7.5.3. Considerations When Using a Single EJB Context

Summary

You must consider your application requirements when using a single EJB client context with standalone remote clients. For more information about the different types of remote clients, refer to: Section 7.5.2, “About EJB Client Contexts” .

Typical Process for a Remote Standalone Client with a Single EJB Client Context

A remote standalone client typically has just one EJB client context backed by any number of EJB receivers. The following is an example of a standalone remote client application:

public class MyApplication {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        final javax.naming.Context ctxOne = new javax.naming.InitialContext();
        final MyBeanInterface beanOne = ctxOne.lookup("ejb:app/module/distinct/bean!interface");
        beanOne.doSomething();
        ...
    }
}

Remote client JNDI lookups are usually backed by a jboss-ejb-client.properties file, which is used to set up the EJB client context and the EJB receivers. This configuration also includes the security credentials, which are then used to create the EJB receiver that connects to the JBoss EAP 6 server. When the above code is invoked, the EJB client API looks for the EJB client context, which is then used to select the EJB receiver that will receive and process the EJB invocation request. In this case, there is just the single EJB client context, so that context is used by the above code to invoke the bean. The procedure to invoke a session bean remotely using JNDI is described in greater detail here: Section 7.5.1, “Invoke a Session Bean Remotely using JNDI” .
Remote Standalone Client Requiring Different Credentials

A user application may want to invoke a bean more than once, but connect to the JBoss EAP 6 server using different security credentials. The following is an example of a standalone remote client application that invokes the same bean twice:

public class MyApplication {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        // Use the "foo" security credential connect to the server and invoke this bean instance
        final javax.naming.Context ctxOne = new javax.naming.InitialContext();
        final MyBeanInterface beanOne = ctxOne.lookup("ejb:app/module/distinct/bean!interface");
        beanOne.doSomething();
        ...
 
        // Use the "bar" security credential to connect to the server and invoke this bean instance
        final javax.naming.Context ctxTwo = new javax.naming.InitialContext();
        final MyBeanInterface beanTwo = ctxTwo.lookup("ejb:app/module/distinct/bean!interface");
        beanTwo.doSomething();
        ...
    }
}

In this case, the application wants to connect to the same server instance to invoke the EJB hosted on that server, but wants to use two different credentials while connecting to the server. Because the client application has a single EJB client context, which can have only one EJB receiver for each server instance, this means the above code uses just one credential to connect to the server and the code does not execute as the application expects it to.
Solution

Scoped EJB client contexts offer a solution to this issue. They provide a way to have more control over the EJB client contexts and their associated JNDI contexts, which are typically used for EJB invocations. For more information about scoped EJB client contexts, refer to Section 7.5.4, “Using Scoped EJB Client Contexts” and Section 7.5.5, “Configure EJBs Using a Scoped EJB Client Context” .