6.2. Advanced Scenario: Creating a Large Overcloud with Ceph Storage Nodes

This scenario creates a large enterprise-level OpenStack Platform environment with Red Hat Ceph Storage nodes. This scenario consists of nine nodes in the Overcloud:
  • Three Controller nodes with high availability
  • Three Compute nodes
  • Three Red Hat Ceph Storage nodes in a cluster
All machines are bare metal systems using IPMI for power management. This scenario aims to demonstrate the director's ability to create an production-level Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform environment that can scale Compute nodes in the future. This scenario uses the command line tools to demonstrate some of the advanced features of the director, including using the Automated Health Check Tools for role matching, and advanced network isolation.

Workflow

  1. Create a node definition template and register blank nodes in the director.
  2. Inspect hardware and benchmark all nodes.
  3. Use the Automated Health Check (AHC) Tools to define policies that automatically tag nodes into roles.
  4. Create flavors and tag them into roles.
  5. Use an environment file to configure Ceph Storage.
  6. Create Heat templates to isolate all networks.
  7. Create the Overcloud environment using the default Heat template collection and the additional network isolation templates.
  8. Add fencing information for each Controller node in the high-availability cluster.

Requirements

  • The director node created in Chapter 3, Installing the Undercloud
  • Nine bare metal machines. These machines must comply with the requirements set for the Controller, Compute, and Ceph Storage nodes. For these requirements, see:
    These nodes do not require an operating system because the director copies a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 image to each node.
  • One network connection for our Provisioning network, which is configured as a native VLAN. All nodes must connect to this network and comply with the requirements set in Section 2.3, “Networking Requirements”. For this example, we use 192.0.2.0/24 as the Provisioning subnet with the following IP address assignments:

    Table 6.3. Provisioning Network IP Assignments

    Node Name
    IP Address
    MAC Address
    IPMI IP Address
    Director
    192.0.2.1
    aa:aa:aa:aa:aa:aa
    Controller 1
    DHCP defined
    b1:b1:b1:b1:b1:b1
    192.0.2.205
    Controller 2
    DHCP defined
    b2:b2:b2:b2:b2:b2
    192.0.2.206
    Controller 3
    DHCP defined
    b3:b3:b3:b3:b3:b3
    192.0.2.207
    Compute 1
    DHCP defined
    c1:c1:c1:c1:c1:c1
    192.0.2.208
    Compute 2
    DHCP defined
    c2:c2:c2:c2:c2:c2
    192.0.2.209
    Compute 3
    DHCP defined
    c3:c3:c3:c3:c3:c3
    192.0.2.210
    Ceph 1
    DHCP defined
    d1:d1:d1:d1:d1:d1
    192.0.2.211
    Ceph 2
    DHCP defined
    d2:d2:d2:d2:d2:d2
    192.0.2.212
    Ceph 3
    DHCP defined
    d3:d3:d3:d3:d3:d3
    192.0.2.213
  • Each Overcloud node uses the remaining two network interfaces in a bond to serve networks in tagged VLANs. The following network assignments apply to this bond:

    Table 6.4. Network Subnet and VLAN Assignments

    Network Type
    Subnet
    VLAN
    Internal API
    172.16.0.0/24
    201
    Tenant
    172.17.0.0/24
    202
    Storage
    172.18.0.0/24
    203
    Storage Management
    172.19.0.0/24
    204
    External / Floating IP
    10.1.1.0/24
    100

6.2.1. Registering Nodes for the Advanced Overcloud

In this section, we create a node definition template. This file (instackenv.json) is a JSON format file and contains the hardware and power management details for our nine nodes.
This template uses the following attributes:
mac
A list of MAC addresses for the network interfaces on the node. Use only the MAC address for the Provisioning NIC of each system.
pm_type
The power management driver to use. This example uses the IPMI driver (pxe_ipmitool).
pm_user, pm_password
The IPMI username and password.
pm_addr
The IP address of the IPMI device.
cpu
The number of CPUs on the node.
memory
The amount of memory in MB.
disk
The size of the hard disk in GB.
arch
The system architecture.
For example:
{
    "nodes":[
        {
            "mac":[
                "b1:b1:b1:b1:b1:b1"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.205"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "b2:b2:b2:b2:b2:b2"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.206"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "b3:b3:b3:b3:b3:b3"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.207"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "c1:c1:c1:c1:c1:c1"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.208"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "c2:c2:c2:c2:c2:c2"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.209"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "c3:c3:c3:c3:c3:c3"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.210"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "d1:d1:d1:d1:d1:d1"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.211"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "d2:d2:d2:d2:d2:d2"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.212"
        },
        {
            "mac":[
                "d3:d3:d3:d3:d3:d3"
            ],
            "cpu":"4",
            "memory":"6144",
            "disk":"40",
            "arch":"x86_64",
            "pm_type":"pxe_ipmitool",
            "pm_user":"admin",
            "pm_password":"p@55w0rd!",
            "pm_addr":"192.0.2.213"
        }
    ]
}

Note

For more supported power management types and their options, see Appendix C, Power Management Drivers.
After creating the template, save the file to the stack user's home directory as instackenv.json, then import it into the director. Use the following command to accomplish this:
$ openstack baremetal import --json ~/instackenv.json
This imports the template and registers each node from the template into the director.
Assign the kernel and ramdisk images to all nodes:
$ openstack baremetal configure boot
The nodes are now registered and configured in the director. View a list of these nodes in the CLI using the following command:
$ openstack baremetal list

6.2.2. Inspecting the Hardware of Nodes

After registering the nodes, we inspect the hardware attribute of each node. This scenario also benchmarks the node for use with the Automated Health Check (AHC) Tools, which we use to automatically tag nodes into deployment profiles. These profile tags match our nodes to flavors, and in turn the flavors are assigned to a deployment role.

Important

The benchmarking feature requires the discovery_runbench option set to true when initially configuring the director (see Section 3.6, “Configuring the Director”).
If you need to enable benchmarking after installing the director, edit the /httpboot/discoverd.ipxe and set the RUNBENCH kernel parameter to 1.
Run the following command to inspect the hardware attributes of each node:
$ openstack baremetal introspection bulk start
Monitor the progress of the introspection using the following command in a separate terminal window:
$ sudo journalctl -l -u openstack-ironic-discoverd -u openstack-ironic-discoverd-dnsmasq -u openstack-ironic-conductor -f

Important

Make sure this process runs to completion. This process usually takes 15 minutes for bare metal nodes.
Alternatively, perform a single introspection on each node individually. Set the node to maintenance mode, perform the introspection, then revert the node out of maintenance mode:
$ ironic node-set-maintenance [NODE UUID] true
$ openstack baremetal introspection start [NODE UUID]
$ ironic node-set-maintenance [NODE UUID] false

6.2.3. Automatically Tagging Nodes with Automated Health Check (AHC) Tools

Once the discovery process completes its benchmark tests, you can generate a set of reports to identify and isolate underperforming or unstable nodes from use in the Overcloud. This section examines how to generate these reports and create policies to automatically tag nodes into certain roles.
Install the following Automated Health Check (AHC) tools using the following command:
$ sudo yum install -y ahc-tools
The package contains two tools:
  • ahc-report, which provides reports from the benchmark tests.
  • ahc-match, which tags nodes into specific roles based on policies.

Important

These tools require credentials for Ironic and Swift set in the /etc/ahc-tools/ahc-tools.conf file. These are the same credentials in /etc/ironic-discoverd/discoverd.conf. Use the following commands to copy and tailor the configuration file for /etc/ahc-tools/ahc-tools.conf:
$ sudo -i
# mkdir /etc/ahc-tools
# sed 's/\[discoverd/\[ironic/' /etc/ironic-discoverd/discoverd.conf > /etc/ahc-tools/ahc-tools.conf
# chmod 0600 /etc/ahc-tools/ahc-tools.conf
# exit

6.2.3.1. ahc-report

The ahc-report script produces various reports about your nodes. To view a full report, use the --full option.
$ sudo ahc-report --full
The ahc-report command can also focus on specific parts of a report. For example, use the --categories to categorize nodes based on their hardware (processors, network interfaces, firmware, memory, and various hardware controllers). This also groups these nodes together with similar hardware profiles. For example, the Processors section for our two example nodes might list the following:
######################
##### Processors #####
2 identical systems :
[u'7F8831F1-0D81-464E-A767-7577DF49AAA5', u'7884BC95-6EF8-4447-BDE5-D19561718B29']
[(u'cpu', u'logical', u'number', u'4'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical', u'number', u'4'),
 (u'cpu',
  u'physical_0',
  u'flags',
  u'fpu fpu_exception wp de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 syscall nx x86-64 rep_good nopl pni cx16 hypervisor lahf_lm'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'frequency', u'2000000000'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'physid', u'0'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'product', u'Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU       E3-1271v3 @ 3.6GHz'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'vendor', u'GenuineIntel'),
 (u'cpu',
  u'physical_1',
  u'flags',
  u'fpu fpu_exception wp de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 syscall nx x86-64 rep_good nopl pni cx16 hypervisor lahf_lm'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'frequency', u'2000000000'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'physid', u'0'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'product', u'Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU       E3-1271v3 @ 3.6GHz'),
 (u'cpu', u'physical_0', u'vendor', u'GenuineIntel')
 ...
 ]
The ahc-report tool also identifies the outliers in your node collection. Use the --outliers switch to enable this:
$ sudo ahc-report --outliers

Group 0 : Checking logical disks perf
standalone_randread_4k_KBps   : INFO    : sda   : Group performance : min=45296.00, mean=53604.67, max=67923.00, stddev=12453.21
standalone_randread_4k_KBps   : ERROR   : sda   : Group's variance is too important :   23.23% of 53604.67 whereas limit is set to 15.00%
standalone_randread_4k_KBps   : ERROR   : sda   : Group performance : UNSTABLE
standalone_read_1M_IOps       : INFO    : sda   : Group performance : min= 1199.00, mean= 1259.00, max= 1357.00, stddev=   85.58
standalone_read_1M_IOps       : INFO    : sda   : Group performance = 1259.00   : CONSISTENT
standalone_randread_4k_IOps   : INFO    : sda   : Group performance : min=11320.00, mean=13397.33, max=16977.00, stddev= 3113.39
standalone_randread_4k_IOps   : ERROR   : sda   : Group's variance is too important :   23.24% of 13397.33 whereas limit is set to 15.00%
standalone_randread_4k_IOps   : ERROR   : sda   : Group performance : UNSTABLE
standalone_read_1M_KBps       : INFO    : sda   : Group performance : min=1231155.00, mean=1292799.67, max=1393152.00, stddev=87661.11
standalone_read_1M_KBps       : INFO    : sda   : Group performance = 1292799.67   : CONSISTENT

...
In the example above, ahc-report marked the standalone_randread_4k_KBps and standalone_randread_4k_IOps disk metrics as unstable due to the standard deviation of all nodes being higher than the allowable threshold. In our example, this could happen if our two nodes have a significant difference in disk transfer rates.
It is useful to determine outliers in your node collection because you can assign high performance nodes for more suitable tasks. For example, nodes with better disk transfer rates make better storage nodes, while nodes with better memory performance might make better Compute nodes. Once you have identified hardware performance of each node, create a set of policies and use the ahc-match command to assign nodes to specific roles.

6.2.3.2. ahc-match

The ahc-match command applies a set of policies to your Overcloud plan to help assign nodes to certain roles. Prior to using this command, create a set of policies to match suitable nodes to roles.
The ahc-tools package installs a set of policy files under /etc/ahc-tools/edeploy. This includes:
  • state - The state file, which outlines the number of nodes for each role.
  • compute.specs, control.specs - Policy files for matching Compute and Controller nodes.
  • compute.cmdb.sample, control.cmdb.sample - Sample Configuration Management Database (CMDB) files, which contain key/value settings for RAID and BIOS ready-state configuration (Dell DRAC only).
State File
The state file indicates the number of nodes for each role. The default configuration file shows:
[('control', '1'), ('compute', '*')]
This means the ahc-match assigns one control node and any number of compute nodes. For this scenario, edit this file:
[('control', '3'), ('ceph-storage', '3'), ('compute', '*')]
This matches three Controller nodes, three Red Hat Ceph Storage nodes, and an unlimited number of Compute nodes.
Policy Files
The compute.specs and control.specs files list the assignment rules for each respective role. The file contents is a tuple format, such as:
[
 ('cpu', 'logical', 'number', 'ge(2)'),
 ('disk', '$disk', 'size', 'gt(4)'),
 ('network', '$eth', 'ipv4', 'network(192.0.2.0/24)'),
 ('memory', 'total', 'size', 'ge(4294967296)'),
]
This provides a way to define assignments rules based on hardware parameters. For a full reference of all parameters available, see Appendix D, Automated Health Check (AHC) Tools Parameters.
The policy files also use a set of helper functions to match value ranges. These functions are
  • network() - The network interface is in the specified network.
  • gt(), ge() - Greater than (or equal).
  • lt(), le() - Lower than (or equal).
  • in() - The item to match shall be in a specified set.
  • regexp() - Match a regular expression.
  • or(), and(), not() - Boolean functions. or() and and() take two parameters and not() one parameter.
For example, this scenario uses the standalone_randread_4k_KBps and standalone_randread_4k_IOps values from Section 6.2.3.1, “ahc-report” to limit the Controller role to node with disk access rates higher than the average rate. The rules for each would be:
[
 ('disk', '$disk', 'standalone_randread_4k_KBps', 'gt(53604)'),
 ('disk', '$disk', 'standalone_randread_4k_IOps', 'gt(13397)')
]
You can also create additional policy profiles for other roles. For example, create a ceph-storage.spec for a profile specifically for Red Hat Ceph Storage. Ensure these new filenames (without extension) are included in the state file.
Ready-State Files (Dell DRAC only)
The ready-state configuration prepares bare metal resources for deployment. This includes BIOS and RAID configuration for predefined profiles.
To define a BIOS setting, define a JSON tuple that define each setting and target value for the bios_settings key. For example:
[
  {
    'bios_settings': {'ProcVirtualization': 'Enabled', 'ProcCores': 4}
  }
]
You configure the RAID configuration in two ways:
  • List the IDs of the physical disks - Provide a list of physical disk IDs using the following attributes: controller, size_gb, raid_level and the list of physical_disks. controller should be the FQDD of the RAID controller that the DRAC assigns. Similarly, the list of physical_disks should be the FQDDs of physical disks the DRAC card assigns.
    [
      {
        'logical_disks': [
          {'controller': 'RAID.Integrated.1-1',
            'size_gb': 100,
            'physical_disks': [
              'Disk.Bay.0:Enclosure.Internal.0-1:RAID.Integrated.1-1',
              'Disk.Bay.1:Enclosure.Internal.0-1:RAID.Integrated.1-1',
              'Disk.Bay.2:Enclosure.Internal.0-1:RAID.Integrated.1-1'],
            'raid_level': '5'},
        ]
      }
    ]
    
  • Let Ironic assign physical disks to the RAID volume - The following attributes are required: controller, size_gb, raid_level and the number_of_physical_disks. controller should be the FQDD of the RAID controller the DRAC card assigns.
    [
      {
        'logical_disks': [
          {'controller': 'RAID.Integrated.1-1',
            'size_gb': 50,
            'raid_level': '1',
            'number_of_physical_disks': 2},
        ]
      }
    ]
    
Running the Matching Tool
After defining your rules, run the ahc-match tool to assign your nodes.
$ sudo ahc-match
This matches all nodes to the roles defined in /etc/ahc-tools/edeploy/state. When a node matches a role, ahc-match adds the role to the node in Ironic as a capability.
$ ironic node-show b73fb5fa-1a2c-49c6-b38e-8de41e3c0532 | grep properties -A2
| properties    | {u'memory_mb': u'6144', u'cpu_arch': u'x86_64', u'local_gb': u'40',      |
|               | u'cpus': u'4', u'capabilities': u'profile:control,boot_option:local'}    |
| instance_uuid | None                                                                     |
The director uses this profile tag from each node to match to roles and flavors with the same tag.
If you also configured RAID and BIOS ready-state settings, run the following command to configure these on each node:
$ instack-ironic-deployment --configure-nodes

6.2.4. Creating Hardware Profiles

The director also needs a set of hardware profiles, or flavors, for the registered nodes. In this scenario, we'll create a profile each for the Compute, Controller, and Ceph Storage nodes:
$ openstack flavor create --id auto --ram 6144 --disk 40 --vcpus 4 control
$ openstack flavor create --id auto --ram 6144 --disk 40 --vcpus 4 compute
$ openstack flavor create --id auto --ram 6144 --disk 40 --vcpus 4 ceph-storage

Important

The values for the three flavors in this scenario are for example purposes only. Use the specifications for your hardware identified with the AHC Tools.
This creates three flavors for your nodes. We also set the additional properties for each flavor.
$ openstack flavor set --property "cpu_arch"="x86_64" --property "capabilities:boot_option"="local" --property "capabilities:profile"="compute" compute
$ openstack flavor set --property "cpu_arch"="x86_64" --property "capabilities:boot_option"="local" --property "capabilities:profile"="control" control
$ openstack flavor set --property "cpu_arch"="x86_64" --property "capabilities:boot_option"="local" --property "capabilities:profile"="ceph-storage" ceph-storage
The capabilities:boot_option sets the boot mode for the flavor and the capabilities:profile defines the profile to use.

Important

Unused roles also require a default flavor named baremetal. Create this flavor if it does not exist:
$ openstack flavor create --id auto --ram 4096 --disk 40 --vcpus 1 baremetal

6.2.5. Configuring Ceph Storage

This section describes installing and configuring Red Hat Ceph Storage using Director for use with OpenStack. The installation and configuration process is based on a combination of Heat Templates and Puppet configuration.
The Overcloud image already contains the Ceph Storage software and the necessary Puppet modules to automatically configure both the Ceph OSD nodes and the Ceph Monitor on Controller clusters. The Overcloud's Heat template collection also contains the necessary configuration to enable your Ceph Storage configuration.
The Ceph Storage cluster might require some minor configuration, specifically the disk layout on the Ceph Storage nodes. To pass this information, copy the storage-environment.yaml environment file to your stack user's templates directory.
$ cp /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/storage-environment.yaml ~/templates/.
Modify the following options in the copy of storage-environment.yaml:
CinderEnableIscsiBackend
Enables the iSCSI backend. Set to false.
CinderEnableRbdBackend
Enables the Ceph Storage backend. Set to true.
CinderEnableNfsBackend
Enables the NFS backend. Set to false.
NovaEnableRbdBackend
Enables Ceph Storage for Nova ephemeral storage. Set to true.
GlanceBackend
Define the backend to use for Glance. Set to rbd to use Ceph Storage for images.

Note

The storage-environment.yaml also contains some options to configure Ceph Storage directly through Heat. However, these options are not necessary in this scenario since the director creates these nodes and automatically defines the configuration values.
Add an additional section to this environment file that contains the following:
parameter_defaults:
  ExtraConfig:
    ceph::profile::params::osds:
This adds extra Hiera data to the Overcloud, which is used in the Puppet configuration. For more information, see Section 9.4, “Customizing Puppet Configuration Data”.
Use ceph::profile::params::osds parameter to map the relevant journal partitions and disks. For example, a Ceph node with four disks might have the following assignments:
  • /dev/sda - The root disk containing the Overcloud image
  • /dev/sdb - The disk containing the journal partitions. This is usually a solid state disk (SSD) to aid with system performance.
  • /dev/sdc and /dev/sdd - The OSD disks
For this example, the mapping might contain the following:
    ceph::profile::params::osds:
      '/dev/sdc':
        journal: '/dev/sdb'
      '/dev/sdd':
        journal: '/dev/sdb'
If you do not want a separate disk for journals, use co-located journals on the OSD disks. Pass a blank value to the journal parameters:
    ceph::profile::params::osds:
        '/dev/sdb': {}
        '/dev/sdc': {}
        '/dev/sdd': {}
The storage-environment.yaml file's options should look similar to the following:
parameters:
  CinderEnableIscsiBackend: false
  CinderEnableRbdBackend: true
  CinderEnableNfsBackend: false
  NovaEnableRbdBackend: true

parameter_defaults:
  ExtraConfig:
    ceph::profile::params::osds:
      '/dev/sdc':
        journal: '/dev/sdb'
      '/dev/sdd':
        journal: '/dev/sdb'
After completing these modifications, save the storage-environment.yaml so that when we deploy the Overcloud, the Ceph Storage nodes will use our disk mapping and custom settings. We include this file in our deployment to initiate our storage requirements.

Important

The Ceph Storage OSDs should be unpartitioned disks with GPT disk labels, which you also configure prior to customization. For example, use the following command on the potential Ceph Storage host to create a GPT disk label for a disk or partition:
# parted [device] mklabel gpt

6.2.6. Isolating all Networks into VLANs

The director provides methods to configure isolated overcloud networks. This means the Overcloud environment separates network traffic types into different networks, which in turn assigns network traffic to specific network interfaces or bonds. After configuring isolated networks, the director configures the OpenStack services to use the isolated networks. If no isolated networks are configured, all services run on the Provisioning network.
This scenario uses separate networks for all services:
  • Network 1 - Provisioning
  • Network 2 - Internal API
  • Network 3 - Tenant Networks
  • Network 4 - Storage
  • Network 5 - Storage Management
  • Network 6 - External and Floating IP (mapped after Overcloud creation)
The following sections show how to create Heat templates to isolate all network types. For more examples of network configuration, see Appendix F, Network Interface Template Examples.

6.2.6.1. Creating Custom Interface Templates

The Overcloud network configuration requires a set of the network interface templates. You customize these templates to configure the node interfaces on a per role basis. These templates are standard Heat templates in YAML format (see Chapter 5, Understanding Heat Templates). The director contains a set of example templates to get you started:
  • /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/single-nic-vlans - Directory containing templates for single NIC with VLANs configuration on a per role basis.
  • /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/bond-with-vlans - Directory containing templates for bonded NIC configuration on a per role basis.
For the Advanced Overcloud scenario, we use the default bonded NIC example configuration as a basis. Copy the version located at /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/bond-with-vlans.
$ cp -r /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/network/config/bond-with-vlans ~/templates/nic-configs
This creates a local set of Heat templates that define a bonded network interface configuration for each role. Each template contains the standard parameters, resources, and output sections. For our purposes, we only edit the resources section. Each resources section begins with the following:
resources:
  OsNetConfigImpl:
    type: OS::Heat::StructuredConfig
    properties:
      group: os-apply-config
      config:
        os_net_config:
          network_config:
This creates a request for the os-apply-config command and os-net-config subcommand to configure the network properties for a node. The network_config section contains our custom interface configuration arranged in a sequence based on type, which includes the following:
interface
Defines a single network interface. The configuration defines each interface using either the actual interface name ("eth0", "eth1", "enp0s25") or a set of numbered interfaces ("nic1", "nic2", "nic3").
            - type: interface
              name: nic2
vlan
Defines a VLAN. Use the VLAN ID and subnet passed from the parameters section.
            - type: vlan
              vlan_id: {get_param: ExternalNetworkVlanID}
              addresses:
                - ip_netmask: {get_param: ExternalIpSubnet}
ovs_bond
Defines a bond in Open vSwitch. A bond joins two or more interfaces together to help with redundancy and increase bandwidth.
            - type: ovs_bond
              name: bond1
              members:
              - type: interface
                name: nic2
              - type: interface
                name: nic3
ovs_bridge
Defines a bridge in Open vSwitch. A bridge connects multiple interface, bond and vlan objects together.
            - type: ovs_bridge
              name: {get_input: bridge_name}
              members:
                - type: ovs_bond
                  name: bond1
                  members:
                    - type: interface
                      name: nic2
                      primary: true
                    - type: interface
                      name: nic3
                - type: vlan
                  device: bond1
                  vlan_id: {get_param: ExternalNetworkVlanID}
                  addresses:
                    - ip_netmask: {get_param: ExternalIpSubnet}
linux_bridge
Defines a Linux bridge. Similar to an Open vSwitch bridge, it connects multiple interface, bond and vlan objects together.
              - type: linux_bridge
                name: bridge1
                members:
                - type: interface
                  name: nic1
                  primary: true
              - type: vlan
                device: bridge1
                vlan_id: {get_param: ExternalNetworkVlanID}
                addresses:
                  - ip_netmask: {get_param: ExternalIpSubnet}
See Appendix E, Network Interface Parameters for a full list of parameters for each of these items.
For the Advanced Scenario, we use the default bonded interface configuration. For example, the /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/controller.yaml template uses the following network_config:
          network_config:
            - type: interface
              name: nic1
              use_dhcp: false
              addresses:
                - ip_netmask:
                    list_join:
                      - '/'
                      - - {get_param: ControlPlaneIp}
                        - {get_param: ControlPlaneSubnetCidr}
              routes:
                - ip_netmask: 169.254.169.254/32
                  next_hop: {get_param: EC2MetadataIp}

            - type: ovs_bridge
              name: {get_input: bridge_name}
              dns_servers: {get_param: DnsServers}
              members:
                - type: ovs_bond
                  name: bond1
                  ovs_options: {get_param: BondInterfaceOvsOptions}
                  members:
                    - type: interface
                      name: nic2
                      primary: true
                    - type: interface
                      name: nic3
                - type: vlan
                  device: bond1
                  vlan_id: {get_param: ExternalNetworkVlanID}
                  addresses:
                    - ip_netmask: {get_param: ExternalIpSubnet}
                  routes:
                    - ip_netmask: 0.0.0.0/0
                      next_hop: {get_param: ExternalInterfaceDefaultRoute}
                - type: vlan
                  device: bond1
                  vlan_id: {get_param: InternalApiNetworkVlanID}
                  addresses:
                  - ip_netmask: {get_param: InternalApiIpSubnet}
                - type: vlan
                  device: bond1
                  vlan_id: {get_param: StorageNetworkVlanID}
                  addresses:
                  - ip_netmask: {get_param: StorageIpSubnet}
                - type: vlan
                  device: bond1
                  vlan_id: {get_param: StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID}
                  addresses:
                  - ip_netmask: {get_param: StorageMgmtIpSubnet}
                - type: vlan
                  device: bond1
                  vlan_id: {get_param: TenantNetworkVlanID}
                  addresses:
                  - ip_netmask: {get_param: TenantIpSubnet}
This template defines a bridge (usually the external bridge named br-ex) and creates a bonded interface called bond1 from two numbered interfaces: nic2 and nic3. The bridge also contains a number of tagged VLAN devices, which use bond1 as a parent device.
For more examples of network interface templates, see Appendix F, Network Interface Template Examples.
Note that a lot of these parameters use the get_param function. We define these in an environment file we create specifically for our networks.

Important

Unused interfaces can cause unwanted default routes and network loops. For example, your template might contain a network interface (nic4) that does not use any IP assignments for OpenStack services but still uses DHCP and/or a default route. To avoid network conflicts, remove any used interfaces from ovs_bridge devices and disable the DHCP and default route settings:
- type: interface
  name: nic4
  use_dhcp: false
  defroute: false

6.2.6.2. Creating an Advanced Overcloud Network Environment File

The network environment file is a Heat environment file that describes the Overcloud's network environment and points to the network interface configuration templates from the previous section. We define the subnets and VLANs for our network along with IP address ranges. We customize these values for the local environment.
This scenario uses the following network environment file saved as /home/stack/templates/network-environment.yaml:
resource_registry:
  OS::TripleO::BlockStorage::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/cinder-storage.yaml
  OS::TripleO::Compute::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/compute.yaml
  OS::TripleO::Controller::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/controller.yaml
  OS::TripleO::ObjectStorage::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/swift-storage.yaml
  OS::TripleO::CephStorage::Net::SoftwareConfig: /home/stack/templates/nic-configs/ceph-storage.yaml

parameter_defaults:
  InternalApiNetCidr: 172.16.0.0/24
  TenantNetCidr: 172.17.0.0/24
  StorageNetCidr: 172.18.0.0/24
  StorageMgmtNetCidr: 172.19.0.0/24
  ExternalNetCidr: 10.1.1.0/24
  InternalApiAllocationPools: [{'start': '172.16.0.10', 'end': '172.16.0.200'}]
  TenantAllocationPools: [{'start': '172.17.0.10', 'end': '172.17.0.200'}]
  StorageAllocationPools: [{'start': '172.18.0.10', 'end': '172.18.0.200'}]
  StorageMgmtAllocationPools: [{'start': '172.19.0.10', 'end': '172.19.0.200'}]
  # Leave room for floating IPs in the External allocation pool
  ExternalAllocationPools: [{'start': '10.1.1.10', 'end': '10.1.1.50'}]
  # Set to the router gateway on the external network
  ExternalInterfaceDefaultRoute: 10.1.1.1
  # Gateway router for the provisioning network (or Undercloud IP)
  ControlPlaneDefaultRoute: 192.0.2.254
  # The IP address of the EC2 metadata server. Generally the IP of the Undercloud
  EC2MetadataIp: 192.0.2.1
  # Define the DNS servers (maximum 2) for the overcloud nodes
  DnsServers: ["8.8.8.8","8.8.4.4"]
  InternalApiNetworkVlanID: 201
  StorageNetworkVlanID: 202
  StorageMgmtNetworkVlanID: 203
  TenantNetworkVlanID: 204
  ExternalNetworkVlanID: 100
  # Set to "br-ex" if using floating IPs on native VLAN on bridge br-ex
  NeutronExternalNetworkBridge: "''"
  # Customize bonding options if required
  BondInterfaceOvsOptions:
    "bond_mode=balance-slb"
The resource_registry section contains links to the network interface templates for each node role.
The parameter_defaults section contains a list of parameters that define the network options for each network type. For a full reference of these options, see Appendix G, Network Environment Options.
This scenario defines options for each network. All network types use an individual VLAN and subnet used for assigning IP addresses to hosts and virtual IPs. In the example above, the allocation pool for the Internal API network starts at 172.16.0.10 and continues to 172.16.0.200 using VLAN 201. This results in static and virtual IPs assigned starting at 172.16.0.10 and upwards to 172.16.0.200 while using VLAN 201 in our environment.
The External network hosts the Horizon dashboard and Public API. If using the External network for both cloud administration and floating IPs, make sure there is room for a pool of IPs to use as floating IPs for VM instances. In our example, we only have IPs from 10.1.1.10 to 10.1.1.50 assign to the External network, which leaves IP addresses from 10.1.1.51 and above free to use for Floating IP addresses. Alternately, place the Floating IP network on a separate VLAN and configure the Overcloud after creation to use it.
The BondInterfaceOvsOptions option provides options for our bonded interface using nic2 and nic3. For more information on bonding options, see Appendix H, Bonding Options.

Important

Changing the network configuration after creating the Overcloud can cause configuration problems due to the availability of resources. For example, if a user changes a subnet range for a network in the network isolation templates, the reconfiguration might fail due to the subnet already being used.

6.2.6.3. Assigning OpenStack Services to Isolated Networks

Each OpenStack service is assigned to a default network type in the resource registry. These services are then bound to IP addresses within the network type's assigned network. Although the OpenStack services are divided among these networks, the number of actual physical networks might differ as defined in the network environment file. You can reassign OpenStack services to different network types by defining a new network map in your network environment file (/home/stack/templates/network-environment.yaml). The ServiceNetMap parameter determines the network types used for each service.
For example, we can reassign the Storage Management network services to the Storage Network by modifying the highlighted sections:
...

parameter_defaults:

  ServiceNetMap:
    NeutronTenantNetwork: tenant
    CeilometerApiNetwork: internal_api
    MongoDbNetwork: internal_api
    CinderApiNetwork: internal_api
    CinderIscsiNetwork: storage
    GlanceApiNetwork: storage
    GlanceRegistryNetwork: internal_api
    KeystoneAdminApiNetwork: internal_api
    KeystonePublicApiNetwork: internal_api
    NeutronApiNetwork: internal_api
    HeatApiNetwork: internal_api
    NovaApiNetwork: internal_api
    NovaMetadataNetwork: internal_api
    NovaVncProxyNetwork: internal_api
    SwiftMgmtNetwork: storage_mgmt
    SwiftProxyNetwork: storage
    HorizonNetwork: internal_api
    MemcachedNetwork: internal_api
    RabbitMqNetwork: internal_api
    RedisNetwork: internal_api
    MysqlNetwork: internal_api
    CephClusterNetwork: storage_mgmt
    CephPublicNetwork: storage
    # Define which network will be used for hostname resolution
    ControllerHostnameResolveNetwork: internal_api
    ComputeHostnameResolveNetwork: internal_api
    BlockStorageHostnameResolveNetwork: internal_api
    ObjectStorageHostnameResolveNetwork: internal_api
    CephStorageHostnameResolveNetwork: storage
Changing these parameters to storage places these services on the Storage network instead of the Storage Management network. This means you only need to define a set of parameter_defaults for the Storage network and not the Storage Management network.

6.2.7. Enabling SSL/TLS on the Overcloud

The Overcloud uses unencrypted endpoints for its services by default. This means the Overcloud configuration requires an additional environment file to enable SSL/TLS for its endpoints.
This process requires network isolation to define the endpoints for the Public API. See Section 6.2.6, “Isolating all Networks into VLANs” for instruction on network isolation.
Ensure you have a private key and certificate authority created. See Appendix B, SSL/TLS Certificate Configuration for more information on creating a valid SSL/TLS key and certificate authority file.

Enabling SSL/TLS

Copy the enable-tls.yaml environment file from the Heat template collection:
$ cp -r /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/enable-tls.yaml ~/templates/.
Edit this file and make the following changes for these parameters:

parameter_defaults:

SSLCertificate:
Copy the contents of the certificate file into the SSLCertificate parameter. For example:
parameter_defaults:
    SSLCertificate: |
      -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
      MIIDgzCCAmugAwIBAgIJAKk46qw6ncJaMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUAMFgxCzAJBgNV
      ...
      sFW3S2roS4X0Af/kSSD8mlBBTFTCMBAj6rtLBKLaQbIxEpIzrgvp
      -----END CERTIFICATE-----

Important

The certificate authority contents require the same indentation level for all new lines.
SSLKey:
Copy the contents of the private key into the SSLKey parameter. For example>
parameter_defaults:
    ...
    SSLKey: |
      -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
      MIIEowIBAAKCAQEAqVw8lnQ9RbeI1EdLN5PJP0lVO9hkJZnGP6qb6wtYUoy1bVP7
      ...
      ctlKn3rAAdyumi4JDjESAXHIKFjJNOLrBmpQyES4XpZUC7yhqPaU
      -----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

Important

The private key contents require the same indentation level for all new lines.
EndpointMap:
The EndpointMap contains a mapping of the services using HTTPS and HTTP communication. If using DNS for SSL communication, leave this section with the defaults. However, if using an IP address for the SSL certificate's common name (see Appendix B, SSL/TLS Certificate Configuration), replace all instances of CLOUDNAME with IP_ADDRESS. Use the following command to accomplish this:
  $ sed -i 's/CLOUDNAME/IP_ADDRESS/' ~/templates/enable-tls.yaml

Important

Do not substitute IP_ADDRESS or CLOUDNAME for actual values. Heat replaces these variables with the appropriate value during the Overcloud creation.

resource_registry:

OS::TripleO::NodeTLSData:
Change the resource URL for OS::TripleO::NodeTLSData: to an absolute URL:
resource_registry:
  OS::TripleO::NodeTLSData: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/puppet/extraconfig/tls/tls-cert-inject.yaml

Injecting a Root Certificate

If using a self-signed certificate or the certificate signer is not in the default trust store on the Overcloud image, inject the certificate into the Overcloud image. Copy the inject-trust-anchor.yaml environment file from the Heat template collection:
$ cp -r /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/inject-trust-anchor.yaml ~/templates/.
Edit this file and make the following changes for these parameters:

parameter_defaults:

SSLRootCertificate:
Copy the contents of the root certificate authority file into the SSLRootCertificate parameter. For example:
parameter_defaults:
    SSLRootCertificate: |
      -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
      MIIDgzCCAmugAwIBAgIJAKk46qw6ncJaMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUAMFgxCzAJBgNV
      ...
      sFW3S2roS4X0Af/kSSD8mlBBTFTCMBAj6rtLBKLaQbIxEpIzrgvp
      -----END CERTIFICATE-----

Important

The certificate authority contents require the same indentation level for all new lines.

resource_registry:

OS::TripleO::NodeTLSCAData:
Change the resource URL for OS::TripleO::NodeTLSCAData: to an absolute URL:
  resource_registry:
    OS::TripleO::NodeTLSCAData: /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/puppet/extraconfig/tls/ca-inject.yaml

Configuring DNS Endpoints

If using a DNS hostname to access the Overcloud through SSL/TLS, create a new environment file (~/templates/cloudname.yaml) to define the hostname of the Overcloud's endpoints. Use the following parameters:

parameter_defaults:

CloudName:
The DNS hostname for the Overcloud endpoints.
DnsServers:
A list of DNS server to use. The configured DNS servers must contain an entry for the configured CloudName that matches the IP for the Public API.
The following is an example of the contents for this file:
parameter_defaults:
  CloudName: overcloud.example.com
  DnsServers: ["10.0.0.1"]

Adding Environment Files During Overcloud Creation

The deployment command (openstack overcloud deploy) in Section 6.2.9, “Creating the Advanced Overcloud” uses the -e option to add environment files. Add the environment files from this section in the following order:
  • The environment file to enable SSL/TLS (enable-tls.yaml)
  • The environment file to set the DNS hostname (cloudname.yaml)
  • The environment file to inject the root certificate authority (inject-trust-anchor.yaml)
For example:
$ openstack overcloud deploy --templates [...] -e /home/stack/templates/enable-tls.yaml -e ~/templates/cloudname.yaml -e ~/templates/inject-trust-anchor.yaml

6.2.8. Registering the Overcloud

The Overcloud provides a method to register nodes to either the Red Hat Content Delivery Network, a Red Hat Satellite 5 server, or a Red Hat Satellite 6 server. You can either achieve this through environment files or the command line.

Method 1 - Command Line

The deployment command (openstack overcloud deploy) uses a set of options to define your registration details. The table in Appendix I, Deployment Parameters contains these options and their descriptions. Include these options when running the deployment command in Section 6.2.9, “Creating the Advanced Overcloud”. For example:
# openstack overcloud deploy --templates --rhel-reg --reg-method satellite --reg-sat-url http://example.satellite.com  --reg-org MyOrg --reg-activation-key MyKey --reg-force [...]

Method 2 - Environment File

Copy the registration files from the Heat template collection:
$ cp -r /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/extraconfig/pre_deploy/rhel-registration ~/templates/.
Edit the ~/templates/rhel-registration/environment-rhel-registration.yaml and modify the following values to suit your registration method and details.
rhel_reg_method
Choose the registration method. Either portal, satellite, or disable.
rhel_reg_type
The type of unit to register. Leave blank to register as a system
rhel_reg_auto_attach
Automatically attach compatible subscriptions to this system. Set to either true to enable.
rhel_reg_service_level
The service level to use for auto attachment.
rhel_reg_release
Use this parameter to set a release version for auto attachment. Leave blank to use the default from Red Hat Subscription Manager.
rhel_reg_pool_id
The subscription pool ID to use. Use this if not auto-attaching subscriptions.
rhel_reg_sat_url
The base URL of the Satellite server to register Overcloud nodes. Use the Satellite's HTTP URL and not the HTTPS URL for this parameter. For example, use http://satellite.example.com and not https://satellite.example.com. The Overcloud creation process uses this URL to determine whether the server is a Red Hat Satellite 5 or Red Hat Satellite 6 server. If a Red Hat Satellite 6 server, the Overcloud obtains the katello-ca-consumer-latest.noarch.rpm file, registers with subscription-manager, and installs katello-agent. If a Red Hat Satellite 6 server, the Overcloud obtains the RHN-ORG-TRUSTED-SSL-CERT file and registers with rhnreg_ks.
rhel_reg_server_url
The hostname of the subscription service to use. The default is for Customer Portal Subscription Management, subscription.rhn.redhat.com. If this option is not used, the system is registered with Customer Portal Subscription Management. The subscription server URL uses the form of https://hostname:port/prefix.
rhel_reg_base_url
Gives the hostname of the content delivery server to use to receive updates. The default is https://cdn.redhat.com. Since Satellite 6 hosts its own content, the URL must be used for systems registered with Satellite 6. The base URL for content uses the form of https://hostname:port/prefix.
rhel_reg_org
The organization to use for registration.
rhel_reg_environment
The environment to use within the chosen organization.
rhel_reg_repos
A comma-separated list of repositories to enable.
rhel_reg_activation_key
The activation key to use for registration.
rhel_reg_user, rhel_reg_password
The username and password for registration. If possible, use activation keys for registration.
rhel_reg_machine_name
The machine name. Leave this as blank to use the hostname of the node.
rhel_reg_force
Set to true to force your registration options. For example, when re-registering nodes.
The deployment command (openstack overcloud deploy) in Section 6.2.9, “Creating the Advanced Overcloud” uses the -e option to add environment files. Add both ~/templates/rhel-registration/environment-rhel-registration.yaml and ~/templates/rhel-registration/rhel-registration-resource-registry.yaml. For example:
$ openstack overcloud deploy --templates [...] -e /home/stack/templates/rhel-registration/environment-rhel-registration.yaml -e /home/stack/templates/rhel-registration/rhel-registration-resource-registry.yaml

Important

Registration is set as the OS::TripleO::NodeExtraConfig Heat resource. This means you can only use this resource for registration. See Section 9.2, “Customizing Overcloud Pre-Configuration” for more information.

6.2.9. Creating the Advanced Overcloud

The final stage in creating your OpenStack environment is to run the necessary commands to create it. The command options we use install three Controller nodes, three Compute nodes, and three Ceph Storage nodes.

Note

The Red Hat Customer Portal contains a lab to help validate your configuration before creating the Overcloud. This lab is available at https://access.redhat.com/labs/ospec/ and instructions for this lab are available at https://access.redhat.com/labsinfo/ospec.
Run the following command to start the Advanced Overcloud creation:
$ openstack overcloud deploy --templates -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml -e ~/templates/network-environment.yaml -e ~/templates/storage-environment.yaml --control-scale 3 --compute-scale 3 --ceph-storage-scale 3 --control-flavor control --compute-flavor compute --ceph-storage-flavor ceph-storage --ntp-server pool.ntp.org --neutron-network-type vxlan --neutron-tunnel-types vxlan
This command contains the following additional options:
  • --templates - Creates the Overcloud using the Heat template collection in /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates.
  • -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml - The -e option adds an additional environment file to the Overcloud deployment. In this case, it is an environment file that initializes network isolation configuration.
  • -e ~/templates/network-environment.yaml - The -e option adds an additional environment file to the Overcloud deployment. In this case, it is the network environment file from Section 6.2.6.2, “Creating an Advanced Overcloud Network Environment File”.
  • -e ~/templates/storage-environment.yaml - The -e option adds an additional environment file to the Overcloud deployment. In this case, it is a custom environment file that initializes our storage configuration.
  • --control-scale 3 - Scale the Controller nodes to three.
  • --compute-scale 3 - Scale the Compute nodes to three.
  • --ceph-storage-scale 3 - Scale the Ceph Storage nodes to three.
  • --control-flavor control - Use the a specific flavor for the Controller nodes.
  • --compute-flavor compute - Use the a specific flavor for the Compute nodes.
  • --ceph-storage-flavor ceph-storage - Use the a specific flavor for the Ceph Storage nodes.
  • --ntp-server pool.ntp.org - Use an NTP server for time synchronization. This is useful for keeping the Controller node cluster in synchronization.
  • --neutron-network-type vxlan - Use Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN) for the Neutron networking in the Overcloud.
  • --neutron-tunnel-types vxlan - Use Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN) for Neutron tunneling in the Overcloud.

Note

For a full list of options, run:
$ openstack help overcloud deploy
See also Appendix I, Deployment Parameters for parameter examples and Section 6.2.8, “Registering the Overcloud” for registration details.
The Overcloud creation process begins and the director provisions your nodes. This process takes some time to complete. To view the status of the Overcloud creation, open a separate terminal as the stack user and run:
$ source ~/stackrc                # Initializes the stack user to use the CLI commands
$ heat stack-list --show-nested
The heat stack-list --show-nested command shows the current stage of the Overcloud creation.

Warning

Any environment files added to the Overcloud using the -e option become part of your Overcloud's stack definition. The director requires these environment files for re-deployment and post-deployment functions in Chapter 7, Performing Tasks after Overcloud Creation. Failure to include these files can result in damage to your Overcloud.
If you aim to later modify the Overcloud configuration, modify parameters in the custom environment files and Heat templates, then run the openstack overcloud deploy command again. Do not edit the Overcloud configuration directly as such manual configuration gets overridden by the director's configuration when updating the Overcloud stack with the director.
Save the original deployment command for later use and modification. For example, save your deployment command in a script file called deploy-overcloud.sh:
#!/bin/bash
openstack overcloud deploy --templates \
  -e /usr/share/openstack-tripleo-heat-templates/environments/network-isolation.yaml \
  -e ~/templates/network-environment.yaml \
  -e ~/templates/storage-environment.yaml \
  -t 150 \
  --control-scale 3 \
  --compute-scale 3 \
  --ceph-storage-scale 3 \
  --swift-storage-scale 0 \
  --block-storage-scale 0 \
  --compute-flavor compute \
  --control-flavor control \
  --ceph-storage-flavor ceph-storage \
  --swift-storage-flavor swift-storage \
  --block-storage-flavor block-storage \
  --ntp-server pool.ntp.org \
  --neutron-network-type vxlan \
  --neutron-tunnel-types vxlan \
  --libvirt-type qemu
This retains the Overcloud deployment command's parameters and environment files for future use, such as Overcloud modifications and scaling. You can then edit and rerun this script to suit future customizations to the Overcloud.

Warning

Do not run openstack overcloud deploy as a background process. The Overcloud creation might hang in mid-deployment if started as a background process.

6.2.10. Accessing the Advanced Overcloud

The director generates a script to configure and help authenticate interactions with your Overcloud from the director host. The director saves this file, overcloudrc, in your stack user's home director. Run the following command to use this file:
$ source ~/overcloudrc
This loads the necessary environment variables to interact with your Overcloud from the director host's CLI. To return to interacting with the director's host, run the following command:
$ source ~/stackrc

6.2.11. Fencing the Controller Nodes

Fencing is the process of isolating a node to protect a cluster and its resources. Without fencing, a faulty node can cause data corruption in a cluster.
The director uses a tool called Pacemaker to provide a highly available cluster of Controller nodes. Pacemaker uses a process called STONITH (Shoot-The-Other-Node-In-The-Head) to help fence faulty nodes. By default, STONITH is disabled on your cluster and requires manual configuration so that Pacemaker can control the power management of each node in the cluster.

Note

Login to each node as the heat-admin user from the stack user on the director. The Overcloud creation automatically copies the stack user's SSH key to each node's heat-admin.
Verify you have a running cluster with pcs status:
$ sudo pcs status
Cluster name: openstackHA
Last updated: Wed Jun 24 12:40:27 2015
Last change: Wed Jun 24 11:36:18 2015
Stack: corosync
Current DC: lb-c1a2 (2) - partition with quorum
Version: 1.1.12-a14efad
3 Nodes configured
141 Resources configured
Verify that stonith is disabled with pcs property show:
$ sudo pcs property show
Cluster Properties:
 cluster-infrastructure: corosync
 cluster-name: openstackHA
 dc-version: 1.1.12-a14efad
 have-watchdog: false
 stonith-enabled: false
The Controller nodes contain a set of fencing agents for various power management devices the director supports. This includes:

Table 6.5. Fence Agents

Device
Type
fence_ipmilan
The Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI)
fence_idrac, fence_drac5
Dell Remote Access Controller (DRAC)
fence_ilo
Integrated Lights-Out (iLO)
fence_ucs
fence_xvm, fence_virt
Libvirt and SSH
The rest of this section uses the IPMI agent (fence_ipmilan) as an example.
View a full list of IPMI options that Pacemaker supports:
$ sudo pcs stonith describe fence_ipmilan
Each node requires configuration of IPMI devices to control the power management. This involves adding a stonith device in pacemaker for each node. Use the following commands for the cluster:

Note

The second command in each example is to prevent the node from asking to fence itself.
For Controller node 1:
$ sudo pcs stonith create my-ipmilan-for-controller01 fence_ipmilan pcmk_host_list=overcloud-controller-0 ipaddr=192.0.2.205 login=admin passwd=p@55w0rd! lanplus=1 cipher=1 op monitor interval=60s
$ sudo pcs constraint location my-ipmilan-for-controller01 avoids overcloud-controller-0
For Controller node 2:
$ sudo pcs stonith create my-ipmilan-for-controller02 fence_ipmilan pcmk_host_list=overcloud-controller-1 ipaddr=192.0.2.206 login=admin passwd=p@55w0rd! lanplus=1 cipher=1 op monitor interval=60s
$ sudo pcs constraint location my-ipmilan-for-controller02 avoids overcloud-controller-1
For Controller node 3:
$ sudo pcs stonith create my-ipmilan-for-controller03 fence_ipmilan pcmk_host_list=overcloud-controller-2 ipaddr=192.0.2.207 login=admin passwd=p@55w0rd! lanplus=1 cipher=1 op monitor interval=60s
$ sudo pcs constraint location my-ipmilan-for-controller03 avoids overcloud-controller-2
Run the following command to see all stonith resources:
$ sudo pcs stonith show
Run the following command to see a specific stonith resource:
$ sudo pcs stonith show [stonith-name]
Finally, enable fencing by setting the stonith property to true:
$ sudo pcs property set stonith-enabled=true
Verify the property:
$ sudo pcs property show

6.2.12. Completing the Advanced Overcloud

This concludes the creation of the Advanced Overcloud. For post-creation functions, see Chapter 7, Performing Tasks after Overcloud Creation.