CLI Guide

Migration Toolkit for Applications 6.1

Learn how to use the Migration Toolkit for Applications CLI to migrate your applications.

Red Hat Customer Content Services

Abstract

This guide describes how to use the Migration Toolkit for Applications CLI to simplify migration of Java applications.

Making open source more inclusive

Red Hat is committed to replacing problematic language in our code, documentation, and web properties. We are beginning with these four terms: master, slave, blacklist, and whitelist. Because of the enormity of this endeavor, these changes will be implemented gradually over several upcoming releases. For more details, see our CTO Chris Wright’s message.

Chapter 1. Introduction

1.1. About the CLI Guide

This guide is for engineers, consultants, and others who want to use the Migration Toolkit for Applications (MTA) to migrate Java applications or other components. It describes how to install and run the CLI, review the generated reports, and take advantage of additional features.

1.2. About the Migration Toolkit for Applications

What is the Migration Toolkit for Applications?

Migration Toolkit for Applications (MTA) accelerates large-scale application modernization efforts across hybrid cloud environments on Red Hat OpenShift. This solution provides insight throughout the adoption process, at both the portfolio and application levels: inventory, assess, analyze, and manage applications for faster migration to OpenShift via the user interface.

MTA uses an extensive questionnaire as the basis for assessing your applications, enabling you to estimate the difficulty, time, and other resources needed to prepare an application for containerization. You can use the results of an assessment as the basis for discussions between stakeholders to determine which applications are good candidates for containerization, which require significant work first, and which are not suitable for containerization.

MTA analyzes applications by applying one or more rulesets to each application considered to determine which specific lines of that application must be modified before it can be modernized.

MTA examines application artifacts, including project source directories and application archives, and then produces an HTML report highlighting areas needing changes. MTA supports many migration paths including the following:

  • Upgrading to the latest release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform
  • Migrating from Oracle WebLogic or IBM WebSphere Application Server to Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform
  • Containerizing applications and making them cloud-ready
  • Migrating from Java Spring Boot to Quarkus
  • Upgrading from OpenJDK 8 to OpenJDK 11
  • Upgrading from OpenJDK 11 to OpenJDK 17
  • Migrating EAP Java applications to Azure App Service
  • Migrating Spring Boot Java applications to Azure App Service

For more information about use cases and migration paths, see the MTA for developers web page.

How does the Migration Toolkit for Applications simplify migration?

The Migration Toolkit for Applications looks for common resources and known trouble spots when migrating applications. It provides a high-level view of the technologies used by the application.

MTA generates a detailed report evaluating a migration or modernization path. This report can help you to estimate the effort required for large-scale projects and to reduce the work involved.

1.3. About the CLI

The CLI is a command-line tool in the Migration Toolkit for Applications that allows you to assess and prioritize migration and modernization efforts for applications. It provides numerous reports that highlight the analysis without the overhead of the other tools. The CLI includes a wide array of customization options, and allows you to finely tune MTA analysis options or integrate with external automation tools.

Chapter 2. Installing and Running the CLI

2.1. Installing the CLI

You can install the CLI on Linux, Windows, or macOS operating systems.

Prerequisites

  • Java Development Kit (JDK) installed. MTA supports the following JDKs:

    • OpenJDK 11
    • OpenJDK 17
    • Oracle JDK 11
    • Oracle JDK 17
    • Eclipse Temurin™ JDK 11
    • Eclipse Temurin™ JDK 17
  • 8 GB RAM
  • macOS installation: the value of maxproc must be 2048 or greater.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to the MTA Download page and download the Migration Toolkit CLI file.
  2. Extract the .zip file to a directory of your choice.

    Note

    If you are installing on a Windows operating system:

    1. Extract the .zip file to a folder named LC_PSN to avoid a Path too long error. Alternatively, extract the file with 7-Zip to a folder of any name you choose.
    2. If a Confirm file replace window is displayed during extraction, click Yes to all.

    When you encounter <MTA_HOME> in this guide, replace it with the actual path to your MTA installation.

2.2. Running the CLI

You can run MTA against your application.

Procedure

  1. Open a terminal and navigate to the <MTA_HOME>/bin/ directory.
  2. Execute the windup-cli script, or windup-cli.bat for Windows, and specify the appropriate arguments:

    $ ./windup-cli --input /path/to/jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear \
        --output /path/to/output --source weblogic --target eap:6 \
        --packages com.acme org.apache
    • --input: The application to be evaluated.
    • --output: The output directory for the generated reports.
    • --source: The source technology for the application migration.
    • --target: The target technology for the application migration.
    • --packages: The packages to be evaluated. This argument is highly recommended to improve performance.
  3. Access the report.

2.2.1. MTA command examples

Running MTA on an application archive

The following command analyzes the com.acme and org.apache packages of the jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear example EAR archive for migrating from JBoss EAP 5 to JBoss EAP 7:

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli \
    --input /path/to/jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear \
    --output /path/to/report-output/ --source eap:5 --target eap:7 \
    --packages com.acme org.apache
Running MTA on source code

The following command analyzes the org.jboss.seam packages of the seam-booking-5.2 example source code for migrating to JBoss EAP 6.

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli --sourceMode --input /path/to/seam-booking-5.2/ \
    --output /path/to/report-output/ --target eap:6 --packages org.jboss.seam
Running cloud-readiness rules

The following command analyzes the com.acme and org.apache packages of the jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear example EAR archive for migrating to JBoss EAP 7. It also evaluates for cloud readiness:

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli --input /path/to/jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear \
    --output /path/to/report-output/ \
    --target eap:7 --target cloud-readiness --packages com.acme org.apache
Overriding MTA properties

To override the default Fernflower decompiler, pass the -Dwindup.decompiler argument on the command line. For example, to use the Procyon decompiler, use the following syntax:

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli -Dwindup.decompiler=procyon \
    --input <INPUT_ARCHIVE_OR_DIRECTORY> --output <OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY> \
    --target <TARGET_TECHNOLOGY> --packages <PACKAGE_1> <PACKAGE_2>

2.2.2. MTA CLI Bash completion

The MTA CLI provides an option to enable Bash completion for Linux systems, allowing the MTA command-line arguments to be auto completed by pressing the Tab key when entering the commands. For instance, when Bash completion is enabled, entering the following displays a list of available arguments.

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli [TAB]
Enabling Bash completion

To enable Bash completion for the current shell, execute the following command:

$ source <MTA_HOME>/bash-completion/windup-cli
Enabling persistent Bash completion

The following commands allow Bash completion to persist across restarts:

  • To enable Bash completion for a specific user across system restarts, include the following line in that user’s ~/.bashrc file.

    source <MTA_HOME>/bash-completion/windup-cli
  • To enable Bash completion for all users across system restarts, copy the Migration Toolkit for Applications CLI Bash completion file to the /etc/bash_completion.d/ directory as the root user.

    # cp <MTA_HOME>/bash-completion/windup-cli /etc/bash_completion.d/

2.2.3. Accessing MTA help

To see the complete list of available arguments for the windup-cli command, open a terminal, navigate to the <MTA_HOME> directory, and execute the following command:

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli --help

2.2.4. Using OpenRewrite recipes

Important

OpenRewrite recipe support is provided as Technology Preview only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs), might not be functionally complete, and Red Hat does not recommend to use them for production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

See Technology Preview features support scope on the Red Hat Customer Portal for information about the support scope for Technology Preview features.

You can refactor the source code of Java applications by using OpenRewrite recipes with the MTA CLI.

For example, the OpenRewrite recipe org.jboss.windup.JavaxToJakarta renames imported javax packages to their jakarta equivalents.

Procedure

  1. Run windup-cli, specifying the recipe name, the path to the configuration file, and the application:

    $ ./windup-cli --openrewrite --input </path/to/source/project> \
      "-Drewrite.configLocation=<path/to/rewrite.yaml>"  \
      "-DactiveRecipes=<recipe_name>" --goal dryRun
    • "-DactiveRecipes=<recipe name>": Specify the OpenRewrite recipe, for example, org.jboss.windup.JavaxToJakarta.
    • --input: Specify the application to be refactored. The application must be the top of the source code project containing a Maven Project Object Model (POM) XML file, pom.xml.
    • -Drewrite.configLocation=<path/to/rewrite.yaml> : The location of the rewrite.yaml configuration file to use. The shipped rewrite.yaml configuration files are located in your <MTA_HOME>/rules/openrewrite subfolder, for example," -Drewrite.configLocation=<MTA_HOME>/rules/openrewrite/jakarta/javax/imports/rewrite.yaml".
    • "-DactiveRecipes=<recipe name>": Specify the OpenRewrite recipe, for example, org.jboss.windup.JavaxToJakarta.

      You can include more than one recipe by specifying each in the activeRecipes parameter. For example, to include the recipes org.jboss.windup.JavaxInjectToJakartaInject and org.jboss.windup.JavaxEjbToJakartaEjb", enter the following for "-DactiveRecipes=<recipe name>":

        "-DactiveRecipes=org.jboss.windup.JavaxInjectToJakartaInject, \
          org.jboss.windup.JavaxEjbToJakartaEjb"
    • --goal: Optional: The OpenRewrite Maven goal to run.

      • dryRun : The script returns a list of proposed changes. Ignore the "Run 'mvn rewrite:run' to apply the recipes" message.
      • run: The script applies the changes.
  2. Run windup-cli with --goal run to apply the recipe:

    $ ./windup-cli --openrewrite --input </path/to/source/project> \
      "-Drewrite.configLocation=<path/to/rewrite.yaml>"  \
      "-DactiveRecipes=<recipe_name>" --goal run

2.2.4.1. Available OpenRewrite recipes

Table 2.1. Available OpenRewrite recipes

Migration pathPurposerewrite.configLocationactiveRecipes

Java EE to Jakarta EE

Replace import of javax packages with equivalent jakarta packages

Replace javax artifacts, declared within pom.xml files, with the jakarta equivalents

<MTR_HOME>/rules/openrewrite/jakarta \ /javax/imports/rewrite.yml

org.jboss.windup.JavaxToJakarta

Java EE to Jakarta EE

Rename bootstrapping files

<MTR_HOME>/rules/openrewrite/jakarta \ /javax/bootstrapping/rewrite.yml

org.jboss.windup.jakarta.javax. \ BootstrappingFiles

Java EE to Jakarta EE

Transform persistence.xml configuration

<MTR_HOME>/rules/openrewrite/jakarta \ /javax/xml/rewrite.yml

org.jboss.windup.javax-jakarta. \ PersistenceXML

Spring Boot to Quarkus

Replace spring.jpa.hibernate.ddl-auto property within files matching application*.properties

<MTR_HOME>/rules/openrewrite/quarkus \ /springboot/properties/rewrite.yml

org.jboss.windup.sb-quarkus.Properties

2.3. Accessing reports

When you run the Migration Toolkit for Applications, a report is generated in the <OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY> that you specify using the --output argument in the command line.

The output directory contains the following files and subdirectories:

<OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY>/
├── index.html          // Landing page for the report
├── <EXPORT_FILE>.csv   // Optional export of data in CSV format
├── archives/           // Archives extracted from the application
├── mavenized/          // Optional Maven project structure
├── reports/            // Generated HTML reports
├── stats/              // Performance statistics

Procedure

  1. Obtain the path of the index.html file of your report from the output that appears after you run MTA:

    Report created: <OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY>/index.html
                  Access it at this URL: file:///<OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY>/index.html
  2. Open the index.html file by using a browser.

    The generated report is displayed.

Chapter 3. Reviewing the reports

The report examples shown in the following sections are a result of analyzing the com.acme and org.apache packages in the jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear example application, which is located in the MTA GitHub source repository.

The report was generated using the following command.

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli --input /home/username/windup-cli-source/test-files/jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear/ --output /home/username/windup-cli-reports/jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear-report --target eap:6 --packages com.acme org.apache

Use a browser to open the index.html file located in the report output directory. This opens a landing page that lists the applications that were processed. Each row contains a high-level overview of the story points, number of incidents, and technologies encountered in that application.

Figure 3.1. Application list

Application list
Note

The incidents and estimated story points change as new rules are added to MTA. The values here may not match what you see when you test this application.

The following table lists all of the reports and pages that can be accessed from this main MTA landing page. Click the name of the application, jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear, to view the application report.

PageHow to Access

Application

Click the name of the application.

Technologies report

Click the Technologies link at the top of the page.

Archives shared by multiple applications

Click the Archives shared by multiple applications link. Note that this link is only available when there are shared archives across multiple applications.

Rule providers execution overview

Click the Rule providers execution overview link at the bottom of the page.

Note that if an application shares archives with other analyzed applications, you will see a breakdown of how many story points are from shared archives and how many are unique to this application.

Figure 3.2. Shared archives

Shared archives

Information about the archives that are shared among applications can be found in the Archives Shared by Multiple Applications reports.

3.1. Application report

3.1.1. Dashboard

Access this report from the report landing page by clicking on the application name in the Application List.

The dashboard gives an overview of the entire application migration effort. It summarizes:

  • The incidents and story points by category
  • The incidents and story points by level of effort of the suggested changes
  • The incidents by package

Figure 3.3. Dashboard

Dashboard

The top navigation bar lists the various reports that contain additional details about the migration of this application. Note that only those reports that are applicable to the current application will be available.

ReportDescription

Issues

Provides a concise summary of all issues that require attention.

Application details

Provides a detailed overview of all resources found within the application that may need attention during the migration.

Technologies

Displays all embedded libraries grouped by functionality, allowing you to quickly view the technologies used in each application.

Dependencies

Displays all Java-packaged dependencies found within the application.

Unparsable

Shows all files that MTA could not parse in the expected format. For instance, a file with a .xml or .wsdl suffix is assumed to be an XML file. If the XML parser fails, the issue is reported here and also where the individual file is listed.

Remote services

Displays all remote services references that were found within the application.

EJBs

Contains a list of EJBs found within the application.

JBPM

Contains all of the JBPM-related resources that were discovered during analysis.

JPA

Contains details on all JPA-related resources that were found in the application.

Hibernate

Contains details on all Hibernate-related resources that were found in the application.

Server resources

Displays all server resources (for example, JNDI resources) in the input application.

Spring Beans

Contains a list of Spring Beans found during the analysis.

Hard-coded IP addresses

Provides a list of all hard-coded IP addresses that were found in the application.

Ignored files

Lists the files found in the application that, based on certain rules and MTA configuration, were not processed. See the --userIgnorePath option for more information.

About

Describes the current version of MTA and provides helpful links for further assistance.

3.1.2. Issues report

Access this report from the dashboard by clicking the Issues link.

This report includes details about every issue that was raised by the selected migration paths. The following information is provided for each issue encountered:

  • A title to summarize the issue.
  • The total number of incidents, or times the issue was encountered.
  • The rule story points to resolve a single instance of the issue.
  • The estimated level of effort to resolve the issue.
  • The total story points to resolve every instance encountered. This is calculated by multiplying the number of incidents found by the story points per incident.

Figure 3.4. Issues report

Issues report

Each reported issue may be expanded, by clicking on the title, to obtain additional details. The following information is provided.

  • A list of files where the incidents occurred, along with the number of incidents within each file. If the file is a Java source file, then clicking the filename will direct you to the corresponding Source report.
  • A detailed description of the issue. This description outlines the problem, provides any known solutions, and references supporting documentation regarding either the issue or resolution.
  • A direct link, entitled Show Rule, to the rule that generated the issue.

Figure 3.5. Expanded issue

Expanded rule in the issues report

Issues are sorted into four categories by default. Information on these categories is available at ask Category.

3.1.3. Application details report

Access this report from the dashboard by clicking the Application Details link.

The report lists the story points, the Java incidents by package, and a count of the occurrences of the technologies found in the application. Next is a display of application messages generated during the migration process. Finally, there is a breakdown of this information for each archive analyzed during the process.

Figure 3.6. Application Details report

Application Details report

Expand the jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear/jee-example-services.jar to review the story points, Java incidents by package, and a count of the occurrences of the technologies found in this archive. This summary begins with a total of the story points assigned to its migration, followed by a table detailing the changes required for each file in the archive. The report contains the following columns.

Column NameDescription

Name

The name of the file being analyzed.

Technology

The type of file being analyzed, for example, Decompiled Java File or Properties.

Issues

Warnings about areas of code that need review or changes.

Story Points

Level of effort required to migrate the file.

Note that if an archive is duplicated several times in an application, it will be listed just once in the report and will be tagged with [Included multiple times].

Figure 3.7. Duplicate archive in an application

Duplicate archive

The story points for archives that are duplicated within an application will be counted only once in the total story point count for that application.

3.1.4. Technologies report

Access this report from the dashboard by clicking the Technologies link.

The report lists the occurrences of technologies, grouped by function, in the analyzed application. It is an overview of the technologies found in the application, and is designed to assist users in quickly understanding each application’s purpose.

The image below shows the technologies used in the jee-example-app.

Figure 3.8. Technologies in an application

Technology report Application view

3.1.5. Transactions report

A Transactions report displays the call stack, which executes operations on relational database tables. The Enable Transaction Analysis feature supports Spring Data JPA and the traditional preparedStatement() method for SQL statement execution. It does not support ORM frameworks, such as Hibernate.

The image below shows an example of a Transactions report.

Figure 3.9. Transactions report

Transactions report

3.1.6. Source report

The Source report displays the migration issues in the context of the source file in which they were discovered.

Figure 3.10. Source report

Source Report

3.2. Technologies report

Access this report from the report landing page by clicking the Technologies link.

This report provides an aggregate listing of the technologies used, grouped by function, for the analyzed applications. It shows how the technologies are distributed, and is typically reviewed after analyzing a large number of applications to group the applications and identify patterns. It also shows the size, number of libraries, and story point totals of each application.

Clicking any of the headers, such as Markup, sorts the results in descending order. Selecting the same header again will resort the results in ascending order. The currently selected header is identified in bold, next to a directional arrow, indicating the direction of the sort.

Figure 3.11. Technologies used across multiple applications

Technologies used across multiple applications

3.3. Archives shared by multiple applications

Access these reports from the report landing page by clicking the Archives shared by multiple applications link. Note that this link is only available if there are applicable shared archives.

Figure 3.12. Archives shared by multiple applications

Archives shared by multiple applications

This allows you to view the detailed reports for all archives that are shared across multiple applications.

3.4. Rule providers execution overview

Access this report from the report landing page by clicking the Rule providers execution overview link.

This report provides the list of rules that ran when running the MTA migration command against the application.

Figure 3.13. Rule providers execution overview

Rule Provider Execution Overview

Chapter 4. Exporting the report in CSV format

MTA provides the ability to export the report data, including the classifications and hints, to a flat file on your local file system. The export function currently supports the CSV file format, which presents the report data as fields separated by commas (,).

The CSV file can be imported and manipulated by spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Excel, OpenOffice Calc, or LibreOffice Calc. Spreadsheet software provides the ability to sort, analyze, evaluate, and manage the result data from an MTA report.

4.1. Exporting the report

To export the report as a CSV file, run MTA with the --exportCSV argument. A CSV file is created in the directory specified by the --output argument for each application analyzed.

All discovered issues, spanning all the analyzed applications, are included in the AllIssues.csv file that is exported to the root directory of the report.

Accessing the report from the application report

If you have exported the CSV report, you can download all of the CSV issues in the Issues Report. To download these issues, click Download All Issues CSV in the Issues Report.

Figure 4.1. Issues report with CSV download

Issues report with CSV download

4.2. Importing the CSV file into a spreadsheet program

  1. Launch the spreadsheet software, for example, Microsoft Excel.
  2. Choose FileOpen.
  3. Browse to the CSV exported file and select it.
  4. The data is now ready to analyze in the spreadsheet software.

4.3. About the CSV data structure

The CSV formatted output file contains the following data fields:

Rule Id
The ID of the rule that generated the given item.
Problem type
hint or classification
Title
The title of the classification or hint. This field summarizes the issue for the given item.
Description
The detailed description of the issue for the given item.
Links
URLs that provide additional information about the issue. A link consists of two attributes: the link and a description of the link.
Application
The name of the application for which this item was generated.
File Name
The name of the file for the given item.
File Path
The file path for the given item.
Line
The line number of the file for the given item.
Story points
The number of story points, which represent the level of effort, assigned to the given item.

Chapter 5. Mavenizing your application

MTA provides the ability to generate an Apache Maven project structure based on the application provided. This will create a directory structure with the necessary Maven Project Object Model (POM) files that specify the appropriate dependencies.

Note that this feature is not intended to create a final solution for your project. It is meant to give you a starting point and identify the necessary dependencies and APIs for your application. Your project may require further customization.

5.1. Generating the Maven project structure

You can generate a Maven project structure for the provided application by passing in the --mavenize flag when executing MTA.

The following example runs MTA using the jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear test application:

$ <MTA_HOME>/bin/windup-cli --input /path/to/jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear --output /path/to/output --target eap:6 --packages com.acme org.apache --mavenize

This generates the Maven project structure in the /path/to/output/mavenized directory.

Note

You can only use the --mavenize option when providing a compiled application for the --input argument. This feature is not available when running MTA against source code.

You can also use the --mavenizeGroupId option to specify the <groupId> to be used for the POM files. If unspecified, MTA will attempt to identify an appropriate <groupId> for the application, or will default to com.mycompany.mavenized.

5.2. Reviewing the Maven project structure

The /path/to/output/mavenized/<APPLICATION_NAME>/ directory contains the following items:

  • A root POM file. This is the pom.xml file at the top-level directory.
  • A BOM file. This is the POM file in the directory ending with -bom.
  • One or more application POM files. Each module has its POM file in a directory named after the archive.

The example jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear application is an EAR archive that contains a WAR and several JARs. There is a separate directory created for each of these artifacts. Below is the Maven project structure created for this application.

/path/to/output/mavenized/jee-example-app/
    jee-example-app-bom/pom.xml
    jee-example-app-ear/pom.xml
    jee-example-services2-jar/pom.xml
    jee-example-services-jar/pom.xml
    jee-example-web-war/pom.xml
    pom.xml

Review each of the generated files and customize as appropriate for your project. To learn more about Maven POM files, see the Introduction to the POM section of the Apache Maven documentation.

Root POM file

The root POM file for the jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear application can be found at /path/to/output/mavenized/jee-example-app/pom.xml. This file identifies the directories for all of the project modules.

The following modules are listed in the root POM for the example jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear application.

<modules>
  <module>jee-example-app-bom</module>
  <module>jee-example-services2-jar</module>
  <module>jee-example-services-jar</module>
  <module>jee-example-web-war</module>
  <module>jee-example-app-ear</module>
</modules>
Note

Be sure to reorder the list of modules if necessary so that they are listed in an appropriate build order for your project.

The root POM is also configured to use the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform Maven repository to download project dependencies.

BOM file

The Bill of Materials (BOM) file is generated in the directory ending in -bom. For the example jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear application, the BOM file can be found at /path/to/output/mavenized/jee-example-app/jee-example-app-bom/pom.xml. The purpose of this BOM is to have the versions of third-party dependencies used by the project defined in one place. For more information on using a BOM, see the Introduction to the dependency mechanism section of the Apache Maven documentation.

The following dependencies are listed in the BOM for the example jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear application

<dependencyManagement>
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>log4j</groupId>
      <artifactId>log4j</artifactId>
      <version>1.2.6</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>commons-lang</groupId>
      <artifactId>commons-lang</artifactId>
      <version>2.5</version>
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>
</dependencyManagement>

Application POM files

Each application module that can be mavenized has a separate directory containing its POM file. The directory name contains the name of the archive and ends in a -jar, -war, or -ear suffix, depending on the archive type.

Each application POM file lists that module’s dependencies, including:

  • Third-party libraries
  • Java EE APIs
  • Application submodules

For example, the POM file for the jee-example-app-1.0.0.ear EAR, /path/to/output/mavenized/jee-example-app/jee-example-app-ear/pom.xml, lists the following dependencies.

<dependencies>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>log4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>log4j</artifactId>
    <version>1.2.6</version>
  </dependency>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>org.jboss.seam</groupId>
    <artifactId>jee-example-web-war</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <type>war</type>
  </dependency>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>org.jboss.seam</groupId>
    <artifactId>jee-example-services-jar</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
  </dependency>
  <dependency>
    <groupId>org.jboss.seam</groupId>
    <artifactId>jee-example-services2-jar</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
  </dependency>
</dependencies>

Chapter 6. Optimizing MTA performance

MTA performance depends on a number of factors, including hardware configuration, the number and types of files in the application, the size and number of applications to be evaluated, and whether the application contains source or compiled code. For example, a file that is larger than 10 MB may need a lot of time to process.

In general, MTA spends about 40% of the time decompiling classes, 40% of the time executing rules, and the remainder of the time processing other tasks and generating reports. This section describes what you can do to improve the performance of MTA.

6.1. Deploying and running the application

Try these suggestions first before upgrading hardware.

  • If possible, run MTA against the source code instead of the archives. This eliminates the need to decompile additional JARs and archives.
  • Specify a comma-separated list of the packages to be evaluated by MTA using the --packages argument on the <MTA_HOME>/bin/mta-cli command line. If you omit this argument, MTA will decompile everything, which has a big impact on performance.
  • Specify the --excludeTags argument where possible to exclude them from processing.
  • Avoid decompiling and analyzing any unnecessary packages and files, such as proprietary packages or included dependencies.
  • Increase your ulimit when analyzing large applications. See this Red Hat Knowledgebase article for instructions on how to do this for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.
  • If you have access to a server that has better resources than your laptop or desktop machine, you may want to consider running MTA on that server.

6.2. Upgrading hardware

If the application and command-line suggestions above do not improve performance, you may need to upgrade your hardware.

  • If you have access to a server that has better resources than your laptop/desktop, then you may want to consider running MTA on that server.
  • Very large applications that require decompilation have large memory requirements. 8 GB RAM is recommended. This allows 3 - 4 GB RAM for use by the JVM.
  • An upgrade from a single or dual-core to a quad-core CPU processor provides better performance.
  • Disk space and fragmentation can impact performance. A fast disk, especially a solid-state drive (SSD), with greater than 4 GB of defragmented disk space should improve performance.

6.3. Configuring MTA to exclude packages and files

6.3.1. Excluding packages

You can exclude packages during decompilation and analysis to increase performance. References to these packages remain in the application’s source code but excluding them avoids the decompilation and analysis of proprietary classes.

Any packages that match the defined value are excluded. For example, you can use com.acme to exclude both com.acme.example and com.acme.roadrunner.

You can exclude packages by either of the following methods:

  • Using the --excludePackages argument.
  • Specifying the packages in a file contained within one of the ignored locations. Each package should be included on a separate line, and the file must end in .package-ignore.txt. For example, see <MTA_HOME>/ignore/proprietary.package-ignore.txt.

6.3.2. Excluding files

MTA can exclude specific files, such as included libraries or dependencies, during scanning and report generation. Excluded files are defined in a file with the .mta-ignore.txt or .windup-ignore.txt extension within one of the ignored locations.

These files contain a regex string detailing the name to exclude, with one file listed per line. For example, you can exclude the library ant.jar and any Java source files beginning with Example with a file containing the following:

.*ant.jar
.*Example.*\.java

6.3.3. Searching locations for exclusion

MTA searches the following locations:

  • ~/.mta/ignore/
  • ~/.windup/ignore/
  • <MTA_HOME>/ignore/
  • Any files and folders specified by the --userIgnorePath argument

Each of these files must conform to the rules specified for excluding packages or files, depending on the type of content to be excluded.

Appendix A. Reference material

A.1. About MTA command-line arguments

The following is a detailed description of the available MTA command line arguments.

Note

To run the MTA command without prompting, for example when executing from a script, you must use the following arguments:

  • --batchMode
  • --overwrite
  • --input
  • --target

Table A.1. MTA CLI arguments

ArgumentDescription

--additionalClassPath

A space-delimited list of additional JAR files or directories to add to the class path so that they are available for decompilation or other analysis.

--addonDir

Add the specified directory as a custom add-on repository.

--analyzeKnownLibraries

Flag to analyze known software artifacts embedded within your application. By default, MTA only analyzes application code.

Note

This option may result in a longer execution time and a large number of migration issues being reported.

--batchMode

Flag to specify that MTA should be run in a non-interactive mode without prompting for confirmation. This mode takes the default values for any parameters not passed in to the command line.

--debug

Flag to run MTA in debug mode.

--disableTattletale

Flag to disable generation of the Tattletale report. If both enableTattletale and disableTattletale are set to true, then disableTattletale will be ignored and the Tattletale report will still be generated.

--discoverPackages

Flag to list all available packages in the input binary application.

--enableClassNotFoundAnalysis

Flag to enable analysis of Java files that are not available on the class path. This should not be used if some classes will be unavailable at analysis time.

--enableCompatibleFilesReport

Flag to enable generation of the Compatible Files report. Due to processing all files without found issues, this report may take a long time for large applications.

--enableTattletale

Flag to enable generation of a Tattletale report for each application. This option is enabled by default when eap is in the included target. If both enableTattletale and disableTattletale are set to true, then disableTattletale will be ignored and the Tattletale report will still be generated.

--enableTransactionAnalysis

[Technology Preview] Flag to enable generation of a Transactions report that displays the call stack, which executes operations on relational database tables. The Enable Transaction Analysis feature supports Spring Data JPA and the traditional preparedStatement() method for SQL statement execution. It does not support ORM frameworks, such as Hibernate.

Note

enableTransactionAnalysis is a Technology Preview feature only. Technology Preview features are not supported with Red Hat production service level agreements (SLAs) and might not be functionally complete. Red Hat does not recommend using them in production. These features provide early access to upcoming product features, enabling customers to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

--excludePackages

A space-delimited list of packages to exclude from evaluation. For example, entering com.mycompany.commonutilities excludes all classes whose package names begin with com.mycompany.commonutilities.

--excludeTags

A space-delimited list of tags to exclude. When specified, rules with these tags will not be processed. To see the full list of tags, use the --listTags argument.

--explodedApp

Flag to indicate that the provided input directory contains source files for a single application.

--exportCSV

Flag to export the report data to a CSV file on your local file system. MTA creates the file in the directory specified by the --output argument. The CSV file can be imported into a spreadsheet program for data manipulation and analysis.

--exportSummary

Flag to instruct MTA to generate an analysisSummary.json export file in the output directory. The file contains analysis summary information for each application analyzed, including the number of incidents and story points by category, and all of the technology tags associated with the analyzed applications.

--exportZipReport

This argument creates a reports.zip file in the output folder. The file contains the analysis output, typically, the reports. If requested, it can also contain the CSV export files.

--help

Display the MTA help message.

--immutableAddonDir

Add the specified directory as a custom read-only add-on repository.

--includeTags

A space-delimited list of tags to use. When specified, only rules with these tags will be processed. To see the full list of tags, use the --listTags argument.

--input

A space-delimited list of the path to the file or directory containing one or more applications to be analyzed. This argument is required.

--install

Specify add-ons to install. The syntax is <GROUP_ID>:<ARTIFACT_ID>[:<VERSION>]. For example, --install core-addon-x or --install org.example.addon:example:1.0.0.

--keepWorkDirs

Flag to instruct MTA to not delete temporary working files, such as the graph database and extracted archive files. This is useful for debugging purposes.

--legacyReports

Flag to instruct MTA to generate the old format reports instead of the new format reports.

--list

Flag to list installed add-ons.

--listSourceTechnologies

Flag to list all available source technologies.

--listTags

Flag to list all available tags.

--listTargetTechnologies

Flag to list all available target technologies.

--mavenize

Flag to create a Maven project directory structure based on the structure and content of the application. This creates pom.xml files using the appropriate Java EE API and the correct dependencies between project modules. See also the --mavenizeGroupId option.

--mavenizeGroupId

When used with the --mavenize option, all generated pom.xml files will use the provided value for their <groupId>. If this argument is omitted, MTA will attempt to determine an appropriate <groupId> based on the application, or will default to com.mycompany.mavenized.

--online

Flag to allow network access for features that require it. Currently only validating XML schemas against external resources relies on Internet access. Note that this comes with a performance penalty.

--output

Specify the path to the directory to output the report information generated by MTA.

--overwrite

Flag to force delete the existing output directory specified by --output. If you do not specify this argument and the --output directory exists, you are prompted to choose whether to overwrite the contents.

Important

Do not overwrite a report output directory that contains important information.

--packages

A space-delimited list of the packages to be evaluated by MTA. It is highly recommended to use this argument.

--remove

Remove the specified add-ons. The syntax is <GROUP_ID>:<ARTIFACT_ID>[:<VERSION>]. For example, --remove core-addon-x or --remove org.example.addon:example:1.0.0.

--skipReports

Flag to indicate that HTML reports should not be generated. A common use of this argument is when exporting report data to a CSV file using --exportCSV.

--source

A space-delimited list of one or more source technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate from. This argument, in conjunction with the --target argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. Use the --listSourceTechnologies argument to list all available sources.

--sourceMode

Flag to indicate that the application to be evaluated contains source files rather than compiled binaries. The sourceMode argument has been deprecated. There is no longer the need to specify it. MTA can intuitively process any inputs that are presented to it. In addition, project source folders can be analyzed with binary inputs within the same analysis execution.

--target

A space-delimited list of one or more target technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate to. This argument, in conjunction with the --source argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. Use the --listTargetTechnologies argument to list all available targets.

--userIgnorePath

Specify a location, in addition to ${user.home}/.mta/ignore/, for MTA to identify files that should be ignored.

--userLabelsDirectory

Specify a location for MTA to look for custom Target Runtime Labels. The value can be a directory containing label files or a single label file. The Target Runtime Label files must use the .windup.label.xml suffix. The shipped Target Runtime Labels are defined within $MTA_HOME/rules/migration-core/core.windup.label.xml.

--userRulesDirectory

Specify a location, in addition to <MTA_HOME>/rules/ and ${user.home}/.mta/rules/, for MTA to look for custom MTA rules. The value can be a directory containing ruleset files or a single ruleset file. The ruleset files must use the .windup.xml suffix.

--version

Display the MTA version.

--skipSourceCodeReports

This option skips generating a Source code report when generating the application analysis report. Use this advanced option when concerned about source code information appearing in the application analysis.

A.1.1. Specifying the input

A space-delimited list of the path to the file or directory containing one or more applications to be analyzed. This argument is required.

Usage

--input <INPUT_ARCHIVE_OR_DIRECTORY> [...]

Depending on whether the input file type provided to the --input argument is a file or directory, it will be evaluated as follows depending on the additional arguments provided.

Directory
--explodedApp--sourceModeNeither Argument

The directory is evaluated as a single application.

The directory is evaluated as a single application.

Each subdirectory is evaluated as an application.

File
--explodedApp--sourceModeNeither Argument

Argument is ignored; the file is evaluated as a single application.

The file is evaluated as a compressed project.

The file is evaluated as a single application.

A.1.2. Specifying the output directory

Specify the path to the directory to output the report information generated by MTA.

Usage

--output <OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY>

  • If omitted, the report will be generated in an <INPUT_ARCHIVE_OR_DIRECTORY>.report directory.
  • If the output directory exists, you will be prompted with the following (with a default of N).

    Overwrite all contents of "/home/username/<OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY>" (anything already in the directory will be deleted)? [y,N]

However, if you specify the --overwrite argument, MTA will proceed to delete and recreate the directory. See the description of this argument for more information.

A.1.3. Setting the source technology

A space-delimited list of one or more source technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate from. This argument, in conjunction with the --target argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. Use the --listSourceTechnologies argument to list all available sources.

Usage

--source <SOURCE_1> <SOURCE_2>

The --source argument now provides version support, which follows the Maven version range syntax. This instructs MTA to only run the rulesets matching the specified versions. For example, --source eap:5.

Warning

When migrating to JBoss EAP, be sure to specify the version, for example, eap:6. Specifying only eap will run rulesets for all versions of JBoss EAP, including those not relevant to your migration path.

See Supported migration paths in Introduction to the Migration Toolkit for Applications for the appropriate JBoss EAP version.

A.1.4. Setting the target technology

A space-delimited list of one or more target technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate to. This argument, in conjunction with the --source argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. If you do not specify this option, you are prompted to select a target. Use the --listTargetTechnologies argument to list all available targets.

Usage

--target <TARGET_1> <TARGET_2>

The --target argument now provides version support, which follows the Maven version range syntax. This instructs MTA to only run the rulesets matching the specified versions. For example, --target eap:7.

Warning

When migrating to JBoss EAP, be sure to specify the version in the target, for example, eap:6. Specifying only eap will run rulesets for all versions of JBoss EAP, including those not relevant to your migration path.

See Supported migration paths in Introduction to the Migration Toolkit for Applications for the appropriate JBoss EAP version.

A.1.5. Selecting packages

A space-delimited list of the packages to be evaluated by MTA. It is highly recommended to use this argument.

Usage

--packages <PACKAGE_1> <PACKAGE_2> <PACKAGE_N>

  • In most cases, you are interested only in evaluating custom application class packages and not standard Java EE or third party packages. The <PACKAGE_N> argument is a package prefix; all subpackages will be scanned. For example, to scan the packages com.mycustomapp and com.myotherapp, use --packages com.mycustomapp com.myotherapp argument on the command line.
  • While you can provide package names for standard Java EE third party software like org.apache, it is usually best not to include them as they should not impact the migration effort.
Warning

If you omit the --packages argument, every package in the application is scanned, which can impact performance.

A.2. Supported technology tags

The following technology tags are supported in MTA 6.1.3:

  • 0MQ Client
  • 3scale
  • Acegi Security
  • AcrIS Security
  • ActiveMQ library
  • Airframe
  • Airlift Log Manager
  • AKKA JTA
  • Akka Testkit
  • Amazon SQS Client
  • AMQP Client
  • Anakia
  • AngularFaces
  • ANTLR StringTemplate
  • AOP Alliance
  • Apache Accumulo Client
  • Apache Aries
  • Apache Commons JCS
  • Apache Commons Validator
  • Apache Flume
  • Apache Geronimo
  • Apache Hadoop
  • Apache HBase Client
  • Apache Ignite
  • Apache Karaf
  • Apache Mahout
  • Apache Meecrowave JTA
  • Apache Sirona JTA
  • Apache Synapse
  • Apache Tapestry
  • Apiman
  • Applet
  • Arquillian
  • AspectJ
  • Atomikos JTA
  • Avalon Logkit
  • Axion Driver
  • Axis
  • Axis2
  • BabbageFaces
  • Bean Validation
  • BeanInject
  • Blaze
  • Blitz4j
  • BootsFaces
  • Bouncy Castle
  • ButterFaces
  • Cache API
  • Cactus
  • Camel
  • Camel Messaging Client
  • Camunda
  • Cassandra Client
  • CDI
  • Cfg Engine
  • Chunk Templates
  • Cloudera
  • Coherence
  • Common Annotations
  • Composite Logging
  • Composite Logging JCL
  • Concordion
  • CSS
  • Cucumber
  • Dagger
  • DbUnit
  • Demoiselle JTA
  • Derby Driver
  • Drools
  • DVSL
  • Dynacache
  • EAR Deployment
  • Easy Rules
  • EasyMock
  • Eclipse RCP
  • EclipseLink
  • Ehcache
  • EJB
  • EJB XML
  • Elasticsearch
  • Entity Bean
  • EtlUnit
  • Eureka
  • Everit JTA
  • Evo JTA
  • Feign
  • File system Logging
  • FormLayoutMaker
  • FreeMarker
  • Geronimo JTA
  • GFC Logging
  • GIN
  • GlassFish JTA
  • Google Guice
  • Grails
  • Grapht DI
  • Guava Testing
  • GWT
  • H2 Driver
  • Hamcrest
  • Handlebars
  • HavaRunner
  • Hazelcast
  • Hdiv
  • Hibernate
  • Hibernate Cfg
  • Hibernate Mapping
  • Hibernate OGM
  • HighFaces
  • HornetQ Client
  • HSQLDB Driver
  • HTTP Client
  • HttpUnit
  • ICEfaces
  • Ickenham
  • Ignite JTA
  • Ikasan
  • iLog
  • Infinispan
  • Injekt for Kotlin
  • Iroh
  • Istio
  • Jamon
  • Jasypt
  • Java EE Batch
  • Java EE Batch API
  • Java EE JACC
  • Java EE JAXB
  • Java EE JAXR
  • Java EE JSON-P
  • Java Transaction API
  • JavaFX
  • JavaScript
  • Javax Inject
  • JAX-RS
  • JAX-WS
  • JayWire
  • JBehave
  • JBoss Cache
  • JBoss EJB XML
  • JBoss logging
  • JBoss Transactions
  • JBoss Web XML
  • JBossMQ Client
  • JBPM
  • JCA
  • Jcabi Log
  • JCache
  • JCunit
  • JDBC
  • JDBC datasources
  • JDBC XA datasources
  • Jersey
  • Jetbrick Template
  • Jetty
  • JFreeChart
  • JFunk
  • JGoodies
  • JMock
  • JMockit
  • JMS Connection Factory
  • JMS Queue
  • JMS Topic
  • JMustache
  • JNA
  • JNI
  • JNLP
  • JPA entities
  • JPA Matchers
  • JPA named queries
  • JPA XML
  • JSecurity
  • JSF
  • JSF Page
  • JSilver
  • JSON-B
  • JSP Page
  • JSTL
  • JTA
  • Jukito
  • JUnit
  • Ka DI
  • Keyczar
  • Kibana
  • KLogger
  • Kodein
  • Kotlin Logging
  • KouInject
  • KumuluzEE JTA
  • LevelDB Client
  • Liferay
  • LiferayFaces
  • Lift JTA
  • Log.io
  • Log4J
  • Log4s
  • Logback
  • Logging Utils
  • Logstash
  • Lumberjack
  • Macros
  • Magicgrouplayout
  • Mail
  • Management EJB
  • MapR
  • MckoiSQLDB Driver
  • Memcached
  • Message (MDB)
  • Micro DI
  • Micrometer
  • Microsoft SQL Driver
  • MiGLayout
  • MinLog
  • Mixer
  • Mockito
  • MongoDB Client
  • Monolog
  • Morphia
  • MRules
  • Mule
  • Mule Functional Test Framework
  • MultithreadedTC
  • Mycontainer JTA
  • MyFaces
  • MySQL Driver
  • Narayana Arjuna
  • Needle
  • Neo4j
  • NLOG4J
  • Nuxeo JTA/JCA
  • OACC
  • OAUTH
  • OCPsoft Logging Utils
  • OmniFaces
  • OpenFaces
  • OpenPojo
  • OpenSAML
  • OpenWS
  • OPS4J Pax Logging Service
  • Oracle ADF
  • Oracle DB Driver
  • Oracle Forms
  • Orion EJB XML
  • Orion Web XML
  • Oscache
  • OTR4J
  • OW2 JTA
  • OW2 Log Util
  • OWASP CSRF Guard
  • OWASP ESAPI
  • Peaberry
  • Pega
  • Persistence units
  • Petals EIP
  • PicketBox
  • PicketLink
  • PicoContainer
  • Play
  • Play Test
  • Plexus Container
  • Polyforms DI
  • Portlet
  • PostgreSQL Driver
  • PowerMock
  • PrimeFaces
  • Properties
  • Qpid Client
  • RabbitMQ Client
  • RandomizedTesting Runner
  • Resource Adapter
  • REST Assured
  • Restito
  • RichFaces
  • RMI
  • RocketMQ Client
  • Rythm Template Engine
  • SAML
  • Santuario
  • Scalate
  • Scaldi
  • Scribe
  • Seam
  • Security Realm
  • ServiceMix
  • Servlet
  • ShiftOne
  • Shiro
  • Silk DI
  • SLF4J
  • Snippetory Template Engine
  • SNMP4J
  • Socket handler logging
  • Spark
  • Specsy
  • Spock
  • Spring
  • Spring Batch
  • Spring Boot
  • Spring Boot Actuator
  • Spring Boot Cache
  • Spring Boot Flo
  • Spring Cloud Config
  • Spring Cloud Function
  • Spring Data
  • Spring Data JPA
  • spring DI
  • Spring Integration
  • Spring JMX
  • Spring Messaging Client
  • Spring MVC
  • Spring Properties
  • Spring Scheduled
  • Spring Security
  • Spring Shell
  • Spring Test
  • Spring Transactions
  • Spring Web
  • SQLite Driver
  • SSL
  • Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT)
  • Stateful (SFSB)
  • Stateless (SLSB)
  • Sticky Configured
  • Stripes
  • Struts
  • SubCut
  • Swagger
  • SwarmCache
  • Swing
  • SwitchYard
  • Syringe
  • Talend ESB
  • Teiid
  • TensorFlow
  • Test Interface
  • TestNG
  • Thymeleaf
  • TieFaces
  • tinylog
  • Tomcat
  • Tornado Inject
  • Trimou
  • Trunk JGuard
  • Twirl
  • Twitter Util Logging
  • UberFire
  • Unirest
  • Unitils
  • Vaadin
  • Velocity
  • Vlad
  • Water Template Engine
  • Web Services Metadata
  • Web Session
  • Web XML File
  • WebLogic Web XML
  • Webmacro
  • WebSocket
  • WebSphere EJB
  • WebSphere EJB Ext
  • WebSphere Web XML
  • WebSphere WS Binding
  • WebSphere WS Extension
  • Weka
  • Weld
  • WF Core JTA
  • Wicket
  • Winter
  • WSDL
  • WSO2
  • WSS4J
  • XACML
  • XFire
  • XMLUnit
  • Zbus Client
  • Zipkin

A.3. About rule story points

A.3.1. What are story points?

Story points are an abstract metric commonly used in Agile software development to estimate the level of effort needed to implement a feature or change.

The Migration Toolkit for Applications uses story points to express the level of effort needed to migrate particular application constructs, and the application as a whole. It does not necessarily translate to man-hours, but the value should be consistent across tasks.

A.3.2. How story points are estimated in rules

Estimating the level of effort for the story points for a rule can be tricky. The following are the general guidelines MTA uses when estimating the level of effort required for a rule.

Level of EffortStory PointsDescription

Information

0

An informational warning with very low or no priority for migration.

Trivial

1

The migration is a trivial change or a simple library swap with no or minimal API changes.

Complex

3

The changes required for the migration task are complex, but have a documented solution.

Redesign

5

The migration task requires a redesign or a complete library change, with significant API changes.

Rearchitecture

7

The migration requires a complete rearchitecture of the component or subsystem.

Unknown

13

The migration solution is not known and may need a complete rewrite.

A.3.3. Task category

In addition to the level of effort, you can categorize migration tasks to indicate the severity of the task. The following categories are used to group issues to help prioritize the migration effort.

Mandatory
The task must be completed for a successful migration. If the changes are not made, the resulting application will not build or run successfully. Examples include replacement of proprietary APIs that are not supported in the target platform.
Optional
If the migration task is not completed, the application should work, but the results may not be optimal. If the change is not made at the time of migration, it is recommended to put it on the schedule soon after your migration is completed. An example of this would be the upgrade of EJB 2.x code to EJB 3.
Potential
The task should be examined during the migration process, but there is not enough detailed information to determine if the task is mandatory for the migration to succeed. An example of this would be migrating a third-party proprietary type where there is no directly compatible type.
Information
The task is included to inform you of the existence of certain files. These may need to be examined or modified as part of the modernization effort, but changes are typically not required. An example of this would be the presence of a logging dependency or a Maven pom.xml.

For more information on categorizing tasks, see Using custom rule categories.

A.4. Additional Resources

A.4.1. Getting involved

To help the Migration Toolkit for Applications cover most application constructs and server configurations, including yours, you can help with any of the following items.

  • Send an email to jboss-migration-feedback@redhat.com and let us know what MTA migration rules should cover.
  • Provide example applications to test migration rules.
  • Identify application components and problem areas that may be difficult to migrate.

    • Write a short description of these problem migration areas.
    • Write a brief overview describing how to solve the problem migration areas.
  • Try Migration Toolkit for Applications on your application. Be sure to report any issues you encounter.
  • Contribute to the Migration Toolkit for Applications rules repository.

    • Write a Migration Toolkit for Applications rule to identify or automate a migration process.
    • Create a test for the new rule.
    • Details are provided in the Rules Development Guide.
  • Contribute to the project source code.

    • Create a core rule.
    • Improve MTA performance or efficiency.

Any level of involvement is greatly appreciated!

A.4.3. Reporting issues

MTA uses Jira as its issue tracking system. If you encounter an issue executing MTA, submit a Jira issue.





Revised on 2023-10-25 17:02:26 UTC

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