13.9.7. Using the Object Graph Navigation Library

In the following message, the OGNL expression representing the customerNumber parameter is "customerOrder.header.customerNumber".
<soapenv:Envelope xmlns:soapenv="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/" 
    xmlns:cus="http://schemas.acme.com">
    <soapenv:Header/>
    <soapenv:Body>
    
        <cus:customerOrder>
            <cus:header>
                <cus:customerNumber>123456</cus:customerNumber>
            </cus:header>
        </cus:customerOrder>
        
    </soapenv:Body>
</soapenv:Envelope>
Once the OGNL expression has been calculated for a parameter, this class will check the supplied parameter map for an Object keyed off the full OGNL expression (Option 1 above). If no such parameter Object is present on the map, this class will then attempt to load the parameter by supplying the map and OGNL expression instances to the OGNL toolkit. If this doesn't yield a value, this parameter location within the SOAP message will remain blank.
Taking the sample message above and populating the "customerNumber" requires an object instance (for instance, an "Order" object instance) to be set on the parameters map under the key "customerOrder". The "customerOrder" object instance needs to contain a "header" property (for example. a "Header" object instance). The object instance behind the "header" property (for example, a "Header" object instance) should have a "customerNumber" property.
OGNL expressions associated with collections are constructed in a slightly different way:
<soapenv:Envelope xmlns:soapenv="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
    xmlns:cus="http://schemas.active-endpoints.com/sample/customerorder/2006/04/CustomerOrder.xsd"
    xmlns:stan="http://schemas.active-endpoints.com/sample/standardtypes/2006/04/StandardTypes.xsd">

    <soapenv:Header/>
    <soapenv:Body>
        <cus:customerOrder>
            <cus:items>
                <cus:item>
                    <cus:partNumber>FLT16100</cus:partNumber>
                    <cus:description>Flat 16 feet 100 count</cus:description>
                    <cus:quantity>50</cus:quantity>
                    <cus:price>490.00</cus:price>
                    <cus:extensionAmount>24500.00</cus:extensionAmount>
                </cus:item>
                <cus:item>
                    <cus:partNumber>RND08065</cus:partNumber>
                    <cus:description>Round 8 feet 65 count</cus:description>
                    <cus:quantity>9</cus:quantity>
                    <cus:price>178.00</cus:price>
                    <cus:extensionAmount>7852.00</cus:extensionAmount>
                </cus:item>
            </cus:items>
        </cus:customerOrder>
    </soapenv:Body>
    
</soapenv:Envelope>
The above order message contains a collection of order "items". Each entry in the collection is represented by an "item" element. The OGNL expressions for the order item "partNumber" is constructed as "customerOrder.items[0].partnumber" and "customerOrder.items[1].partnumber". As you can see from this, the collection entry element (the "item" element) makes no explicit appearance in the OGNL expression. It is represented implicitly by the indexing notation. In terms of an object graph , this could be represented by an order object instance (keyed on the map as "customerOrder") containing an "items" list or array with the list entries being "OrderItem" instances. This in turn contains "partNumber" and any other properties.
To see the SOAP message template as it's being constructed and populated, add the "dumpSOAP" parameter to the parameter map.

Warning

This can be a very useful developer aid, but should not be left on outside of development.