Appendix A. Reference material

A.1. About MTA command-line arguments

The following is a detailed description of the available MTA command line arguments.

Note

To run the MTA command without prompting, for example when executing from a script, you must use the following arguments:

  • --batchMode
  • --overwrite
  • --input
  • --target

Table A.1. MTA CLI arguments

ArgumentDescription

--additionalClassPath

A space-delimited list of additional JAR files or directories to add to the class path so that they are available for decompilation or other analysis.

--addonDir

Add the specified directory as a custom add-on repository.

--batchMode

Flag to specify that MTA should be run in a non-interactive mode without prompting for confirmation. This mode takes the default values for any parameters not passed in to the command line.

--debug

Flag to run MTA in debug mode.

--disableTattletale

Flag to disable generation of the Tattletale report. If both enableTattletale and disableTattletale are set to true, then disableTattletale will be ignored and the Tattletale report will still be generated.

--discoverPackages

Flag to list all available packages in the input binary application.

--enableClassNotFoundAnalysis

Flag to enable analysis of Java files that are not available on the class path. This should not be used if some classes will be unavailable at analysis time.

--enableCompatibleFilesReport

Flag to enable generation of the Compatible Files report. Due to processing all files without found issues, this report may take a long time for large applications.

--enableTattletale

Flag to enable generation of a Tattletale report for each application. This option is enabled by default when eap is in the included target. If both enableTattletale and disableTattletale are set to true, then disableTattletale will be ignored and the Tattletale report will still be generated.

--excludePackages

A space-delimited list of packages to exclude from evaluation. For example, entering com.mycompany.commonutilities would exclude all classes whose package name begins with com.mycompany.commonutilities.

--excludeTags

A space-delimited list of tags to exclude. When specified, rules with these tags will not be processed. To see the full list of tags, use the --listTags argument.

--explodedApp

Flag to indicate that the provided input directory contains source files for a single application.

--exportCSV

Flag to export the report data to a CSV file on your local file system. MTA creates the file in the directory specified by the --output argument. The CSV file can be imported into a spreadsheet program for data manipulation and analysis.

--help

Display the MTA help message.

--immutableAddonDir

Add the specified directory as a custom read-only add-on repository.

--includeTags

A space-delimited list of tags to use. When specified, only rules with these tags will be processed. To see the full list of tags, use the --listTags argument.

--input

A space-delimited list of the path to the file or directory containing one or more applications to be analyzed. This argument is required.

--install

Specify add-ons to install. The syntax is <GROUP_ID>:<ARTIFACT_ID>[:<VERSION>]. For example, --install core-addon-x or --install org.example.addon:example:1.0.0.

--keepWorkDirs

Flag to instruct MTA to not delete temporary working files, such as the graph database and extracted archive files. This is useful for debugging purposes.

--list

Flag to list installed add-ons.

--listSourceTechnologies

Flag to list all available source technologies.

--listTags

Flag to list all available tags.

--listTargetTechnologies

Flag to list all available target technologies.

--mavenize

Flag to create a Maven project directory structure based on the structure and content of the application. This creates pom.xml files using the appropriate Java EE API and the correct dependencies between project modules. See also the --mavenizeGroupId option.

--mavenizeGroupId

When used with the --mavenize option, all generated pom.xml files will use the provided value for their <groupId>. If this argument is omitted, MTA will attempt to determine an appropriate <groupId> based on the application, or will default to com.mycompany.mavenized.

--online

Flag to allow network access for features that require it. Currently only validating XML schemas against external resources relies on Internet access. Note that this comes with a performance penalty.

--output

Specify the path to the directory to output the report information generated by MTA.

--overwrite

Flag to force delete the existing output directory specified by --output. If you do not specify this argument and the --output directory exists, you are prompted to choose whether to overwrite the contents.

Important

Do not overwrite a report output directory that contains important information.

--packages

A space-delimited list of the packages to be evaluated by MTA. It is highly recommended to use this argument.

--remove

Remove the specified add-ons. The syntax is <GROUP_ID>:<ARTIFACT_ID>[:<VERSION>]. For example, --remove core-addon-x or --remove org.example.addon:example:1.0.0.

--skipReports

Flag to indicate that HTML reports should not be generated. A common use of this argument is when exporting report data to a CSV file using --exportCSV.

--source

A space-delimited list of one or more source technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate from. This argument, in conjunction with the --target argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. Use the --listSourceTechnologies argument to list all available sources.

--sourceMode

Flag to indicate that the application to be evaluated contains source files rather than compiled binaries.

--target

A space-delimited list of one or more target technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate to. This argument, in conjunction with the --source argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. Use the --listTargetTechnologies argument to list all available targets.

--userIgnorePath

Specify a location, in addition to ${user.home}/.mta/ignore/, for MTA to identify files that should be ignored.

--userLabelsDirectory

Specify a location for MTA to look for custom Target Runtime Labels. The value can be a directory containing label files or a single label file. The Target Runtime Label files must use either the .windup.label.xml or .mta.label.xml suffix. The shipped Target Runtime Labels are defined within $MTA_HOME/rules/migration-core/core.windup.label.xml.

--userRulesDirectory

Specify a location, in addition to <MTA_HOME>/rules/ and ${user.home}/.mta/rules/, for MTA to look for custom MTA rules. The value can be a directory containing ruleset files or a single ruleset file. The ruleset files must use the .windup.xml or .mta.xml suffix.

--version

Display the MTA version.

A.1.1. Specifying the input

A space-delimited list of the path to the file or directory containing one or more applications to be analyzed. This argument is required.

Usage

--input <INPUT_ARCHIVE_OR_DIRECTORY> [...]

Depending on whether the input file type provided to the --input argument is a file or directory, it will be evaluated as follows depending on the additional arguments provided.

Directory
--explodedApp--sourceModeNeither Argument

The directory is evaluated as a single application.

The directory is evaluated as a single application.

Each subdirectory is evaluated as an application.

File
--explodedApp--sourceModeNeither Argument

Argument is ignored; the file is evaluated as a single application.

The file is evaluated as a compressed project.

The file is evaluated as a single application.

A.1.2. Specifying the output directory

Specify the path to the directory to output the report information generated by MTA.

Usage

--output <OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY>

  • If omitted, the report will be generated in an <INPUT_ARCHIVE_OR_DIRECTORY>.report directory.
  • If the output directory exists, you will be prompted with the following (with a default of N).

    Overwrite all contents of "/home/username/<OUTPUT_REPORT_DIRECTORY>" (anything already in the directory will be deleted)? [y,N]

However, if you specify the --overwrite argument, MTA will proceed to delete and recreate the directory. See the description of this argument for more information.

A.1.3. Setting the source technology

A space-delimited list of one or more source technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate from. This argument, in conjunction with the --target argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. Use the --listSourceTechnologies argument to list all available sources.

Usage

--source <SOURCE_1> <SOURCE_2>

The --source argument now provides version support, which follows the Maven version range syntax. This instructs MTA to only run the rulesets matching the specified versions. For example, --source eap:5.

Warning

When migrating to JBoss EAP, be sure to specify the version, for example, eap:6. Specifying only eap will run rulesets for all versions of JBoss EAP, including those not relevant to your migration path.

See Supported migration paths in Introduction to the Migration Toolkit for Applications for the appropriate JBoss EAP version.

A.1.4. Setting the target technology

A space-delimited list of one or more target technologies, servers, platforms, or frameworks to migrate to. This argument, in conjunction with the --source argument, helps to determine which rulesets are used. If you do not specify this option, you are prompted to select a target. Use the --listTargetTechnologies argument to list all available targets.

Usage

--target <TARGET_1> <TARGET_2>

The --target argument now provides version support, which follows the Maven version range syntax. This instructs MTA to only run the rulesets matching the specified versions. For example, --target eap:7.

Warning

When migrating to JBoss EAP, be sure to specify the version in the target, for example, eap:6. Specifying only eap will run rulesets for all versions of JBoss EAP, including those not relevant to your migration path.

See Supported migration paths in Introduction to the Migration Toolkit for Applications for the appropriate JBoss EAP version.

A.1.5. Selecting packages

A space-delimited list of the packages to be evaluated by MTA. It is highly recommended to use this argument.

Usage

--packages <PACKAGE_1> <PACKAGE_2> <PACKAGE_N>

  • In most cases, you are interested only in evaluating custom application class packages and not standard Java EE or third party packages. The <PACKAGE_N> argument is a package prefix; all subpackages will be scanned. For example, to scan the packages com.mycustomapp and com.myotherapp, use --packages com.mycustomapp com.myotherapp argument on the command line.
  • While you can provide package names for standard Java EE third party software like org.apache, it is usually best not to include them as they should not impact the migration effort.
Warning

If you omit the --packages argument, every package in the application is scanned, which can impact performance. It is best to provide this argument with one or more packages.

A.2. Supported Technology Tags

The following Technology Tags are supported in MTA 5.1.0:

  • 0MQ Client (embedded)
  • 3scale (embedded)
  • Acegi Security (embedded)
  • AcrIS Security (embedded)
  • ActiveMQ (embedded)
  • Airframe (embedded)
  • Airlift Log Manager (embedded)
  • AKKA JTA (embedded)
  • Akka Testkit (embedded)
  • Amazon SQS Client (embedded)
  • AMQP Client (embedded)
  • Anakia (embedded)
  • AngularFaces (embedded)
  • ANTLR StringTemplate (embedded)
  • AOP Alliance (embedded)
  • Apache Accumulo Client
  • Apache Aries (embedded)
  • Apache Axis (embedded)
  • Apache Axis2 (embedded)
  • Apache Camel (embedded)
  • Apache Commons JCS (embedded)
  • Apache Commons Logging (embedded)
  • Apache Commons Validator (embedded)
  • Apache CXF (embedded)
  • Apache Flume (embedded)
  • Apache Geronimo (embedded)
  • Apache Hadoop (embedded)
  • Apache HBase Client
  • Apache Ignite (embedded)
  • Apache Karaf (embedded)
  • Apache Log4J (embedded)
  • Apache Mahout (embedded)
  • Apache Meecrowave JTA (embedded)
  • Apache Santuario (embedded)
  • Apache Shiro (embedded)
  • Apache Sirona JTA (embedded)
  • Apache Struts (embedded)
  • Apache Synapse (embedded)
  • Apache Tapestry (embedded)
  • Apache Wicket (embedded)
  • Apiman (embedded)
  • Arquillian (embedded)
  • AspectJ (embedded)
  • Atomikos JTA (embedded)
  • Avalon Logkit (embedded)
  • Axion Driver
  • BabbageFaces (embedded)
  • Bean Validation
  • BeanInject (embedded)
  • Blaze (embedded)
  • Blitz4j (embedded)
  • BootsFaces (embedded)
  • Bouncy Castle (embedded)
  • ButterFaces (embedded)
  • Cache API (embedded)
  • Cactus (embedded)
  • Camel Messaging Client (embedded)
  • Camunda (embedded)
  • Cassandra Client
  • CDI
  • CDI (embedded)
  • Cfg Engine (embedded)
  • Chunk Templates (embedded)
  • Cloudera (embedded)
  • Clustering EJB
  • Clustering Web Session
  • Coherence (embedded)
  • Common Annotations
  • Composite Logging JCL (embedded)
  • Concordion (embedded)
  • Cucumber (embedded)
  • Dagger (embedded)
  • DbUnit (embedded)
  • Debugging Support for Other Languages
  • Decompiled Java File
  • Demoiselle JTA (embedded)
  • Derby Driver
  • Drools (embedded)
  • DVSL (embedded)
  • Dynacache (embedded)
  • EAR
  • Easy Rules (embedded)
  • EasyMock (embedded)
  • EclipseLink (embedded)
  • EJB
  • EJB XML
  • Ehcache (embedded)
  • Elasticsearch (embedded)
  • Enterprise Web Services
  • Entity Bean
  • EtlUnit (embedded)
  • Everit JTA (embedded)
  • Evo JTA (embedded)
  • FreeMarker (embedded)
  • Geronimo JTA (embedded)
  • GFC Logging (embedded)
  • GIN (embedded)
  • GlassFish JTA (embedded)
  • Google Guice (embedded)
  • Grails (embedded)
  • Grapht DI (embedded)
  • Guava Testing (embedded)
  • GWT (embedded)
  • H2 Driver
  • Hamcrest (embedded)
  • Handlebars (embedded)
  • HavaRunner (embedded)
  • Hazelcast (embedded)
  • Hdiv (embedded)
  • Hibernate (embedded)
  • Hibernate Cfg
  • Hibernate Mapping
  • Hibernate OGM (embedded)
  • HighFaces (embedded)
  • HornetQ Client (embedded)
  • HSQLDB Driver
  • HTTP Client (embedded)
  • HttpUnit (embedded)
  • ICEfaces (embedded)
  • Ickenham (embedded)
  • Ignite JTA (embedded)
  • Ikasan (embedded)
  • iLog (embedded)
  • Infinispan (embedded)
  • Injekt for Kotlin (embedded)
  • Iroh (embedded)
  • Istio (embedded)
  • JACC
  • Jamon (embedded)
  • Jasypt (embedded)
  • Java EE
  • Java EE Batch
  • Java EE Batch API
  • Java EE JSON-P
  • Java EE Security
  • Java Source
  • Java Transaction API (embedded)
  • JavaMail
  • Javax Inject (embedded)
  • JAX-RPC
  • JAX-RS
  • JAX-WS
  • JAXB
  • JAXR
  • JayWire (embedded)
  • JBehave (embedded)
  • JBoss Cache (embedded)
  • JBoss EJB XML
  • JBoss logging (embedded)
  • JBoss Transactions (embedded)
  • JBoss Web XML
  • JBossMQ Client (embedded)
  • JBPM (embedded)
  • JCA
  • Jcabi Log (embedded)
  • JCache (embedded)
  • JCunit (embedded)
  • JDBC (embedded)
  • JDBC datasources
  • JDBC XA datasources
  • Jersey (embedded)
  • Jetbrick Template (embedded)
  • Jetty (embedded)
  • JFreeChart (embedded)
  • JFunk (embedded)
  • JMock (embedded)
  • JMockit (embedded)
  • JMS
  • JMS Connection Factory
  • JMS Queue
  • JMS Topic
  • JMustache (embedded)
  • JPA
  • JPA entities
  • JPA Matchers (embedded)
  • JPA named queries
  • JPA XML
  • JSecurity (embedded)
  • JSF (embedded)
  • JSF Page
  • JSilver (embedded)
  • JSON-B
  • JSP Page
  • JSTL (embedded)
  • JTA
  • Jukito (embedded)
  • JUnit (embedded)
  • Ka DI (embedded)
  • Keyczar (embedded)
  • Kibana (embedded)
  • KLogger (embedded)
  • Kodein (embedded)
  • Kotlin Logging (embedded)
  • KouInject (embedded)
  • KumuluzEE JTA (embedded)
  • LevelDB Client
  • Liferay (embedded)
  • LiferayFaces (embedded)
  • Lift JTA (embedded)
  • Log.io (embedded)
  • Log4s (embedded)
  • Logback (embedded)
  • Logging to file system
  • Logging to Socket Handler
  • Logging Utils (embedded)
  • Logstash (embedded)
  • Lumberjack (embedded)
  • Macros (embedded)
  • Manifest
  • MapR (embedded)
  • Maven XML
  • MckoiSQLDB Driver
  • MEJB
  • Memcached client (embedded)
  • Message (MDB)
  • Micro DI (embedded)
  • Microsoft SQL Driver
  • MinLog (embedded)
  • Mixer (embedded)
  • Mockito (embedded)
  • MongoDB Client
  • Monolog (embedded)
  • Morphia
  • MRules (embedded)
  • Mule (embedded)
  • Mule Functional Test Framework (embedded)
  • MultithreadedTC (embedded)
  • Mycontainer JTA (embedded)
  • MyFaces (embedded)
  • MySQL Driver
  • Narayana Arjuna (embedded)
  • Needle (embedded)
  • Neo4j (embedded)
  • NLOG4J (embedded)
  • Nuxeo JTA/JCA (embedded)
  • OACC (embedded)
  • OAUTH (embedded)
  • OCPsoft Logging Utils (embedded)
  • OmniFaces (embedded)
  • OpenFaces (embedded)
  • OpenPojo (embedded)
  • OpenSAML (embedded)
  • OpenWS (embedded)
  • OPS4J Pax Logging Service (embedded)
  • Oracle ADF (embedded)
  • Oracle DB Driver
  • Oracle Forms (embedded)
  • Orion EJB XML
  • Orion Web XML
  • Oscache (embedded)
  • OTR4J (embedded)
  • OW2 JTA (embedded)
  • OW2 Log Util (embedded)
  • OWASP CSRF Guard (embedded)
  • OWASP ESAPI (embedded)
  • Peaberry (embedded)
  • Pega (embedded)
  • Persistence units
  • Petals EIP (embedded)
  • PicketBox (embedded)
  • PicketLink (embedded)
  • PicoContainer (embedded)
  • Play (embedded)
  • Play Test (embedded)
  • Plexus Container (embedded)
  • Polyforms DI (embedded)
  • Portlet (embedded)
  • PostgreSQL Driver
  • PowerMock (embedded)
  • PrimeFaces (embedded)
  • Properties
  • Qpid Client (embedded)
  • RabbitMQ Client (embedded)
  • RandomizedTesting Runner (embedded)
  • Resource Adapter (embedded)
  • REST Assured (embedded)
  • Restito (embedded)
  • RichFaces (embedded)
  • RMI
  • RocketMQ Client (embedded)
  • Rythm Template Engine (embedded)
  • SAML (embedded)
  • Scalate (embedded)
  • Scaldi (embedded)
  • Scribe (embedded)
  • Seam (embedded)
  • ServiceMix (embedded)
  • Servlet
  • ShiftOne (embedded)
  • Silk DI (embedded)
  • SLF4J (embedded)
  • Snippetory Template Engine (embedded)
  • SNMP4J (embedded)
  • SOAP (SAAJ)
  • Spark (embedded)
  • Specsy (embedded)
  • Spock (embedded)
  • Spring (embedded)
  • Spring Batch (embedded)
  • Spring Boot (embedded)
  • Spring Data (embedded)
  • Spring Integration (embedded)
  • Spring Messaging Client (embedded)
  • Spring MVC (embedded)
  • Spring Security (embedded)
  • Spring Test (embedded)
  • Spring Transactions (embedded)
  • Spring XML
  • SQLite Driver
  • SSL (embedded)
  • Stateful (SFSB)
  • Stateless (SLSB)
  • Sticky Configured (embedded)
  • Stripes (embedded)
  • SubCut (embedded)
  • Swagger (embedded)
  • SwarmCache (embedded)
  • SwitchYard (embedded)
  • Syringe (embedded)
  • Talend ESB (embedded)
  • Teiid (embedded)
  • TensorFlow (embedded)
  • Test Interface (embedded)
  • TestNG (embedded)
  • Thymeleaf (embedded)
  • TieFaces (embedded)
  • tinylog (embedded)
  • Tomcat (embedded)
  • Tornado Inject (embedded)
  • Trimou (embedded)
  • Trunk JGuard (embedded)
  • Twirl (embedded)
  • Twitter Util Logging (embedded)
  • UberFire (embedded)
  • Unirest (embedded)
  • Unitils (embedded)
  • Vaadin (embedded)
  • Velocity (embedded)
  • Vlad (embedded)
  • Water Template Engine (embedded)
  • Web XML
  • WebLogic Web XML
  • Webmacro (embedded)
  • WebSphere EJB
  • WebSphere EJB Ext
  • WebSphere Web XML
  • WebSphere WS Binding
  • WebSphere WS Extension
  • Weka (embedded)
  • Weld (embedded)
  • WF Core JTA (embedded)
  • Winter (embedded)
  • WS Metadata
  • WSDL (embedded)
  • WSO2 (embedded)
  • WSS4J (embedded)
  • XACML (embedded)
  • XFire (embedded)
  • XMLUnit (embedded)
  • Zbus Client (embedded)

A.3. About rule story points

A.3.1. What are story points?

Story points are an abstract metric commonly used in Agile software development to estimate the level of effort needed to implement a feature or change.

The Migration Toolkit for Applications uses story points to express the level of effort needed to migrate particular application constructs, and the application as a whole. It does not necessarily translate to man-hours, but the value should be consistent across tasks.

A.3.2. How story points are estimated in rules

Estimating the level of effort for the story points for a rule can be tricky. The following are the general guidelines MTA uses when estimating the level of effort required for a rule.

Level of EffortStory PointsDescription

Information

0

An informational warning with very low or no priority for migration.

Trivial

1

The migration is a trivial change or a simple library swap with no or minimal API changes.

Complex

3

The changes required for the migration task are complex, but have a documented solution.

Redesign

5

The migration task requires a redesign or a complete library change, with significant API changes.

Rearchitecture

7

The migration requires a complete rearchitecture of the component or subsystem.

Unknown

13

The migration solution is not known and may need a complete rewrite.

A.3.3. Task category

In addition to the level of effort, you can categorize migration tasks to indicate the severity of the task. The following categories are used to group issues to help prioritize the migration effort.

Mandatory
The task must be completed for a successful migration. If the changes are not made, the resulting application will not build or run successfully. Examples include replacement of proprietary APIs that are not supported in the target platform.
Optional
If the migration task is not completed, the application should work, but the results may not be optimal. If the change is not made at the time of migration, it is recommended to put it on the schedule soon after your migration is completed. An example of this would be the upgrade of EJB 2.x code to EJB 3.
Potential
The task should be examined during the migration process, but there is not enough detailed information to determine if the task is mandatory for the migration to succeed. An example of this would be migrating a third-party proprietary type where there is no directly compatible type.
Information
The task is included to inform you of the existence of certain files. These may need to be examined or modified as part of the modernization effort, but changes are typically not required. An example of this would be the presence of a logging dependency or a Maven pom.xml.

For more information on categorizing tasks, see Using custom rule categories.

A.4. Additional Resources

A.4.1. Getting involved

To help the Migration Toolkit for Applications cover most application constructs and server configurations, including yours, you can help with any of the following items.

  • Send an email to jboss-migration-feedback@redhat.com and let us know what MTA migration rules should cover.
  • Provide example applications to test migration rules.
  • Identify application components and problem areas that may be difficult to migrate.

    • Write a short description of these problem migration areas.
    • Write a brief overview describing how to solve the problem migration areas.
  • Try Migration Toolkit for Applications on your application. Be sure to report any issues you encounter.
  • Contribute to the Migration Toolkit for Applications rules repository.

    • Write a Migration Toolkit for Applications rule to identify or automate a migration process.
    • Create a test for the new rule.
    • Details are provided in the Rules Development Guide.
  • Contribute to the project source code.

    • Create a core rule.
    • Improve MTA performance or efficiency.
    • See the Core Development Guide for information about how to configure your environment and set up the project.

Any level of involvement is greatly appreciated!

A.4.3. Reporting issues

MTA uses Jira as its issue tracking system. If you encounter an issue executing MTA, submit a Jira issue.





Revised on 2021-08-02 12:16:42 UTC