7.4. Enabling, Disabling, and Banning Cluster Resources

In addition to the pcs resource move command described in Section 7.1, “Manually Moving Resources Around the Cluster”, there are a variety of other commands you can use to control the behavior of cluster resources.
You can manually stop a running resource and prevent the cluster from starting it again with the following command. Depending on the rest of the configuration (constraints, options, failures, and so), the resource may remain started. If you specify the --wait option, pcs will wait up to 30 seconds (or 'n' seconds, as specified) for the resource to stop and then return 0 if the resource is stopped or 1 if the resource has not stopped.
pcs resource disable resource_id [--wait[=n]]
You can use the following command to allow the cluster to start a resource. Depending on the rest of the configuration, the resource may remain stopped. If you specify the --wait option, pcs will wait up to 30 seconds (or 'n' seconds, as specified) for the resource to start and then return 0 if the resource is started or 1 if the resource has not started.
pcs resource enable resource_id [--wait[=n]]
Use the following command to prevent a resource from running on a specified node, or on the current node if no node is specified.
pcs resource ban resource_id [node] [--master] [lifetime=lifetime] [--wait[=n]]
Note that when you execute the pcs resource ban command, this adds a -INFINITY location constraint to the resource to prevent it from running on the indicated node. You can execute the pcs resource clear or the pcs constraint delete command to remove the constraint. This does not necessarily move the resources back to the indicated node; where the resources can run at that point depends on how you have configured your resources initially. For information on resource constraints, see Chapter 6, Resource Constraints.
If you specify the --master parameter of the pcs resource ban command, the scope of the constraint is limited to the master role and you must specify master_id rather than resource_id.
You can optionally configure a lifetime parameter for the pcs resource ban command to indicate a period of time the constraint should remain. For information on specifying units for the lifetime parameter and on specifying the intervals at which the lifetime parameter should be checked, see Section 7.1, “Manually Moving Resources Around the Cluster”.
You can optionally configure a --wait[=n] parameter for the pcs resource ban command to indicate the number of seconds to wait for the resource to start on the destination node before returning 0 if the resource is started or 1 if the resource has not yet started. If you do not specify n, the default resource timeout will be used.
You can use the debug-start parameter of the pcs resource command to force a specified resource to start on the current node, ignoring the cluster recommendations and printing the output from starting the resource. This is mainly used for debugging resources; starting resources on a cluster is (almost) always done by Pacemaker and not directly with a pcs command. If your resource is not starting, it is usually due to either a misconfiguration of the resource (which you debug in the system log), constraints that the resource from starting, or the resource being disabled. You can use this command to test resource configuration, but it should not normally be used to start resources in a cluster.
The format of the debug-start command is as follows.
pcs resource debug-start resource_id