks and latest versioned cluster tasks, edit the TektonConfig custom resource definition (CRD) and set the clusterTasks parameter in spec.addon.params to false.

    Example TektonConfig CR

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: TektonConfig
    metadata:
      name: config
    spec:
      params:
      - name: createRbacResource
        value: "false"
      profile: all
      targetNamespace: openshift-pipelines
      addon:
        params:
        - name: clusterTasks
          value: "false"
    ...

    When you disable cluster tasks, the Operator removes all the non-versioned cluster tasks and only the latest version of the versioned cluster tasks from the cluster.

    Note

    Re-enabling cluster tasks installs the non-versioned cluster tasks.

  2. Optional: To delete earlier versions of the versioned cluster tasks, use any one of the following methods:

    1. To delete individual earlier versioned cluster tasks, use the oc delete clustertask command followed by the versioned cluster task name. For example:

      $ oc delete clustertask buildah-1-6-0
    2. To delete all versioned cluster tasks created by an old version of the Operator, you can delete the corresponding installer set. For example:

      $ oc delete tektoninstallerset versioned-clustertask-1-6-k98as
      Caution

      If you delete an old versioned cluster task, you cannot restore it. You can only restore versioned and non-versioned cluster tasks that the current version of the Operator has created.

4.7. Using Tekton Hub with OpenShift Pipelines

Important

Tekton Hub is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

For more information about the support scope of Red Hat Technology Preview features, see Technology Preview Features Support Scope.

Tekton Hub helps you discover, search, and share reusable tasks and pipelines for your CI/CD workflows. A public instance of Tekton Hub is available at hub.tekton.dev. Cluster administrators can also install and deploy a custom instance of Tekton Hub for enterprise use.

4.7.1. Installing and deploying Tekton Hub on a OpenShift Container Platform cluster

Tekton Hub is an optional component; cluster administrators cannot install it using the TektonConfig custom resource (CR). To install and manage Tekton Hub, use the TektonHub CR.

Note

If you are using Github Enterprise or Gitlab Enterprise, install and deploy Tekton Hub in the same network as the enterprise server. For example, if the enterprise server is running behind a VPN, deploy Tekton Hub on a cluster that is also behind the VPN.

Prerequisites

  • Ensure that the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator is installed in the default openshift-pipelines namespace on the cluster.

Procedure

  1. Create a fork of the Tekton Hub repository.
  2. Clone the forked repository.
  3. Update the config.yaml file to include at least one user with the following scopes:

    • A user with agent:create scope who can set up a cron job that refreshes the Tekton Hub database after an interval, if there are any changes in the catalog.
    • A user with the catalog:refresh scope who can refresh the catalog and all resources in the database of the Tekton Hub.
    • A user with the config:refresh scope who can get additional scopes.

      ...
      scopes:
      - name: agent:create
        users: <username_registered_with_the_Git_repository_hosting_service_provider>
      - name: catalog:refresh
        users: <username_registered_with_the_Git_repository_hosting_service_provider>
      - name: config:refresh
        users: <username_registered_with_the_Git_repository_hosting_service_provider>
      ...

      The supported service providers are GitHub, GitLab, and BitBucket.

  4. Create an OAuth application with your Git repository hosting provider, and note the Client ID and Client Secret.

    • For a GitHub OAuth application, set the Homepage URL and the Authorization callback URL as <auth-route>.
    • For a GitLab OAuth application, set the REDIRECT_URI as <auth-route>/auth/gitlab/callback.
    • For a BitBucket OAuth application, set the Callback URL as <auth-route>.
  5. Edit the following fields in the <tekton_hub_repository>/config/02-api/20-api-secret.yaml file for the Tekton Hub API secret:

    • GH_CLIENT_ID: The Client ID from the OAuth application created with the Git repository hosting service provider.
    • GH_CLIENT_SECRET: The Client Secret from the OAuth application created with the Git repository hosting service provider.
    • GHE_URL: GitHub Enterprise URL, if you are authenticating using GitHub Enterprise. Do not provide the URL to the catalog as a value for this field.
    • GL_CLIENT_ID: The Client ID from the GitLab OAuth application.
    • GL_CLIENT_SECRET: The Client Secret from the GitLab OAuth application.
    • GLE_URL: GitLab Enterprise URL, if you are authenticating using GitLab Enterprise. Do not provide the URL to the catalog as a value for this field.
    • BB_CLIENT_ID: The Client ID from the BitBucket OAuth application.
    • BB_CLIENT_SECRET: The Client Secret from the BitBucket OAuth application.
    • JWT_SIGNING_KEY: A long, random string used to sign the JSON Web Token (JWT) created for users.
    • ACCESS_JWT_EXPIRES_IN: Add the time limit after which the access token expires. For example, 1m, where m denotes minutes. The supported units of time are seconds (s), minutes (m), hours (h), days (d), and weeks (w).
    • REFRESH_JWT_EXPIRES_IN: Add the time limit after which the refresh token expires. For example, 1m, where m denotes minutes. The supported units of time are seconds (s), minutes (m), hours (h), days (d), and weeks (w). Ensure that the expiry time set for token refresh is greater than the expiry time set for token access.
    • AUTH_BASE_URL: Route URL for the OAuth application.

      Note
      • Use the fields related to Client ID and Client Secret for any one of the supported Git repository hosting service providers.
      • The account credentials registered with the Git repository hosting service provider enables the users with catalog: refresh scope to authenticate and load all catalog resources to the database.
  6. Commit and push the changes to your forked repository.
  7. Ensure that the TektonHub CR is similar to the following example:

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: TektonHub
    metadata:
      name: hub
    spec:
      targetNamespace: openshift-pipelines 1
      api:
        hubConfigUrl: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/tektoncd/hub/main/config.yaml 2
    1
    The namespace in which Tekton Hub must be installed; default is openshift-pipelines.
    2
    Substitute with the URL of the config.yaml file of your forked repository.
  8. Install the Tekton Hub.

    $ oc apply -f TektonHub.yaml 1
    1
    The file name or path of the TektonConfig CR.
  9. Check the status of the installation.

    $ oc get tektonhub.operator.tekton.dev
    NAME   VERSION   READY   REASON   APIURL                    UIURL
    hub    v1.7.2    True             https://api.route.url/    https://ui.route.url/

4.7.1.1. Manually refreshing the catalog in Tekton Hub

When you install and deploy Tekton Hub on a OpenShift Container Platform cluster, a Postgres database is also installed. Initially, the database is empty. To add the tasks and pipelines available in the catalog to the database, cluster administrators must refresh the catalog.

Prerequisites

  • Ensure that you are in the <tekton_hub_repository>/config/ directory.

Procedure

  1. In the Tekton Hub UI, click Login -→ Sign In With GitHub.

    Note

    GitHub is used as an example from the publicly available Tekton Hub UI. For custom installation on your cluster, all Git repository hosting service providers for which you have provided Client ID and Client Secret are listed.

  2. On the home page, click the user profile and copy the token.
  3. Call the Catalog Refresh API.

    • To refresh a catalog with a specific name, run the following command:

      $ curl -X POST -H "Authorization: <jwt-token>" \ 1
        <api-url>/catalog/<catalog_name>/refresh 2
      1
      The Tekton Hub token copied from UI.
      2
      The API pod URL and name of the catalog.

      Sample output:

      [{"id":1,"catalogName":"tekton","status":"queued"}]
    • To refresh all catalogs, run the following command:

      $ curl -X POST -H "Authorization: <jwt-token>" \ 1
        <api-url>/catalog/refresh 2
      1
      The Tekton Hub token copied from UI
      2
      The API pod URL.
  4. Refresh the page in the browser.

4.7.1.2. Optional: Setting a cron job for refreshing catalog in Tekton Hub

Cluster administrators can optionally set up a cron job to refresh the database after a fixed interval, so that changes in the catalog appear in the Tekton Hub web console.

Note

If resources are added to the catalog or updated, refreshing the catalog displays these changes in the Tekton Hub UI. However, if a resource is deleted from the catalog, refreshing the catalog does not remove the resource from the database. The Tekton Hub UI continues displaying the deleted resource.

Prerequisites

  • Ensure that you are in the <project_root>/config/ directory, where <project_root> is the top level directory of the cloned Tekton Hub repository.
  • Ensure that you have a JSON web token (JWT) token with a scope of refreshing the catalog.

Procedure

  1. Create an agent-based JWT token for longer use.

    $ curl -X PUT --header "Content-Type: application/json" \
        -H "Authorization: <access-token>" \ 1
        --data '{"name":"catalog-refresh-agent","scopes": ["catalog:refresh"]}' \
        <api-route>/system/user/agent
    1
    The JWT token.

    The agent token with the necessary scopes are returned in the {"token":"<agent_jwt_token>"} format. Note the returned token and preserve it for the catalog refresh cron job.

  2. Edit the 05-catalog-refresh-cj/50-catalog-refresh-secret.yaml file to set the HUB_TOKEN parameter to the <agent_jwt_token> returned in the previous step.

    apiVersion: v1
    kind: Secret
    metadata:
      name: catalog-refresh
    type: Opaque
    stringData:
      HUB_TOKEN: <hub_token> 1
    1
    The <agent_jwt_token> returned in the previous step.
  3. Apply the modified YAML files.

    $ oc apply -f 05-catalog-refresh-cj/ -n openshift-pipelines.
  4. Optional: By default, the cron job is configured to run every 30 minutes. To change the interval, modify the value of the schedule parameter in the 05-catalog-refresh-cj/51-catalog-refresh-cronjob.yaml file.

    apiVersion: batch/v1
    kind: CronJob
    metadata:
      name: catalog-refresh
      labels:
        app: tekton-hub-api
    spec:
      schedule: "*/30 * * * *"
      ...

4.7.1.3. Optional: Adding new users in Tekton Hub configuration

Procedure

  1. Depending on the intended scope, cluster administrators can add new users in the config.yaml file.

    ...
    scopes:
      - name: agent:create
        users: [<username_1>, <username_2>] 1
      - name: catalog:refresh
        users: [<username_3>, <username_4>]
      - name: config:refresh
        users: [<username_5>, <username_6>]
    
    default:
      scopes:
        - rating:read
        - rating:write
    ...
    1
    The usernames registered with the Git repository hosting service provider.
    Note

    When any user logs in for the first time, they will have only the default scope even if they are added in the config.yaml. To activate additional scopes, ensure the user has logged in at least once.

  2. Ensure that in the config.yaml file, you have the config-refresh scope.
  3. Refresh the configuration.

    $ curl -X POST -H "Authorization: <access-token>" \ 1
        --header "Content-Type: application/json" \
        --data '{"force": true} \
        <api-route>/system/config/refresh
    1
    The JWT token.

4.7.2. Opting out of Tekton Hub in the Developer perspective

Cluster administrators can opt out of displaying Tekton Hub resources, such as tasks and pipelines, in the Pipeline builder page of the Developer perspective of an OpenShift Container Platform cluster.

Prerequisite

  • Ensure that the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator is installed on the cluster, and the oc command line tool is available.

Procedure

  • To opt of displaying Tekton Hub resources in the Developer perspective, set the value of the enable-devconsole-integration field in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR) to false.

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
      kind: TektonConfig
      metadata:
        name: config
      spec:
        targetNamespace: openshift-pipelines
        ...
        hub:
          params:
            - name: enable-devconsole-integration
              value: "false"
        ...

    By default, the TektonConfig CR does not include the enable-devconsole-integration field, and the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator assumes that the value is true.

4.7.3. Additional resources

4.8. Using Pipelines as Code

With Pipelines as Code, cluster administrators and users with the required privileges can define pipeline templates as part of source code Git repositories. When triggered by a source code push or a pull request for the configured Git repository, the feature runs the pipeline and reports the status.

4.8.1. Key features

Pipelines as Code supports the following features:

  • Pull request status and control on the platform hosting the Git repository.
  • GitHub Checks API to set the status of a pipeline run, including rechecks.
  • GitHub pull request and commit events.
  • Pull request actions in comments, such as /retest.
  • Git events filtering and a separate pipeline for each event.
  • Automatic task resolution in Pipelines, including local tasks, Tekton Hub, and remote URLs.
  • Retrieval of configurations using GitHub blobs and objects API.
  • Access Control List (ACL) over a GitHub organization, or using a Prow style OWNER file.
  • The tkn pac CLI plugin for managing bootstrapping and Pipelines as Code repositories.
  • Support for GitHub App, GitHub Webhook, Bitbucket Server, and Bitbucket Cloud.

4.8.2. Installing Pipelines as Code on an OpenShift Container Platform

Pipelines as Code is installed by default when you install the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. If you are using Pipelines 1.7 or later versions, skip the procedure for manual installation of Pipelines as Code.

To disable the default installation of Pipelines as Code with the Operator, set the value of the enable parameter to false in the TektonConfig custom resource.

...
 spec:
    platforms:
      openshift:
        pipelinesAsCode:
          enable: false
          settings:
            application-name: Pipelines as Code CI
            auto-configure-new-github-repo: "false"
            bitbucket-cloud-check-source-ip: "true"
            hub-catalog-name: tekton
            hub-url: https://api.hub.tekton.dev/v1
            remote-tasks: "true"
            secret-auto-create: "true"
...

Optionally, you can run the following command:

$ oc patch tektonconfig config --type="merge" -p '{"spec": {"platforms": {"openshift":{"pipelinesAsCode": {"enable": false}}}}}'

To enable the default installation of Pipelines as Code with the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, set the value of the enable parameter to true in the TektonConfig custom resource:

...
spec:
    addon:
      enablePipelinesAsCode: false
...

Optionally, you can run the following command:

$ oc patch tektonconfig config --type="merge" -p '{"spec": {"platforms": {"openshift":{"pipelinesAsCode": {"enable": true}}}}}'

4.8.3. Installing Pipelines as Code CLI

Cluster administrators can use the tkn pac and opc CLI tools on local machines or as containers for testing. The tkn pac and opc CLI tools are installed automatically when you install the tkn CLI for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines.

You can install the tkn pac and opc version 1.9.1 binaries for the supported platforms:

4.8.4. Using Pipelines as Code with a Git repository hosting service provider

After installing Pipelines as Code, cluster administrators can configure a Git repository hosting service provider. Currently, the following services are supported:

  • GitHub App
  • GitHub Webhook
  • GitLab
  • Bitbucket Server
  • Bitbucket Cloud
Note

GitHub App is the recommended service for using with Pipelines as Code.

4.8.5. Using Pipelines as Code with a GitHub App

GitHub Apps act as a point of integration with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines and bring the advantage of Git-based workflows to OpenShift Pipelines. Cluster administrators can configure a single GitHub App for all cluster users. For GitHub Apps to work with Pipelines as Code, ensure that the webhook of the GitHub App points to the Pipelines as Code event listener route (or ingress endpoint) that listens for GitHub events.

4.8.5.1. Configuring a GitHub App

Cluster administrators can create a GitHub App by running the following command:

$ tkn pac bootstrap github-app

If the tkn pac CLI plugin is not installed, you can create the GitHub App manually.

Procedure

To create and configure a GitHub App manually for Pipelines as Code, perform the following steps:

  1. Sign in to your GitHub account.
  2. Go to SettingsDeveloper settingsGitHub Apps, and click New GitHub App.
  3. Provide the following information in the GitHub App form:

    • GitHub Application Name: OpenShift Pipelines
    • Homepage URL: OpenShift Console URL
    • Webhook URL: The Pipelines as Code route or ingress URL. You can find it by running the command echo https://$(oc get route -n openshift-pipelines pipelines-as-code-controller -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}').
    • Webhook secret: An arbitrary secret. You can generate a secret by executing the command openssl rand -hex 20.
  4. Select the following Repository permissions:

    • Checks: Read & Write
    • Contents: Read & Write
    • Issues: Read & Write
    • Metadata: Read-only
    • Pull request: Read & Write
  5. Select the following Organization permissions:

    • Members: Readonly
    • Plan: Readonly
  6. Select the following User permissions:

    • Commit comment
    • Issue comment
    • Pull request
    • Pull request review
    • Pull request review comment
    • Push
  7. Click Create GitHub App.
  8. On the Details page of the newly created GitHub App, note the App ID displayed at the top.
  9. In the Private keys section, click Generate Private key to automatically generate and download a private key for the GitHub app. Securely store the private key for future reference and usage.

4.8.5.2. Configuring Pipelines as Code to access a GitHub App

To configure Pipelines as Code to access the newly created GitHub App, execute the following command:

+

$ oc -n openshift-pipelines create secret generic pipelines-as-code-secret \
        --from-literal github-private-key="$(cat <PATH_PRIVATE_KEY>)" \ 1
        --from-literal github-application-id="<APP_ID>" \ 2
        --from-literal webhook.secret="<WEBHOOK_SECRET>" 3
1
The path to the private key you downloaded while configuring the GitHub App.
2
The App ID of the GitHub App.
3
The webhook secret provided when you created the GitHub App.
Note

Pipelines as Code works automatically with GitHub Enterprise by detecting the header set from GitHub Enterprise and using it for the GitHub Enterprise API authorization URL.

4.8.5.3. Creating a GitHub App in administrator perspective

As a cluster administrator, you can configure your GitHub App with the OpenShift Container Platform cluster to use Pipelines as Code. This configuration allows you to execute a set of tasks required for build deployment.

Prerequisites

You have installed the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines pipelines-1.10 operator from the Operator Hub.

Procedure

  1. In the administrator perspective, navigate to Pipelines using the navigation pane.
  2. Click Setup GitHub App on the Pipelines page.
  3. Enter your GitHub App name. For example, pipelines-ci-clustername-testui.
  4. Click Setup.
  5. Enter your Git password when prompted in the browser.
  6. Click Create GitHub App for <username>, where <username> is your GitHub user name.

Verification

After successful creation of the GitHub App, the OpenShift Container Platform web console opens and displays the details about the application.

Github app details

The details of the GitHub App are saved as a secret in the openShift-pipelines namespace.

To view details such as name, link, and secret associated with the GitHub applications, navigate to Pipelines and click View GitHub App.

4.8.6. Using Pipelines as Code with GitHub Webhook

Use Pipelines as Code with GitHub Webhook on your repository if you cannot create a GitHub App. However, using Pipelines as Code with GitHub Webhook does not give you access to the GitHub Check Runs API. The status of the tasks is added as comments on the pull request and is unavailable under the Checks tab.

Note

Pipelines as Code with GitHub Webhook does not support GitOps comments such as /retest and /ok-to-test. To restart the continuous integration (CI), create a new commit to the repository. For example, to create a new commit without any changes, you can use the following command:

$ git --amend -a --no-edit && git push --force-with-lease <origin> <branchname>

Prerequisites

  • Ensure that Pipelines as Code is installed on the cluster.
  • For authorization, create a personal access token on GitHub.

    • To generate a secure and fine-grained token, restrict its scope to a specific repository and grant the following permissions:

      Table 4.7. Permissions for fine-grained tokens

      NameAccess

      Administration

      Read-only

      Metadata

      Read-only

      Content

      Read-only

      Commit statuses

      Read and Write

      Pull request

      Read and Write

      Webhooks

      Read and Write

    • To use classic tokens, set the scope as public_repo for public repositories and repo for private repositories. In addition, provide a short token expiration period and note the token in an alternate location.

      Note

      If you want to configure the webhook using the tkn pac CLI, add the admin:repo_hook scope.

Procedure

  1. Configure the webhook and create a Repository custom resource (CR).

    • To configure a webhook and create a Repository CR automatically using the tkn pac CLI tool, use the following command:

      $ tkn pac create repo

      Sample interactive output

      ? Enter the Git repository url (default: https://github.com/owner/repo):
      ? Please enter the namespace where the pipeline should run (default: repo-pipelines):
      ! Namespace repo-pipelines is not found
      ? Would you like me to create the namespace repo-pipelines? Yes
      ✓ Repository owner-repo has been created in repo-pipelines namespace
      ✓ Setting up GitHub Webhook for Repository https://github.com/owner/repo
      👀 I have detected a controller url: https://pipelines-as-code-controller-openshift-pipelines.apps.example.com
      ? Do you want me to use it? Yes
      ? Please enter the secret to configure the webhook for payload validation (default: sJNwdmTifHTs):  sJNwdmTifHTs
      ℹ ️You now need to create a GitHub personal access token, please checkout the docs at https://docs.github.com/en/authentication/keeping-your-account-and-data-secure/creating-a-personal-access-token for the required scopes
      ? Please enter the GitHub access token:  ****************************************
      ✓ Webhook has been created on repository owner/repo
      🔑 Webhook Secret owner-repo has been created in the repo-pipelines namespace.
      🔑 Repository CR owner-repo has been updated with webhook secret in the repo-pipelines namespace
      ℹ Directory .tekton has been created.
      ✓ We have detected your repository using the programming language Go.
      ✓ A basic template has been created in /home/Go/src/github.com/owner/repo/.tekton/pipelinerun.yaml, feel free to customize it.

    • To configure a webhook and create a Repository CR manually, perform the following steps:

      1. On your OpenShift cluster, extract the public URL of the Pipelines as Code controller.

        $ echo https://$(oc get route -n pipelines-as-code pipelines-as-code-controller -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')
      2. On your GitHub repository or organization, perform the following steps:

        1. Go to Settings –> Webhooks and click Add webhook.
        2. Set the Payload URL to the Pipelines as Code controller public URL.
        3. Select the content type as application/json.
        4. Add a webhook secret and note it in an alternate location. With openssl installed on your local machine, generate a random secret.

          $ openssl rand -hex 20
        5. Click Let me select individual events and select these events: Commit comments, Issue comments, Pull request, and Pushes.
        6. Click Add webhook.
      3. On your OpenShift cluster, create a Secret object with the personal access token and webhook secret.

        $ oc -n target-namespace create secret generic github-webhook-config \
          --from-literal provider.token="<GITHUB_PERSONAL_ACCESS_TOKEN>" \
          --from-literal webhook.secret="<WEBHOOK_SECRET>"
      4. Create a Repository CR.

        Example: Repository CR

        apiVersion: "pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/v1alpha1"
        kind: Repository
        metadata:
          name: my-repo
          namespace: target-namespace
        spec:
          url: "https://github.com/owner/repo"
          git_provider:
            secret:
              name: "github-webhook-config"
              key: "provider.token" # Set this if you have a different key in your secret
            webhook_secret:
              name: "github-webhook-config"
              key: "webhook.secret" # Set this if you have a different key for your secret

        Note

        Pipelines as Code assumes that the OpenShift Secret object and the Repository CR are in the same namespace.

  2. Optional: For an existing Repository CR, add multiple GitHub Webhook secrets or provide a substitute for a deleted secret.

    1. Add a webhook using the tkn pac CLI tool.

      Example: Additional webhook using the tkn pac CLI

      $ tkn pac webhook add -n repo-pipelines

      Sample interactive output

      ✓ Setting up GitHub Webhook for Repository https://github.com/owner/repo
      👀 I have detected a controller url: https://pipelines-as-code-controller-openshift-pipelines.apps.example.com
      ? Do you want me to use it? Yes
      ? Please enter the secret to configure the webhook for payload validation (default: AeHdHTJVfAeH):  AeHdHTJVfAeH
      ✓ Webhook has been created on repository owner/repo
      🔑 Secret owner-repo has been updated with webhook secert in the repo-pipelines namespace.

    2. Update the webhook.secret key in the existing OpenShift Secret object.
  3. Optional: For an existing Repository CR, update the personal access token.

    • Update the personal access token using the tkn pac CLI tool.

      Example: Updating personal access token using the tkn pac CLI

      $ tkn pac webhook update-token -n repo-pipelines

      Sample interactive output

      ? Please enter your personal access token:  ****************************************
      🔑 Secret owner-repo has been updated with new personal access token in the repo-pipelines namespace.

    • Alternatively, update the personal access token by modifying the Repository CR.

      1. Find the name of the secret in the Repository CR.

        ...
        spec:
          git_provider:
            secret:
              name: "github-webhook-config"
        ...
      2. Use the oc patch command to update the values of the $NEW_TOKEN in the $target_namespace namespace.

        $ oc -n $target_namespace patch secret github-webhook-config -p "{\"data\": {\"provider.token\": \"$(echo -n $NEW_TOKEN|base64 -w0)\"}}"

4.8.7. Using Pipelines as Code with GitLab

If your organization or project uses GitLab as the preferred platform, you can use Pipelines as Code for your repository with a webhook on GitLab.

Prerequisites

  • Ensure that Pipelines as Code is installed on the cluster.
  • For authorization, generate a personal access token as the manager of the project or organization on GitLab.

    Note
    • If you want to configure the webhook using the tkn pac CLI, add the admin:repo_hook scope to the token.
    • Using a token scoped for a specific project cannot provide API access to a merge request (MR) sent from a forked repository. In such cases, Pipelines as Code displays the result of a pipeline as a comment on the MR.

Procedure

  1. Configure the webhook and create a Repository custom resource (CR).

    • To configure a webhook and create a Repository CR automatically using the tkn pac CLI tool, use the following command:

      $ tkn pac create repo

      Sample interactive output

      ? Enter the Git repository url (default: https://gitlab.com/owner/repo):
      ? Please enter the namespace where the pipeline should run (default: repo-pipelines):
      ! Namespace repo-pipelines is not found
      ? Would you like me to create the namespace repo-pipelines? Yes
      ✓ Repository repositories-project has been created in repo-pipelines namespace
      ✓ Setting up GitLab Webhook for Repository https://gitlab.com/owner/repo
      ? Please enter the project ID for the repository you want to be configured,
        project ID refers to an unique ID (e.g. 34405323) shown at the top of your GitLab project : 17103
      👀 I have detected a controller url: https://pipelines-as-code-controller-openshift-pipelines.apps.example.com
      ? Do you want me to use it? Yes
      ? Please enter the secret to configure the webhook for payload validation (default: lFjHIEcaGFlF):  lFjHIEcaGFlF
      ℹ ️You now need to create a GitLab personal access token with `api` scope
      ℹ ️Go to this URL to generate one https://gitlab.com/-/profile/personal_access_tokens, see https://is.gd/rOEo9B for documentation
      ? Please enter the GitLab access token:  **************************
      ? Please enter your GitLab API URL::  https://gitlab.com
      ✓ Webhook has been created on your repository
      🔑 Webhook Secret repositories-project has been created in the repo-pipelines namespace.
      🔑 Repository CR repositories-project has been updated with webhook secret in the repo-pipelines namespace
      ℹ Directory .tekton has been created.
      ✓ A basic template has been created in /home/Go/src/gitlab.com/repositories/project/.tekton/pipelinerun.yaml, feel free to customize it.

    • To configure a webhook and create a Repository CR manually, perform the following steps:

      1. On your OpenShift cluster, extract the public URL of the Pipelines as Code controller.

        $ echo https://$(oc get route -n pipelines-as-code pipelines-as-code-controller -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')
      2. On your GitLab project, perform the following steps:

        1. Use the left sidebar to go to Settings –> Webhooks.
        2. Set the URL to the Pipelines as Code controller public URL.
        3. Add a webhook secret and note it in an alternate location. With openssl installed on your local machine, generate a random secret.

          $ openssl rand -hex 20
        4. Click Let me select individual events and select these events: Commit comments, Issue comments, Pull request, and Pushes.
        5. Click Save changes.
      3. On your OpenShift cluster, create a Secret object with the personal access token and webhook secret.

        $ oc -n target-namespace create secret generic gitlab-webhook-config \
          --from-literal provider.token="<GITLAB_PERSONAL_ACCESS_TOKEN>" \
          --from-literal webhook.secret="<WEBHOOK_SECRET>"
      4. Create a Repository CR.

        Example: Repository CR

        apiVersion: "pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/v1alpha1"
        kind: Repository
        metadata:
          name: my-repo
          namespace: target-namespace
        spec:
          url: "https://gitlab.com/owner/repo" 1
          git_provider:
            secret:
              name: "gitlab-webhook-config"
              key: "provider.token" # Set this if you have a different key in your secret
            webhook_secret:
              name: "gitlab-webhook-config"
              key: "webhook.secret" # Set this if you have a different key for your secret

        1
        Currently, Pipelines as Code does not automatically detects private instances for GitLab. In such cases, specify the API URL under the git_provider.url spec. In general, you can use the git_provider.url spec to manually override the API URL.
    Note
    • Pipelines as Code assumes that the OpenShift Secret object and the Repository CR are in the same namespace.
  2. Optional: For an existing Repository CR, add multiple GitLab Webhook secrets or provide a substitute for a deleted secret.

    1. Add a webhook using the tkn pac CLI tool.

      Example: Adding additional webhook using the tkn pac CLI

      $ tkn pac webhook add -n repo-pipelines

      Sample interactive output

      ✓ Setting up GitLab Webhook for Repository https://gitlab.com/owner/repo
      👀 I have detected a controller url: https://pipelines-as-code-controller-openshift-pipelines.apps.example.com
      ? Do you want me to use it? Yes
      ? Please enter the secret to configure the webhook for payload validation (default: AeHdHTJVfAeH):  AeHdHTJVfAeH
      ✓ Webhook has been created on repository owner/repo
      🔑 Secret owner-repo has been updated with webhook secert in the repo-pipelines namespace.

    2. Update the webhook.secret key in the existing OpenShift Secret object.
  3. Optional: For an existing Repository CR, update the personal access token.

    • Update the personal access token using the tkn pac CLI tool.

      Example: Updating personal access token using the tkn pac CLI

      $ tkn pac webhook update-token -n repo-pipelines

      Sample interactive output

      ? Please enter your personal access token:  ****************************************
      🔑 Secret owner-repo has been updated with new personal access token in the repo-pipelines namespace.

    • Alternatively, update the personal access token by modifying the Repository CR.

      1. Find the name of the secret in the Repository CR.

        ...
        spec:
          git_provider:
            secret:
              name: "gitlab-webhook-config"
        ...
      2. Use the oc patch command to update the values of the $NEW_TOKEN in the $target_namespace namespace.

        $ oc -n $target_namespace patch secret gitlab-webhook-config -p "{\"data\": {\"provider.token\": \"$(echo -n $NEW_TOKEN|base64 -w0)\"}}"

4.8.8. Using Pipelines as Code with Bitbucket Cloud

If your organization or project uses Bitbucket Cloud as the preferred platform, you can use Pipelines as Code for your repository with a webhook on Bitbucket Cloud.

Prerequisites

  • Ensure that Pipelines as Code is installed on the cluster.
  • Create an app password on Bitbucket Cloud.

    • Check the following boxes to add appropriate permissions to the token:

      • Account: Email, Read
      • Workspace membership: Read, Write
      • Projects: Read, Write
      • Issues: Read, Write
      • Pull requests: Read, Write

        Note
        • If you want to configure the webhook using the tkn pac CLI, add the Webhooks: Read and Write permission to the token.
        • Once generated, save a copy of the password or token in an alternate location.

Procedure

  1. Configure the webhook and create a Repository CR.

    • To configure a webhook and create a Repository CR automatically using the tkn pac CLI tool, use the following command:

      $ tkn pac create repo

      Sample interactive output

      ? Enter the Git repository url (default: https://bitbucket.org/workspace/repo):
      ? Please enter the namespace where the pipeline should run (default: repo-pipelines):
      ! Namespace repo-pipelines is not found
      ? Would you like me to create the namespace repo-pipelines? Yes
      ✓ Repository workspace-repo has been created in repo-pipelines namespace
      ✓ Setting up Bitbucket Webhook for Repository https://bitbucket.org/workspace/repo
      ? Please enter your bitbucket cloud username:  <username>
      ℹ ️You now need to create a Bitbucket Cloud app password, please checkout the docs at https://is.gd/fqMHiJ for the required permissions
      ? Please enter the Bitbucket Cloud app password:  ************************************
      👀 I have detected a controller url: https://pipelines-as-code-controller-openshift-pipelines.apps.example.com
      ? Do you want me to use it? Yes
      ✓ Webhook has been created on repository workspace/repo
      🔑 Webhook Secret workspace-repo has been created in the repo-pipelines namespace.
      🔑 Repository CR workspace-repo has been updated with webhook secret in the repo-pipelines namespace
      ℹ Directory .tekton has been created.
      ✓ A basic template has been created in /home/Go/src/bitbucket/repo/.tekton/pipelinerun.yaml, feel free to customize it.

    • To configure a webhook and create a Repository CR manually, perform the following steps:

      1. On your OpenShift cluster, extract the public URL of the Pipelines as Code controller.

        $ echo https://$(oc get route -n pipelines-as-code pipelines-as-code-controller -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')
      2. On Bitbucket Cloud, perform the following steps:

        1. Use the left navigation pane of your Bitbucket Cloud repository to go to Repository settings –> Webhooks and click Add webhook.
        2. Set a Title. For example, "Pipelines as Code".
        3. Set the URL to the Pipelines as Code controller public URL.
        4. Select these events: Repository: Push, Pull Request: Created, Pull Request: Updated, and Pull Request: Comment created.
        5. Click Save.
      3. On your OpenShift cluster, create a Secret object with the app password in the target namespace.

        $ oc -n target-namespace create secret generic bitbucket-cloud-token \
          --from-literal provider.token="<BITBUCKET_APP_PASSWORD>"
      4. Create a Repository CR.

        Example: Repository CR

        apiVersion: "pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/v1alpha1"
        kind: Repository
        metadata:
          name: my-repo
          namespace: target-namespace
        spec:
          url: "https://bitbucket.com/workspace/repo"
          branch: "main"
          git_provider:
            user: "<BITBUCKET_USERNAME>" 1
            secret:
              name: "bitbucket-cloud-token" 2
              key: "provider.token" # Set this if you have a different key in your secret

        1
        You can only reference a user by the ACCOUNT_ID in an owner file.
        2
        Pipelines as Code assumes that the secret referred in the git_provider.secret spec and the Repository CR is in the same namespace.
    Note
    • The tkn pac create and tkn pac bootstrap commands are not supported on Bitbucket Cloud.
    • Bitbucket Cloud does not support webhook secrets. To secure the payload and prevent hijacking of the CI, Pipelines as Code fetches the list of Bitbucket Cloud IP addresses and ensures that the webhook receptions come only from those IP addresses.

      • To disable the default behavior, set the bitbucket-cloud-check-source-ip key to false in the Pipelines as Code config map for the pipelines-as-code namespace.
      • To allow additional safe IP addresses or networks, add them as comma separated values to the bitbucket-cloud-additional-source-ip key in the Pipelines as Code config map for the pipelines-as-code namespace.
  2. Optional: For an existing Repository CR, add multiple Bitbucket Cloud Webhook secrets or provide a substitute for a deleted secret.

    1. Add a webhook using the tkn pac CLI tool.

      Example: Adding additional webhook using the tkn pac CLI

      $ tkn pac webhook add -n repo-pipelines

      Sample interactive output

      ✓ Setting up Bitbucket Webhook for Repository https://bitbucket.org/workspace/repo
      ? Please enter your bitbucket cloud username:  <username>
      👀 I have detected a controller url: https://pipelines-as-code-controller-openshift-pipelines.apps.example.com
      ? Do you want me to use it? Yes
      ✓ Webhook has been created on repository workspace/repo
      🔑 Secret workspace-repo has been updated with webhook secret in the repo-pipelines namespace.

      Note

      Use the [-n <namespace>] option with the tkn pac webhook add command only when the Repository CR exists in a namespace other than the default namespace.

    2. Update the webhook.secret key in the existing OpenShift Secret object.
  3. Optional: For an existing Repository CR, update the personal access token.

    • Update the personal access token using the tkn pac CLI tool.

      Example: Updating personal access token using the tkn pac CLI

      $ tkn pac webhook update-token -n repo-pipelines

      Sample interactive output

      ? Please enter your personal access token:  ****************************************
      🔑 Secret owner-repo has been updated with new personal access token in the repo-pipelines namespace.

      Note

      Use the [-n <namespace>] option with the tkn pac webhook update-token command only when the Repository CR exists in a namespace other than the default namespace.

    • Alternatively, update the personal access token by modifying the Repository CR.

      1. Find the name of the secret in the Repository CR.

        ...
        spec:
          git_provider:
            user: "<BITBUCKET_USERNAME>"
            secret:
              name: "bitbucket-cloud-token"
              key: "provider.token"
        ...
      2. Use the oc patch command to update the values of the $password in the $target_namespace namespace.

        $ oc -n $target_namespace patch secret bitbucket-cloud-token -p "{\"data\": {\"provider.token\": \"$(echo -n $NEW_TOKEN|base64 -w0)\"}}"

4.8.9. Using Pipelines as Code with Bitbucket Server

If your organization or project uses Bitbucket Server as the preferred platform, you can use Pipelines as Code for your repository with a webhook on Bitbucket Server.

Prerequisites

  • Ensure that Pipelines as Code is installed on the cluster.
  • Generate a personal access token as the manager of the project on Bitbucket Server, and save a copy of it in an alternate location.

    Note
    • The token must have the PROJECT_ADMIN and REPOSITORY_ADMIN permissions.
    • The token must have access to forked repositories in pull requests.

Procedure

  1. On your OpenShift cluster, extract the public URL of the Pipelines as Code controller.

    $ echo https://$(oc get route -n pipelines-as-code pipelines-as-code-controller -o jsonpath='{.spec.host}')
  2. On Bitbucket Server, perform the following steps:

    1. Use the left navigation pane of your Bitbucket Data Center repository to go to Repository settings –> Webhooks and click Add webhook.
    2. Set a Title. For example, "Pipelines as Code".
    3. Set the URL to the Pipelines as Code controller public URL.
    4. Add a webhook secret and save a copy of it in an alternate location. If you have openssl installed on your local machine, generate a random secret using the following command:

      $ openssl rand -hex 20
    5. Select the following events:

      • Repository: Push
      • Repository: Modified
      • Pull Request: Opened
      • Pull Request: Source branch updated
      • Pull Request: Comment added
    6. Click Save.
  3. On your OpenShift cluster, create a Secret object with the app password in the target namespace.

    $ oc -n target-namespace create secret generic bitbucket-server-webhook-config \
      --from-literal provider.token="<PERSONAL_TOKEN>" \
      --from-literal webhook.secret="<WEBHOOK_SECRET>"
  4. Create a Repository CR.

    Example: Repository CR

    ---
      apiVersion: "pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/v1alpha1"
      kind: Repository
      metadata:
        name: my-repo
        namespace: target-namespace
      spec:
        url: "https://bitbucket.com/workspace/repo"
        git_provider:
          url: "https://bitbucket.server.api.url/rest" 1
          user: "<BITBUCKET_USERNAME>" 2
          secret: 3
            name: "bitbucket-server-webhook-config"
            key: "provider.token" # Set this if you have a different key in your secret
          webhook_secret:
            name: "bitbucket-server-webhook-config"
            key: "webhook.secret" # Set this if you have a different key for your secret

    1
    Ensure that you have the right Bitbucket Server API URL without the /api/v1.0 suffix. Usually, the default install has a /rest suffix.
    2
    You can only reference a user by the ACCOUNT_ID in an owner file.
    3
    Pipelines as Code assumes that the secret referred in the git_provider.secret spec and the Repository CR is in the same namespace.
    Note

    The tkn pac create and tkn pac bootstrap commands are not supported on Bitbucket Server.

4.8.10. Interfacing Pipelines as Code with custom certificates

To configure Pipelines as Code with a Git repository that is accessible with a privately signed or custom certificate, you can expose the certificate to Pipelines as Code.

Procedure

  • If you have installed Pipelines as Code using the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, you can add your custom certificate to the cluster using the Proxy object. The Operator exposes the certificate in all Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components and workloads, including Pipelines as Code.

Additional resources

4.8.11. Using the Repository CRD with Pipelines as Code

The Repository custom resource (CR) has the following primary functions:

  • Inform Pipelines as Code about processing an event from a URL.
  • Inform Pipelines as Code about the namespace for the pipeline runs.
  • Reference an API secret, username, or an API URL necessary for Git provider platforms when using webhook methods.
  • Provide the last pipeline run status for a repository.

You can use the tkn pac CLI or other alternative methods to create a Repository CR inside the target namespace. For example:

cat <<EOF|kubectl create -n my-pipeline-ci -f- 1

apiVersion: "pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/v1alpha1"
kind: Repository
metadata:
  name: project-repository
spec:
  url: "https://github.com/<repository>/<project>"
EOF
1
my-pipeline-ci is the target namespace.

Whenever there is an event coming from the URL such as https://github.com/<repository>/<project>, Pipelines as Code matches it and starts checking out the content of the <repository>/<project> repository for pipeline run to match the content in the .tekton/ directory.

Note
  • You must create the Repository CRD in the same namespace where pipelines associated with the source code repository will be executed; it cannot target a different namespace.
  • If multiple Repository CRDs match the same event, Pipelines as Code will process only the oldest one. If you need to match a specific namespace, add the pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/target-namespace: "<mynamespace>" annotation. Such explicit targeting prevents a malicious actor from executing a pipeline run in a namespace to which they do not have access.

4.8.11.1. Setting concurrency limits in the Repository CRD

You can use the concurrency_limit spec in the Repository CRD to define the maximum number of pipeline runs running simultaneously for a repository.

...
spec:
  concurrency_limit: <number>
  ...

If there are multiple pipeline runs matching an event, the pipeline runs that match the event start in an alphabetical order.

For example, if you have three pipeline runs in the .tekton directory and you create a pull request with a concurrency_limit of 1 in the repository configuration, then all the pipeline runs are executed in an alphabetical order. At any given time, only one pipeline run is in the running state while the rest are queued.

4.8.12. Using Pipelines as Code resolver

The Pipelines as Code resolver ensures that a running pipeline run does not conflict with others.

To split your pipeline and pipeline run, store the files in the .tekton/ directory or its subdirectories.

If Pipelines as Code observes a pipeline run with a reference to a task or a pipeline in any YAML file located in the .tekton/ directory, Pipelines as Code automatically resolves the referenced task to provide a single pipeline run with an embedded spec in a PipelineRun object.

If Pipelines as Code cannot resolve the referenced tasks in the Pipeline or PipelineSpec definition, the run fails before applying any changes to the cluster. You can see the issue on your Git provider platform and inside the events of the target namespace where the Repository CR is located.

The resolver skips resolving if it observes the following type of tasks:

  • A reference to a cluster task.
  • A task or pipeline bundle.
  • A custom task with an API version that does not have a tekton.dev/ prefix.

The resolver uses such tasks literally, without any transformation.

To test your pipeline run locally before sending it in a pull request, use the tkn pac resolve command.

You can also reference remote pipelines and tasks.

4.8.12.1. Using remote task annotations with Pipelines as Code

Pipelines as Code supports fetching remote tasks or pipelines by using annotations in a pipeline run. If you reference a remote task in a pipeline run, or a pipeline in a PipelineRun or a PipelineSpec object, the Pipelines as Code resolver automatically includes it. If there is any error while fetching the remote tasks or parsing them, Pipelines as Code stops processing the tasks.

To include remote tasks, refer to the following examples of annotation:

Reference remote tasks in Tekton Hub

  • Reference a single remote task in Tekton Hub.

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task: "git-clone" 1
    ...
    1
    Pipelines as Code includes the latest version of the task from the Tekton Hub.
  • Reference multiple remote tasks from Tekton Hub

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task: "[git-clone, golang-test, tkn]"
    ...
  • Reference multiple remote tasks from Tekton Hub using the -<NUMBER> suffix.

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task: "git-clone"
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task-1: "golang-test"
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task-2: "tkn" 1
    ...
    1
    By default, Pipelines as Code interprets the string as the latest task to fetch from Tekton Hub.
  • Reference a specific version of a remote task from Tekton Hub.

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task: "[git-clone:0.1]" 1
    ...
    1
    Refers to the 0.1 version of the git-clone remote task from Tekton Hub.

Remote tasks using URLs

...
  pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task: "<https://remote.url/task.yaml>" 1
...

1
The public URL to the remote task.
Note

Reference a task from a YAML file inside your repository

...
pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task: "<share/tasks/git-clone.yaml>" 1
...

1
Relative path to the local file containing the task definition.

4.8.12.2. Using remote pipeline annotations with Pipelines as Code

You can share a pipeline definition across multiple repositories by using the remote pipeline annotation.

...
    pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/pipeline: "<https://git.provider/raw/pipeline.yaml>" 1
...
1
URL to the remote pipeline definition. You can also provide locations for files inside the same repository.
Note

You can reference only one pipeline definition using the annotation.

4.8.13. Creating a pipeline run using Pipelines as Code

To run pipelines using Pipelines as Code, you can create pipelines definitions or templates as YAML files in the .tekton/ directory of the repository. You can reference YAML files in other repositories using remote URLs, but pipeline runs are only triggered by events in the repository containing the .tekton/ directory.

The Pipelines as Code resolver bundles the pipeline runs with all tasks as a single pipeline run without external dependencies.

Note
  • For pipelines, use at least one pipeline run with a spec, or a separated Pipeline object.
  • For tasks, embed task spec inside a pipeline, or define it separately as a Task object.

Parameterizing commits and URLs

You can specify the parameters of your commit and URL by using dynamic, expandable variables with the {{<var>}} format. Currently, you can use the following variables:

  • {{repo_owner}}: The repository owner.
  • {{repo_name}}: The repository name.
  • {{repo_url}}: The repository full URL.
  • {{revision}}: Full SHA revision of a commit.
  • {{sender}}: The username or account id of the sender of the commit.
  • {{source_branch}}: The branch name where the event originated.
  • {{target_branch}}: The branch name that the event targets. For push events, it’s the same as the source_branch.
  • {{pull_request_number}}: The pull or merge request number, defined only for a pull_request event type.
  • {{git_auth_secret}}: The secret name that is generated automatically with Git provider’s token for checking out private repos.

Matching an event to a pipeline run

You can match different Git provider events with each pipeline by using special annotations on the pipeline run. If there are multiple pipeline runs matching an event, Pipelines as Code runs them in parallel and posts the results to the Git provider as soon a pipeline run finishes.

Matching a pull event to a pipeline run

You can use the following example to match the pipeline-pr-main pipeline with a pull_request event that targets the main branch:

...
  metadata:
    name: pipeline-pr-main
  annotations:
    pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-target-branch: "[main]" 1
    pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-event: "[pull_request]"
...
1
You can specify multiple branches by adding comma-separated entries. For example, "[main, release-nightly]". In addition, you can specify the following:
  • Full references to branches such as "refs/heads/main"
  • Globs with pattern matching such as "refs/heads/\*"
  • Tags such as "refs/tags/1.\*"

Matching a push event to a pipeline run

You can use the following example to match the pipeline-push-on-main pipeline with a push event targeting the refs/heads/main branch:

...
  metadata:
    name: pipeline-push-on-main
  annotations:
    pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-target-branch: "[refs/heads/main]" 1
    pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-event: "[push]"
...
1
You can specifiy multiple branches by adding comma-separated entries. For example, "[main, release-nightly]". In addition, you can specify the following:
  • Full references to branches such as "refs/heads/main"
  • Globs with pattern matching such as "refs/heads/\*"
  • Tags such as "refs/tags/1.\*"

Advanced event matching

Pipelines as Code supports using Common Expression Language (CEL) based filtering for advanced event matching. If you have the pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-cel-expression annotation in your pipeline run, Pipelines as Code uses the CEL expression and skips the on-target-branch annotation. Compared to the simple on-target-branch annotation matching, the CEL expressions allow complex filtering and negation.

To use CEL-based filtering with Pipelines as Code, consider the following examples of annotations:

  • To match a pull_request event targeting the main branch and coming from the wip branch:

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-cel-expression: |
        event == "pull_request" && target_branch == "main" && source_branch == "wip"
    ...
  • To run a pipeline only if a path has changed, you can use the .pathChanged suffix function with a glob pattern:

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-cel-expression: |
        event == "pull_request" && "docs/\*.md".pathChanged() 1
    ...
    1
    Matches all markdown files in the docs directory.
  • To match all pull requests starting with the title [DOWNSTREAM]:

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-cel-expression: |
        event == "pull_request && event_title.startsWith("[DOWNSTREAM]")
    ...
  • To run a pipeline on a pull_request event, but skip the experimental branch:

    ...
      pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-cel-expression: |
        event == "pull_request" && target_branch != experimental"
    ...

For advanced CEL-based filtering while using Pipelines as Code, you can use the following fields and suffix functions:

  • event: A push or pull_request event.
  • target_branch: The target branch.
  • source_branch: The branch of origin of a pull_request event. For push events, it is same as the target_branch.
  • event_title: Matches the title of the event, such as the commit title for a push event, and the title of a pull or merge request for a pull_request event. Currently, only GitHub, Gitlab, and Bitbucket Cloud are the supported providers.
  • .pathChanged: A suffix function to a string. The string can be a glob of a path to check if the path has changed. Currently, only GitHub and Gitlab are supported as providers.

Using the temporary GitHub App token for Github API operations

You can use the temporary installation token generated by Pipelines as Code from GitHub App to access the GitHub API. The token value is stored in the temporary {{git_auth_secret}} dynamic variable generated for private repositories in the git-provider-token key.

For example, to add a comment to a pull request, you can use the github-add-comment task from Tekton Hub using a Pipelines as Code annotation:

...
  pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/task: "github-add-comment"
...

You can then add a task to the tasks section or finally tasks in the pipeline run definition:

[...]
tasks:
  - name:
      taskRef:
        name: github-add-comment
      params:
        - name: REQUEST_URL
          value: "{{ repo_url }}/pull/{{ pull_request_number }}" 1
        - name: COMMENT_OR_FILE
          value: "Pipelines as Code IS GREAT!"
        - name: GITHUB_TOKEN_SECRET_NAME
          value: "{{ git_auth_secret }}"
        - name: GITHUB_TOKEN_SECRET_KEY
          value: "git-provider-token"
...
1
By using the dynamic variables, you can reuse this snippet template for any pull request from any repository.
Note

On GitHub Apps, the generated installation token is available for 8 hours and scoped to the repository from where the events originate unless configured differently on the cluster.

Additional resources

4.8.14. Running a pipeline run using Pipelines as Code

With default configuration, Pipelines as Code runs any pipeline run in the .tekton/ directory of the default branch of repository, when specified events such as pull request or push occurs on the repository. For example, if a pipeline run on the default branch has the annotation pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/on-event: "[pull_request]", it will run whenever a pull request event occurs.

In the event of a pull request or a merge request, Pipelines as Code also runs pipelines from branches other than the default branch, if the following conditions are met by the author of the pull request:

  • The author is the owner of the repository.
  • The author is a collaborator on the repository.
  • The author is a public member on the organization of the repository.
  • The pull request author is listed in an OWNER file located in the repository root of the main branch as defined in the GitHub configuration for the repository. Also, the pull request author is added to either approvers or reviewers section. For example, if an author is listed in the approvers section, then a pull request raised by that author starts the pipeline run.
...
  approvers:
    - approved
...

If the pull request author does not meet the requirements, another user who meets the requirements can comment /ok-to-test on the pull request, and start the pipeline run.

Pipeline run execution

A pipeline run always runs in the namespace of the Repository CRD associated with the repository that generated the event.

You can observe the execution of your pipeline runs using the tkn pac CLI tool.

  • To follow the execution of the last pipeline run, use the following example:

    $ tkn pac logs -n <my-pipeline-ci> -L 1
    1
    my-pipeline-ci is the namespace for the Repository CRD.
  • To follow the execution of any pipeline run interactively, use the following example:

    $ tkn pac logs -n <my-pipeline-ci> 1
    1
    my-pipeline-ci is the namespace for the Repository CRD. If you need to view a pipeline run other than the last one, you can use the tkn pac logs command to select a PipelineRun attached to the repository:

If you have configured Pipelines as Code with a GitHub App, Pipelines as Code posts a URL in the Checks tab of the GitHub App. You can click the URL and follow the pipeline execution.

Restarting a pipeline run

You can restart a pipeline run with no events, such as sending a new commit to your branch or raising a pull request. On a GitHub App, go to the Checks tab and click Re-run.

If you target a pull or merge request, use the following comments inside your pull request to restart all or specific pipeline runs:

  • The /retest comment restarts all pipeline runs.
  • The /retest <pipelinerun-name> comment restarts a specific pipeline run.
  • The /cancel comment cancels all pipeline runs.
  • The /cancel <pipelinerun-name> comment cancels a specific pipeline run.

The results of the comments are visible under the Checks tab of a GitHub App.

4.8.15. Monitoring pipeline run status using Pipelines as Code

Depending on the context and supported tools, you can monitor the status of a pipeline run in different ways.

Status on GitHub Apps

When a pipeline run finishes, the status is added in the Check tabs with limited information on how long each task of your pipeline took, and the output of the tkn pipelinerun describe command.

Log error snippet

When Pipelines as Code detects an error in one of the tasks of a pipeline, a small snippet consisting of the last 3 lines in the task breakdown of the first failed task is displayed.

Note

Pipelines as Code avoids leaking secrets by looking into the pipeline run and replacing secret values with hidden characters. However, Pipelines as Code cannot hide secrets coming from workspaces and envFrom source.

Annotations for log error snippets

In the Pipelines as Code config map, if you set the error-detection-from-container-logs parameter to true, Pipelines as Code detects the errors from the container logs and adds them as annotations on the pull request where the error occurred.

Important

This feature is in Technology Preview.

Currently, Pipelines as Code supports only the simple cases where the error looks like makefile or grep output of the following format:

<filename>:<line>:<column>: <error message>

You can customize the regular expression used to detect the errors with the error-detection-simple-regexp field. The regular expression uses named groups to give flexibility on how to specify the matching. The groups needed to match are filename, line, and error. You can view the Pipelines as Code config map for the default regular expression.

Note

By default, Pipelines as Code scans only the last 50 lines of the container logs. You can increase this value in the error-detection-max-number-of-lines field or set -1 for an unlimited number of lines. However, such configurations may increase the memory usage of the watcher.

Status for webhook

For webhook, when the event is a pull request, the status is added as a comment on the pull or merge request.

Failures

If a namespace is matched to a Repository CRD, Pipelines as Code emits its failure log messages in the Kubernetes events inside the namespace.

Status associated with Repository CRD

The last 5 status messages for a pipeline run is stored inside the Repository custom resource.

$ oc get repo -n <pipelines-as-code-ci>
NAME                  URL                                                        NAMESPACE             SUCCEEDED   REASON      STARTTIME   COMPLETIONTIME
pipelines-as-code-ci   https://github.com/openshift-pipelines/pipelines-as-code   pipelines-as-code-ci   True        Succeeded   59m         56m

Using the tkn pac describe command, you can extract the status of the runs associated with your repository and its metadata.

Notifications

Pipelines as Code does not manage notifications. If you need to have notifications, use the finally feature of pipelines.

4.8.16. Using private repositories with Pipelines as Code

Pipelines as Code supports private repositories by creating or updating a secret in the target namespace with the user token. The git-clone task from Tekton Hub uses the user token to clone private repositories.

Whenever Pipelines as Code creates a new pipeline run in the target namespace, it creates or updates a secret with the pac-gitauth-<REPOSITORY_OWNER>-<REPOSITORY_NAME>-<RANDOM_STRING> format.

You must reference the secret with the basic-auth workspace in your pipeline run and pipeline definitions, which is then passed on to the git-clone task.

...
  workspace:
  - name: basic-auth
    secret:
      secretName: "{{ git_auth_secret }}"
...

In the pipeline, you can reference the basic-auth workspace for the git-clone task to reuse:

...
workspaces:
  - name basic-auth
params:
    - name: repo_url
    - name: revision
...
tasks:
  workspaces:
    - name: basic-auth
      workspace: basic-auth
  ...
  tasks:
  - name: git-clone-from-catalog
      taskRef:
        name: git-clone 1
      params:
        - name: url
          value: $(params.repo_url)
        - name: revision
          value: $(params.revision)
...
1
The git-clone task picks up the basic-auth workspace and uses it to clone the private repository.

You can modify this configuration by setting the secret-auto-create flag to either a false or true value, as required in the Pipelines as Code config map.

4.8.17. Cleaning up pipeline run using Pipelines as Code

There can be many pipeline runs in a user namespace. By setting the max-keep-runs annotation, you can configure Pipelines as Code to retain a limited number of pipeline runs that matches an event. For example:

...
  pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/max-keep-runs: "<max_number>" 1
...
1
Pipelines as Code starts cleaning up right after it finishes a successful execution, retaining only the maximum number of pipeline runs configured using the annotation.
Note
  • Pipelines as Code skips cleaning the running pipelines but cleans up the pipeline runs with an unknown status.
  • Pipelines as Code skips cleaning a failed pull request.

4.8.18. Using incoming webhook with Pipelines as Code

Using an incoming webhook URL and a shared secret, you can start a pipeline run in a repository.

To use incoming webhooks, specify the following within the spec section of the Repository CRD:

  • The incoming webhook URL that Pipelines as Code matches.
  • The Git provider and the user token. Currently, Pipelines as Code supports github, gitlab, and bitbucket-cloud.

    Note

    When using incoming webhook URLs in the context of GitHub app, you must specify the token.

  • The target branches and a secret for the incoming webhook URL.

Example: Repository CRD with incoming webhook

apiVersion: "pipelinesascode.tekton.dev/v1alpha1"
kind: Repository
metadata:
  name: repo
  namespace: ns
spec:
  url: "https://github.com/owner/repo"
  git_provider:
    type: github
    secret:
      name: "owner-token"
  incoming:
    - targets:
      - main
      secret:
        name: repo-incoming-secret
      type: webhook-url

Example: The repo-incoming-secret secret for incoming webhook

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: repo-incoming-secret
  namespace: ns
type: Opaque
stringData:
  secret: <very-secure-shared-secret>

To trigger a pipeline run located in the .tekton directory of a Git repository, use the following command:

$ curl -X POST 'https://control.pac.url/incoming?secret=very-secure-shared-secret&repository=repo&branch=main&pipelinerun=target_pipelinerun'

Pipelines as Code matches the incoming URL and treats it as a push event. However, Pipelines as Code does not report status of the pipeline runs triggered by this command.

To get a report or a notification, add it directly with a finally task to your pipeline. Alternatively, you can inspect the Repository CRD with the tkn pac CLI tool.

4.8.19. Customizing Pipelines as Code configuration

To customize Pipelines as Code, cluster administrators can configure the following parameters using the pipelines-as-code config map in the pipelines-as-code namespace:

Table 4.8. Customizing Pipelines as Code configuration

ParameterDescriptionDefault

application-name

The name of the application. For example, the name displayed in the GitHub Checks labels.

"Pipelines as Code CI"

max-keep-days

The number of the days for which the executed pipeline runs are kept in the pipelines-as-code namespace.

Note that this configmap setting does not affect the cleanups of a user’s pipeline runs, which are controlled by the annotations on the pipeline run definition in the user’s GitHub repository.

 

secret-auto-create

Indicates whether or not a secret should be automatically created using the token generated in the GitHub application. This secret can then be used with private repositories.

enabled

remote-tasks

When enabled, allows remote tasks from pipeline run annotations.

enabled

hub-url

The base URL for the Tekton Hub API.

https://hub.tekton.dev/

hub-catalog-name

The Tekton Hub catalog name.

tekton

tekton-dashboard-url

The URL of the Tekton Hub dashboard. Pipelines as Code uses this URL to generate a PipelineRun URL on the Tekton Hub dashboard.

NA

bitbucket-cloud-check-source-ip

Indicates whether to secure the service requests by querying IP ranges for a public Bitbucket. Changing the parameter’s default value might result into a security issue.

enabled

bitbucket-cloud-additional-source-ip

Indicates whether to provide an additional set of IP ranges or networks, which are separated by commas.

NA

max-keep-run-upper-limit

A maximum limit for the max-keep-run value for a pipeline run.

NA

default-max-keep-runs

A default limit for the max-keep-run value for a pipeline run. If defined, the value is applied to all pipeline runs that do not have a max-keep-run annotation.

NA

auto-configure-new-github-repo

Configures new GitHub repositories automatically. Pipelines as Code sets up a namespace and creates a custom resource for your repository. This parameter is only supported with GitHub applications.

disabled

auto-configure-repo-namespace-template

Configures a template to automatically generate the namespace for your new repository, if auto-configure-new-github-repo is enabled.

{repo_name}-pipelines

error-log-snippet

Enables or disables the view of a log snippet for the failed tasks, with an error in a pipeline. You can disable this parameter in the case of data leakage from your pipeline.

enabled

4.8.20. Pipelines as Code command reference

The tkn pac CLI tool offers the following capabilities:

  • Bootstrap Pipelines as Code installation and configuration.
  • Create a new Pipelines as Code repository.
  • List all Pipelines as Code repositories.
  • Describe a Pipelines as Code repository and the associated runs.
  • Generate a simple pipeline run to get started.
  • Resolve a pipeline run as if it was executed by Pipelines as Code.
Tip

You can use the commands corresponding to the capabilities for testing and experimentation, so that you don’t have to make changes to the Git repository containing the application source code.

4.8.20.1. Basic syntax

$ tkn pac [command or options] [arguments]

4.8.20.2. Global options

$ tkn pac --help

4.8.20.3. Utility commands

4.8.20.3.1. bootstrap

Table 4.9. Bootstrapping Pipelines as Code installation and configuration

CommandDescription

tkn pac bootstrap

Installs and configures Pipelines as Code for Git repository hosting service providers, such as GitHub and GitHub Enterprise.

tkn pac bootstrap --nightly

Installs the nightly build of Pipelines as Code.

tkn pac bootstrap --route-url <public_url_to_ingress_spec>

Overrides the OpenShift route URL.

By default, tkn pac bootstrap detects the OpenShift route, which is automatically associated with the Pipelines as Code controller service.

If you do not have an OpenShift Container Platform cluster, it asks you for the public URL that points to the ingress endpoint.

tkn pac bootstrap github-app

Create a GitHub application and secrets in the pipelines-as-code namespace.

4.8.20.3.2. repository

Table 4.10. Managing Pipelines as Code repositories

CommandDescription

tkn pac repo create

Creates a new Pipelines as Code repository and a namespace based on the pipeline run template.

tkn pac repo list

Lists all the Pipelines as Code repositories and displays the last status of the associated runs.

tkn pac repo describe

Describes a Pipelines as Code repository and the associated runs.

4.8.20.3.3. generate

Table 4.11. Generating pipeline runs using Pipelines as Code

CommandDescription

tkn pac generate

Generates a simple pipeline run.

When executed from the directory containing the source code, it automatically detects current Git information.

In addition, it uses basic language detection capability and adds extra tasks depending on the language.

For example, if it detects a setup.py file at the repository root, the pylint task is automatically added to the generated pipeline run.

4.8.20.3.4. resolve

Table 4.12. Resolving and executing pipeline runs using Pipelines as Code

CommandDescription

tkn pac resolve

Executes a pipeline run as if it is owned by the Pipelines as Code on service.

tkn pac resolve -f .tekton/pull-request.yaml | oc apply -f -

Displays the status of a live pipeline run that uses the template in .tekton/pull-request.yaml.

Combined with a Kubernetes installation running on your local machine, you can observe the pipeline run without generating a new commit.

If you run the command from a source code repository, it attempts to detect the current Git information and automatically resolve parameters such as current revision or branch.

tkn pac resolve -f .tekton/pr.yaml -p revision=main -p repo_name=<repository_name>

Executes a pipeline run by overriding default parameter values derived from the Git repository.

The -f option can also accept a directory path and apply the tkn pac resolve command on all .yaml or .yml files in that directory. You can also use the -f flag multiple times in the same command.

You can override the default information gathered from the Git repository by specifying parameter values using the -p option. For example, you can use a Git branch as a revision and a different repository name.

4.8.21. Additional resources

4.9. Working with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines in the web console

You can use the Administrator or Developer perspective to create and modify Pipeline, PipelineRun, and Repository objects from the Pipelines page in the OpenShift Container Platform web console. You can also use the +Add page in the Developer perspective of the web console to create CI/CD pipelines for your software delivery process.

4.9.1. Working with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines in the Developer perspective

In the Developer perspective, you can access the following options for creating pipelines from the +Add page:

  • Use the +AddPipelinesPipeline builder option to create customized pipelines for your application.
  • Use the +AddFrom Git option to create pipelines using pipeline templates and resources while creating an application.

After you create the pipelines for your application, you can view and visually interact with the deployed pipelines in the Pipelines view. You can also use the Topology view to interact with the pipelines created using the From Git option. You must apply custom labels to pipelines created using the Pipeline builder to see them in the Topology view.

Prerequisites

4.9.2. Constructing Pipelines using the Pipeline builder

In the Developer perspective of the console, you can use the +AddPipelinePipeline builder option to:

  • Configure pipelines using either the Pipeline builder or the YAML view.
  • Construct a pipeline flow using existing tasks and cluster tasks. When you install the OpenShift Pipelines Operator, it adds reusable pipeline cluster tasks to your cluster.
  • Specify the type of resources required for the pipeline run, and if required, add additional parameters to the pipeline.
  • Reference these pipeline resources in each of the tasks in the pipeline as input and output resources.
  • If required, reference any additional parameters added to the pipeline in the task. The parameters for a task are prepopulated based on the specifications of the task.
  • Use the Operator-installed, reusable snippets and samples to create detailed pipelines.

Procedure

  1. In the +Add view of the Developer perspective, click the Pipeline tile to see the Pipeline builder page.
  2. Configure the pipeline using either the Pipeline builder view or the YAML view.

    Note

    The Pipeline builder view supports a limited number of fields whereas the YAML view supports all available fields. Optionally, you can also use the Operator-installed, reusable snippets and samples to create detailed Pipelines.

    Figure 4.1. YAML view

    op pipeline yaml
  3. Configure your pipeline by using Pipeline builder:

    1. In the Name field, enter a unique name for the pipeline.
    2. In the Tasks section:

      1. Click Add task.
      2. Search for a task using the quick search field and select the required task from the displayed list.
      3. Click Add or Install and add. In this example, use the s2i-nodejs task.

        Note

        The search list contains all the Tekton Hub tasks and tasks available in the cluster. Also, if a task is already installed it will show Add to add the task whereas it will show Install and add to install and add the task. It will show Update and add when you add the same task with an updated version.

        • To add sequential tasks to the pipeline:

          • Click the plus icon to the right or left of the task → click Add task.
          • Search for a task using the quick search field and select the required task from the displayed list.
          • Click Add or Install and add.

            Figure 4.2. Pipeline builder

            op pipeline builder
        • To add a final task:

          • Click the Add finally task → Click Add task.
          • Search for a task using the quick search field and select the required task from the displayed list.
          • Click Add or Install and add.
    3. In the Resources section, click Add Resources to specify the name and type of resources for the pipeline run. These resources are then used by the tasks in the pipeline as inputs and outputs. For this example:

      1. Add an input resource. In the Name field, enter Source, and then from the Resource Type drop-down list, select Git.
      2. Add an output resource. In the Name field, enter Img, and then from the Resource Type drop-down list, select Image.

        Note

        A red icon appears next to the task if a resource is missing.

    4. Optional: The Parameters for a task are pre-populated based on the specifications of the task. If required, use the Add Parameters link in the Parameters section to add additional parameters.
    5. In the Workspaces section, click Add workspace and enter a unique workspace name in the Name field. You can add multiple workspaces to the pipeline.
    6. In the Tasks section, click the s2i-nodejs task to see the side panel with details for the task. In the task side panel, specify the resources and parameters for the s2i-nodejs task:

      1. If required, in the Parameters section, add more parameters to the default ones, by using the $(params.<param-name>) syntax.
      2. In the Image section, enter Img as specified in the Resources section.
      3. Select a workspace from the source drop-down under Workspaces section.
    7. Add resources, parameters, and workspaces to the openshift-client task.
  4. Click Create to create and view the pipeline in the Pipeline Details page.
  5. Click the Actions drop-down menu then click Start, to see the Start Pipeline page.
  6. The Workspaces section lists the workspaces you created earlier. Use the respective drop-down to specify the volume source for your workspace. You have the following options: Empty Directory, Config Map, Secret, PersistentVolumeClaim, or VolumeClaimTemplate.

4.9.3. Creating OpenShift Pipelines along with applications

To create pipelines along with applications, use the From Git option in the Add+ view of the Developer perspective. You can view all of your available pipelines and select the pipelines you want to use to create applications while importing your code or deploying an image.

The Tekton Hub Integration is enabled by default and you can see tasks from the Tekton Hub that are supported by your cluster. Administrators can opt out of the Tekton Hub Integration and the Tekton Hub tasks will no longer be displayed. You can also check whether a webhook URL exists for a generated pipeline. Default webhooks are added for the pipelines that are created using the +Add flow and the URL is visible in the side panel of the selected resources in the Topology view.

For more information, see Creating applications using the Developer perspective.

4.9.4. Interacting with pipelines using the Developer perspective

The Pipelines view in the Developer perspective lists all the pipelines in a project, along with the following details:

  • The namespace in which the pipeline was created
  • The last pipeline run
  • The status of the tasks in the pipeline run
  • The status of the pipeline run
  • The creation time of the last pipeline run

Procedure

  1. In the Pipelines view of the Developer perspective, select a project from the Project drop-down list to see the pipelines in that project.
  2. Click the required pipeline to see the Pipeline details page.

    By default, the Details tab displays a visual representation of all the all the serial tasks, parallel tasks, finally tasks, and when expressions in the pipeline. The tasks and the finally tasks are listed in the lower right portion of the page. Click the listed Tasks and Finally tasks to view the task details.

    Figure 4.3. Pipeline details

    Pipeline details
  3. Optional: On the Pipeline details page, click the Metrics tab to see the following information about pipelines:

    • Pipeline Success Ratio
    • Number of Pipeline Runs
    • Pipeline Run Duration
    • Task Run Duration

      You can use this information to improve the pipeline workflow and eliminate issues early in the pipeline lifecycle.

  4. Optional: Click the YAML tab to edit the YAML file for the pipeline.
  5. Optional: Click the Pipeline Runs tab to see the completed, running, or failed runs for the pipeline.

    The Pipeline Runs tab provides details about the pipeline run, the status of the task, and a link to debug failed pipeline runs. Use the Options menu kebab to stop a running pipeline, to rerun a pipeline using the same parameters and resources as that of the previous pipeline execution, or to delete a pipeline run.

    • Click the required pipeline run to see the Pipeline Run details page. By default, the Details tab displays a visual representation of all the serial tasks, parallel tasks, finally tasks, and when expressions in the pipeline run. The results for successful runs are displayed under the Pipeline Run results pane at the bottom of the page. Additionally, you would only be able to see tasks from Tekton Hub which are supported by the cluster. While looking at a task, you can click the link beside it to jump to the task documentation.

      Note

      The Details section of the Pipeline Run Details page displays a Log Snippet of the failed pipeline run. Log Snippet provides a general error message and a snippet of the log. A link to the Logs section provides quick access to the details about the failed run.

    • On the Pipeline Run details page, click the Task Runs tab to see the completed, running, and failed runs for the task.

      The Task Runs tab provides information about the task run along with the links to its task and pod, and also the status and duration of the task run. Use the Options menu kebab to delete a task run.

    • Click the required task run to see the Task Run details page. The results for successful runs are displayed under the Task Run results pane at the bottom of the page.

      Note

      The Details section of the Task Run details page displays a Log Snippet of the failed task run. Log Snippet provides a general error message and a snippet of the log. A link to the Logs section provides quick access to the details about the failed task run.

  6. Click the Parameters tab to see the parameters defined in the pipeline. You can also add or edit additional parameters, as required.
  7. Click the Resources tab to see the resources defined in the pipeline. You can also add or edit additional resources, as required.

4.9.5. Starting pipelines from Pipelines view

After you create a pipeline, you need to start it to execute the included tasks in the defined sequence. You can start a pipeline from the Pipelines view, the Pipeline Details page, or the Topology view.

Procedure

To start a pipeline using the Pipelines view:

  1. In the Pipelines view of the Developer perspective, click the Options kebab menu adjoining a pipeline, and select Start.
  2. The Start Pipeline dialog box displays the Git Resources and the Image Resources based on the pipeline definition.

    Note

    For pipelines created using the From Git option, the Start Pipeline dialog box also displays an APP_NAME field in the Parameters section, and all the fields in the dialog box are prepopulated by the pipeline template.

    1. If you have resources in your namespace, the Git Resources and the Image Resources fields are prepopulated with those resources. If required, use the drop-downs to select or create the required resources and customize the pipeline run instance.
  3. Optional: Modify the Advanced Options to add the credentials that authenticate the specified private Git server or the image registry.

    1. Under Advanced Options, click Show Credentials Options and select Add Secret.
    2. In the Create Source Secret section, specify the following:

      1. A unique Secret Name for the secret.
      2. In the Designated provider to be authenticated section, specify the provider to be authenticated in the Access to field, and the base Server URL.
      3. Select the Authentication Type and provide the credentials:

        • For the Authentication Type Image Registry Credentials, specify the Registry Server Address that you want to authenticate, and provide your credentials in the Username, Password, and Email fields.

          Select Add Credentials if you want to specify an additional Registry Server Address.

        • For the Authentication Type Basic Authentication, specify the values for the UserName and Password or Token fields.
        • For the Authentication Type SSH Keys, specify the value of the SSH Private Key field.

          Note

          For basic authentication and SSH authentication, you can use annotations such as:

      4. Select the check mark to add the secret.

    You can add multiple secrets based upon the number of resources in your pipeline.

  4. Click Start to start the pipeline.
  5. The Pipeline Run Details page displays the pipeline being executed. After the pipeline starts, the tasks and steps within each task are executed. You can:

    • Hover over the tasks to see the time taken to execute each step.
    • Click on a task to see the logs for each step in the task.
    • Click the Logs tab to see the logs relating to the execution sequence of the tasks. You can also expand the pane and download the logs individually or in bulk, by using the relevant button.
    • Click the Events tab to see the stream of events generated by a pipeline run.

      You can use the Task Runs, Logs, and Events tabs to assist in debugging a failed pipeline run or a failed task run.

      Figure 4.4. Pipeline run details

      Pipeline run details

4.9.6. Starting pipelines from Topology view

For pipelines created using the From Git option, you can use the Topology view to interact with pipelines after you start them:

Note

To see the pipelines created using Pipeline builder in the Topology view, customize the pipeline labels to link the pipeline with the application workload.

Procedure

  1. Click Topology in the left navigation panel.
  2. Click the application to display Pipeline Runs in the side panel.
  3. In Pipeline Runs, click Start Last Run to start a new pipeline run with the same parameters and resources as the previous one. This option is disabled if a pipeline run has not been initiated. You can also start a pipeline run when you create it.

    Figure 4.5. Pipelines in Topology view

    Pipelines in Topology view

In the Topology page, hover to the left of the application to see the status of its pipeline run. After a pipeline is added, a bottom left icon indicates that there is an associated pipeline.

4.9.7. Interacting with pipelines from Topology view

The side panel of the application node in the Topology page displays the status of a pipeline run and you can interact with it.

  • If a pipeline run does not start automatically, the side panel displays a message that the pipeline cannot be automatically started, hence it would need to be started manually.
  • If a pipeline is created but the user has not started the pipeline, its status is not started. When the user clicks the Not started status icon, the start dialog box opens in the Topology view.
  • If the pipeline has no build or build config, the Builds section is not visible. If there is a pipeline and build config, the Builds section is visible.
  • The side panel displays a Log Snippet when a pipeline run fails on a specific task run. You can view the Log Snippet in the Pipeline Runs section, under the Resources tab. It provides a general error message and a snippet of the log. A link to the Logs section provides quick access to the details about the failed run.

4.9.8. Editing Pipelines

You can edit the Pipelines in your cluster using the Developer perspective of the web console:

Procedure

  1. In the Pipelines view of the